Monday Forum: August 6, 2018

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1,493 Responses to Monday Forum: August 6, 2018

  1. .

    “Thank a farmer for your meal”

    Well, I can hunt and fish, and even garden okay, so not really.

    I’ll send you a thank you card when you stop getting paid.

  2. 132andBush

    bush, I think we city slickers more than pay our way. Our water rates more than cover the cost.

    and as Gez pointed out above, so do farmers.
    They also produce more than just piss and steam with it as well.

  3. JC

    They also produce more than just piss and steam with it as well.

    Markets determine production, utility and ultimately, value. No one holds the high ground because we’re so interdependent.

  4. Snoopy

    Go and forage for breakfast, Dot.

  5. JC

    Go and forage for breakfast, Dot.

    Oh lord you’re an imbecile. Farming is 4% of the nation’s GDP. If every farmer closed down, we would import our food needs from overseas suppliers.

    It’s 4% of GDP!

  6. Snoopy

    The only thing sillier than a farm commodity trader is a farmer who thinks they can speculate in the market while holding physical product.

    I can remember when the potential of raising cattle and investing in the likes of AACo excited some here.

  7. Boambee John

    JC at 2136

    Nicely said.

  8. .

    Yeah I don’t know about that JC. It is also highly productive; it has high inter-industry multipliers and has a lot of secondary industry and services attached.

    We also export about 30% of our production.

  9. Snoopy

    Oh lord you’re an imbecile. Farming is 4% of the nation’s GDP. If every farmer closed down, we would import our food needs from overseas suppliers.

    It’s 4% of GDP!

    I think I’m beginning to see where you’re coming from. How many additional immigrants would we need to import each year to make up the 4% hit to GDP?

  10. JC

    it has high inter-industry multipliers and has a lot of secondary industry and services attached.

    Yes it’s true. The value adding side in combination would take it closer to 20% of GDP, I reckon.

  11. Farmer Gez

    Nobody owes you a thank you. You aren’t doing it for the love, are you. And even if you were, to do so would be your choice.

    OCO.
    I was simply addressing the fact that the commodity that JC speculates on (oil as he said) needs to be produced, like farm products. Producers and the end users are the market that creates the opportunities that JC works on.
    If that’s ridiculous thinking then I’m happy with it.

  12. .

    The only thing sillier than a farm commodity trader is a farmer who thinks they can speculate in the market while holding physical product.

    Well they do, risk is mitigated sometimes hilariously unsuccessfully in grain pools. You can’t just flip the stuff immediately even with a fleet of trucks at the peak of harvest.

    It is inevitable unless they really have a small farm and just take the cash price.

    My qualified opinion is that you really need a diversified marketing strategy. Some pools, some cash, some multigrade, some sold forward and some held on farm.

    I’d say use a broker too. Not necessarily one with a big name because they can be lazy and ask the accumulators for the cash price plus their fee. Fucking incompetent shysters. If you’re going to ask above market, sweeten the deal with volume or delivery to port.

    I still laugh at the canola decs. Major Mitchell saw vast swathes of grasslands on his expedition. A lot of the “forest” is really new growth scrub.

  13. Snoopy

    Yes it’s true. The value adding side in combination would take it closer to 20% of GDP, I reckon.

    No problemo. All we need to do is import the population of Yemen. Each year.

  14. 132andBush

    Markets determine production, utility and ultimately, value.

    Food does have a certain utility and, hopefully, value.

    With your profession you would spread your money invested over many sectors to minimize risk etc etc.
    So do most farmers. Personally I have three avenues of income within the ag sector and if all else fails a fallback outside of ag.
    I’m guessing a big stock market crash where everything drops/evaporates, whatever, would be your equivalent of a prolonged drought?

  15. Oh come on

    Fact is, if you’re not a leech you may as well say ‘thank a [blank] for [blank]’.

    Or don’t waste your time and keep doing what you’re doing. Nobody is doing anyone else any favours in the wash-up.

  16. JC

    Snoopy
    #2782639, posted on August 6, 2018 at 9:54 pm

    Yes it’s true. The value adding side in combination would take it closer to 20% of GDP, I reckon.

    No problemo. All we need to do is import the population of Yemen. Each year.

    Lame. Just face plant lame.

  17. 132andBush

    When’s the next Ford A vid?

  18. Farmer Gez

    Dot.
    The biggest benefit for farmers in recent years is quality on farm storage and good old seller resistance.
    I don’t know the brokers that grain businesses use but they regularly underperform the forward cash market.
    A larger Australian population would benefit farmers.
    The big food importers are also among the poorest nations. I would rather deal all domestically if I could.

  19. Oh come on

    Producers and the end users are the market that creates the opportunities that JC works on.

    Yes but people like JC facilitate the trade of your product, create demand for it, ensure supply to the markets you sell into and so forth. This helps you and the end consumer.

    Again, nobody owes anybody else any thanks. You aren’t doing what you do for JC’s benefit, and he isn’t doing what he does for yours.

  20. JC

    Food does have a certain utility and, hopefully, value.

    Sure it does. Air haws a certain quality of utility too. 🙂

    With your profession you would spread your money invested over many sectors to minimize risk etc etc.
    So do most farmers. Personally I have three avenues of income within the ag sector and if all else fails a fallback outside of ag.

    Diversification applies to pretty much everything we do. Manufacturers shouldn’t rely on just one client for instance. Always avoid the potential bat to the head. Spread the risk

    I’m guessing a big stock market crash where everything drops/evaporates, whatever, would be your equivalent of a prolonged drought?

    I think what you’re describing is ag land fast turning into the Sahara. 🙂

  21. Snoopy

    Lame. Just face plant lame.

