Suicide of a nation

Jo Nova describes how windpower is destroying baseload capacity.

In the South Australian experiment total wind power capacity is now far above the average state demand most hours of the day. This effectively destroys any economic case for cheap baseload power (I hear that was the aim). This fleet of unreliable generators is being supported by forced subsidies through power bills from all around Australia. Sadly, despite this rain of money falling in SA, those funds end up with renewable investors, not South Australian consumers who pay some of the highest rates in the world.

Victoria is determined to follow South Australia. While it currently has a small proportion of windpower — there are so many new unreliable plants being planned that these will randomly, but inevitably make cheap baseload economically impossible there too. The cost of wholesale electricity prices will rise, which will work out very profitably for renewables companies and electricity retailers and any generators that survives.

As a matter of interest, can someone advise who are the persons who represent Australia at the IPCC, who appoints them, the criteria for selection and whether any of them have ever reported anything in public about the way the Panel conducts its business?

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52 Responses to Suicide of a nation

  1. .

    I honestly can’t believe we’re doing this anti-civilisational nonsense when we’re on the verge of cracking LENR, propellantless propulsion and travel to Mars (albeit by conventional means).

    This could be the one time in history when industrialisation was harnessed to help retard industrialisation.

    It really is the modern day saboteurs and luddites joining up to achieve a very low-value goal of paying higher prices for electricity and reducing CO2 emissions in a totally insignificant way.

  2. I fail to see how you put up with this foolishness

    You are paying up to 5 times what we pay in Japan for power

    If you aren’t in the street with pitchforks and torches, you should seriously consider it.

  3. Roger

    Have no fear, Maladroit’s NEG is near!

    It will magically lower prices and ensure supply.

  4. I don’t know why, but I can’t help but think that the instigators are somehow receiving personal reward from all of this. In the olden days there were robber barons, but nowadays it seems our politicians are the robber barons.

  5. John Constantine

    De-industrialisation means Decolonialisation.

    “Hugo Chávez, who became president in 1999, adopted a form of socialism that resulted in many businesses collapsing or being nationalized. A purge of the state-run oil industry — a center of opposition to his rule — removed thousands of workers, who were often replaced by political supporters with little to no technical experience.

    Venezuela’s slide turned into a free fall under President Nicolás Maduro — a former bus driver and union leader who inherited power after Chávez’s death in 2013. Critics say his government’s mismanagement and corruption and Maduro’s own ruthless bid to cement power — even as oil prices tumbled — have broken the nation.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/world/wp/2018/07/27/feature/as-venezuela-crumbles-its-fleeing-citizens-are-becoming-latin-americas-new-underclass/?utm_term=.f2810d48daa7

    In Australia. we can go from riches to rags, or from riches to rage, but our departure from riches is locked in.

    The purge of industry and agriculture and oil and gas and transport is locked in.

    Bespoke labour, piling deep on street corners to beg for stoop work picking up the droppings of the dogs owned by our political class is the clear vision for our gulag future.

    Comrades.

  6. John Constantine

    Australia is purging our oil and gas sector as blindly as Venezuela purged theirs.

    Not only is drilling for gas banned in Victoria, but activists are foaming with rage to use lawfare and physical blockades to prevent an import terminal being built to import gas into yarragrad.

    Stop and think–we are at the stage of banning production of gas and importing it instead.

    Purge them Comrades.

  7. John Constantine

    Our quisling Venezuela-class destroyers are purging Australia’s energy generation industry, firing and disposing of the politically unsound that work and replacing them with revolutionaries with windmills.

  8. Myrddin Seren

    If you aren’t in the street with pitchforks and torches, you should seriously consider it.

    Labor – steadily crank up the misery and offer to tax opponents and subsidise potential support groups – to mitigate the misery they have caused in the first place.

    Bill Shorten vows to keep energy supplements for pensioners

    Rinse, repeat until there is nothing but helpless dependents on government falling reliably in to electoral line, or class enemies being ground down.

    Sometimes step the pace up about, face down the pitchfork and torches protests, and resume strip mining the wealth of the country as before.

    eg I can’t recall any widespread street protests in starving, thirsty Venezuela since the last lot of protest was beaten back. The regime gets fatter, the Proles now appear to be beaten down in to submission.

    Based on the new crop of wannabe politicians emerging from the ACTU and Labor ‘Left’ ( aka – the Bolshevik wing ), the future here is looking very Bolivaran indeed:

    St Vincent de Paul CEO John Falzon is running on a progressive agenda to represent the party in ACT’s newest seat.

    How progressive Señor Falzon ?

    “Neoliberalism is the aberration. We need to build a society that’s predicated on the principle of ‘from each according to their ability, to each according to their needs’,” Falzon says, quoting Karl Marx.

    That, he says, means a tax system where “people contribute what they can”, and a strong social safety net.

