Open Forum: August 4, 2018

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1,217 Responses to Open Forum: August 4, 2018

  1. C.L.

    ‘Armed’ white supremacists set to attend Portland’s pro-fascist Patriot Prayer Rally stoke fears it could lead to levels of violence not seen since Charlottesville

    Corrected for accuracy:

    Democrats and extremist blacks set to attack law-abiding white people in Portland

  2. Digger

    Seen a lot written about a Model A Ford being rebuilt on here. My retired USN mate in Colorado purchased this one for about $50, 50 years ago. It took him about 40 years to get it to this condition but it is absolutely superb.

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQabMbva1EbjfgTyIom3F684gBlSk1hEVtXfdDQAjqHHgtfSA

  3. Steve trickler

    Context. It is needed for this clip from Joe Blevins.

    “Sara” was the name Nicks gave to her unborn child before she had an abortion. In 1977, she dated Don Henley, and later confirmed that she became pregnant with his child and terminated the pregnancy. Henley spoke about it in a 1991 interview with GQ, where he stated: “I believe to the best of my knowledge she became pregnant by me. And she named the kid Sara, and she had an abortion and then wrote the song of the same name to the spirit of the aborted baby. I was building my house at the time, and there’s a line in the song that says ‘And when you build your house, call me.'”
    Nicks, who was furious that Henley made this public, confirmed the story in 2014, speaking to Billboard magazine. “Had I married Don and had that baby, and had she been a girl, I would have named her Sara.”

    —–



    The imagery tells a story.

    Haunting.

  4. Pedro the Ignorant

    On the road to Kalgoorlie for Diggers and Dealers early AM Sunday.
    The gabfest starts on Monday morning.
    Delightful accomodations in a donga in Boulder for the duration.

    As the Doomlord is fond of quoting when he swans off to far flung and exotic locations, “postings may be heavy or light”.

  5. cohenite

    English people are forbidden from walking their dogs in the town of Oldham in England because it upsets the Profit Muhammad

    ;

    https://www.facebook.com/banshariainaus/videos/213969762597200/?hc_ref=ARRObG6shMoMOOpeWf3uylnVgJKJZRj83TjHEQILzuvWvANaV0tpDd66ebhiAB6nhhs

  6. Farmer Gez

    Where the hell is Stimpson?
    Exhibit A.

    Shy Ted
    #2780990, posted on August 4, 2018 at 8:02 pm
    And to the thief who broke into my house and stole my antidepressants, I hope you’re happy!

  7. Macbeth

    Lizzie, at the Tattoo, look for our pipe band contingent from 5/6 RVR. The old Victorian Scottish regiment. It’s not the full band, but they are very good.

  8. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Farmer Gez, you mentioned Multi peril insurance up thread. What premium do you pay?

  9. None

    Stevie Nicks is 70 years old.

  10. Makka

    English people are forbidden from walking their dogs in the town of Oldham in England because it upsets the Profit Muhammad

    How typical of these vermin, screeching, shouting, waving the handss about… he’s just walking the freaking dog. It’s so easy to loath these people.

  11. Farmer Gez

    Farmer Gez, you mentioned Multi peril insurance up thread. What premium do you pay?

    Yeah sorry about that. Taking kids to sport.
    About 4-5% of insured sum.
    We’ve been in it a few years so we benefit from better rates.

  12. Steve trickler

    This will stir the media pot.



  13. DrBeauGan

    I’d hold my dog by the collar, point at the noisiest and say “Kill!” in a loud voice. Then laugh myself silly as they ran.

  14. Makka

    This will stir the media pot.

    It will take their attention off their latest hysteria, Q.

  15. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Yeah sorry about that. Taking kids to sport.
    About 4-5% of insured sum.
    We’ve been in it a few years so we benefit from better rates.

    No need for any apology – who offers multi peril for those rates?

    FWIW, there was a scheme here in Western Australia floated, full multi peril at six dollars a hectare, but it didn’t take off.

  16. I’d hold my dog by the collar, point at the noisiest and say “Kill!” in a loud voice. Then laugh myself silly as they ran. soil myself when the brothers pulled out their Glocks and opened fire on me

    FIFY.
    These types of stories must have an ending similar to that they’d have in the real world.

  17. Farmer Gez

    A crew called Rural Solutions.
    A broker in NSW.

  18. Mitch M.

    English people are forbidden from walking their dogs in the town of Oldham in England because it upsets the Profit Muhammad

    That is a shocking incident cohenite. Fight back, they stopped dogs but hey citizens should start walking pigs in public.

  19. entropy

    FWIW, there was a scheme here in Western Australia floated, full multi peril at six dollars a hectare, but it didn’t take off.

    State subsidised, and even then there were about 23 takers or thereabouts.

    what are the reductions in the rate over time Gez? Is the price per ha?

  20. max

    Alion SBS.

    Early on it shows a version of the fight with Sonny Liston, full of menace. Anyone who got into the ring with Liston took his life into his hands.

    About Islam, Ali was a deluded stooge. Of course the film treats it with reverence and respect. In fact the whole film is turning into Islamic propaganda.

  21. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    State subsidised, and even then there were about 23 takers or thereabouts.

    Bullshit. Emperor Barnett told the wheat growers that the State Government was not there to offer multi peril insurance, and there were far more then 23 growers.

  22. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Macbeth, I will definitely be looking out for your old regimental group. Best I tell Da Hairy Ape the details, as he has much sharper vision than I do. Even the African ‘spotters’ on our game drives delegated some of the looking to him; lion over dere at two o’clock, he’d say, and sure enough the waving grasses would produce a lion once we all knew where to set our sights. We all became very adept at the analogue clockface.

    Busy here in Englnd. We have just driven half way across London from Richmond to Elstree via the North Circular Road to visit an elderly relative of Hairy’s. We all took lunch in for her as her legs aren’t much good for going out lately. Her mind still firing on eight cylinders though and we had a great laugh about the rise of British veganism. She said she could put up with some of the food that the children of friends insisted on eating but she couldn’t stand the accompanying lecture. We said Australia had the same vegan madness and we felt exactly the same way about the lecturing.

  23. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The Masai: these are extraordinary people. Firstly, they are very tall and do well in long-distance running as their legs are long. Surprisingly, their legs are quite thin and non-muscular to look at. Secondly, the Masai have insisted on maintaining their traditional lifestyle; albeit somewhat attenuated these days. They no longer wear leopard skin shawls nor animal hide cloaks, but dress themselves instead in varieties of ‘shuka’, a brightly coloured striped or tartan cloak and add a sarong in similar material. You can buy these as a tourist item; I brought some to cheer up our terrace on cold nites, as throws to snuggle into. To their ensemble, they add beaded necklets and other decorations. Only the old people have the stretched earlobes of the past, and some have moved into townships of various types. However out on the Mara there are still Masai villages of a traditional sort, the area protected as an animal corral by a thorn bush collection of cut branches around the housing, and the central part being a lion-free shelter for their much valued cattle. In these villages the people still live in traditional huts of branches strung together by twine into a fretted framework, which is then infilled with wet cattle dung and mud. You enter by a corridor hall and the small ‘rooms’ have only one airhole for the smoke of the central cooking fire to disperse; it keeps mosquitos as bay so is useful inside, although it seemed to me rather like living with my dad in his smoking days.

    They have virtually no possessions except a few aluminium cooking pots, and live mainly on blood drawn regularly from the cattle, and the milk of the cattle which they mix with the blood and drink for brekkie and on high days and holidays some beef in a stew. They make some money from tourism via rental access to their lands and may also purchase some maize for porridge. Everything operates tribally by Council of male elders. The ‘Medicine Man’ is an important man in the village, skilled in traditional remedies. Modern medicine is slowly gaining some presence. They do not engage in any agriculture and still take their herds to graze the grasslands amongst the other animals. All children go to school, which is a major reason why the Masai are now tending to live a more settled village life rather than remaking their villages regularly on new sites as they wander. Traditional herders, their whole culture and song is orientated around the needs of their cattle; little calves are brought in to sleep with the children.

    Women work extremely hard, and constantly. They gather the firewood in great bundles, carrying it home on their backs via a sling round their heads, and carry water long distances from the stream, balancing the containers on their heads. Acting jointly, they build the new houses and repair the old ones. They also do all the washing, cooking and child-caring, in very primitive conditions. The surrounding thorn bush fence is decorated with washing, drying on these spikey supports in the dusty breeze. The children however are beautifully turned out in modern uniforms, spotless, for school each day. They have no toys or modern electronic gadgets and were doing their homework in old writing-primer schoolbooks on their laps when we visited. They play games with string and bone pieces. Fees are paid by the tribal funds.

    Polygamy is still practiced, although it is decreasing under the joint influence of Christianity, which is very strong in the region, and the difficulty of obtaining enough cattle for brideprice given the other pulls on any available income as settlement increases. The going price for a bride is ten cows. As we sat on tiny, tiny benches with our tour group in the home of the Medicine Man, we bemused Western women asked: what do the men do? They make babies, was the response, which was greeted by us all with loud protests. That doesn’t take long, said a few brave females, including me. Again, we muttered, it is the women who do all the real work. Men look after cattle, counting them proudly, we are told. New wives are welcomed by the old we are also told, because they ease the burden of the constant work for Number One Wife. Each wife has her own small hut with her own children and receive visits from the busy husband of them all.

    As we hunched down exiting the hut via the narrow and low corridor at the entrance, eyes watering from the smoke and nostrils blazing at the general odor of the place and its people, our menfolk following told us to get a move on, calling us Number One Wife. Even Hairy! The Masai were laughing, as they understand English well; it is the National Language of Kenya, taught in schools, along with the pigeon language of Swahili, which unites the many diverse tribal groups in a Lingua Franca. One warrior, carrying the lethal traditional spear with which he would once have had to kill a lion to prove his manhood, laughingly grabbed my phone to take a group photo of us all, showing much more proficiency with the latest Samsung 9s/x camera than I can yet manage. He certainly knew his way around phone technology; all the warriors had mobile phones. This one had a go at taking a selfie and it turned out well. I retrieved my phone then, and the warrior put his arm around me for Hairy to take a photo of us together. How much for this good woman? he asked Hairy, starting the offer at ten cows. No, said Hairy, she is worth fifteen at least.

    Ain’t love grand? 🙂

    On a serious note, Hairy and I both thought we were seeing the very last of a traditional culture here. The pull of education and Christian civilization is strong, and the new group of elders emerging will want more settlement and better conditions. As a condition for tourist use of their lands they require education and training opportunities for the children. This is thus a temporary and transitional situation we were partaking in, here in the mud hut village.

  24. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Forgot to mention that we saw some traditional dancing, and especially impressive, the traditional chanting and whooping that accompanied it. Firstly the men, doing their warrior initiation dance which involved seeing who could jump straight up the highest, and the guys put on a fair competition against each other. It is, apparently, a well-known fact that girls always want to marry the warrior who can jump the highest; and the tallest have some advantage in this, although some little guys put on a sterling effort. A man does not chose his first wife, the parents and elders do that, although by his own efforts, when he has accrued more cattle by his own efforts, he is then free to chose his later wives without intervention by others. The warrior dancing was very impressive; the women’s wedding dancing quite loud and dramatic, but in general fairly subservient, we ‘new feminists’ all thought. 🙂

  25. Tom

    Something for everyone in a masterful fisking of the lunatic American left coast in Week In Pictures: Last Straw Man Edition.

  26. Tom

    … and, if you’re still hungry, here’s three hours eleven minutes of Geoff Peterson* and Craig Ferguson**. See you at brekky.

    *guest voices edition.
    **Larry King starts around 48m45s.

  27. Bruce of Newcastle

    Some nice history from late night cats!

    My retired USN mate in Colorado purchased this one for about $50, 50 years ago. It took him about 40 years to get it to this condition but it is absolutely superb. (Digger)

    Took me a little but got it on the third try. A P-39 Airacobra! Very cool.

    at the Tattoo, look for our pipe band contingent from 5/6 RVR (Macbeth)

    The 5/6 RVR has a fine wiki and the band does too: RVR Pipes and Drums. Dress uniform kilts!

    Firstly the men, doing their warrior initiation dance which involved seeing who could jump straight up the highest, and the guys put on a fair competition against each other. It is, apparently, a well-known fact that girls always want to marry the warrior who can jump the highest (Lizzie)

    Took me a little to work out this wasn’t the Highland Games… 😀

  28. Mindfree

    Its 5:30 in the afternoon just been on a boat ride outside of twillingate and now relaxing with some local rhubarb wine and checking out the view from my balcony
    Life is good in these moments
    On to rocky harbour tomorrow
    Newfie people are superb human beings
    They know how to show hospitality and are blown away by australians

  29. Rafe Champion

    Liberty Quote

    When the polls agree with the Left’s objectives, that is the “voice of the people”.
    When the polls agree with something anathema to the Left, that is “populism”.

    — Boambee John

  30. Bruce of Newcastle

    This WIP cartoon fits well with the following story:

    Mizzou quarterback forced to apologize for ‘insensitive’ tweets from 8th grade

    Yep, now they’re digging back into early school tweets to see if you’ve committed thoughtcrime.
    OTOH Jack Dorsey giving Twitter to Year 8 kids could render an entire generation unemployable…

  31. Mak Siccar

    For Prof Sinc if he is watching, in case he hasn’t seen it yet.

    https://streetwiseprofessor.com/this-is-my-shocked-face-blockchain-hype-is-fading-fast/

    This Is My Shocked Face: Blockchain Hype Is Fading Fast
    Filed under: Blockchain,Commodities,Cryptocurrency,Economics — cpirrong @ 7:02 pm
    Imagine my great surprise at reading a Bloomberg piece titled: “Blockchain, Once Seen as a Corporate Cure-All, Suffers Slowdown.”

    That was sarcasm, by the way. I’ve long and publicly expressed my skepticism that blockchain will have revolutionary effects, at least in the near to medium term. In my public speaking on the topic, I’ve explored the implications of three basic observations. First, that blockchain is basically a way of sharing/communicating information, which can in turn be put to various uses. Second, there alternative ways of sharing/communicating information, with different costs and benefits. And third, it is necessary to distinguish between sharing information within an organization and between organizations.

    Much of the hype about blockchain relates to the potential benefits of more efficient sharing and validation of information. But this does not address the issue of whether blockchain does this more efficiently than alternative means of sharing/communicating/validating. As in all institutional/technology issues, a comparison of alternatives is necessary. This comparison has been sadly lacking in public discussions of the potential for blockchain, beyond incantations about blockchain eliminating the need for trusted third parties which is (a) often untrue (in part because trusted parties may be required to enter information into a blockchain, and (b) is not necessarily a feature, because trusted third parties may be able to operate more efficiently than consensus based systems employed on a blockchain.

    The most developed implementation of blockchain (Bitcoin) involves very large cost to solve a particular problem that (a) is unique to cryptocurrency, and (b) is not necessarily important in other contexts–namely, the double spend problem in crypto. Maybe blockchain is the best way to solve that particular problem (which itself begs the question of whether cryptocurrency`is an efficient solution to any economic problem), but that doesn’t mean that it will be a more efficient way of solving the myriad types of opportunism, fraud, and deceit that plague other kinds of transactions. Double spend is not the alpha and omega of transactional challenges. Indeed, it might be one of the most trivial.