    But

    If every farmer closed down, we would import our food needs from overseas suppliers.

    is genius. Apparently.

  22. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    So do most farmers. Personally I have three avenues of income within the ag sector and if all else fails a fallback outside of ag.

    Fair comment. “Back in the day” we were buying back into sheep in large numbers, when all our neighbors had decided on cropping only. There’s been a “fallback outside of ag” going on since 1950, when Grandfather Two Alpha invested the proceeds of the “wool boom” in BHP shares, while the neighbors blew their proceeds on new cars, trips overseas, and all night poker games. The record was an eight thousand pound wool cheque, lost over the poker table..

  23. JC

    Snoopy
    #2782669, posted on August 6, 2018 at 10:08 pm

    Lame. Just face plant lame.

    But

    If every farmer closed down, we would import our food needs from overseas suppliers.

    is genius. Apparently.

    Naaa, but I guess from your low level it would appear genius, numbnuts.

    Stop being so fucking boring.

  24. JC

    Oh fuck FFS, the squatter’s here. Forced, “forced” to explain his history.

  25. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    In this upside down world I haven’t yet caught up with all of this thread. We have just finished a lunch of haggis, heaps and turnips. But I must have a little boast that I told youse all before Breitbart did that the papers in SA were calling Mandela an Uncle Tom and calling for white blood and land seizure when we passed through two weeks ago.

    Not good for SA and sad for Africa in general as these madnesses can be contagious in third world economies, even those trying really hard to ditch socialism.

  26. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    That is neaps (turnips) not heaps, btw.

  27. Farmer Gez

    Yes but people like JC facilitate the trade of your product, create demand for it, ensure supply to the markets you sell into and so forth. This helps you and the end consumer.

    OCO.
    You’re kidding. JC and his mates provide liquidity. None of the above.

  28. Oh come on

    Put it this way, Gez. Subtract the ‘middlemen’ between your business and those who might be your consumers, and are you better or worse off?

    Answer this truthfully. Then consider if anyone ought to be grateful as a result of the way you make your living.

  29. 132andBush

    I think what you’re describing is ag land fast turning into the Sahara.

    In some cases very nearly, short term.

    BTW, I do see a lot of instances of cashed up farmers needlessly buying huge$ machinery (mostly harvesters) without calculating the real costs of ownership in order to reduce tax liability.
    Defaults on first payments already happening.
    I also repeat my statement from the other day.
    Two years ago nearly every part of the eastern states was 1 inch away from being drowned.

  30. Bruce in WA

    Garden tools not put away after last being used, however, and picked up spontaneously when the thug went at your spouse, children or guests, …

    Ah, yes 😀 As long as, of course, the bad guys don’t get to them first …

    WAPOL have a neat idea here regarding thieves who break in and open your safe to steal your firearms. If they use a tool you left where the crooks can access it (such as an angle grinder, crowbar etc.), WAPOL say they will charge you for not ensuring your tools were secured … Like to see it tested in the SAT, but that’s the mentality here in Wait Awhile …

  31. Oh come on

    Everyone plays their part, Gez. Do you need liquidity now and again?

  32. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    That is neaps (turnips) not heaps, btw.

    There was a rather monumental lunch of “haggis, neaps and tatties” in Aberdeen some years ago. Various guests decided that single malt over the lunch table wasn’t their go, so I floated out the door, feeling no pain, while a veddy veddy upper crust English accent asked if “Australians usually drank so much over the lunch table…”

  33. Farmer Gez

    Everyone plays their part, Gez. Do you need liquidity now and again?
    Oh for fucks sake.
    Did I say I didn’t?
    Subtract consumers?
    Some farmers even direct market. Fancy that.

  34. 132andBush

    OCO,
    Some of the “middlemen”, those who create massive volatility in prices through speculative trading we could well do without.
    Supply chain middlemen, not so much.

  35. Death Giraffe

    132andBush
    #2782657, posted on August 6, 2018 at 10:04 pm
    When’s the next Ford A vid?

    ..
    On hold for a day or two.
    I am filming an interview tomorrow.
    It’s going to be huge.
    Wait and see.
    It will blow your minds.

  36. JC

    Gez
    WTF is Cape Grim Steak and why does it sell for a fortune. Those guys must be making a fortune as it’s almost every restaurant menu. I’ve seen it at an over priced butcher at Prahran market for close on to 100 buck a kilo. No, I would never buy it.

  37. Snoopy

    If only someone would invent a search engine.

  38. 132andBush

    It will blow your minds.

    Holy crap!!
    And I thought sex was great!!

    I love the passion you’re putting into it.
    Love old iron.

  39. Infidel Tiger

    Jc weren’t you a highly successful cattle farmer?

  40. Oh come on

    Some farmers even direct market. Fancy that.

    Yeah they do. Anf if that’s your angle, that’s great, good for you. Middlemen also come in all shapes and sizes. Some are useful for you, some aren’t. But they’re useful for someone like you, otherwise they wouldn’t exist. It’s the same with consumers. A farmer who direct markets blackberries isn’t much bloody good to me in summer where I live. Hopefully, if I want fresh blackberries (consumers come in all shapes and sizes, after all), someone has made it possible for me to purchase the produce of a farmer harvesting a winter berry in their corner of the world. I won’t be able to head down to my local farmer’s market and grab some fresh raspberries in December.

  41. Farmer Gez

    Cape Grim Steak?

    I have no idea but it might be like Russell Crowe’s steaks.
    On every menu and oh so twee.
    Maybe Rusty has moved to Tassie.

  42. JC

    Jc weren’t you a highly successful cattle farmer?

    Lol. Yugely. Two seasons. I went down there exactly twice, which was two too many times.