    You control energy and you control a modern society.

    There is a very good chance we a f$cked – collectively – Comrades.

  9. Bruce of Newcastle

    If we were committing national suicide for some heroic reason at least that might have merit.
    But no. It is all for nothing.
    As I’ve been saying global temperature is lower this year than it was for the first half of 2002, sixteen years ago. Today the news is the Arctic is about where it was in 2004, fourteen years ago.
    Those fourteen-odd years have seen CO2 rise markedly for no actual measurable effect.
    The real world is proving we are stupid.
    Can a whole country win a Darwin Award?

  10. .

    Bill Shorten vows to keep energy supplements for pensioners

    The chocolate ration has been increased by 25%.

  11. Roger

    That, he says, means a tax system where “people contribute what they can”, and a strong social safety net.

    And when the people who can contribute leave or stop, the strong safety net begins to unravel.

  12. John Constantine

    Free adult onesies for all freezing pensioners.

    Hivis.

    Comrades.

  13. Rafe Champion

    As a matter of interest, can someone advise who are persons who represent Australia at the IPCC, who appoints them, the criteria for selection and whether any of them have ever reported anything in public about the way the Panel conducts its business?

  14. rickw

    The Africanisation of Australia, in every sense.

  15. It could be all part of the grand Socialist plan.

    First you get rid of the weak that are a burden on society, the old, the infirm, the very young. By making electricity unaffordable, the burdensome quickly die off from heat and cold, and then you can start working on the remainder.

    The remainder are now faced with direct threats (both industry and workers) and coerced into submission or turning against each other for survival. It becomes a dog eat dog world.

    Not long after, the conversion to full Socialism is complete.

  16. John Constantine

    So we vote turnbull election winning machine coalition, and we take 15 years to go full Venezuela.

    We go shorten looting cartel, join the stasi, join the cartel and Australia goes full Venezuela in five years, but we get ten good ones before being purged ourselves.

    We are merely watching our future inescapeably barrelling towards us.

    Once the first massive pulse of windmills, the ones constructed in the first rort all, wear out at once, we will be helpless and bankrupt, unable to rebuild windmills from the industrial capacity of an economy based upon windmills.

    Onesies in the Gulags.

    Comrades.

  17. Wil

    All Australia needs is a clever tech-savvy leader we can get behind, and who can put forward with clarity, indisputable facts that show the real situation.
    In other words, Revolution . New thinking.
    Who could that person be?
    Not anyone from any of the present lot in Canberra.
    Got to be someone who can get the real economic facts to Every person in every street in every town and city in Australia.

  18. Singleton Engineer

    Roger: “Have no fear, Maladroit’s NEG is near! It will magically lower prices and ensure supply.”

    Only if repetition of the same actions can be expected to deliver an opposite result than previously.

    Cost-wise, SA’s score is on the board.
    System reliability also has its scores on the board, starting Sept 2016.
    Germany’s experience of conversion to wind+solar+natgas, etc for zero net CO2 emission advantage points to the future for SA.

    Its not as though they haven’t been warned many times already. Their problem is not want of advice – it stems from accepting advice from those with commercial conflicts of interest, supported by both federal and state governments who think that money grows on (other people’s) trees and that arithmetic doesn’t apply to them.

    I have stated many times, if the goal is to substantially reduce CO2 emissions, then the means of attainment will best be met via an “all options, on their merits” approach. Which, in uranium rich SA, means that nuclear power options, of which there are many, must be on the table for the mid and long terms.

  19. Infidel Tiger

    First you switch off base load power. Then you replace the population with people who have never had it before.

    Economic and cultural suicide in one generation.

  20. I just reread Neville Shute’s novel “The Far Country.” How sad that he would not recognize it.

    I have only visited a couple of times and the second time to Queensland, which impressed me as the place I would live if I ever moved.

  21. BoyfromTottenham

    I think we need some short, punchy slogans for the minor (non-left) parties to use at the next federal election. Can I suggest a few: Solar power – guaranteed not to produce power in peak hours. Steam engines replaces unreliable windmills 200 years ago. Do you want to live like they did in 1820? The U.N. wants to reduce global population by 50%. Did you vote for this? Solar power only works for half the day. Would you buy anything that only works half the time? Without CO2, all plants die, and so do we. With more CO2 all plants grow faster. Which way do you choose? In 1988 the U.N. decided that CO2 was a dangerous gas, even though all life depends on it. Who do you believe?
    Feel free to add more! All non-left political parties – feel free to use these slogans.

  22. Dr Fred Lenin

    The people advocating this national destruction are corrupt bribe taking Traitors , they are committing High Treason and the normal procedure for that charge is excecution by hanging .
    Next election vote against Every Sitting member ,the parliament will be full of muppets who don’t know what they are doing ,as that’s quite normal in Canberra there will be little change . Fill the senate with weirdos as we normally do ,next election vote against the sitting members again ,make politics a bigger ness than it normally is ,force the pollies to put proposed laws to referenda ,challenge existing u.n. Communis inspired laws ,racist ,anti free speech etc ,force pollies to hold referenda about them ,that’s a step on the way to sanity.