    Thinking in Williamsonian transaction cost terms, where the transaction is the unit of analysis, transactions are highly diverse. Different kinds of transactions are vulnerable to different kinds of information and opportunism problems, meaning that customized blockchain approaches are likely necessary. One likely cause for the waning enthusiasm mentioned in the Bloomberg article is that people are coming to the recognition that customization is not easy, and it may not be worth the candle, compared to other ways of addressing the same issues. Relatedly, customization makes it harder to exploit scale economies, and recognition of this is likely to be making initially enthusiastic commercial users less keen on the idea: that is, it may be possible to use blockchain in many settings, but it may not be cost-effective to do so.

    The siloed vs. cooperative divide is also likely to be extremely important, and the Bloomberg article mentions that issue a couple of times. The blockchain initiatives that do seem to have been implemented, at least to some degree, as with Maersk in container shipping or Cargill with turkeys, are intra-firm endeavors that do not require coordination and cooperation across firms, and can exploit the governance structure that a firm has in place. Many of the other proposed uses–for instance, in trade finance, or in commodity trading, both of which require myriad parties in a single transaction to communicate information among one another–are inherently multilateral.

    This creates all sorts of challenges. How can commercial rivals cooperate? How are the gains from cooperation divided?–this is a problem even when participants supply complementary services, such as a trading firm, banks providing trade finance, and the buyer and seller of a commodity. As oil unitization has shown, battles over dividing the gains from cooperation can dissipate much of those gains. Who gets to see what information? Who makes the rules? How? How are they enforced? What is the governance structure? How is free riding prevented? Who pays?

    Ironically, where the gains from cooperation are seemingly biggest–where there are large numbers of potential participants–is exactly where the problems of coordination, negotiation, and agreement are likely to be most daunting.

    I’ve drawn the analogy between these cooperative blockchain endeavors and commodity exchanges, which (as I showed in a 1995 JLS paper) were formed primarily as ways to reduce transactions costs via cooperative rule making and enforcement. The old paper shows that exchanges faced serious obstacles in achieving the gains from cooperation, and often failed to do so. Don’t expect blockchain to be any different, especially given the greater complexity of the transactional problems that it is being proposed as a fix.

    Thus, I am not surprised to read things like this:

    “The expectation was we’d quickly find use cases,” Magnus Haglind, Nasdaq’s senior vice president and head of product management for market technology, said in an interview. “But introducing new technologies requires broad collaboration with industry participants, and it all takes time.”

    or this:

    Most blockchains also can’t yet handle a large volume of transactions — a must-have for major corporations. And they only shine in certain types of use cases, typically where companies collaborate on projects. But because different businesses have to share the same blockchain, it can be a challenge to agree on technology and how to adopt it.

    One of my favorite illustrations of the hype outstripping the reality is the endeavor launched with much fanfare in the cotton market, where IBM and The Seam announced an endeavor to use the blockchain to revolutionize the cotton supply chain. It’s been almost two years, and after the initial press releases, it’s devilish hard to find any mention of the project, let alone any indication that it will go into operation anytime soon.

    Read the Bloomberg article and you’ll have a better understanding of R3’s announcement of an IPO–and that they might have missed their opportunity.

    In 2017 and a little before, Blockchain was a brand new shiny hammer. People have been looking everywhere for nails to pound with it, and spending a lot of money in the effort. But they’re finding that many transactional problems aren’t nails, that there are other hammers that might do the job better, and there are other problems that require many parties to agree on just how the hammer is to be used and by whom. Given this, it is not surprising that the euphoria is fading fast. The main question that remains is in what shrunken domain will blockchain actually be employed, and when. My guess is that the domain will be relatively small, and the time until employment will be pretty long.

  32. Entropy

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2781099, posted on August 4, 2018 at 11:51 pm
    State subsidised, and even then there were about 23 takers or thereabouts.

    Bullshit. Emperor Barnett told the wheat growers that the State Government was not there to offer multi peril insurance, and there were far more then 23 growers

    I suspect we are talking different programs. The one I am thinking of was in the nineties.

  33. calli

    Heh

    Chuckle – there’s one in Pennant Hills. Someone keeps pinching the sign, but I can’t imagine why.

    Thanks Tom.

  34. feelthebern

    Looks like RGIII is really back.
    He won’t get much game time with Flacco in front of him.
    I always thought he was too slight to be effective.
    Now he’s grown up & filled out he’ll end up playing for another 10 years one way or another.

  35. Elle

    Thanks for the week in pictures, Tom. The comment’s section in the link is as funny as the pics!

  36. lotocoti

    … and, if you’re still hungry

    The Jayleno Fly compiles are a great way to while away the hours.

  37. Leigh Lowe

    Anybody else listening to Macca on Sunday mornings on ABC?
    Nah, me neither.

  38. Cactus

    Pedro. Im also going to Diggers. First time. Any free advice? Im excited, Im expecting a bouyant mood.

  39. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hmmm. Very interesting.

    Mystery=> FBI Logged Cyber Intrusion Analysis Request to Hillary’s Email Investigation ONE DAY After 2016 Election

    On Friday, the FBI released a tranche of documents on Hillary Clinton’s email investigation thanks to a FOIA lawsuit filed by Judicial Watch.The documents reveal the FBI logged a cyber intrusion analysis request to Hillary’s email investigation one day after the 2016 election–the FBI had already closed the investigation. Why??

    Looks to me that the FBI knew very well that Hillary’s server was wide open…but dared not do anything when they believed she would become President.

    So they filed the request just after the election results came out…

  40. Tintarella di Luna

    I am into learning about drills and tools and miscellaneous handyman stuff and found this amusing – someone who’s obviously been doing work experience with Pudding Face the swivel-eyed loon.

  41. Tintarella di Luna

    Anybody else listening to Macca on Sunday mornings on ABC?
    Nah, me neither.

    I used to listen to Macca religiously every Sunday morning but since 2007 I’ve become an ABC apostate

  42. feelthebern

    Macca is still alive?

  43. Gab

    Who or what is a “Macca”?

  44. OldOzzie

    Socialism can’t flourish without ignorance

    The capacity of human beings for making the same mistake again and again is exceeded only by the capacity of their governments to enshrine those mistakes in law.

    To err is human; to forgive, divine – but what are we to do when a significant segment of our population has grown so enamored of an error that they lose the capability to recognize it as such? Indeed, they become violently defensive at the mere mention of reassessing their beliefs.

    A difficult situation is made untenable when the error involved has dangerous ramifications for everyone, not just those making the mistake.

    This is where 21st-century America finds itself today, relative to that perennial error known as socialism.

    The base of support for this long discredited ethos is multi-layered, with each layer supporting the error from a different foundation.

    The largest element stands on a foundation of ignorance – they are simply unaware of the history and track record of collectivist schemes in general and socialism in particular.

    A good read

  45. pete m

    From now on refer to Lizzie as da hairy ape’s first wife.

    Lizzie I reckon 20 cows should be your price.

  46. Tintarella di Luna

    Lizzie thanks for this morning contribution, I feel like I’m there with you thank goodness because the way things are visiting the Masai isn’t on the horizon.

  47. Elle

    I also use to listen to Macca on ABC radio on a Sunday … but that was years ago before I discovered 2UE. Then followed AJ to 2GB.

  48. calli

    That’s why they go into politics, Old Ozzie.

    Those with genuinely altruistic aims are as rare as unicorns. And they’ll be trampled in the rush to the trough.

  49. Baldrick

    Socialist Greens hate everyone, even babies …

    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    Voluntary Human Extinction Movement wants you to rethink your baby plans

  50. Geriatric Mayfly

    Face tattoos go mainstream

    Definitely on the ‘to do’ list for this week. A beginner’s guide suggests a heart with MUM inscribed in the middle. Other suggestions welcome.

  51. Gab

    “Macca”? Anyone? Help a fellow Cat out.

  52. OldOzzie

    Why Australia needs to stand firm and protect its borders – By Douglas Murray

    The news that Australia is refusing to join the UN’s Global Compact for Migration will cause howls of complaint at home and abroad. “Don’t you know what you are doing?” these people will cry. “Do you see who you are allied with? The US and Hungary. Really?”

    The Australian government should ignore these howlers. For it is not the government of Malcolm Turnbull, or those in Hungary or the US, that is wrong. It is the UN, which keeps trying to push mass migration on to nation-states and whose officials imagine that the answer to the existence of some porous, poor and failed states is to make the world one great porous, poor and failed state. Nation-states have the right to resist this pressure, and they should.

    Yet one of the most startling facts about migration in recent years has been that the greatest plaudits continue to go to those who are most reckless in their policies, while the most abuse goes to those who are most prudent. Perhaps this is because grandstanding and virtue-signalling are cheap. You can almost always get other people to pay for them.

    Nobody in recent years has made so impulsive and catastrophic a decision as German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Her 2015 decision to open the borders of Europe to anyone who made it there is having consequences that will roll out for years to come. Yet even as the German public turns against her and her party, she continues to be lauded across the international opinion-forming classes. Despite unleashing social and security problems across an entire continent, organs of international elite opinion and Merkel’s fellow world leaders continue to give her an easy ride. At worst she was “well-intentioned” and “naive”, they say. By contrast, the leaders of countries that refuse to accept open-borders, mandatory migrant quotas and the like are the ones that come in for execration and attack.

    Nevertheless, the rule of law and the protection of the social stability and security situation in countries such as Australia are worth defending, whatever the pushback. The Australian delegation at the UN in New York was right to state that the UN had “failed to make clear distinctions between regular and irregular migrants and between refugees and migrants”. These distinctions matter. Indeed they are vital. For they are not only a defence of the law but also a prudent response to a challenge that is only going to grow. For countries that fail to secure their borders in the end cannot secure their people either.

    Take my own country, Britain. More than a year has passed since it was rocked by three Islamist terror attacks. The first attack, on Westminster Bridge, claimed the lives of five innocent people including a police officer who was stabbed to death by the attacker inside the gates of Parliament. The second attack, at the Manchester Arena, killed 22 mainly young people and maimed and injured hundreds more. They were victims of a young suicide bomber who waited for them in the lobby as they streamed out of an Ariana Grande concert. In the third attack, a fortnight later, three men rampaged across London Bridge in a van and then ran through Borough Market slashing at the throats of passers-by, targeting women. While doing this they were heard to shout “This is for Allah”. Their attack injured 48 and stole the lives of eight people.

    The dead that night included two Australians. Sara Zelenak, 21, was stabbed through the neck. Kirsty Boden, 28, a nurse, was stabbed through the chest as she ran to help other victims of the attack. After the third attack British Prime Minister Theresa May announced that “enough is enough”. But the truth is that she is incapable of acting because like the rest of us she is a hostage of the asylum and migration policies of her predecessors.

    One year on from those attacks and that statement, the government’s only initiative has been the appointment of an “extremism commissioner”. After half a year that appointee (anti-extremism activist Sara Khan) has announced that her first priority is to gather evidence about “all forms of extremism in the UK”. So “enough is enough” turns out to mean: “We will appoint a commissioner who will appoint a board to look into unrelated issues.”

    Of course one wishes Khan well. But here is one bitter truth that I bet Khan’s commission will not look into. Among last year’s attackers, most should never have been in Britain in the first place.

    The Westminster Bridge attacker, a convert to Islam, was indeed born in Britain. But the Manchester Arena bomber should never have been there. His father was a member of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, an al-Qa’ida affiliate. Back in the 1990s the LIFG was opposed to Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi, and he returned the favour. So when the situation in Libya got too hot for Ramadan Abedi and his wife they decamped to Britain, where they were given asylum. Weeks later their son Salman was born in Manchester.

    Twenty-two years later he would repay the country that gave his parents sanctuary by detonating an explosive packed with nuts and bolts to cause maximum damage to the young skulls and spines into which they ripped.

    Just this past week a British newspaper revealed that in 2014 the Royal Navy saved Salman Abedi along with other British nationals from the civil war in Libya. HMS Enterprise rescued him and 100 other British nationals when the security situation in that country deteriorated. What was he doing there? Why were he and his family ever in Britain? And why did Britain keep paying the family’s travel expenses whenever they felt like visiting the country they allegedly had fled?

    An even clearer story emerges from the London Bridge attackers. And it has been even less dis­cussed. The three perpetrators that night were Youssef Zaghba, 22; Khuram Butt, 27; and Rachid Redouane, 30. Zaghba and Redou­ane were born in Morocco, an entirely peaceful and pleasant country. An inquest after the attack found that Redouane had entered Britain using a false name, claiming to be Libyan, and he was five years older than he had pretended. He had been refused asylum under his false Libyan iden­tity, exhausted his further appeals, absconded and lived under his Moroccan identity instead. So again, why was he in Britain? What was he doing for us? What did Britain get out of this deal?

    The case of Butt is even more shameful. He had been born in Pakistan and was described as having arrived in Britain as a “child refugee” in 1998, his family having moved to the UK to claim asylum based on “political oppression”. What nobody has been able to explain since is why, other than saving al-Qa’ida fighters from Libya, Britain’s immigration services in the 190s were still giving “asylum” to people from Pakistan.

    Pakistan in the 90s was not in a state of war. The country is — for good or ill — an ally of Britain and about as stable a country as you get in that region. His family does not appear to be among the numerous religious minorities so eagerly persecuted by the Muslim majority in Pakistan. So why was Butt in Britain? What exactly did he bring to Britain in the years that followed?

    After the London Bridge attack May and London mayor Sadiq Khan eagerly launched into a debate about the role that internet companies had in tackling terror.

    It is an interesting debate. But it had nothing to do with that attack. So far as is known there was no subterranean online jihadist activity going on. In fact the attackers and their associates could hardly have been more out in the open. The year before the London Bridge attack Butt was even on British television as was one of the stars of a Channel 4 show: The Jihadis Next Door. So he wasn’t exactly hiding. He was starring on prime time. May and Khan didn’t need to sit on the tech companies to avert an atrocity such as London Bridge. They just needed to turn on their televisions.

    When something is staring you in the face and you ignore it, there is always a reason. One conclusion that I have come to over the years I have been covering the story of extremism and terrorism in Europe is that the one connection nobody in power wants is between anything negative and anything to do with migration. There is a reason: which is that this is a problem they have brought us.

    Of course every religion and ideology can produce nutters. But it still does not make any sense — indeed, it could be said to be a form of madness — to import forms of extremism we used not to have. And this — for politicians in Britain and Europe — is the toxic underbelly of this debate. We have had, on continental Europe even more than in Britain, plenty of violent ideologies and creeds of our own. But Islamic extremism is an imported problem. A problem our politicians imported in the post-war period right up to the present.