    A Chinese dude bought it. After he did, apparently he was asking the stock agent if he could draw water underground for veggie crops, which I believe is one of the most restrictive things you can ask for.

  43. Oh come on

    Some of the “middlemen”, those who create massive volatility in prices through speculative trading we could well do without.

    Not true. Successful speculative traders make the market more efficient by punishing the bad and rewarding the good. Unsuccessful speculative traders go broke.

  44. JC

    I think farming is like any business. You either have to be very big – even relative the region, or very small and boutiquie where you can sell the stuff with the brand or quality. The middle always get seriously fucked.

  45. Peter Castieau


    On hold for a day or two.
    I am filming an interview tomorrow.
    It’s going to be huge.
    Wait and see.
    It will blow your minds.

    Go DG

  46. Oh come on

    Of course there are plenty of corporatist types that 132 is talking about, I gather. Sure, they do ugly deals with legislators and regulators and screw everything up royally. But sorry the farm lobby is no better, really. I’ll say it again – Exhibit A being the National Party of Australia. There isn’t a bill in the land that they haven’t attempted (and frequently succeeded in their mission) to fill with as much pork as they can get away with on behalf of their constituents.

  47. Tintarella di Luna

    Riccardo Bois was on Outsiders tonight with Rowan and Ross talking about the gender-benders in the ADF and calling out the invisible but unmissable Minister for Defence on her misspeaking this morning in her interview on radio 2GB. Shari Markson actually called her a liar. My goodness the warts and all close-ups of the Minister for Defence were really too much for my still delicate stomach.

  48. Tintarella di Luna

    Jeez lord.

    Oh dear JC and all without a trigger warning, errrrkkkkkkk even with the pixilations it was too much

  49. Oh come on

    A Chinese dude bought it. After he did, apparently he was asking the stock agent if he could draw water underground for veggie crops,

    I guess he was thinking about how stupid these Aussies were for running wheat and sheep when he could turn his thousand+ hectares into a giant market garden simply by drilling a hole in the ground.

    All’s fair in love and war, though. Plenty of Aussies have gone to China hoping to make a fortune out of gaps they think exist in the Chinese market, and have done their dough because it turned out they were innocents abroad.

    Turnabout is fair play.

  50. Tintarella di Luna

    Oh dear I mean Riccardo Bosi – one too many Black Sambuccas — buona notte.

  51. Oh come on

    Was m0nty!!! on that course? Yerk.

  52. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I think farming is like any business. You either have to be very big – even relative the region, or very small and boutiquie where you can sell the stuff with the brand or quality. The middle always get seriously fucked.

    JC, if you have any more priceless gems of wisdom to cast on this blog – ” any business” (Snork, snork) could you really share them with us?

  53. JC

    OCO

    I think it’s very difficult if not next to impossible to get ground water rights for that sort of farming. I think it’s getting to the stage where the Governor General has to sign off on it 🙂

    We’re fucked as a country.

  54. Beertruk

    Bruce in WA
    #2782698, posted on August 6, 2018 at 10:19 pm
    WAPOL have a neat idea here regarding thieves who break in and open your safe to steal your firearms. If they use a tool you left where the crooks can access it (such as an angle grinder, crowbar etc.), WAPOL say they will charge you for not ensuring your tools were secured

    Same here in QLD.

  55. DrBeauGan

    cohenite
    #2782747, posted on August 6, 2018 at 10:50 pm
    The hunchback’s guide to gender correct terminology:

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155858354994370&set=a.10150149146444370.295334.573739369&type=3&theater

    I guess it’s a love of controlling people and nothing substantive to do. Dedicating your days work to making a fraction of a percent of the population not feel so bad about being twisted sickos as they might ought to be a low priority.

  56. Oh come on

    Ok Zulu, farms can be non-profit entities, like churches. No taxes, no profits, we’ll all be grateful for the work being done by these selfless farmers, many are called but few are chosen etc.

    Is that what you want? Or are you just another business?

  57. Oh come on

    That’s really what it breaks down to. If you’re doing what you’re doing to maximise your profit, please end the special pleading. No you aren’t special. Your average mine is more economically productive than your average farm, for starters. Should we thank a miner for doing his job? If not why not?

  58. JC

    JC, if you have any more priceless gems of wisdom to cast on this blog – ” any business” (Snork, snork) could you really share them with us?

    Like this you irredeemable dickhead.

    I may have been prone, in my younger days, to settle arguments with my fists, I may have caused the military and service police to earn their pay in my younger days, I may have separated young ladies – and some old enough to know better – from the odious burden of their chastity, but I have NEVER, but NEVER, sunk to the depths of voting Labor.

    Or this:

    Ummm, no, Dad. Since you’re now gone, I can tell you it was your oldest son who dropped one of the .303 blanks you had in a tin in the shed into the bin. Father, now that you have been gone all these years, I can reveal which of your sons it was who tried to shoot a crow, with a .303 rifle, and shot a hole in the house rainwater tank in the process. It wasn’t your eldest son – the prodigal son, the one who you said would never come to any good – it was your favourite son, the son you were grooming to run the whole enterprise, and who fucked off East, and left the prodigal son to run the whole matter. Rest in peace, Dad

    How about this:

    Hey, whitefella, lend us twenty bucks until pension day?

    And this

    I’m getting quietly smashed here, – as a self funded retiree, I’ve got forty thousand dollars going into my bank account, courtesy of Broken Hill, and Wesfarmers,sometime in the next two weeks..

    The rankest, most dickhead stuff ever posted here.

  59. cohenite

    Miss Southern and Molyneux eviscerate a dumb as bricks kiwi interviewer who is so stupid, so arrogant, so ugly he doesn’t realise:

  60. BrettW

    Just catching up with the Drum.