  23. .

    The people advocating this national destruction are corrupt bribe taking Traitors , they are committing High Treason and the normal procedure for that charge is excecution by hanging .

    Sorry mate, this is all nonsense.

    Furthermore, we keep on voting for this shit.

    In a democracy, the buck stops with the voters, regardless of how much the ruling elites despise them and connive against them.

  24. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    “Neoliberalism is the aberration. We need to build a society that’s predicated on the principle of ‘from each according to their ability, to each according to their needs’,” Falzon says, quoting Karl Marx.

    My needs Sir, include a 500ft yacht, helicopter a Bugati Chiron, not to mention penthouses in all major Western capitals.

  25. Ironicman

    ‘In a democracy, the buck stops with the voters …’

    A Pox on both their Houses … Vote Informal

  26. NB

    Wil at #2780603, posted on August 4, 2018 at 12:52 pm says: ‘All Australia needs is a clever tech-savvy leader we can get behind’
    I understand the idea, but no. What we need is a competent employee who will do sensible stuff. But, so long as we vote in imbeciles, we will have imbecilic stuff done.
    The majority of the electorate wants to have implemented policies that will pauperise it? Then pauperised it will be.
    The best form of defence, outside of taking to the streets and deploying the same tactics as the destroyers of civilisation, is to prepare for evacuation. If a country decides to destroy itself, I see no reason to go down with it.

  27. Howard Hill

    Carpe Jugulum
    #2780536, posted on August 4, 2018 at 11:17 am

    I fail to see how you put up with this foolishness

    You are paying up to 5 times what we pay in Japan for power

    If you aren’t in the street with pitchforks and torches, you should seriously consider it.

    Not true. We’ve all got solar panels on our roofs and now our electrickery bill is nothing compared to yours. Just ask anyone with panels, they’ll tell you. They’ll also tell you that they’ll vote for whoever increases their FIT and the first Poly-tick to announce a great subsidy on Telsa Power Walls for everyone will be made supreme Emperor.

    I fail to see what all the whining on here is about? Everyone I know has panels now and their power bills have never been cheaper.

  28. John Constantine

    As Marie Antoinette said:

    “Let them install solar panels”

  29. Howard Hill

    In a democracy, the buck stops with the voters, regardless of how much the ruling elites despise them and connive against them.

    Ah yes, the good old Aussie democracy. The same menu printed in two different colours, winning!

  30. .

    Like Jesse Ventura said, the two party system is one more choice than you get in communism.

  31. ChrisCross

    Not True HH. Paying a fraction of what the plebs pay is the result of having invested in solar panels. Not everyone did. Those who could afford it (those with surplus coin) did, and now get a cheque for their troubles; however, those that couldn’t afford it (those without surplus coin) now pay those that could (those with surplus coin). That’s how leftys help those without surplus coin i.e the poor.

  32. Combine Dave

    Infidel Tiger
    #2780608, posted on August 4, 2018 at 1:09 pm
    First you switch off base load power. Then you replace the population with people who have never had it before.

    Economic and cultural suicide in one generation.

    The great irony here is that the inflooding new Australians probably had more reliable and cheaper electricity back home.

    The second is that once Australia has reached full shit hole status our best and brightest will leave, in some cases to the original homes of the new Australians. Where taxation is likely lower and security/safety higher.

  33. Dr Faustus

    As a matter of interest, can someone advise who are persons who represent Australia at the IPCC, who appoints them, the criteria for selection and whether any of them have ever reported anything in public about the way the Panel conducts its business?

    Ultimately, sort of Frydenberg, in an ‘all care no responsibility’ way, although the technical scrutiny of the reports is done through multiple government agencies:

    The Department of the Environment and Energy operates as the National Focal Point for IPCC activities and has the task of recommending Australian experts to fulfill author roles for these reports.

    Alarmingly, however, it is Mz Bishop herself who has the responsibility for agreeable cocktail parties and backing us into economic ruination:

    The Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is responsible for leading its international engagement on climate change through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

    Ratfuckers..

  34. Neenee

    Don Quixote saw the problem, grabbed his lance, mounted his trusty steed and charged the bloody windmills.

    Where’s our fearless Don Quixote?

  35. Howard Hill

    ChrisCross
    #2780683, posted on August 4, 2018 at 3:25 pm

    Not True HH. Paying a fraction of what the plebs pay is the result of having invested in solar panels.

    You obviously missed the sarc tags I used, ChrisCross?

  36. rickw

    I fail to see what all the whining on here is about? Everyone I know has panels now and their power bills have never been cheaper.