    Obviously that isn’t to say that all those people who have come from Pakistan and other Muslim countries are terrorists. Clearly not. But they have too many people among them who profess an ideology that countries such as ours are not just slow but reluctant to recognise. And if those people who have come to our countries legally show the mess of our system, what hope do we have with illegal migration at the level that supranational organisations such as the EU and UN think is perfectly fine?

    A great problem for the pro-mass migration panjandrums is that the public can make all the obvious connection with our own eyes. But our politicians are incapable of providing answers. And it is not as though the answers are easy. For instance, what do you do with citizens who hate the state they are in? For most Europeans this is an unanswerable question. But because a question cannot be answered or is hard to answer, it does not follow that the question must not be asked. Yet there, for the time being Britain, like the rest of western Europe, uncom­fort­ably sits.

    I am often asked by Australian friends what differences exist between Europe and Australia in these matters. And on my tour of Australia this month I look forward to hearing and learning more about this. But, broadly speaking, from the outside it looks to me like there are two clear differences.

    The first is in your immigration policies. To the fury of many campaigners in Australia and abroad, a generation of Australian politicians, from John Howard onwards, made the most important realisation of all. They realised that you have a country or you don’t. And if you have a country you have to have borders and rules. Unlike Merkel and European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker, John Howard and Tony Abbott in particular knew the difference between “legal” and “illegal” immigration is not some tiny technicality to be got around by a phalanx of human rights lawyers. The difference between legal and illegal immigration is the law. The law that Australia’s representatives at the UN have once again necessarily and heroically upheld. Because if you don’t have the law then you don’t have much of a state either.

    The second difference is that Australia seems to still have (though this may be on the wane) some residual common sense of a kind that appears to be almost absent in my country. There seems to remain in Australia a strain of perfectly legitimate opinion that still finds it acceptable to say: “If you don’t like it here then why don’t you hop it?” In Britain and most of western Europe anybody who uttered such a statement would be too sensible to survive.

    And perhaps that’s where we are more generally. A country that imports jihadists who are down on their luck and a continent that welcomes anyone who makes it there is a continent with a deeply troubled future. The best piece of advice any Brit or European can give to an Australian today is the saddest advice of all: don’t do what we did. The happier piece of advice — and one this Brit is happy to give to our Australian friends — is: keep doing what you are doing. You are right. And don’t let anyone, not even the UN, try to tell you otherwise.

    The Strange Death of Europe by Douglas Murray (Bloomsbury Continuum, $22.99) is out now. Murray will be in Australia this month on a national speaking tour with Think Inc.

  53. Bruce of Newcastle

    “Macca”? Anyone? Help a fellow Cat out.

    Gab – Australia All Over.

    I will not give a link.

  54. Elle

    Ray Hadley wonders why his son didn’t come to him about his mental health issues. That’s because he was having a great time getting high on cocaine. It’s amazing how many people develop mental health issues when they get caught. Drug use is a choice. If you’re doing drugs to cope with a mental health issue get help. Don’t wait until you’re arrested.

  55. Baldrick

    “Macca”? Anyone? Help a fellow Cat out.

    Here Gab.

    Gone the same way as Landline and Gardening Australia. Agrarian socialist pap.

  56. stackja

    Which ABC Radio ‘personality ‘ is worth listening to?

  57. Boambee John

    Baldrick
    #2781160, posted on August 5, 2018 at 8:56 am
    Socialist Greens hate everyone, even babies …

    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    Voluntary Human Extinction Movement wants you to rethink your baby plans

    I’ll listen to tbem when they have self-implemented their own policy.

    Oh hell, I can’t hear them, they are extinct!

  58. Elle

    Gab, google Ian McNamara ABC.

  59. Gab

    Ian McNamara. Oh, thanks Baldrick. Never heard of him but then I haven’t listened/watched their ABC since since the 90s.

  60. stackja

    Elle
    #2781166, posted on August 5, 2018 at 9:07 am

    Ray Hadley can be an unsympathetic person. Mental problems? I don’t know enough to comment.

  61. OldOzzie

    calli
    #2781158, posted on August 5, 2018 at 8:49 am

    That’s why they go into politics, Old Ozzie.

    Those with genuinely altruistic aims are as rare as unicorns. And they’ll be trampled in the rush to the trough.

    Ted Mack is the only one that springs to mind – resigned the day before he was entitled to Old NSW State Politicians Super then similarly a day before he was entitled to Federal Politicians Super. – still kept driving his LT15 Old Citreon around North Sydney

    Tony Abbott still lives in his old house in Forestville and is like normal Australians with a Mortgage

  62. Geriatric Mayfly

    Further to Lizzie’s encounter with the Masai we stumbled across a group of colourful young Masai men in a remote gorge in Tanzania back in the late 80’s. Their curiosity suggested that contact with outsiders had been minimal. The language barrier was a big handicap in our mutual interest in one another. A smattering of broken swahili from our guides seemed to tidy up one question. Besides spears, why were they carrying bundles of bark? A ritual, or party coming up back at the bomas and this fibre is somehow fermented to give the ceremonies an extra fillip. Two urchin goat herds arrived on the scene, and were beaten mercilessly with sticks for a serious misdemeanour. I shared ‘lunch’ with one and gave him a hard boiled egg. The little mite had never seen such a thing, and once I removed the shell, and took a small bite myself he ate the rest with gusto.

  63. Elle

    In some cases an arrest is the result of a life that has spiraled out of control. In others it’s “bugger, I got caught” and all of a sudden I have mental health issues – often associated with the stress if being arrested and the court process.

  64. stackja

    Boambee John
    #2781169, posted on August 5, 2018 at 9:10 am

    The Voluntary Human Extinction Movement

    “May we live long and die out”
    Phasing out the human race by voluntarily ceasing to breed will allow Earth’s biosphere to return to good health. Crowded conditions and resource shortages will improve as we become less dense.

    The Voluntary Human Extinction Movement was founded by Les U. Knight,[2][3][B] a high school substitute teacher living in Portland, Oregon.[2] After becoming involved in the environmental movement as a college student in the 1970s, Knight attributed most of the dangers faced by the planet to human overpopulation.[2][5] He joined the Zero Population Growth organization,[2] and chose to be vasectomised at age 25.[5] He later concluded that the extinction of humanity would be the best solution to the Earth’s environmental problems.[2] He believes that this idea has also been held by some people throughout human history.[6]

  65. OldOzzie

    Death toll 34 in Afghan mosque bombing

    Two male suicide bombers dressed in women’s clothes and armed with rifles, entered a Shi’ite mosque in the Khoja Hassan in Gardiz on Friday afternoon, opened fire on worshippers and subsequently blew themselves up, officials said.

  66. Elle

    *of
    Doing this on my phone.

  67. Boambee John

    Old Ozzie

    In many ways Tony Abbott was a disappointment as PM.

    However, he stopped the boats and now promises to reduce, if not stop entirely, the migrant planes. This is the key issue for me. I would like to see s18c gone, the deficit fixed, reliable electrical power at a reasonable price, but I will vote for anyone who will fix immigration (and asylum seeker) policies.

  68. zyconoclast

    Shades of some well known Retired Labor Politicians

    The Obamas are worth 30 times more than when they entered the White House in 2008 — here’s how they spend their millions

    Hard work and saving your lunch money.

  69. Elle

    Tony Abbott was at Balgowlah Bunnings helping raise funds for our farmers. I like the bloke. Always have. If I ‘m having a bad day I play his victory speech. Unlike a lefty friend who plays Gillard’s misogyny speech to cheer himself up. 🙃

  70. Elle

    *He was at Bunnings this week.

  71. Tom

    Gab, the reason Ian McNamara and Australia All Over are never promoted or acknowledged by Their ABC’s current affairs department is that he keeps his Sunday morning show by popular demand from a loyal band of One Nation-voting Australian bushies. As you know, popular demand is a dangerous concept in the ABC’s communist world view which, if encouraged, leads to Trumpism.

    McNamara, incidentally, is a Sydney jazz musician who invented his John Williamsonesque hayseed personality to keep his Sunday morning sinecure at the ABC trough. I haven’t listened to Australia All Over for 20 years.

  72. OldOzzie

    Elle
    #2781184, posted on August 5, 2018 at 9:28 am

    Tony Abbott was at Balgowlah Bunnings helping raise funds for our farmers. I like the bloke. Always have. If I ‘m having a bad day I play his victory speech. Unlike a lefty friend who plays Gillard’s misogyny speech to cheer himself up. 🙃

    Agree I like Tony Abbott (my local member) as well, and you reminded me I have to get down Burnt Creek to Bunnings Balgowlah to get some tools. mortar, Yates dynamic lifter to repair part of driveway and get Autumn hedging and gardening on the way

  73. C.L.

    Great essay on your travels, Lizz.
    The gal can write.

  74. Elle

    OldOzzie, I love Bunnings! You can find all sorts of things there. One thing you won’t find is plastic bags. At least they provide boxes.

  75. C.L.

    Via GWP, Elizabeth Heng for Congress …
    An amazing personal story – and a great American story.
    Begins in the death pits of Cambodia, ends in Stanford and Yale.
    Her promotional video has been banned by Facebook because the filmic evidence of leftism was too “shocking.”

  76. OldOzzie

    Car sales crash hard whatever the model – Philip King Motoring Editor

    Vehicle sales careered off a cliff last month with luxury demand plummeting and imported replacements for former locally built favourites dropping off shopping lists.

    It was a nightmare month for almost every carmaker but especially Land Rover, Audi and Porsche, with sales down by a third compared with last July, while mainstream buyers shunned replacements for the Toyota Camry and Holden Commodore.

    Both cars, which were made here until October last year, witnessed sharp July declines that confirmed their failure as imports, with Camry down 37 per cent year-to-date and Commodore a whopping 53 per cent.

    The result compounded the misery for incoming Holden boss Dave Buttner, the previous Toyota chief who has been lured out of retirement to fix the ailing Aussie brand, as it fell to ninth in the sales charts.

    On his first day in the job this week he said there was still a place for the Commodore and was confident he could turn things around. “The upside for this franchise is still incredibly high. We just have to get all our ducks in a row,” he said.

    The threat to luxury demand from Queensland’s stamp duty increase on cars costing more than $l00,000 failed to materialise, as premium deliveries there fell in line with a nationwide slump.

    Luxury demand had been recovering after a 7 per cent downturn in 2017, but most brands are now down for the year.

    Mercedes-Benz spokesman David McCarthy said the extra 2 per cent impost would eventually bite and the result was partly down to an end-of-financial-year effect.

    “In June there was a lot of pull-forward but the market was definitely softer,” Mr McCarthy said. “Dealers say it’s tough.”

    The sales figures, released yesterday by the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries, show overall vehicle sales fell 7.8 per cent compared with the same month last year, making it the slowest July since 2011

  77. C.L.

    … I love Bunnings!

    IT will now issue a fatwa on you, Elle.

  78. OldOzzie

    Oops Finger Slip above

  79. John Constantine

    Australia all over is the only windmill denier program on ABC radio.

    Never advertised.

  80. C.L.

    Malcolm Turnbull reaches out to drought victims, ABC captions photo blaming Turnbull:

    Malcolm Turnbull (right) comforts Edwina Robertson after she confronted the Prime Minister over the drought.

  81. Elle

    Is Bunnings halal certified, C.L.?

  82. C.L.

    As the FBI continues to analyse Paul Manafort’s ostrich coat, the Bureau has officially announced they’ve got nothing re the Las Vegas massacre of conservative country music fans.

    Case closed.

  83. min

    I was in the Masai Mara in the 80’s so interesting to read Lizzie ‘s update . We visited a village where the huts were built into the walls made from the tree with prickles , had a descriptive name. Cattle and goats were kept in the centre and it was the children who took then out during the day . Women spent their day making jewellery from tiny beads and keeping the huts immaculately clean . I did not think they were tall but forever smiling.
    January 2017 , my granddaughter , then a medical student , volunteered in Tanzania , Masai live here also. Part of time she spent in a remote village helping in a mobile clinic ,that is going out in svu and conducting clinic in middle of nowhere. The Masai women and children walked to meet them. She thought they were cruel to the children as they cut their faces with wire if they were naughty. Some mothers looked about 14 she actually had a patient in the hospital who was 17, having her fourth child.
    Gemma Sisi and her St Jude’s school is doing great work educating them and last year had her first lot accepted at university.
    I noted in pictures she sent us ,that the landscape looked bare , eaten out by goats the facilities in the camp for the medicos was appalling, eg a bucket and tap for bathroom in a hut.
    Lizzie I think you were presented with the tourists’ view.

  84. Elle

    Insiders has been quite painful to watch … as usual. Wish we had an Insiders’ thread, like the Q&A one.

  85. Robber Baron

    Two male suicide bombers dressed in women’s clothes and armed with rifles, entered a Shi’ite mosque in the Khoja Hassan in Gardiz on Friday afternoon, opened fire on worshippers and subsequently blew themselves up, officials said.

    There are heaps of Mosques in Melbourne. Do we really want these people here?

  86. zyconoclast

    How did the Dutch predict the future?

    “Some ships bound for Java strayed too far south and east and when they changed course for the run up yo Java found a long barren coast blocking their passage; in 1627 a Dutch ship sailed a thousand miles along the southern coast of Australia and was 500 sea miles from the site of what is now Adelaide before she retreated.”

    The Tyranny of Distance by Geoffrey Blainey.

  87. John Constantine

    Their turnbull didn’t stop the rain, but it is an unwavering turnfailure commitment to dump the irrigation water that could grow fodder and grain to use as rations, dump it unused out to sea to comply with united nations demands.

    The water currently being dumped out of the dams wouldn’t be available in the middle of a dry spell if the dams hadn’t been built, and once the dams are breached and the rivers saved by a future greens government we rewild back to the old days, where floodplains were devastated every flood season, then in theory carried the enviroment through the dry times.

    But not the people.

    Comrades.

  88. C.L.

    ADF illegally leaks report to Fairfax to get the SAS:

    SAS ethics ‘deeply compromised’ by Afghanistan failings

    A former head of Australia’s special forces expressed fears that some of the nation’s most elite SAS Regiment and Commandos soldiers were “deeply compromised” ethically and their command “not fit for purpose”.

    In a blistering secret briefing, the then Special Operations Commander Major General Jeff Sengelman attacked a collapse of leadership, “tribalism”, government policy that exhausted special forces through multiple deployments to Afghanistan, and a failure by individuals to take responsibility for their actions.

    The report went to the then recently appointed defence force chief, Angus Campbell who seized on Mr Sengelman’s advice to commission a major quasi-judicial inquiry into “rumours” of alleged breaches of the laws of armed conflict involving special forces in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2016.

    Mr Sengelman warned that “those who feel threatened at the prospect of transparency, personal accountability and the evidence of inadequate standards” would resist any reform attempts.“Cumulatively, these reports convey a sobering insight into our Command that for many starkly contradicts the public image and reputation many unconditionally hold,” he said.

    “Every member of the Command who values their integrity” should support reform, “because we are all responsible to ensure the organisation walks the right path…

    Fairfax Media obtained the report as part of an ongoing investigation into allegations special forces soldiers went rogue and committed war crimes in Afghanistan.