    One of the more interesting shows. Surprise surprise heavy on support for Sudanese in Melbourne and Blair Cotteral clearly triggered people. Sky News very bad and morphed into the Austraoian also bad because of Bolts column on migration.

    Ellen Fanning on the attack against The Australian but Caroline Overington held her own (except when she agreed with Crusg Emerson in dislike of Bolt column.

    Definitely a strong go at News Corp papers for its reporting on Sudanese crime and migration.

  61. Makka

    Definitely a strong go at News Corp papers for its reporting on Sudanese crime and migration.

    I’m guessing they didn’t interview any of the old dears brutalized in their homes by these African swine?

  62. Snoopy

    Miss Southern and Molyneux eviscerate a dumb as bricks kiwi interviewer who is so stupid, so arrogant, so ugly he doesn’t realise:

    Watch it for the LOLs.

  63. jupes

    Miss Southern and Molyneux eviscerate a dumb as bricks kiwi interviewer who is so stupid, so arrogant, so ugly he doesn’t realise:

    Good grief! How dumb is that bloke?

  64. BrettW

    Makka,
    Clearly you have not been paying attention to the thoughts of Comical Waleed Aly who says the problem only exists on talk back radio. Plus he was miffed not been invited to join a gang.

    Warning that episode does feature Tim Soupy blathering.

  65. DrBeauGan

    Good grief! How dumb is that bloke?

    Jupes, he was proving that white people can have incredibly low IQs too. 😁

  66. JC

    This is going to end up at the Supreme court and the lawsuits are going to be flying.

    The Trump Administration in July withdrew Obama-era guidance that gave colleges a wink and a nod to racially discriminate. This means that colleges like Harvard that use racial preferences in admissions will receive more legal scrutiny, and the examination should be instructive.

    Between 2011 and 2016, the Obama Education Department issued seven notices advising colleges how they may legally promote racial diversity. The 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits racial discrimination by institutions receiving federal funds. But the Supreme Court has held that colleges may consider race in admissions as long it isn’t the “decisive” factor. Quotas and point systems are forbidden.

    The Obama department advised colleges to consider race as part of what it called an “individualized, holistic review of all applicants.” Colleges also were urged to consider race-neutral alternatives, but that they need not be adopted if they are “unworkable.” In other words, it’s the thought that counts. Many colleges took the guidance as cover to discriminate.

    Harvard’s practices will be the first to be examined under this new spotlight. Students for Fair Admissions has sued the school for discriminating against Asian-American applicants and unconstitutionally favoring other minority groups. The case hasn’t gone to trial, but the plaintiff group’s legal filings based on discovery and depositions are revealing the secrets of Harvard’s use of race.

    Consider Harvard’s “holistic” admissions review. Applicants are rated on a scale of one to six on academics, extracurricular activities, athletics and highly subjective “personal” criteria. Admissions officers also assign applicants an overall score.

    According to Students for Fair Admissions, Asian-Americans boasted higher extracurricular and academic ratings than all other racial groups. They also received higher scores from alumni interviewers. But they were rated disproportionately lower on personal criteria. Only about one in five Asian-Americans in the top 10% of academic performers received a “2” personal rating. Yet blacks and Hispanics with much lower grades and SAT scores received high personal ratings.

    Asian-Americans also disproportionately received lower composite scores. Blacks in the top 10% of academic performers were three times more likely than Asian-Americans to receive a “2” overall rating (“1” is the best). A sample of applicant summary sheets disproportionately refer to Asian-Americans as “busy and bright” and “standard strong”—labels that liberals might call micro-aggressions.

    Following complaints of discrimination, Harvard’s Office of Institutional Research (OIR) in 2013 produced three internal reports showing its admissions process was biased against Asian-Americans. Harvard disclosed the reports during discovery in the lawsuit. One report found that purely “demographic” factors reduced the share of admitted Asian-Americans by 30% while increasing the proportion of admitted Latinos by about 140% and blacks by 370%.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/harvards-education-in-discrimination-1533502018

  67. JC

    I’d be surprised if there isn’t a damages claim here and all the other colleges.

  68. Miss Southern and Molyneux eviscerate a dumb as bricks kiwi interviewer who is so stupid, so arrogant, so ugly he doesn’t realise:

    I couldn’t get past halfway. The interviewer couldn’t have beckoned himself more had he wore a curly red wig, giant shoes, a stupid red nose and braces for oversized pants.

    It wasn’t even a fair fight.

  69. Beclowned, not beckoned. Spell checker is literally Satan.

  70. None

    OMG that Kiwi presenter is a DRONGO. LOW ENERGY, LOW IQ.

  71. Snoopy

    Have you been paying attention?

    Facebook, well-known as a breeding ground for misinformation, has a particular problem with disseminating false and misleading messages about climate change science. The platform spreads climate-denying videos and other posts, hosts climate-denying ads, and officially partners with climate-denying media outlets and organizations.
    >
    >
    Combating fake news is key to combating climate change. As an editorial in the journal Nature Communications argued last year, “Successfully inoculating society against fake news is arguably essential” if major climate initiatives are to succeed. Facebook could be a big part of the solution. But by kowtowing to conservatives, prioritizing profits over accuracy, and maintaining open-door policies toward misinformation, Facebook is entrenching itself as a major part of the problem.

    Media Nutters

  72. None

    I can’t stand Molyneux, total flake, and I think Southern is a lightweight so imagine how dumb that NZ presenter is. The look on Southern’s face was priceless. At times she looked like she was trying to work out if this guy was a parody.