    You are lying. I brought a house that had solar panels on it. I pay more for electricity than people living in Guam.

  37. Rafe Champion

    Thanks Dr Faustus.

  38. None

    I fail to see what all the whining on here is about? Everyone I know has panels now and their power bills have never been cheaper.

    maybe those not tenting. $5000 + to instal maybe pay srlf off in 5 years by which time oanels need replacing. In the meantime it introduces instability into the grid or resulting in more power blackouts has happened in my neighborhood with lots of solar installations and like all renewables solo needs backup like batteries, cost more to transmit and other sorts of issues which overall drive the price up. In other words you are still paying more for electricity then if there were no renewables whatsoever. SA the dumb state.

  39. None

    Maybe those not renting. $5000 + to instal, maybe pay itself off in 5 years by which time panels need replacing. In the meantime it introduces instability into the grid, resulting in more power blackouts as has happened in my neighborhood with lots of solar installations, and like all renewables solar needs backup like batteries, cost more to transmit and other sorts of issues which overall drive the price up. In other words you are still paying more for electricity then if there were no renewables whatsoever. SA the dumb state.

  40. Eyrie

    T shirt Slogan:

    Solar Power
    You can rely on it!
    Not working at night

  41. Aynsley Kellow

    Rafe, I was appointed as an Expert Reviewer for IPCC AR4 Working Group II for the chapter on risk assessment. While the process of appointment was not transparent, I suspect I was nominated by John Zillman, former head of the BOM and former President of the WMO, and then by the government. The invitation came from the IPCC WG Chair.
    Zillman is a scientist of integrity, as can be attested to by Bernie Lewin’s account of the IPCC. He insisted that the Lead Authors responded to my comments – which included the observation that in a world of elevated water vapour (a necessary condition for the positive feedback elevated warming necessary for CAGW), the draft chapter suggested that the resulting additional rainfall would fall only in catastrophic storms and there would be no additional useful rain. The response was that the chapter focused on ‘key vulnerabilities’ – to which I responded that risk should include positive as well as negative events. For some reason, I was not invited to participate in the next Assessment Report (under Rudd-Gillard-Rudd).
    I had been invited to participate in IPCC meeting in the late 1990s – but at meetings at which my teaching commitments precluded attendance. This is a source of IPCC bias, since those with positions in research institutes are not similarly listed (and are more likely to be dependent on the CAGW funding teat).

  42. Neville

    BoyfromTottenham comment, #2780620, posted on August 4, 2018 at 1:25 pm

    This a is a bloody good idea! I have long thought that it’s well over time when people of common sense start to use Alinsky’s rules against the lefty-greeny plague.

  43. Faye

    I feel better when I read Catallaxy comments just to know that others are as shat off as I am. But what do we do about it – NOW! If not, the Liberals will lose the election. His Majesty will step over the entrails and walk away. It would be beneath him to lower himself from PM to OL. I want a noisy protest march/s of young and old to scare the living daylights out of the Liberal Party. Some of our movers and shakers could arrange it.

  44. DrBeauGan

    .
    #2780654, posted on August 4, 2018 at 2:42 pm
    Meanwhile, adults try to advance technology:

    https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180313005600/en/SRI-Report-Independently-Verifies-Brillouin-LENR-Reactions

    Dot, cold fusion is crap. Changing the name to LENR doesn’t stop it being crap.

  45. .

    I think you’ve been misled.

    The “debunking” was a press conference by a jealous rival.

    It took nearly 400 years to go from Leonardo to powered & genuinely controllable flight.

    Pons & Fischer were the best of the best in his field. Most people who quip about “cold fusion” have no idea who he was or what he actually had done up that point.

    SRI are not a crackpot outfit. This is not like the e Cat. Repeated good news points to progress.

  46. Fat Tony

    Cold fusion – back in the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s, ’80s, ’90s…….it was always about 30 years away.

    Is that still the case???

  47. .

    Jesus christ no one was talking about Cold Fusion in the 1950s unless they were talking about very obscure German research from the 1920s.

    To be blunt, not one was talking about “C”F/LENR until the late 1980s and early 1990s.

    You’re talking about fusion generally (hot stuff). LENR (not so hot) is advancing; it has only been around since 1989 IIRC.

  48. Fat Tony

    .
    #2781527, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:42 pm
    Jesus christ no one was talking about Cold Fusion in the 1950s unless they were talking about very obscure German research from the 1920s.

    Thanks for the compliment, but I’m actually Fat Tony, not Jesus Christ.

    I was referring to “controlled fusion” – which, if it was controlled, would definitely not be hot (in the fusion sense) so, by definition, would be “cold” (comparatively).

    I had a quick look at the link, but I’m working now, so I downloaded a copy of the technical report, and will have a read sometime in the next few days.

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