    Angus Campbell should be investigated by the AFP and ASIO over this leak.

  89. H B Bear

    Two male suicide bombers dressed in women’s clothes …

    That could be a problem when they get their 72 virgins … or maybe not. Perhaps they’ll just take goats or camels instead.

  90. Helen Davidson

    Tony Abbott was at Balgowlah Bunnings helping raise funds for our farmers. I like the bloke. Always have.

    Years ago, I think when he was Opposition Leader, he was visiting indigenous communities in the Northern Territory. I always remember reading a newspaper article (I think it was the NT News) and one of the indigenous men saying (my paraphrasing) that he was surprised Tony Abbott was a nice guy and that he’d kept helping even after the cameras stopped.

    Although that probably says as much about other polices as it does about him.

  91. H B Bear

    Listened to a minute and a half of Macca before the 6am news. Fvckin’ weirdo was talking about going into the garden last night looking at slugs and tadpoles.

    His salary at the ALPBC staff co-op $300k+, market value in commercial radio? Dunno but it would be closer to $0 k pa than $300k .

  92. BrettW

    PVO on Insiders again whilst been doing lots of hosting of the Drum.

    Wonder how much he is being paid as a “casual”.

  93. OldOzzie

    Seems to be an ongoing theme at the moment

    Credit crunch hits developers, builders, would-be homeowners – Turi Condon
    Property Editor and Elizabeth Redman Property Reporter


    The credit crunch is hitting builders and developers along with investors, leading to a fall in building starts and fewer homes being sold as money dries up.

    Developers are the most affected, outside of investors, says BIS Oxford Economics managing ­director Rob Mellor.

    The banking regulator’s move to rein in lending to investors and riskier borrowers and the impact of the banking royal commission added to the storm already brewing in the residential market, where foreign buyers have withdrawn because of higher taxes and charges, new apartments are oversupplied and housing faces a ­period of falling prices.

    “Every month that goes by we see a (housing) price decline,” Mr Mellor said, noting that this dissuaded investors in particular and made it harder for builders to fund new projects. While some banks dropped their mortgage rates this week, particularly for owner-occupiers, more restrictive funding was expected over the longer term.

    BIS Shrapnel forecasts a 23 per cent fall in the number of dwelling starts over the next three years. Houses starts would fall by more than 10 per cent, medium-density by 20 per cent and high-rise apartments by almost 50 per cent, the researcher said. Mr Mellor said Sydney, which experienced the heaviest investor activity, was the city most exposed to the slowdown. Dwelling commencements fell 9 per cent last financial year and a drop of 26 per cent was expected over the next two years.

    In May 2015, investors accounted for 54.8 per cent of the total value of new housing loans, researcher CoreLogic noted. This was before macroprudential controls were fully implemented and before investors were charged a mortgage rate premium, says CoreLogic analyst Cameron Kusher. By May 2018, investors accounted for 42 per cent of all new lending, the lowest share since August 2012 — and right on the two-decade average.

    Digital Finance Analytics principal Martin North said borrowers with sizeable deposits could expect to get a good deal from their bank, but those with higher-risk profiles would not be so lucky. Banks were more cautious about prospective buyers who had low deposits, debt-to-income ratios above five or six times, an existing portfolio of investment properties or requests for a large loan over $1 million.

    “There’s more hoops to jump through,” Mr North said. “You have to bring in more documentation, and you have to prove your income and prove your expenses.”

    He said buyers’ “mortgage power” — the amount they could borrow on a given salary — was about 30 per cent lower than 18 months or two years ago. Non-banks were “very active” in lending as they did not face the same regulatory cap.

    Property developers were also finding it hard to borrow as prices for off-the-plan stock had fallen as much as 20 per cent in some areas of inner Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, where a lot of high-rise had come online, Mr North said.

    “If you’re a smaller developer who’s going to build one or two houses, you’ve probably got a better chance of getting a loan,” he said. “But if you’re a larger developer putting high-rise up in and around the CBD or in the inner-urban areas, it’s much more complex.”

    Mr North expects new starts to fall as house prices drift lower, loans tighten and investors drop out. “Just as you’ve got the positive spiral when everybody’s bullish about property, so you have a negative spiral when prices are sliding and property is less available,” he said.

  94. Top Ender

    In 18 months Tony Abbott stopped the boats, scrapped the climate tax, and abolished the mining tax.

    Could have done more but a formidable achievement compared to the other drones who have held the office before and since.

  95. Gab

    Years ago, I think when he was Opposition Leader, he was visiting indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

    Abbott has been volunteering in remote Aboriginal places for decades ever year, without ever advising the media about it.

  96. Tel

    Via GWP, Elizabeth Heng for Congress …
    An amazing personal story – and a great American story.

    Not wanting to take anything away from her as a person, but she is pushing awful policies.

    http://elizabethheng.com/issues/

  97. Eddystone

    Pudencia Carpenter, in comments at the Week in Pictures, looks like good value.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1893909363980879&set=p.1893909363980879&type=3

  98. Snoopy

    Gone the same way as Landline and Gardening Australia. Agrarian socialist pap.

    Gone? Macca was infecting rural Australia with socialist pap 30 years ago. There’s a PhD awaiting someone willing to research Macca’s insidious effect on Australian politics.

  99. Snoopy

    If memory serves, Macca didn’t have the best start in life. I believe his dad worked for the ABC.

  100. mh

    Last weekend Ray Hadley wrote to the NSW Police Commissioner wanting an explanation why Lauren Southern was threatened with arrest for walking through Lakemba.

    Less than a week later, Hadley’s son is facing cocaine charges. Just a coincidence?

  101. John Constantine

    The multi peril insurance is too cheap in boom or bust areas, where boom or bust high input continual cropping is pursued. Almost a moral hazard for operations paying big money for land to high input continually crop with the multiperil insurance as a backstop.

    Less intense operations in the same district cover the production risk by chasing optimum, rather than maximum, turnover.

    Figures yet to prove anything, but the State may well create an economic stimulus by encouraging maximum go for broke high input farming by sponsoring multi-peril insurance.

    Or prevent destocking at optimum times and remove fodder storage incentives.

    Last I looked at multiperil insurance, it would have pushed me into the selling of the sheep, buying more machinery and going all in cropping,with the risk that the premiums would change if the product became too well used.

  102. Death Giraffe

    Hey Stimpson.
    There’s a new thread.

  103. Stimpson J. Cat

    Farmer Gez
    #2781073, posted on August 4, 2018 at 10:32 pm
    Where the hell is Stimpson?
    Exhibit A.

    Shy Ted
    #2780990, posted on August 4, 2018 at 8:02 pm
    And to the thief who broke into my house and stole my antidepressants, I hope you’re happy!

    This is blatant outrageous slander.
    1.)They don’t work on me.
    2.)I don’t break in to houses.
    3.)I cured myself of kleptomania years ago.

  104. Stimpson J. Cat

    You are awful, Stimpy.

    Some people just don’t find Lauren attractive.
    That’s fine.

  105. Snoopy

    You’ve solved the mystery of where Michael Jackson’s black went. Well done!

  106. Less than a week later, Hadley’s son is facing cocaine charges. Just a coincidence?

    I’m not a big believer in coincidence.

  107. Leigh Lowe

    Disappointing news from Venezuala.
    Disappointing that it was unsuccessful I mean.

  108. H B Bear

    Disappointing news from Venezuala.

    They’ve run out of flamingos? This is going to have a knock-on effect on my cookbook sales.

  109. OldOzzie

    For Cat Psephologists

    Labor polling may not be enough to make Shorten prime minister – John Black Columnist

    Demographic profiling of recent key by-elections in New England, Bennelong, Longman and Braddon shows big gains for Labor among higher-income groups in safe seats, but corresponding gains for the Coalition among lower-­income, older voters clustered in marginal seats where small swings make a lot more political impact.

    Labor’s campaign among Catholic parents paid dividends for Susan Lamb in Longman but, again, Catholic voters tend to be bottled up in safe Labor seats, while tax cuts for small ­business, the National Disability Insurance Scheme rollout and Labor’s tampering with retirement ­incomes have been big vote winners for the government in marginal seats, ­especially in the bush.

    In other words, Labor is likely to need more than 51 per cent of the national two-party-preferred vote that it is now recording in opinion polls to win next year.

    A national majority of votes in opinion polls or elections is a great thing to have but it doesn’t neces­sarily mean the leading party wins a majority of seats, as former Coalition prime minister John Howard learned in 1998.

    On Super Saturday we had significant contests in three seats: Mayo, Braddon and Longman.

    Let’s get Mayo out of the way first. It’s a middle-class, professional, commuter seat with quite a few retirees and small business types, which typically should return a comfortable majority for a small-L Liberal candidate.

    But typical Mayo voters don’t wear pearls to work, they don’t get dropped off in Dad’s Maserati, their mum and dad probably voted Labor as often as not, and they don’t mind other aspirational ­incomers to the lovely Adelaide Hills who are just like themselves.

    As the polls predicted, Mayo was won by sitting Centre Alli­ance MP Rebekha Sharkie, who ­expected to work hard for the seat rather than inherit it. In the end, this outcome was a surprise only to Georgina Downer, the Coalition candidate and daughter of Alexander, the former MP.

    Since becoming Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull has had to put up with some pretty ordinary candidates and campaigns in key marginal seats. Which brings us to Longman and Braddon. In both of these seats, former Liberal MPs had a personal vote of a couple of per cent at the expense of Labor in 2016. We’d expect this 2 per cent personal vote to be ­returned to the ALP at the by-­elections, then doubled to 4 per cent by a personal vote for the new ALP members, Justine Keay in Braddon and Lamb in Longman.

    This reshuffle of personal votes for new MPs would add to 4 per cent and is quite separate from any protest vote against the government. The bottom line is I would not be surprised by any by-election swing towards the new ALP MPs in these seats of 4 per cent or more, as this just shows a rearrangement of the furniture, rather than impending disaster.

    Some over-egged poll predictions, however, enhanced expectations of a historic Liberal win in one or both of these seats. These proved unrealistic in Longman, but not so much in the Tasmanian seat of Braddon. The result in Braddon after preferences was pretty close to the poll predictions and showed virtually no swing. This was a strong result for the government.

    How Longman voted

    The result in Longman after preferences showed a swing of 3.6 per cent to the ALP, which was typical of the sort of result seen in a by-election. It could have been a lot worse for the government, as Liberal National Party candidate Trevor Ruthenberg suffered several mishaps on the campaign trail, to put it politely, and the ALP was aided by the presence of a One Nation candidate who siphoned off more primary votes from the LNP than he returned in preferences.

    The range of 2PP swings to the ALP across booths in Longman went from minus 4.7 per cent to plus 9.1 per cent, with an average of 3.6 per cent. The range in Braddon to the ALP across booths went from minus 5.9 per cent to plus 17.8 per cent, with an average swing to the ALP of plus 0.1 per cent.

    This is a range across both seats of about 24 per cent, so there’s plenty of scope to look for demographic differences in the combined booths and also at any variation in these patterns ­between the two seats. Remember, it’s this range of swings, ­rather than the average swing, that’s more important in projecting by-elections and determining who wins elections.

    When we look at common trends to these two marginal seats on Super Saturday, we see that both showed strong swings to the ALP among booths dominated by the higher socio-economic status group of well-paid and better-educated pro­fess­ionals living in bigger, five-bedroom homes. This was consist­ent with previous by-elections and with our working hypothesis, following Bennelong and New England.

    Conversely, both seats also showed strong swings to the ­Coalition in areas containing lots of lower socio-economic status families, with lower education levels, living in less ­expensive homes. These included many families on welfare benefits such as carers, disability benefits, single parents or Newstart. I’d be guessing here, but it looks as if the NDIS may be paying dividends for the Coalition rather than to Labor. In politics, memories are short and voters don’t do irony.

    There were also many semi-skilled, blue-collar workers in these groups swinging to the ­Coalition, such as miners or ­mach­ine operators or hospitality workers, as well as women in white-collar administrative support jobs.

    Nationally then, the outcome for the Coalition parties, at this stage of the election cycle, is a strengthening of their support among lower SES seats in the ­remote and rural seats and in urban migrant seats.

    To evaluate the impact of this demographic on next year’s election, we ranked all 150 seats by ­increasing SES scores to see which seats were likely to swing more to the Coalition, then we checked how many of them were marginal.

    The top 20 on this list with the lower SES scores tend to be safe seats for the Nationals or for the ALP, with the only marginal seats being Labor’s Braddon and Lyons in Tasmania or the Nat­ionals’ Page in NSW.

    Swings to the Coalition among low SES voters in these 20 seats would thus see Page reinforced next year and put the Liberals back in contention to win the two Tasmanian seats. Further down the list, it also would shore up narrow ­Coalition 2016 majorities in Gilmore in NSW and Flynn in Queensland, and give it a second shot at Longman, presuming the LNP could find a strong local candidate in a hurry.

    The challenge for the Coalition is that One Nation also performs well across these low SES seats and the Nationals have yet to realise that flirting with One Nation will always result in them losing more primary votes to Labor than they win back in preferences.

    For the ALP, winning lots of votes in the high SES rich areas is a bit of a bust. If we rank the top 20 federal seats by decreasing SES, we find 13 held by the Libs, six by Labor and one by the Greens. All but two are relatively safe.

    The ALP would have a better show of winning back the seat of Brisbane from the LNP’s Trevor Evans, and my own marginal seat of Griffith would be made safer for the local MP, Terri Butler. Mind you, the LNP doesn’t seem to have a candidate here yet.

    In both of these Goat’s Cheese Circle Brisbane marginals, flirting with One Nation anywhere in Queensland basically just torches the Coalition’s 2PP vote.

    The summary here is the ­Coalition benefits more from a ­reshuffling of its support down the SES spectrum, as there’s more marginal seats to be gained or protected at the lower SES end than at the top. Think of it as trickle-down politics.

    The story doesn’t end here with the Braddon and Longman swings. While they had some demographic swings in common, they were separate campaigns run across two states and there were bound to be some key differences.

    Longman was targeted by a very well-funded Labor media campaign focused on the final week, which was particularly critical of commonwealth policy on Catholic school funding. The Liberals focused on Labor’s threats to retirement incomes and tax cuts for small and medium businesses.

    Labor’s campaign in Braddon seemed less frenetic and I saw no reports of a Longman-style campaign against Catholic school funding. However, the Braddon Labor candidate benefited from the preference votes of the local fishing fraternity channelled from local renegade fisherman Craig Garland, while the local Liberal state government appeared to be still relatively popular.

    The analysis of results by booth showed the ALP’s big-spending campaign in Longman shored up its support among traditional Labor voters and among Liberal voters who swung to the ALP for the first time in 2016. We model all historic 2PP votes for the ALP and Coalition, so we have some idea of long-term trends and of the impact on votes of each of the leaders.

    ALP voters in Braddon went back to the Liberals, in Longman they did not.

    To cancel out this swing back to the Liberals in Braddon, the ALP gained big swings in booths dominated by self-employed farmers or fishermen, thanks, we presume, to preferences from Garland.