  73. Pedro the Ignorant

    Evening again, Cats.
    Back in my dingy little donga in Boulder after the mandatory pub crawl through Hannan street and surrounds.
    Dinner with some fellow delegates was what looked like a heated steel plough disc heaped with Mongolian beef and weird veggies plus a bucket of rice and a few litres of Carlton Draught.
    Luckily I abandoned the daytime suit and tie for King Gee work clobber (no, not hi vis) and this absorbed the high speed fat splatter without drama.
    Day’s highlights.
    Señor Barosso sniped at The Don’s trade tariffs, slagged the US “about face” on free trade and bagged the UK Brexit. Very upbeat on world peace and global investment, however.
    About what you would expect from a former EU commish. Much rolling of eyes from attendees.
    Presenters from various companies very bullish on their product , well duh….
    The “off the program” chats revealed a bit of doom and gloom from the lithium and graphite peeps, the recent short selling of Li stocks is causing the vapours.
    Goldbugs are not happy with the recent dive in spot price, $A1740 in April/May, down to $A1640 today, but most of the canny producers are favourably hedged well into the future.
    Inflationary pressures are a worry for some with fuel, labour costs, power generation through the roof and as always, the cold, dead hand of government regulation cutting into margins.
    Some fascinating exhibits in robotics, drones and automation on display, and I am ditching a couple of the more boring presentations tomorrow to have a closer look at some of this high tech magic.
    Finally, best investment opportunity seen today was the skimpies. Cashed up delegates tipping like ther is no tomorrow.
    One spectacularly endowed young lady will be in the market for a new Porsche roadster in the near future.😀
    Tired and emotional, off to the sack, g’nite from beautiful downtown Boulder.

    More D&D reports may happen tomorrow, Gaia willing.

  74. pete m

    Pedro, everyone is waiting for the photos.
    Or Tom’s cartoon links.

  75. Tom

    Peter Broelman is one of the lefties, like Fakefacts weather hysteric/CAGW propagandist Peter Hannan, who’s looking for a way to attack the foundation set up to handle Trumble gubmint funds for the Little Reef That Could. Broelman titles his latest cartoon “So what’s the catch?”

  76. pete m

    Zanetti bit unfair

    ABC had scientist who said some farmers did better in droughts by moving from beasts to wheat and their roi was 8 % over 10years with 2 years of drought. Farmers who went thru 2 years in a row of drought and adjusted were better off than ones facing 1 year of drought twice in same period.
    Funny stats
    Presenter didn’t know what to make of a scientist explaining how farmers could do well thru droughts when they showed flexibility to change from before

    He also mentioned farmers better off today due to higher meat prices as previous droughts had seen very low prices so double whammy

    Again almost silence from the abc chick

  77. Tom

    A.F. Branco (one of the right-of-centre cartoonists whose postings are being shadow-banned by the fascists at Twitter. More here.)

  78. pete m

    Tom, haters gotta hate

  79. 2dogs

    Miss Southern and Molyneux eviscerate a dumb as bricks kiwi interviewer

    What gets me is this: what Southern and Molyneux are saying seems to be in line with the basic platform of NZ First. So how can Peters support Ardern when she attacks these two?

    Clearly, it’s “bait and switch” – same thing that happened with the Powerstation booking.

  80. Tom

    Thanks to Pedro upthread for his Diggers and Dealers post from Kalgoorlie-Boulder. Look forward to your next instalment.

  81. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you Tom, I loved the Ramirez #1

  82. Tintarella di Luna

    Thanks to the poster of the Southern/Molyneaux interview on NZ TV with that low energy knob.

  83. Up The Workers!

    The farmers problem is that they have too much of the same sort of weather.

    What they need is some diversity.

    I reckon if they were all to paint their little finger-nail pink, it might just…

  84. Nick

    Thanks Cohenite, that was laugh out loud viewing. WTF does a force field have to do with Maori culture anyway? The reposte about whether it was racist to infer maoris have no sense of humour was a beauty.

  85. Gary

    SHOT: Left-wing mob interrupts Candace Owens’ breakfast with primal screams. “As you can see in this clip, Kirk and Owens are inside the restaurant and some of the protesters are inside screaming at them. When they head outside a small mob is chanting and giving them the finger. The protesters, who appear to be mostly young, white women, chant ‘F**k white supremacy.’ Someone with a bullhorn is yelling in Candace Owens ear and she tells that person to back off. And then the protesters begin primal screaming as loud as they can. The look on Owens’ face is priceless.”

  86. Tintarella di Luna

    The reposte about whether it was racist to infer maoris have no sense of humour was a beauty.

    The dumb arse was actually struck dumb, the thought had never occurred to him and you could virtually hear it traipsing across the desert of what must be his mind, bumping into nothing and falling out his left ear. Truly, an embarrassment.

  87. Tom

    Left-wing mob interrupts Candace Owens’ breakfast with primal screams.

    The left is re-enacting the Brown Shirts rampages of the Third Reich while their fascist overlords are behaving like corporate hoodlums:

    Paul Joseph Watson‏Verified account @PrisonPlanet

    Big Tech is engaging in election meddling and COLLUSION.

    Apple, Facebook, Spotify, YouTube (Google) all banned Infowars within 12 hours of each other.

    This is unprecedented.

    This is political warfare.

    Just another day in the neo-fascist revival of the 21st century.

    George Orwell was a prophet.

  88. hzhousewife

    Saw a brief tv grab of Ms Ardern (holding baby) being very dogmatic about not wanting Southern/Molyneaux to speak, is it too long a bow to draw that the cancellation was ordered from “on high”. If so, NZ is in deep deep doo doo for the next few years.

  89. Gary

    The west have absolutely no high ground to lecture others about exploitation of children.

  90. 132andBush

    Miss Southern and Molyneux eviscerate a dumb as bricks kiwi interviewer who is so stupid, so arrogant, so ugly he doesn’t realise:

    For once a “(Blank) DESTROYS (Blank)” video that lives up to it’s title.

  91. Tom

    As Dinesh D’Souza points out, the current platform of the Democratic Party in the US could have been written by the authors of the National Socialist Workers Party manifesto in the 1930s.

  92. Cassie of Sydney

    “Tom
    #2782809, posted on August 7, 2018 at 6:48 am
    Left-wing mob interrupts Candace Owens’ breakfast with primal screams.

    The left is re-enacting the Brown Shirts rampages of the Third Reich while their fascist overlords are behaving like corporate hoodlums:

    Paul Joseph Watson‏Verified account @PrisonPlanet

    Big Tech is engaging in election meddling and COLLUSION.

    Apple, Facebook, Spotify, YouTube (Google) all banned Infowars within 12 hours of each other.

    This is unprecedented.

    This is political warfare.

    Just another day in the neo-fascist revival of the 21st century.

    George Orwell was a prophet.”

    I have just watched with Sargon’s very rational and lucid analysis which he has uploaded in the last 1/2 hour.

    Sargon nails it and as he ominously says “First, They Came For Alex Jones”.

  93. Top Ender

    For god’s sake go! And the reason revealed why no comments under Husar stories in the Oz.

    Comcar’s $570 bill waiting for Husar at corporate breakfast

    Federal Labor MP Emma Husar clocked up a $570 taxpayer-funded Comcar bill for a trip from her home in Sydney’s west to catch an interstate flight by allegedly having her driver wait for hours in the city while she attended a breakfast fundraiser and Bill Shorten policy launch.

    The bill, more than four times the usual cost of a direct Comcar trip to Sydney airport, was incurred in March on the day Ms Husar flew to Queensland for ­official business, and to attend a Bruno Mars concert with a friend.

    Guidelines for MPs’ taxpayer-funded travel are strict in stating Comcars are available only for direct transport between home and a local airport for parliamentary business or political party meetings.

    The Labor MP, battling allegations she bullied staff and misused taxpayer funds, was entitled to use a Comcar on March 13 because she was bound for Cairns to attend a NDIS parliamentary committee hearing the next day.

    But guidelines set by the Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority do not appear to provide for detours to attend ­unrelated events on the way.

    A review of Ms Husar’s expenses reports shows Comcar bills for journeys from her home or electorate office to Sydney airport have usually been in a range of $132 to $178. The estimated taxi fare for this trip is about $171, depending on traffic.

    It appears Ms Husar’s Comcar bill for March 13 ran up to $570 because she left home early for Sydney airport but went first to Barangaroo, Sydney’s new corporate hub, where she ­attended a breakfast fundraiser for Women’s Community Shelters sponsored by Westpac.

    It appears she remained at Barangaroo for some hours, possibly to attend a Labor policy launch next door at KPMG by the Opposition Leader.

    The $570 Comcar bill, along with others, is likely to be the subject of an IPEA check of all Ms Husar’s spending as an MP.

    The Australian asked Ms Husar why the Comcar charge in March was so high compared with others, why the Comcar ­appears to have been used for a detour to events at Barangaroo, and whether the Comcar use fell within IPEA guidelines.

    A spokesman for Ms Husar said: “Emma has already asked IPEA to review her travel e­xpenses so she can be satisfied it is within the rules.”

    The Australian reported last week that Ms Husar travelled to Cairns for an NDIS committee hearing in March but skipped the second day of proceedings to join a friend at a Bruno Mars concert in Brisbane.

    Ms Husar charged taxpayers for the Cairns-to-Brisbane flight, for travel allowance and for a Comcar on the night of the concert. The Brisbane trip was work-related because of meetings with domestic violence groups the next day, she said.

    The Daily Telegraph reported that the Brisbane schedule was fixed only the day before Ms Hussar arrived. In a tweet, Ms Husar said she was “confident” she had acted within the rules.

    An interim report due to be handed to the NSW ALP’s head office this week on allegations from 20 witnesses about Ms Husar’s alleged bullying of staff and other conduct could be used to disendorse her if there are findings of wrongdoing.

    Ms Husar told The Sydney Morning Herald last night that allegations of sexual harassment and bullying arose only after she dismissed staffer Jeremy Anderson for poor performance.

    Mr Anderson “categorically denied’’ Ms Husar’s claims.

    The Herald also reported Ms Husar had retained a defamation barrister and that letters were sent to Mr Anderson, BuzzFeed and News Corp Australia.

    Link

  94. Geriatric Mayfly

    Earth ‘2 degrees from hothouse’
    A two degree rise in global temperatures could spark a “Hothouse Earth’’ cascade of feedbacks with terrible consequences.

    Good news to begin the day. Here on the Plains of Sodom, I have given up growing the larger varieties of tomatoes, as the bloody things never ripen. There is only so much green tomato pickle a chap can tolerate.

  95. Eyrie

    ” If so, NZ is in deep deep doo doo for the next few years.”
    New Zealand is a fascist shithole, made worse by that vicious commie bitch Ardern.

  96. Tom

    Sargon nails it and as he ominously says “First, They Came For Alex Jones”.

    A great post on the escalating threat to free speech from Big Tech.

  97. Farmer Gez

    Earth ‘2 degrees from hothouse’
    A two degree rise in global temperatures could spark a “Hothouse Earth’’ cascade of feedbacks with terrible consequences.

    Hardly worth having breakfast really.

  98. Geriatric Mayfly

    NAB quizzed on trail commission
    NAB went to extraordinary lengths to keep paying now-illegal trailing commissions to

    Yesterday I was puzzled as to why the best line from the TURC namely: ‘I can’t recall,’ had crept into these proceedings at the Banking RC. And here is the clue.