    The campaign in Longman from Labor and local Catholic schools arguing for increased funding from the commonwealth drove a big swing to Labor in booths containing both Catholic parents of young students at local Catholic primary schools.

    This was not just an ecological correlation as Catholicity also ­appeared in our regression modelling as a significant driver of the swing to Labor across Longman booths, even with other drivers taken into account.

    Cancelling out some of this swing to Labor in Longman from the big group of local Catholics was a swing to LNP candidate ­Ruthenberg from the self-employed living off income from an unincorporated business or older locals in their early 60s who had paid off their home loan and were approaching retirement while drawing on income from company investments.

    So the Catholic vote walloped the LNP in Longman and it could have been a lot worse without ­increased support from small family businesses and from Australians about to ­retire.

    The tide in Braddon appears to be going out on the federal Labor vote among its long-term Tasmanian supporters and the Labor candidate was rescued by the strategic preferences from Garland.

    How do these differences play out on the national stage? Well, our scenario would see a swing to Labor from Catholic parents of kids at Catholic schools versus a swing to the Coalition from older people approaching retirement. Labor would have to run particularly well-funded campaigns, as it did in Longman, which could stretch its resources somewhat.

    When we rank all the present federal seats by Catholicity, we find the top 20 dominated by Labor seats, including those of Bill Shorten and his Treasury spokesman, Chris Bowen.

    Ten of the 11 seats here are safe for Labor, with the only exception being Lindsay on 51 per cent 2PP, represented by Emma Husar. Husar is now subject to speculation she may be the cause of the next by-election. Of the remaining nine strong Catholic seats, only Reid, held by Craig Laundy by 54.7 per cent, could be considered marginal for the Coalition.

    Moving further down the list, the Queensland LNP seats of Dawson and Capricornia are marginal and one in four local voters is Catholic, so these could come into play if the Queensland LNP doesn’t lift its game before next May. #This is a reasonably big if.

    The seats ranked according to 60-64 years look a lot more significant. Fifteen of them are held by the Coalition and five by Labor. There’s also a lot of overlap with lower SES seats.

    Of the 15 Coalition seats, four are marginal — Gilmore in NSW, Mayo in South Australia and Indi and Corangamite in Victoria — and these would be shored up for the Coalition by a rise in support from voters transitioning to retirement and concerned at Labor’s plans for their retirement savings.

    On the Labor side, the marginals include Lyons and Braddon in Tasmania and Richmond and Eden-Monaro in NSW. Further down the list we see Bendigo in Victoria. These are potentially target seats for the Coalition in 2019.

    In summary, Catholic parents cranky at the government tend to be found in safe seats, rather than marginals, whereas the older voters transitioning to retirement and worried about Labor’s retirement policies tend to be found in marginal seats, some of which could be won by the Coalition next election.

    What this means in a strategic sense is that on our present trends from the by-elections held in Bennelong, New England, Mayo, Brad­don and Longman, and in the opinion polls, Labor is picking up more wasted votes in safer seats than it is losing in key marginal seats, and this means it is going to need more than 50 per cent of the national 2PP vote to win more than 50 per cent of the seats in the House. The 51 per cent we’re seeing consistently for Labor in the polls now may not be enough for Shorten to become PM.

    This fate befell Labor’s Kim Beazley in 1998 when he won 51.4 per cent of the vote and still failed to win a majority of seats, and it can happen again.

    The ALP tactical campaigning in the by-elections has been a bit of a masterclass really, and credit should go to Shorten for getting away with it for so long. But strategically he has pulled the wrong rein by taking on the boomers and their retirement savings.

    As for the Coalition, you may have noted something missing from this analysis, and that is the group of middle to upper-income earners swinging to the Coalition as a result of Scott Morrison’s personal income tax cuts.

    That’s because they’re not swinging to the Liberals but to Labor. If they believed the Treasurer’s promises or could feel the jingle in their pockets, there would be daylight now between the votes for the Coalition and the ALP.

    You just have to shake your head at this performance. Fair dinkum, Casper the friendly ghost would have more visibility selling this tax policy than the Treasurer.

    And while we’re on the subject of losers, spare a tear for poor old Anthony Albanese. In the days before the by-elections, he was modestly declining to run for the leadership if Labor underperformed — as expected — and protesting his loyalty to Shorten, which all caucus members knew means he was running hard.

    The only person more ­delighted than Shorten by the Super Saturday results for Labor was Bill’s deputy, Tanya Plibersek, who realised that if Bill went, well, so did she, as the idea of two lefties from two adjoining, super-rich, Sydney green-Labor seats getting elected prime minister and deputy prime minister was never going to fly.

    Well, Bill and Tanya are still there and the odds of a last-­minute coup have receded, for the time being.

    This should bring some relief to Turnbull, although it does mean he has to deal with some pesky challenges of his own.

    Pacifying Catholic parents would be top of the list and second from the top would be ­trickling down the company tax cuts for big business to small to ­medium businesses or to ­families.

    And what would he stand for if he abandoned tax cuts for the big end of town?

    Well, getting re-elected for a start. Which is, after all, the primary requirement for a PM.

    John Black is a former Labor senator for Queensland and is chief executive of Australian Development Strategies. His election profiles and maps can be found at http://www.elaborate.net.au.

  110. egg_

    Insiders has been quite painful to watch … as usual. Wish we had an Insiders’ thread, like the Q&A one.

    No neck fat frump frightbat Alice Workman from Buzzardfeed dutifully in attendance to further dump the dirt file on Husar for the NSW ALP factional brawl – double plus bonus with some combined Abbott666 and Coal666 thrown in.
    The ruinables derangement syndrome in full force du jour, denying that they are pushing up power prices even though they cite this as an Election issue that Abbott has tapped into.

  111. Elle

    Do you think it’s a set-up, mh? Ray said his son, Daniel, has accepted responsibility for his actions. I read Daniel was under surveillance, which means there would have been Intel on him.

    Ray’s son would be a target because Ray is outspoken on issues many shy away from. I wonder if Daniel’s mental health issues are compounded because his father is so high profile and as a copper Dan feels he has let his dad down.

    Tis sad, as are the people’s situations Ray would belittle on his show, by playing music that was intended to put them down.

    I did shed a wee tear when Ray lost it at the end of his statement yesterday, but I have mixed emotions about the dude and his family’s predicament.

  112. egg_

    Those weirdo Scando’s can write a great murder mystery.

    +1

    Nord noir seems to be all about stern, constipated serial killers.

  113. Oh come on

    According to this article, Sarah Jeong considers herself a “woman of color”.

    Assumedly, this has nothing to do with her freakish hair colour, as that doesn’t count. Just wondering what colour she thinks she is.

    Now, don’t be obtuse, Sarah. ‘Not white’ isn’t a colour. What colour are you?

  114. John Constantine

    Either they couldn’t hit El presidente, it it is an erdogan style set up to set off a purge.

    Or both.

    Comrades.

  115. zyconoclast

    Two male suicide bombers dressed in women’s clothes …

    That could be a problem when they get their 72 virgins … or maybe not. Perhaps they’ll just take goats or camels instead.

    Little boys are also available.

  116. OldOzzie

    Venezuela’s Maduro Targeted In Assassination Attempt Using Explosive Drones

    Impressive Photos of the Portable Bullet Shields his Security are carrying – quite a lot

  117. Elle

    No neck fat frump frightbat Alice Workman

    She is frightbat personified! Bless Tim Blair for coining that phrase. 😚

  118. Elle

    That is suppose to be a kissy face.

  119. Shy Ted

    They really need to introduce the couch potatoes on Insiders the way wrestlers are introduced in America. (Capitals so you can imagine a big, booming voice). “AND IN THE LEFT CORNER, WEIGHING FIVE HUNDRED POUNDS, FROM BUZZFEED, ALIIIIIIIIIICE WOOOOOOOORKMAN. JOINING HER IN THE LEFT CORNER, SEVEN STONE WEAKLING AND PROFESSOR OF WRONG, PETER VAN OOOOOOOOONSELEN”.

  120. Baldrick

    Disappointing news from Venezuala.

    Expect the socialist payback to be fierce and swift. A few thousand Venezuelans will pay the price.

  121. Jessie

    Somewhat belatedly to matters of a bi-identifying Australians having a parallel Constitution and treaty, Uluru Statements, workplace ‘culturally appropriate’ Awards and employment and such matters: serious concern in Quadrant article Politically Correct Medicine
    source: https://quadrant.org.au/opinion/qed/2018/07/politically-correct-medicine/

    Relatively minor alterations in standard forensic/coronial reporting practices may significantly assist certain groups whose cultural requirements may be under-appreciated and incompletely understood by investigating authorities.
    The interaction of death, sorcery and coronial/forensic practices within traditional indigenous communities. (2005) Byard R and Chivell W (State appointed Coroners, exclusive jurisdiction) J Clin Forensic Med. Amongst many other overseas published ……………. during career………
    NOW Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine (2007).
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16198965

    Sorcery, life under fear and terror, witch drowning and male genital mutilation practices overseen by the apparatchiks of mafia-like and the gulag camps somehow seem inevitable. How fortunate the educated self-identifying are these days.

  122. OldOzzie

    WSJ – ‘I’m Totally Freaked Out’: Brazilians Weigh a Farewell to Paradise

    Shaken by violence, thousands of TV stars, bankers, lawyers and wealthy Brazilians are fleeing the country

    RIO DE JANEIRO—Wealthy Brazilians are fleeing the country, terrified by spiraling gun violence and pessimistic about the nation’s political and economic future.

    Thiago Lacerda, a top soap opera star, is one of scores of celebrities, bankers and other wealthy Brazilians considering emigration as a last resort.

    “I’m totally freaked out by what’s been happening, especially here in Rio,” Mr. Lacerda said.

    For months, the 40-year-old actor has been agonizing over whether to move his family to Europe for the safety of his three young children. “In several years, they’re going to want to go out, to start dating, without worrying about getting shot.”

    Unlike Central Americans fleeing to the U.S. because of gang violence or in search of work, these Brazilians are often members of the country’s elite—“precisely the people who are in a better position to help change Brazil,” said Naercio Menezes Filho, director of the center for public policy at Insper, a São Paulo business school.

    About 52% of the richest Brazilians—those with a monthly household income of more than $2,500—want to emigrate, while 56% of college-educated Brazilians want to leave, according to a study published in June by Brazilian polling agency Datafolha. Overall, 43% of Brazilians would emigrate if they could.

    “The hope that Brazilians once had in their country has gone out the window, and many people are now reaching the conclusion that things are unlikely to change in the next few years,” said Mr. Menezes Filho.

    Brazil’s government has struggled to keep track of how many of its citizens live abroad, but a series of recent studies paint a dismal picture. With the October presidential elections approaching, 41% more Brazilians have registered to vote from abroad than in 2014, according to government figures.

    Meanwhile, the number of Brazilians filing emigration notifications with the federal tax office reached 21,700 last year, nearly three times the number in 2011, when authorities began recording the data. Many are moving to exclusive enclaves on the Portuguese Riviera and to U.S. cities such as Orlando and Miami.

    Violence is a top concern, especially in Rio, where the near-bankrupt state government is struggling to provide the police with basic equipment. Even in luxury gated communities, surrounded by bodyguards, or in bulletproof sports cars, the rich say they no longer feel safe.

    Stray bullets from shootouts between drug gangs and security forces have caused scores of casualties, including a baby who was hit while in his mother’s arms in March inside one of the city’s well-known private schools. In the affluent Urca neighborhood, where locals go to watch the sunset, six dead bodies recently washed up on the rocks.

    Marcelo Caio Corrêa de Melo, a 37-year-old e-commerce manager in the city, said security is the main reason he is emigrating to Portugal at the end of this month with his wife and two children.

    “At the beginning of this year, I was in the office and suddenly we heard a huge explosion outside, and everyone jumped up,” he said. “It was a grenade let off by criminals running from the police.” A couple of months later, he said his father was held up by gunmen.

    Brazil’s dismal economic and political prospects also weigh heavily on the young. The economy is set to grow 1.5% this year, while unemployment is over 12%. About 62% of 16- to 24-year-olds would emigrate if they could, according to Datafolha.

    The young have to pay Brazil’s high taxes but benefit little from government spending, a huge chunk of which goes to pensions, said Tony Volpon, chief economist at UBS in Brazil. For those with a good education, leaving “looks like a good decision,” he said.

    The U.S. is still home to the largest share of Brazilian expats—more than a third of the three million Brazilians estimated to be living abroad, according to Brazil’s foreign ministry.

    “Things just work there. Infrastructure is better, and everything is not so expensive,” said Vinícius Barbosa da Silva, 20, a student from the south of Brazil who said he plans to move to the U.S. in a few years.

    But Portugal, the colonial motherland, is fast becoming Brazilians’ so-called Plan B. There are now 85,000 Brazilians living in Portugal, the largest community of foreign nationals, including many retirees lured by tax incentives, Portugal’s immigration and border service said.

    Brazilians of Japanese descent often return to the land of their forefathers. The U.K. is another popular choice, as is Switzerland—the adopted home of Brazil’s richest man, Jorge Paulo Lemann, who relocated there in 1999 after gunmen tried to kidnap his children on the way to school in São Paulo.

    As Brazilians have rushed to leave, the number of immigrants in the Brazilian workforce fell for the first time in a decade in 2016. Joseph Williams, a U.S. businessman who moved to Brazil eight years ago, said Brazilians can’t understand why he is still here.

    “I tell everyone who comes to Brazil that if someone comes at you with a gun, you give them what you have,” he said. Only this week in São Paulo, where he runs a real-estate advisory and investment firm, two men robbed the drivers in the car next to his at the traffic lights. “I threw my phone and my bag on the floor and slid down on the seat,” he said.

    But for many Brazilians, leaving is the last resort. “I want to give my kids a childhood, more freedom, more equality,” said Mr. Lacerda, the actor, adding that he hopes he can still find a way to do this without emigrating. “The idea of cutting myself off from my country is unthinkable.”

    Still, for Mr. Melo, the e-commerce manager, life in Portugal has more appeal. He is looking forward to simple things, like being able to answer his cellphone in the street—something he said he no longer does in Rio for fear of it being stolen. (Sounds like he lives in Melbourne)

  123. woolfe

    Spacechook on \\For those with Netflix try Occupied. Norwegian language thriller about Russia occupying Norway due to their deranged green policies. Written by Jo Nesbo. And of course there’s Babylon Berlin which must rank among the best series evahhhhh! \\Spacechook off

  124. egg_

    the couch potatoes on Insiders

    Workperson resembles a bean bag with a head.

  125. Whalehunt fun

    I know there are masses living overseas, especially thise in the beauty industry. Where ever I go I see them beauty salons advertusing them. Seems every salon has one on staff.

  126. Shy Ted

    AEMO dashboard showing SA producing 1057 renewables out of a 1074 demand. Thanks to the amazing foresight of previous Labor governments supported by equally prescient state Greens. Take that sceptics.