  99. John Constantine

    Armageddon imminent gloats their ABC.

    Then gloats that immigration will see us move from 25 to 26 million population in the next three years, give or take a year.

    The agenda their ABC is building up is that we must deindustrialise and rewild, while massively importing clients for an industrial economy.

    While too bankrupt to afford infrastructure for the teeming millions of imports.

    Communal Armageddon into the arms of Stalin.

    Comrades.

  100. Snoopy

    Being green is just so, so, so problematic.

    Buying reusable bags every time you shop is worse than just using plastic

    From The Conversation via TheirABC.

    Do read it. It’s a gem.

  101. Has the cold weather in Dannograd made the news and their ABC go all warmy?

  102. C.L.

    Glenn Reynolds:

    REMINDER: Red meat halves risk of depression: Women who reduce lamb and beef in their diets are more likely to suffer depression, according to the new study. You quit red meat, go vegetarian, and the next thing you know you’ve dyed your hair pink and are leading a miserable life posting hate-tweets about white men on twitter. Have a steak instead!

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/304013/

  103. Dr Faustus

    A two degree rise in global temperatures could spark a “Hothouse Earth’’ cascade of feedbacks with terrible consequences.

    Cheer up, GM.

    The Prophet of Doom is Will Steffen, and:

    The study did not lay down a timeframe for when such events would begin to occur, but theorised — if the threshold was crossed — it could be within a century or two.

    Gomorrah. It’s always Gomorrah…

  104. C.L.

    Cascade of feedbacks

    Sounds very sciencey.

  105. cohenite

    The Prophet of Doom is Will Steffen

    There’s a lot of the 3rd rate bastards but steffen, karoly and flannery are at the top of the turd pile.

  106. John Constantine

    Inequality, we are add importing millions of poor people for the Ponzi, and our wealth redistribution isn’t keeping up, warns their left.

  107. A two degree rise in global temperatures could spark a “Hothouse Earth’’ cascade of feedbacks with terrible consequences.

    Isn’t it amazing that in four and a half billion years that that has never happened, or Earth would be uninhabitable. Even more amazing is far higher temperatures not resulting in runaway global warming.

    Like the return of explicit socialism, they now think the kids have been sufficiently indoctrinated to believe any old shit.

    Meanwhile, my 11 year old has started using the term “feminazi”, despite dad never uttering the word in front of him.

  108. Dave in Marybrook

    Pedro, although you’re probably sleeping it off-
    that heated plough disc is actually mimicking a Mongolian Hordesman’s shield. There was once a ripper Mongolian BBQ place in Perth that cooked on one, live charcoal beneath, and a seven foot spear to toss the fry-up.

  109. mh

    I thought I would check how Chicago’s strict gun control laws are working out.

    Oh….

    75 SHOT IN CHICAGO OVER WEEKEND

    Anti-gun advocates remained relatively silent over the weekend as approximately 75 people were shot in Chicago.
    Between Friday afternoon and early Monday 63 people were wounded and 12 killed during shootings across the crime-ridden city’s South and West sides.
    In just a 7-hour period over the weekend, the Chicago Tribune reports, 41 people were hit by gunfire.

    Ages of the victims ranged from as young as 11 up to 62 years of age.
    “The largest attack wounded eight people in the South Side’s Gresham neighborhood around 12:40 a.m. Monday, including a 14-year-old girl and two 17-year-old girls,” the Tribune reports. “Two 17-year-olds shot in separate incidents were the weekend’s youngest homicide victims.”

    https://www.infowars.com/75-shot-in-chicago-over-weekend/

  110. Dr Faustus

    Buying reusable bags every time you shop is worse than just using plastic

    Organic, free-range cotton bags, in particular, are the work of the Devil. To avoid being (somehow) worse than single use supermarket bags, “cotton bags should be used 7,100 times“.

    We supermarket shop once a week.
    At that rate, if we used them, we would need to keep our cotton bags for 130 years.

    Heirlooms.

  111. DavidH

    Good news for Europeans sweltering in the heat wave – it should be over soon. Why? The UK Met Office is predicting the heat may last until October.

  112. Dave in Marybrook

    That explains why Obama’s daft library rises above the wasteland much like a gun turret, mh.
    Nine MSM says The issue of gun violence in Chicago is inextricably linked to the city’s frequently testy politics. Doesn’t spell out BLM though.

  113. How about we put those bags outside in a pile in the Dreadful Heat™ .
    Let them melt/fry in the never before seen midday winter sun?

  114. Farmer Gez

    I’m off to load hay going to a very big dairy farm.
    Plenty of extra milk needed for our 25 million.
    The poor old moo cows will barely be able to cover the froth needed for the cappuccinos.

  115. mh

    Obama could calm the oceans but not stop violence in his home town. Funny that.

  116. 132andBush

    Not true. Successful speculative traders make the market more efficient by punishing the bad and rewarding the good. Unsuccessful speculative traders go broke.

    From last night.
    Not sure what you’re getting at here, OCO.
    Other than saying good spec traders survive and bad ones don’t. In the meantime the sometimes wild fluctuations in grain prices is something we could well do without.

  117. Baldrick

    Left-wing mob interrupts Candace Owens’ breakfast with primal screams.

    I think the last time Democrats hounded a black woman out of a restaurant was the 1960’s.

  118. mh

    Paul Joseph Watson

    @PrisonPlanet
    Apple chose to shut down Infowars after repeated criticism of them selling data to and working with Communist Chinese government. Just a coincidence.
    1:12 AM – Aug 7, 2018

  119. Herodotus

    None, you were already pretty close to being a total scroll-past, but this is the clincher:

    I can’t stand Molyneux, total flake, and I think Southern is a lightweight

  120. Geriatric Mayfly

    Left-wing mob interrupts Candace Owens’ breakfast with primal screams.