  127. Shy Ted

    Government Worker Napped Three Hours Per Day for Four Years.
    When I saw this headline I thought “Why is Zerohedge writing about Malcolm on the campaign trail?”

  128. .

    That younger, blacker Lauren Southern should have considered what Matthew Shephard could have done to his attackers if he was carrying something like a Glock 42 with high-velocity JHPs.

    The Laramie Project would be a shooting range and tourist attraction, not a theatrical performance.

  129. Farmer Gez

    The biggest problem with multi peril crop insurance is the lack of an insurance pool of sufficient size that could pay out claims and still maintain a profit margin for the underwriters.
    Canada achieved this by provincial government support.
    How a farmer deals with risk is a personal decision and I doubt multi peril insurance would change your methods but it does allow you to sleep easier (not to be underestimated).
    We use the insurance as income protection for our families and workers.

  130. egg_

    So long as Workperson doesn’t do a Basic Instinct on air, although viewers may think it’s a doco on the Grand Canyon?

  131. Geriatric Mayfly

    Can any savvy Cats assist. I have an issue with the Hilton Bayfront San Diego. The only email access is via a very restrictive pro-forma set up, which does not allow a full explanation of the problem at hand. I have sent four of these Mickey Mouse dispatches, none has been answered. How does one find a REAL email address that allows for an expanded explanation of my problem?

  132. zyconoclast

    Oregon High Schools to Mix Genders in Showers and Bathrooms in New Transgender Ruling

    A U.S. District Court Judge in Oregon recently ruled that boys must be allowed to use the girls locker room, showers and bathrooms, and vice versa in public schools throughout the state.

    According to Judge Marco Hernandez, for children to “see or be seen by someone of the opposite biological sex while either are undressing or performing bodily functions in a restroom, shower, or locker room does not give rise to a constitutional violation.”

    Perhaps not, but it does violate normal standards of decency. The Judge offered an alternative to parents who disagreed with the policy, telling them to send their kids to private school, according to WND. That way, not only do they get to have their conservative beliefs trampled on, but they also get to pay taxes to support the public school trampling on their conservative beliefs, and private school tuition. What a deal!

    “It is within Parent Plaintiffs’ right to remove their children from Dallas [Oregon] High School if they disapprove of transgender student access to facilities,” the judge said. “Once the parents have chosen to send their children to school … their liberty interest in their children’s education is severely diminished.”

    But President Donald J. Trump revoked the Obama-era guidelines on transgender bathrooms early in his presidency.

    “[Hernandez], however, conflicts with President Trump’s rescinding of an Obama administration guidance letter directing schools that want to continue to receive federal funding to let transgender students use facilities that correspond with their ‘gender identity,’” said WND.

    The Obama-appointed Judge rejected the complaint of a group called Parents For Privacy.

  133. H B Bear

    No neck fat frump frightbat ,,,

    Isn’t that all of them that flop down on Ol’ Leathery’s overworked couches? And yeah that includes you Fat Fingers Farr.

  134. Whalehunt fun

    ADF illegally leaks report to Fairfax to get the SAS:

    Now who would I least like to piss off. Would laugh to exgaustion if there was some direct justice.

  135. Helen

    Geriatric,

    There is a 1300 number you can call in Australia that might be useful for you.

    The link is here

    The number is 1300 44 58 66 – it is a toll free number.

    Good Luck

  136. DrBeauGan

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781274, posted on August 5, 2018 at 11:50 am
    OK this is epic.

    Trump is a smart man.

  137. OldOzzie

    Piers Akerman: ‘Why Malcolm Turnbull is not the prime minister for these times’

    MALCOLM Turnbull has the political nous of a gnat and is squandering the nation’s conservative legacy as surely as did his Labor predecessors Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd.

    Time and again he has shown he is incapable of learning anything from his brushes with the public given the views they have delivered in the polling booths.

    Last weekend’s by-election results should have led to a comprehensive calibration of policies and advisers or even in Turnbull’s resignation but there is no evidence of the ­former and zero chance of the latter, given the size of the ego that drives him.

    It would now be apparent to anyone that Turnbull is not the prime minister for these times — but if he insists he is and ­remains adamant that he is the saviour he must show the door to those he has been listening to and whose advice he has been following.

    Of course, if he has only been taking his own advice he has no choice but to hand over the reins to someone more ­attuned to reality.

    Turnbull has long ignored the principal concerns of the majority of Australians. Seen through the prism of his own quite sheltered upbringing, the pressures on average ­people seem piddling and he has adopted the fantasies of the elites with his embrace of identity politics, meaningless objectives such as diversity and unaffordable and eco­nomically disastrous goals such as unaffordable renewable energy.

    The slump in the vote for the major parties at last weekend’s by-election made Saturday anything but super.

    The clear message from the punters was that both Turnbull’s conservative brand and Bill Shorten’s thuggish union lickspittle flavour are unappetising. For a solid 15 per cent of the community voting in Queensland, Pauline Hanson’s party was the solution. Sneer at Hanson if you will but the writing is plainly on the wall.

    A successful political leader must have the well-honed ­instincts of a competitive tabloid editor. It was not for nothing that post-Budget front pages used to scream their messages to their hundreds of thousands of readers in type so large it was made from wooden blocks, not lead, and those short sharp messages were ­reduced to “Beer, smokes up!” Readers knew instantly how they would be affected.

    Any editor who suffered a circulation decline equivalent to the Liberals’ running Newspoll slump under Turnbull would be looking for another job.

    Being popular is not a bad thing, though populists are denigrated by the insular coterie of advisers both leaders have encouraged. Funnily, strong leaders can retain their popularity when they do the right thing by the electorate. Weak leaders remain weak no matter how much they pander to the people.

    Cost of living is one of the greatest worries for average Australians today and the price of electricity is one of the key drivers — neither the Turnbull coalition or Shorten’s Labor are within a bull’s roar of addressing this issue.

    The government’s handling of energy has been utterly disastrous. Not only has it lied but it has stupidly produced model after model to demonstrate the direction it wishes prices to go and each model had produced a different outcome — the end result being that the government has only reinforced the popular view that such modelling is unbelievable, a worthless waste of time and money (taxpayers’ money).

    I’ve spent the past week reviewing petroleum production in Brunei and neighbouring Borneo. In these countries, the pump price for petrol is about 53c a litre and 84c a litre. Power is affordable and makes electricity cheap enough to keep the airconditioning running and industry (and living) feasible and comfortable.

    Pensioners in Australia can’t afford to keep their homes heated and some are suffering fatally because their charges are inflated by the cost of subsidies to unreliable ­renewables, particularly solar and wind power.

    The new National Energy Guarantee modelling is just so much humbug. Why would anyone swallow the nonsense that power bills will be reduced by $500-per-year in the future when, last month, the same modellers predicted there would be a $400 reduction?

    What will Canberra try to sell tomorrow? A $1000 ­reduction?

    Labor is so much worse that it’s not worth calculating how much faster they could destroy the economy.

    Compare what we are permitting out politicians to do to our economy with the triumph that Donald Trump’s presidency and his energy dominance policy is achieving in the US. Well, actually, there is no comparison.

    Cost of living is one of the greatest worries for average Australians today and the price of electricity is one of the key drivers — neither the Turnbull coalition or Shorten’s Labor are within a bull’s roar of addressing this issue.

    Mock The Donald as they do in Turnbull’s office and fund campaigns against him as they did in Labor’s headquarters, but the man they ridiculed has slashed taxes and regulations, encouraged productive technological breakthroughs and ensured that the US is well on target to become the world’s biggest producer of crude oil in the next five years, ahead of Russia and Saudi Arabia. He has made power prices in the US internationally competitive.

    In Australia, under either party, we have internationally uncompetitive company taxes, we have internationally uncompetitive energy prices and we have internationally uncompetitive labour costs.

    Not to mention the burden of hosting a burgeoning mig­rant population that doesn’t wish to assimilate and has shown an unhealthy fondness for generous welfare benefits.

    While Turnbull and his blinkered advisers and Shorten and his ideological apparatchiks talk in terms of smart grids, renewables and big batteries, we are exporting high grade coal at premium prices to countries like Japan which are generating competitively priced electricity in high ­efficiency low emission power plants to drive industries our energy policies have made unaffordable.

    And it can only get worse under the NEG.

    We are shunning coal in favour of expensive and unrealisable unreliable renewable targets.

    The Shorten prime ministership looks all but secured thanks to the vacuum Turnbull has created.

  138. .

    LOL. “Top KEK”, I think they say…

    https://medium.com/@davesmithhvac/paul-krugmans-infamous-internet-quote-9c367d39040f

    The growth of the Internet will slow drastically, as the flaw in ‘Metcalfe’s law’–which states that the number of potential connections in a network is proportional to the square of the number of participants–becomes apparent: most people have nothing to say to each other! By 2005 or so, it will become clear that the Internet’s impact on the economy has been no greater than the fax machine’s.” Paul Krugman quote from 1998

    Note the absolute left wing (“centrist”) muppet defending this idiocy.

  139. Whalehunt fun

    I’d hold my dog by the collar, point at the noisiest and say “Kill!” in a loud voice. Then laugh myself silly as they ran.

    Please please please let attack trained pigs be something that exists and is on sale on ebay.

  140. Gary

    Never been to university so I’m curios on what predatory tactics progressives use to groom minority tokens as cannon fodder. The background of he liberty statue girl suggest she would embraced American opportunity’s under normal circumstances.

  141. Geriatric Mayfly

    Thanks Helen. All this over a consignment delivered to the hotel, from Amazon (Does not ship to Sydney) but my “carrier” friend at the hotel was not informed of its arrival. Bespoke trout fishing t-shirts and a hoodie, so that I can set the trend when the season opens next month. Two hundred bucks worth I might add.

  142. DrBeauGan

    Gary
    #2781288, posted on August 5, 2018 at 12:14 pm
    Never been to university

    You’ve missed a huge opportunity to get yourself exposed to a vast range of bullshit.

  143. Zatara

    GM, try:

    [email protected]

    Or call +1-619-564-3333 and ask to be transferred to the San Diego Bayfront hotel.

  144. woolfe

    Or tweet them on @hiltonbayfront

  145. Stimpson J. Cat

    The background of he liberty statue girl suggest she would embraced American opportunity’s under normal circumstances.

    Certainly embracing American dentistry first would have helped, but that’s just me.

  146. Gary

    DrBeauGan
    #2781291, posted on August 5, 2018 at 12:20 pm
    Gary
    #2781288, posted on August 5, 2018 at 12:14 pm
    Never been to university
    You’ve missed a huge opportunity to get yourself exposed to a vast range of bullshit.

    Its a mixed blessing.
    I read plenty of story’s about the toxic Uni couture but no one in authority seems to have the guts to challenge it.

  147. Whalehunt fun

    The answer is simple.
    1 Add Islam to the list of declared terrorist organisations
    2 Disallow dual citizenship, cancelling immediately the citizenship of all persons holding foreign citizenship or the right to such
    3 Limit welfare to citizens only
    4 Limit the ownsership of real estate to citizens only.
    5 Retrospectively make attempting to enter the country without a valid visa a capital offence.
    6 Retrospectively make employment by or otherwise belonging to the UN a capital offence justifying shoot on sight by any citizen.
    7 Withdraw from the UN and publicly repudiate all UN agreements.
    8 Make promoting UN charters or treaties a treason and a capital offence and specifically state that it applies to all levels of the judiciary.
    9 Burn the ABC and SBS to the ground and deport all their staff.
    10 Cease federal funding of the arts.
    11 Build one nuclear power plant and one coal fired plant in each capital city, right in the middle of gren voting ele torates.
    12 Set the bar for aboriginality at 75% by DNA testing.
    13 Legislate free speech
    14 Pay pensions and welfare only to citizens residing in Australia.
    15 Apply a wealth tax to owners of electric vehicles and consumers of soy latte or smashed avacado.
    16 Limit the dole to 12 months.
    17 Criminalise the act of being bamed plibersek or Hanson-Young (my favorite)
    18 Criminalise the recognition of traditional forms of ownership as treason.
    19 Apply corporations law to unions
    20 Guarantee the right of citizens to travel unhindered by protests with protesterssubjected to public floggings at the site of any violation and the right to do the flogging sold by public auction or as part of a lottery prize.

  148. C.L.

    I guess politicians will now have to speak in mesh-covered stadiums.
    Welcome to the age of drone assassinations.

  149. Whalehunt fun

    and 21 Include whalehunting as a sport in all scholl curricula.

  150. John Constantine

    DRO droneshield.

    Not a tip, just showing what is out there.

    https://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/20180529/pdf/43vckz3pm2pmgg.pdf

  151. Snoopy

    Bernard Gaynor filed a summons in the New South Wales Supreme Court last month seeking rulings against the President of the New South Wales Anti-Discrimination Board (ADB), President of the New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal (NCAT) and the New South Wales Local Court for their ongoing unlawful persecution of him over his views on marriage, family and morality.

    The first hearing is tomorrow. You can assist his fight against tyranny by donating here.

  152. Geriatric Mayfly

    Thanks Cats with the Hilton Bayfront. I have been in sunny Jamaica with Diane and via seance session with her to the Bayfront. The latest is that the package may be lingering in a UPS facility which is somehow attached to the hotel, but so far removed as to now require a separate round of enquiries.

  153. John Constantine

    If an assassination attempt is genuine, it will come through a mass swarm of drones, not just one or two.

    few drones doing aircraft collisions, few doing isolated bomb runs, but nothing like the impact of a drone swarm targeting Australias few import liquid fuel storage facilities, disproportionately, using a drone swarm to ignite these would stop Australia, possibly beyond repair in a day or so.

  154. DrBeauGan

    Gary
    #2781297, posted on August 5, 2018 at 12:39 pm
    DrBeauGan
    #2781291, posted on August 5, 2018 at 12:20 pm
    Gary
    #2781288, posted on August 5, 2018 at 12:14 pm
    Never been to university
    You’ve missed a huge opportunity to get yourself exposed to a vast range of bullshit.

    Its a mixed blessing.
    I read plenty of story’s about the toxic Uni couture but no one in authority seems to have the guts to challenge it.

    Apart from STEM subjects, there are only two benefits from university. The first is the social life and the possibility of useful contacts, and the second is that you find out what it’s like to go to university. The price is far too high. I don’t mean the money, I mean the time wasted. You learn much more about the world by being in it.

    University used to give you the chance to withdraw from the world in order to think about it. Now it’s a place to memorise the conventional bullshit.

    Privatise the lot. Those which survived might be worth attending for a while.

  155. John Constantine

    Page 24 of the droneshield presentation has a photo of chrissy pyne with a dronegun tactical as big as his election winning phantasies.

    Begging to be memed.

    https://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/20180529/pdf/43vckz3pm2pmgg.pdf

  156. John Constantine

    There are proven to be university courses that have adverse health outcomes for women.

    Specifically, nearly forty percent of women that consume some uni courses are rendered sterile and permanently childless as a direct consequence of the consumption of that product.

    Those that profit from the provision of this sterility causing product hide this side effect from potential female consumers.

    End thalidomide university products now.

  157. Macbeth

    Thanks BoN for the Wiki reference. Also Lizzie, 5/6 RVR wears the Gordon tartan kilt and (usually) khaki shirt. Gordon tartan is basically the dark Black Watch overlaid with narrow gold square grid.

  158. calli

    Is Bunnings halal certified, C.L.?

    The dog/pig wire section is strictly haram.

  159. Gary

    DrBeauGan
    I agree but the stark reality is you cant start from the pushing trollies and end up an at least in a mid level managerial position as you could years ago. The opportunities for the less academically inclined for upwards mobility are becoming fewer every year.

  160. cohenite

    mh

    #2781230, posted on August 5, 2018 at 10:34 am

    Last weekend Ray Hadley wrote to the NSW Police Commissioner wanting an explanation why Lauren Southern was threatened with arrest for walking through Lakemba.

    Less than a week later, Hadley’s son is facing cocaine charges. Just a coincidence?

    Worth considering.

  161. cohenite

    Dr Ed Berry does a neat refutation of alarmism by showing human CO2 has barely contributed to the increase in CO2:

    https://theclimatescepticsparty.blogspot.com/2018/08/human-co2-emissions-not-responsible-for.html

    The simple model shows the ratio of human to natural equilibrium levels is equal to the ratio of their inflows. This means natural CO2 emissions cause 392 ppm of today’s CO2 level and human CO2 emissions cause only 18 ppm, for a total of 410 ppm today. If all human emissions were totally stopped and natural emissions remained constant, the level of CO2 in the atmosphere would fall by only 18 ppm in about 20 years.

    Figure 7.3 of AR4 shows human CO2 is about 3.7% of all CO2 flux. So even the stinking IPCC agrees with him; they’ve just been lying about it.

    This means humans are NOT responsible for climate change.

  162. Confused Old Misfit

    This means humans are NOT responsible for climate change.

    I quite agree.

    Now, how does one convince our various governments of that?

  163. min

    Re batteries for energy storage that are made using lithium and cobalt what happens with them once they no longer work. ? Are they recyclable. We ran electricity on our houseboat from solar panels, old Telstra batteries and generator

  164. Stimpson J. Cat

    Attention Catallaxy Boomers and assorted other old people.
    Struggling to articulate to your friends, coworkers, and children the depths of their PC folly?
    Unable to explain just how entrenched their brainwashing is?

    Millenial Matt returns with a surefire strategy to really get those brain cells thinking in no time.

    All you have to do is just get them to read through his Twitter retweets.
    Some of the names you will recognize.
    The ones you do, retweet and spread the love.
    If you want to help, sure Twitter and send him any worthy submissions.

    Have fun!

  165. Stimpson J. Cat

    sure = search

  166. DrBeauGan

    Now, how does one convince our various governments of that?

    You can’t. It’s Parkinson you’d have to convince, and he’s got religion. And insufficient technical background to understand the evidence and the argument anyway.

  167. Geriatric Mayfly

    Is Bunnings halal certified, C.L.?
    The dog/pig wire section is strictly haram.

    In the garden section they do have a variety of pebbles and stones however. Some brightly coloured for the sight impaired. Usually presented in netted assortments. I have not seen any yet in packages of three.

  168. calli

    Economy packs.

    How thoughtful.

  169. Tel

    Re batteries for energy storage that are made using lithium and cobalt what happens with them once they no longer work. ?

    Yes all these things are recyclable, but there’s a certain energy (and cost) spent in doing that recycling, so possibly no one will bother. If the effort you go to gets larger than the benefit you get back, the whole exercise becomes a bit pointless.

    I think there’s huge potential for lithium batteries and no intrinsic reason in terms of physics and chemistry why they cannot be used extensively. The current problems are related to technological limitations and economics:
    * Batteries are still very expensive, especially large batteries.
    * For stationary batteries energy density isn’t much of a problem, but you need to at least build a shed to hold them so that costs money.
    * They catch fire if you let them overheat.
    * Batteries don’t mesh well with an AC grid, so you need plenty of power electronics and control systems.

    I would say all these things are fixable, and the best way to do that is allow the regular process of the free market to allow entrepreneurs to research this at a natural pace. Maybe we are waiting for a breakthrough in other areas (e.g. micro-machined batteries) in order to get to the next step.

  170. DrBeauGan

    I agree but the stark reality is you cant start from the pushing trollies and end up an at least in a mid level managerial position as you could years ago. The opportunities for the less academically inclined for upwards mobility are becoming fewer every year.

    The problem is the stupid accreditation conventions, and they derive from the bureaucratic centralism from which we suffer. You have to endure three years of bullshit to prove you are worth hiring as a box ticking serf.

  171. DrBeauGan

    Becoming a tradie is a far better way to go.

  172. Roger

    MALCOLM Turnbull has the political nous of a gnat and is squandering the nation’s conservative legacy as surely as did his Labor predecessors Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd. Time and again he has shown he is incapable of learning anything from his brushes with the public given the views they have delivered in the polling booths.

    Surely there’s little the Australian public could teach the man who virtually invented the internet?

  173. Oh come on

    Are NEW Chinese buildings really FALLING DOWN?

    Yes, or at least they tend to be built astonishingly badly and give the appearance of being in the process of collapsing a year or two after being built. I also noticed it was common for people living in these kinds of places to engage in what looked like DIY renos (definitely not council-approved!), so they’d knock down a wall or two and/or rip part of the roof off and then run out of money or have a change of heart or whatever, and just leave these enormous gaping wounds in their relatively newly built Chinese style McMansions. There were also a lot of unfinished ‘luxury’ housing estates dotted around the outer ring roads of Beijing with superficially fancy looking houses that were 85% completed before being abandoned. Lots of exposed, rusting rebar and concrete cancer on show.

    I have to say I noticed the same phenomenon in most other developing Asian countries, too.

  174. calli

    Makka
    #2781333, posted on August 5, 2018 at 1:53 pm

    Saw a lot of this travelling in China. Ghost cities out to the horizon, like something from a sci-fi movie.

    Proves the maxim – whatever governments subsidise turns to sh*t. Fast.

  175. Elle

    Bunnings sell a ‘Spit Charcoal Roaster’ for your pig for under $80. Pig ain’t kosher for some here in the eastern suburbs of Sydney, but you will see a pig on a spit at local restaurants here to accommodate one and all – my fav restaurant here does it regularly. Take a trip to Shalkemba and you won’t see the same.

  176. calli

    The properties are sold hollow, too. The buyer is expected to fit them out, including power and plumbing.

  177. Gary

    DrBeauGan

    Thanks I appreciate the discussion. I remember going for a forklift ticket and telling the instructor that it was irrelevant sitting for three hours leaning the history of forklifts. He was not amused. I have a high intolerance to BS that’s got me in trouble with many supervisors.

  178. DrBeauGan

    I have a high intolerance to BS .

    #metoo

  179. Snoopy

    The problem is the stupid accreditation conventions, and they derive from the bureaucratic centralism from which we suffer.

    Check out this enthusiastic, driven, self-taught 25 year old. Now with his own custom 4WD business.

    Passion can drive you further than formal training.

  180. Geriatric Mayfly

    sitting for three hours leaning the history of forklifts

    Is there a Kindle version of this? Bedtime reading of late has been bringing on the ZZZZzzzzz’s quicker than is normally the case.

  181. .

    No one even has fun kicking Krugman around on this blog anymore.

    He is held in such low esteem!

    Which is good in its own way.

  182. DrBeauGan

    Check out this enthusiastic, driven, self-taught 25 year old. Now with his own custom 4WD business.

    Passion can drive you further than formal training.

    Bloody minded persistence gets you places brains won’t go.

  183. 2dogs

    There is a reason Switzerland doesn’t have a refugee problem, even through all the countries around it do, and even though the borders with those other countries are fairly open.

    You will note that Germany didn’t develop their problem until after 2011, and Australia didn’t have a problem with refugees before 1972.

  184. Makka

    Trump’s winning formula is still a mystery to much of the GOP elite. That’s what happens when you are so far up your own arse;

    The Blue-Collar Elephant in the Room

    In short, these voters aren’t moved by culture wars in either direction; they value jobs and security equally with growth and over entrepreneurship; and they favor a robust but not adventurous foreign policy. They can live with the base of either party as long as their needs and wants are satisfied.

    Republicans Ignore Trump’s Message at Their Peril
    Trump demonstrated that connection with these voters in spades. He clearly is not a culture warrior, except to the extent that he provokes progressives to engage in culture wars of their own against these voters. He ran as a candidate of jobs over growth, and explicitly took entitlement reform off the table. Moreover his break with the Bush-McCain approach to foreign policy was music to these voters’ ears.

    https://amgreatness.com/2018/08/03/the-blue-collar-elephant-in-the-room/

  185. .

    That’s a good point Mr Dogs.

    Some of them are probably dodging conscription at home too, besides trying to collect a welfare cheque.

  186. .

    I like Trump’s approach, but even extend it to the unemployed and less well off as well.

    A policy of getting rid of payroll tax and some of the sillier occupational licensing like an ID card to pull a beer, and getting rid of some of the more inequitable taxes like excise would go a long way.

    It would actually help the indigent and generationally poor.

  187. Marcus

    Fargo Season 4 is a go, and apparently it’s going to star Chris Rock.

    Story here.

    It sounds like it’s going to go into the origins of the Kansas City enforcer Mike Milligan from Season 2. Given that 2 was probably the strongest one so far, it sounds promising.

  188. woolfe

    Haven”t finished season 1 yet!

  189. testpattern

    Decarbonising ocean transport – Ferguson’s HySeas III

    Ferguson Marine to Develop World’s First Renewables-Powered Hydrogen Ferry – HySeas III

    ‘The vessel’s fuel will be produced from renewable electricity marking a paradigm shift towards entirely emissions-free marine transport.

    The vessel is planned to operate in and around Orkney – which is already producing hydrogen in volume from constrained – and hence otherwise wasted – renewable energy.

    ‘world’s first zero emission, hydrogen fuel cell powered commercial ROPAX ferry in 2020.”

    http://www.fergusonmarine.com/media/1172/2018-06-18-hyseas-iii-release-monday-18-june.pdf

  190. Confused Old Misfit

    Decarbonising ocean transport – Ferguson’s HySeas III

    Why bother?

  191. Herodotus

    I’m not going to link to it, but someone on Facebook has put up video of pigs being abused at a slaughterhouse, allegedly in Europe.
    Given the history of activist groups doing setups, I would not trust this to be shall we say kosher, or in one of those countries where we would normally expect humane slaughtering procedures.

  192. Steve trickler

    Holy shit!

    This camera work is astonishing.



  193. Bushkid

    SHY crowdfunded $60k to sue Leyonjhelm?

    An interesting point that’s come to light from the crowd-funding efforts for the drought-affected farmers is that the proceeds are taxable.

    So, I wonder if Ms H-Y realises this, and is preparing put aside an appropriate amount to meet the ensuing tax obligation, or if it’s going to be yet another case of “poor little me, I’m so hard-done-by” when she gets the ATO bill.

  194. Confused Old Misfit

    Steve trickler
    #2781386, posted on August 5, 2018 at 3:49 pm
    Holy shit!

    That bloke is having entirely too much fun!

  195. Stimpson J. Cat

    Wow that Andrew Bolt anti-semitic thread went quiet.
    I feel like that lone crazy bald guy at the back of the crowd yelling “Jesus! ” while everyone else is screaming “Barabbas! “.

    Ha ha ha ja ja ha ja!
    😁

  196. cohenite

    Wow that Andrew Bolt anti-semitic thread went quiet.

    Where?

  197. testpattern

    ‘Why bother?’

    Money. Lots and lots of it. Why else would you get up and go to work.

  198. calli

    I suspect it has had a Visitation, cohenite.

  199. Elle

    Stimpson – Shalom 🇮🇱 🙂

  200. Elle

    Cohenite, there is a new post by Steve Kates.

  201. Confused Old Misfit

    Why else would you get up and go to work.

    Possibly because I enjoyed doing what I was doing and wasn’t fooling myself into believing that, by sucking up other peoples money, I was saving the world for the children by reducing a mythical carbon footprint that was dooming us all to fry.

  202. Stimpson J. Cat

    Stimpson – Shalom 🇮🇱 🙂

    Oy vey shut it down Elles here!

    😁

  203. Stimpson J. Cat

    Why else would you get up and go to work.

    To help our fellow man of course you Godless Hippy.

  204. egg_

    No neck fat frump frightbat ,,,

    Isn’t that all of them that flop down on Ol’ Leathery’s overworked couches?

    Almost universal, but if Workperson and Van Badass sat in the Green Room together, the Gravity lensing effect could be a Cosmic event, where we merge with the parallel clown Universe on a permanent basis?

  205. Mark A

    2dogs
    #2781369, posted on August 5, 2018 at 3:12 pm

    There is a reason Switzerland doesn’t have a refugee problem, even through all the countries around it do, and even though the borders with those other countries are fairly open.

    You will note that Germany didn’t develop their problem until after 2011, and Australia didn’t have a problem with refugees before 1972.

    Sorry but you are wrong, Switzerland has a lot of problems with refugees, both from Europe (mostly Albanians and Kosovars) and from the Mid East and Africa.

    Not as open slather as the silly Germans, but there are % wise a lot of refugees in Switzerland.
    Only saving grace is the long wait and strict requirements for citizenship.

    As to military service, not a lot of naturalized citizens serve in the actual army, they mostly do civil service instead.

  206. Mak Siccar

    Whalehunt fun
    #2781298, posted on August 5, 2018 at 12:43 pm

    +100

  207. testpattern

    ‘sucking up other peoples money’

    Works for me. They give it to me and I make more for them. And I give my money to those I think who can make more for me too. That’s communism for ya.

  208. C.L.

    German holocaust denier Ursula Haverbeck has been sentenced to two and a half years in prison after the country’s highest court ruled that denying the mass murder of Jews during Nazi Germany is not covered by the right to free speech and “threatens public peace”.

    Haverbeck, who is known as the ‘Nazi-Grandma’, was convicted last May for publishing a series of articles in which she insisted that the Holocaust and murder of Jews at Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland are not “historically proven”.

    In Germany, denying the Holocaust constitutes a crime of incitement to hatred and carries a prison sentence of up to five years.

    The 89-year old went to Germany’s constitutional court to appeal her sentence, claiming that her statements fall under the country’s right to free speech, which is protected by law.

    But in their ruling, the high court judges found that the right to free speech does not protect the denial of the Holocaust.

    “The dissemination of untrue and deliberately false statements of fact can not contribute to the development of public opinion and thus do not fall in the remits of protection for free speech”, the judges wrote in a statement.

    Let’s highlight that: The dissemination of untrue and deliberately false statements of fact can not contribute to the development of public opinion and thus do not fall in the remits of protection for free speech. If that’s the case, Angela Merkel should be thrown in jail immediately, as should every member in good standing of the EU. They are the ones who have threatened and harmed Germany, not this 89 year-old crank. Way to be Nazis while virtue-signaling anti-Nazism.

  209. H B Bear

    Time for the ALPFL to introduce relegation and start booting teams. Starting with Carlton.

  210. C.L.

    German holocaust denier Ursula Haverbeck has been sentenced to two and a half years in prison after the country’s highest court ruled that denying the mass murder of J-ws during Nazi Germany is not covered by the right to free speech and “threatens public peace”.

    Haverbeck, who is known as the ‘Nazi-Grandma’, was convicted last May for publishing a series of articles in which she insisted that the Holocaust and murder of Jews at Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland are not “historically proven”.

    In Germany, denying the Holocaust constitutes a crime of incitement to hatred and carries a prison sentence of up to five years.

    The 89-year old went to Germany’s constitutional court to appeal her sentence, claiming that her statements fall under the country’s right to free speech, which is protected by law.

    But in their ruling, the high court judges found that the right to free speech does not protect the denial of the Holocaust.

    “The dissemination of untrue and deliberately false statements of fact can not contribute to the development of public opinion and thus do not fall in the remits of protection for free speech”, the judges wrote in a statement.

    Let’s highlight that: The dissemination of untrue and deliberately false statements of fact can not contribute to the development of public opinion and thus do not fall in the remits of protection for free speech. If that’s the case, Angela Merkel should be thrown in jail immediately, as should every member in good standing of the EU. They are the ones who have threatened and harmed Germany, not this 89 year-old crank. Way to be Nazis while virtue-signaling anti-Nazism.

  211. Elle

    Most of my maternal grandparent’s family perished in Auschwitz. What are you saying, Stimpson?

  212. C.L.

    German hol-caust denier Ursula Haverbeck has been sentenced to two and a half years in prison after the country’s highest court ruled that denying the mass murder of J-ws during Nazi Germany is not covered by the right to free speech and “threatens public peace”.

    Haverbeck, who is known as the ‘Nazi-Grandma’, was convicted last May for publishing a series of articles in which she insisted that the Hol-caust and murder of J–s at Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland are not “historically proven”.

    In Germany, denying the Holocaust constitutes a crime of incitement to hatred and carries a prison sentence of up to five years.

    The 89-year old went to Germany’s constitutional court to appeal her sentence, claiming that her statements fall under the country’s right to free speech, which is protected by law.

    But in their ruling, the high court judges found that the right to free speech does not protect the denial of the Hol-caust.

    “The dissemination of untrue and deliberately false statements of fact can not contribute to the development of public opinion and thus do not fall in the remits of protection for free speech”, the judges wrote in a statement.

    Let’s highlight that: The dissemination of untrue and deliberately false statements of fact can not contribute to the development of public opinion and thus do not fall in the remits of protection for free speech. If that’s the case, Angela Merkel should be thrown in jail immediately, as should every member in good standing of the EU. They are the ones who have threatened and harmed Germany, not this 89 year-old crank. Way to be Nazis while virtue-signaling anti-Nazism.

  213. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Lizzie I think you were presented with the tourists’ view.

    Of course. I don’t think I’ve claimed anything else about our visit to the Masai village, which was part of an organised tour for which the Masai received payment. This particular village are doing well through their close association with a tourist lodge within the Mara itself. They made a special point of being welcoming, and that they were open to photographs and house visits. However, the point I made still stands: that this village is one of the last trying to keep ‘traditional’ in its lifestyle, even though it has now stopped its wandering ways and become a permanent settlement. Thus, we are seeing the last of the ‘cattle only’ lifestyle as Western culture will now hit hard once the next generation raises its sights above that traditional corral of thorn bushes. They are genuinely transitional.

    Re Brideprice; in this village, as elsewhere, cattle are the unit of exchange for women. Ten cows is the usual price paid by a bridegroom to the lineage elders (owners) of the woman. The price compensates the lineage for the loss of her labour doing domestic services and carries a reproductive component; the price allows the woman’s natal lineage to then purchase a reproductive woman they can actually utilise to bear the lineage’s future children (i.e. not a close relative). Hairy, as my putative ‘owner’, was playing the part of a true lineage elder – upping the ante on my price due to my undoubted domestic virtues (which shows that in any culture anyone can be sold a dud based on packaging and presentation. 🙂 ). A lineage puts effort into training a young woman into her servitude duties and Hairy hasn’t done too well at that with me, but he’s not letting on. The warrior has obviously taken a shine to me (the photo shows his hand possessively on my shoulder) and he is suggesting the usual price of ten cows would be a fair one for him to pay Hairy to get me as his new wife number three! Hairy suggests a price of fifteen cows would be fair. In this exchange I note no notice is taken of my literary and intellectual skills!!! With fifteen cows in exchange for me, Hairy could for ten of these cows then purchase a new wife who could actually cook, and he’d still have five cows left over. A few exchanges of women beefed up (as it were) for presentation rather than skills, and he could gain high prices for them and thus have enough cows to purchase a second wife for himself.

    Brideprice and Dowry are both ways of ensuring exogamy (marriage out of the group) via the exchange of women in traditional societies. Both involve the exchange of goods between natal and marital groups.

    Tanzaneer and Kenya are both societies in transition from these traditional forms. There is much in these traditions that is admirable; the respect people show to each other, the strong separation of male and female roles with each having their own rituals and ways of seeing themselves (a certainty in existence we have lost in our world), the respect for the elders, and the value that is placed on a limited range of treasures rather than an overwhelming amount of ‘stuff’. Yet it is a time in human cultural life that the modern world must leave behind; no industrial society can survive using this template for its existence.

    It seems to me that the ‘precious Ramotswe’ tales of Alexander McColl Smith from Botswana highlight very well the value of some of these traditions in creating a stable base from which to slowly change to new ways. Botswana is doing very well now economically as there has been far less corruption, the rule of law has been retained by and large, and there is a strong sense there, we find from talking around, to a shared sense of identity still impelled by the memory of Sir Seretse, the original King and then Prime Minister. Botswana has remained relatively free of the current infection of socialist racism that is destroying much that was hopeful in South Africa. South African newspapers that we picked up in Jo’burg were appalling in their outright declamatory racism against white ownership of land, and the violence that was more or less openly being encouraged.

    Thankfully, there seems to be little of that infection in Tanzaneer and Kenya. White farmers have moved there, purchased land and farm it productively; and there is much good land. What surprised me in both countries, and really impressed, was the tremendous sense of optimism that prevailed. These are two African countries that, while definitely Third World, still have an entrepreneurial core, from a mass of small traders in the towns to real development impulses at the level of government, funded as trade not aid, and not without commercial and political gain to the funders, by Chinese money, which is pouring in. The Chinese have no truck with any of the cries of Imperialism! Racism! Colonialism! that so infect relationships with with the wittering West (we are our own worst enemies by encouraging this nonsense, which the Chinese ignore totally). Another nonsense we could well do without in the African context (as elsewhere) is ‘climate change’, where so often we have been told by ‘educated’ Africans that this or that bad thing is due to ‘climate change’, when it is clear that other factors are at work and that climate change is just a handy begging label for Western money.

    The rains, by the way, in the whole of East Africa this year have been wonderful and everything is thriving in the rich volcanic soil. Re the comment above (Min’s?) re tales of hardship in clinics are far too ‘Western’ in perspective, in my view. Any clinic is better than no clinic, or the Masai Medicine Man’s ministrations. See things in context.

    Clean Your Room: this is one of the most impressive things we have found in Tanzaneer and Kenya. It is the Pick Up Litter Campaign. It started in Rwanda, that home of a terrible genocide. In order to bring tribes together the new government (yes, dictatorial and corrupt etc as all of them are to some extent, but trying to reintroduce some order) issued an edict: every fourth Saturday is Clean Up Day and all citizens are required to participate, with sanctions if they do not. This has meant the groups have a common purpose to work together towards, and has resulted in Rwanda now being so litter-free it is referred to as the Switzerland of Africa.

    It is a movement that has caught on. Tanzaneer now have a two-hour mandatory collection by citizens of their local litter between 8am and 10am every Saturday. You are not allowed to open your business until this litter collection has been done. Thus the shanty towns, where all the ‘shops’ are shanties with wonderful names such as Freedom Kingdom Store or Lovely Girls Beauty, are free of the endless litter that we see in our own poor and aboriginal communities, and elsewhere in the Third World. And a miracle happens, just as Jordan Petersen suggests it does. People begin to respect themselves and their surroundings and ambition and enterprise flourish. Kenya, which has bigger problems of urban unemployment and squalor than Tanzaneer, has also started a similar clean up litter program.

    In Tanzaneer we attended at one Lodge a speech on his country by a proud and educated man with a very gentle voice. Hairy and I were delighted to hear him say that his country was now trying to ‘move quickly away from socialism to African Capitalism’. A very good thing to hear, in our opinion, and we applauded his talk and his hopefulness. We come away from African now not thinking by any means that the problems are solved, but with a feeling that in the southern countries of the continent, with the notable exception of South Africa, human ambition and a desire for a better life will eventually win out over entrenched corruption. At least corruption at the lower levels is being tackled: there are ‘corruption free zones’ for transport inspections for example on that long road we took, part of the way from Mombassa to Uganda, which is a conduit for thousands of big trucks daily to service the inland nations from the port. A very, very scary drive, in which we felt bound to reward our wonderful driver well in a tip for his skill in constant safe overtaking on this one-lane each way major highway , for our lives were certainly in his hands. The Chinese are building a big rail project to take some of this pressure of this highway.

    I went to Africa this time not wanting to go much. I came away refreshed as the good things and stories that I heard there. It is not all doom and gloom and perhaps we hear too much of the ‘basket case’ stuff and should pay more attention to other things.

    There is an orphanage tale I would also like to tell you; for another day though.
    We have to make that train to Edinburgh now.

    Tinta, take heart. Hope lies eternal; Africa shows us that.

  214. Cassie of Sydney

    “Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781410, posted on August 5, 2018 at 4:48 pm
    Thank God Germany is safe for illegal migrants now this Nazi grandmother is off the streets.”

    And your point is?

  215. Elle

    My question too, Cassie.

  216. Stimpson J. Cat

    Most of my maternal grandparent’s family perished in Auschwitz. What are you saying, Stimpson?

    What do think I should say Elle?
    Should disputing historical events be a crime,
    yes or no?

  217. Nick

    I wonder though what is more harmful, denying the hol*caust took place or rabid anti semites with quite extreme views who may at some stage lead Britain’s Government?

  218. testpattern

    While frontier massacres of aboriginal peoples rightly deserve their current attention by historians, murders of 1-4 fly under the radar but should be equally exposed.

    WA 1865 – Cautioned the jury not to be carried away by too eager a desire for equal justice between white and black’

    ‘Sammy, an aboriginal : through an interpreter. Was at the native camp at Mr. Steere’s station on the Blackwood, when Denny was lying down covered with his cloak, the prisoner came to his own fire where he had a loaf baking, and then came over to them, uncovered and kicked Denny ; prisoner had boots on with nails in them ; deceased was lying on his side, and was kicked in the stomach three times ; he said his liver was broken, took up his womera and three spears, went a short distance and fell ; prisoner took the spears and broke them.’

    ‘Mr. Landor in addressing the Jury for the defence contended that the prisoner in kicking the deceased only intended to rouse him and make him get up, and cautioned the jury not to be carried away by too eager a desire for equal justice between white and black’

    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/3755530?

  219. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Two other things I forgot to mention that are immediately noticeable: the children whose parents can pay the mandatory school fee (not all can) attend school in a bright, colourful and very clean and tidy school uniform. There is a tremendous pride in their education and the aspiration this represents. These children are the future, and they are something indeed to be proud of.

    Our tour host was a South African woman of German descent. She idolises Mandela as a ‘true saint’. She had been so hopeful, she says, but believes that the rule of law is breaking down all over the place now in South Africa, such that no personal property is safe from seizure: houses or goods or land. She sighs that it is so difficult for her to leave, especially to go to Australia, as we make it so difficult for white South Africans, she believes. We noted the trend in those South African newspapers, where there was open commentary calling Mandela an ‘Uncle Tom’.

  220. mh

    Haverbeck has been found guilty of holocaust denial. What the judges found was that a deliberate falsehood demonstrated by facts are not protected by free speech laws. I can’t see the problem here.

  221. Cassie of Sydney

    “Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781421, posted on August 5, 2018 at 5:03 pm
    Most of my maternal grandparent’s family perished in Auschwitz. What are you saying, Stimpson?

    What do think I should say Elle?
    Should disputing historical events be a crime,
    yes or no?”

    As a believer in free speech, no, I don’t think it should be a crime. Why? Because the beauty of free speech is that it outs J*w haters and Holocaust deniers. So what are you disputing Stimpy? Cmon, give us a hint.

  222. Baldrick

    I don’t think anybody should be gaoled for expressing an opinion against the State , not matter how stupid it may seem.

  223. Elle

    Stimpson, the denial of the systematic genocidal killing of millions of Jews is illegal in many European countries and including Israel. Free speech when it’s free, but not where there are laws in place. You’re a staunch Libertarian. I respect that. I don’t respect your support of a Holocaust denier.

  224. mh

    In Germany, denying the Holocaust constitutes a crime of incitement to hatred and carries a prison sentence of up to five years.

    I cannot see the problem with that law. It’s German law.

  225. Elle

    Ooh, I got to say Jew without it being ousted.

  226. Stimpson J. Cat

    Cmon, give us a hint.

    Why is this all about me now?
    I’m not a Nazi grandmother and I don’t want to go to jail.
    I believe you should be able to dispute historical events no matter what they are.
    Enough bullying ladies geez.
    I’m sensitive.

  227. Tom

    Australia’s last genuinely funny TV comedy series, Russell Coight’s All Aussie Adventures, starts a new series at 7.30 tonight on Network Ten. Series writing credits: Santo Cilauro, Tom Gleisner, Rob Sitch and Glenn Robbins (who plays Russell Coight) – the elite talent of Australian comedy-writing in the past 20 years. Somehow, Glenn Robbins has avoided bowing to the humour-killing dead hand of totalitarianism (political correctness), while taking the piss out of outback folklore. Runs just 30 minutes. Worth tuning in for a look.

  228. cohenite

    Seagal fails:

    Russia’s Foreign Ministry said on Saturday it had made Steven Seagal, the American actor, its special representative for Russian-US humanitarian ties, a role it said was meant to deepen cultural, art and youth ties between the two countries.

    President Vladimir Putin presented a Russian passport to Seagal in 2016, saying he hoped it would serve as a symbol of how fractious ties between Moscow and Washington were starting to improve.

    Since then, US-Russia relations have only got worse however with American intelligence agencies accusing Moscow of interfering in Donald Trump’s White House run, an allegation Russia denies. The two countries are also at odds over Syria and Ukraine.

  229. Tom

    Why is this all about me now?

    Because you’re an attention-seeking smartarse, which works only half the time.

  230. woolfe

    Why are we spending a squillion $ of tax payers funds on the most powerful icebreaker in the world Evaaaaaaah when soon there will be no ice to break?

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