    Baboons cover many octaves of the primal scream, I wonder if by any chance they are related.

  121. calli

    For once a “(Blank) DESTROYS (Blank)” video that lives up to it’s title.

    😀

    So much false advertising on the interwebs. That interviewer would only just scrape in as a sentient life form. The Bugman’s Useful Idiot.

  122. Snoopy

    Apple, Facebook, Spotify, YouTube (Google) all banned Infowars within 12 hours of each other.

    This is unprecedented.

    Within 12 hours? Maybe. Otherwise it’s not.

  123. Mark A

    132andBush
    #2782846, posted on August 7, 2018 at 8:31 am

    Not true. Successful speculative traders make the market more efficient by punishing the bad and rewarding the good. Unsuccessful speculative traders go broke.

    From last night.
    Not sure what you’re getting at here, OCO.
    Other than saying good spec traders survive and bad ones don’t. In the meantime the sometimes wild fluctuations in grain prices is something we could well do without.

    Just a thought bubble, would the world stop if there was no stock exchange?

  124. woolfe

    Made a comment in the Paywallian about the choice of the photo of Steffan having crazed eyes. Of course it did not make it through their censors.

  125. cohenite

    By way of counterpoise to what that bastard steffen is saying about tipping points here is the inestimable Ian Plimer:

    Repeat after me: carbon dioxide is good for us

    Ian Plimer The Australian August 7, 2018

    Climate policy is underpinned by two fallacies. The first is that human emissions of carbon dioxide drive global warming. The second is that future climate can be predicted from computer models.

    It has yet to be shown that human emissions of carbon dioxide drive climate change. More than 100 climate models over the past 30 years did not predict what actually happened because it was assumed carbon dioxide had the pivotal role in driving climate change and that the effects of clouds, back-radiation and the sun were trivial.

    Climate projections also assume that planet Earth is not dynamic and that a temporary terrestrial vertebrate on an evolving planet can change major planetary and extraterrestrial systems.

    Unless the past is understood, climate projections can be only highly speculative. Even in our own lifetimes, there is no relationship between temperature and carbon dioxide emissions by ­humans, yet there is a very close relationship between solar activity and temperature.

    Since the beginning of time, water vapour has been the main greenhouse gas and carbon dioxide has had a minuscule effect on global climate.

    Carbon dioxide is a trace gas in the atmosphere. We are expected to believe that emission of traces of a trace gas into the atmosphere is a major planetary driving force. If the atmosphere comprised 85,000 molecules, the total carbon dioxide emissions added annually would be 33 molecules, of which only one molecule would be from human emissions and the other 32 from natural emissions. Do we really believe that one bellowing fan in a crowd of 85,000 at the MCG can completely change the course of a game?

    For the past 4567 million years, the sun and the Earth’s orbit have driven climate change cycles. In the past, the atmospheric carbon dioxide content has been orders of magnitude higher than now, yet there were ice ages.

    We currently live in an interglacial during an ice age with alternating cycles of glaciations and interglacials. The current interglacial reached a peak about 5000 years ago. Since then, the planet has been cooling on a millennial scale and no amount of hot air, agreements, taxes, environmental wailing or legislation can change the fact that the Earth’s orbit is slowly taking us farther from the sun.

    Just 1.25 per cent of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere-ocean system has been released by ­humans in the past 250 years. The ­atmospheric residency time of carbon dioxide is five years and it is quickly sequestered into plants, marine life, oceans and sediments. If human emissions of carbon dioxide drive global warming, why have there been slight warmings and coolings since the Industrial Revolution? Why is it that human emissions of carbon dioxide drive global warming yet natural emissions do not?

    Carbon dioxide is plant food. Horticulturalists pump warm carbon dioxide into glasshouses to stimulate growth. Over the past 30 years, planet Earth has greened due to a slight increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Without carbon dioxide, there would be no complex life on earth. It is neither pollution nor a poison, and in the past the atmospheric carbon dioxide content has varied enormously.

    When the atmospheric carbon dioxide content was low, plants struggled. When it was high, there was an expansion and increasing diversity of vegetation.

    In addition, when it was warm, life expanded, whereas when it was cold, life contracted. Over historical times, when it was cold there was human depopulation. When it was warm, economies thrived.

    Biological, geological and planetary systems are extremely robust. Our evolving dynamic planet has survived sea level changes of hundreds of metres, super volcanoes filling the atmosphere with dust, asteroid impacts, mass extinctions, ice ages and global warming. For most of time, Earth has been a warm, wet volcanic planet with no polar ice.

    Australia has uranium, coal and gas for generations. Fracking for tight gas and oil could further extend energy resources. We are the envy of the world. Australia once had cheap, reliable electricity and the states competed to provide cheap, long-term, reliable energy to attract industry.

    Now the states rely on the weather and compete to reach the bottom. South Australia is winning: it has the most unreliable grid in the world outside Africa and the most expensive electricity. When South Australians buy electricity at $14,200/MWh, they are paying the equivalent of $400 a litre for petrol.

    As soon as the word emissions entered the language and became part of a religious ideology, electricity prices skyrocketed, electricity supply became more unreliable, subsidies for wind and solar energy went through the roof and employers and consumers had massive cost increases. Never mind that the emissions of carbon dioxide to make and maintain a wind or solar industrial complex are far greater than they will ever save.

    The Paris accord is non-binding. This is recognised by the major carbon dioxide emitters such as China, India and the US, which don’t comply. No EU state has met its target. Why should Australia be the only country out of step and aim for an impossible, bankrupting reduction of 26 per cent or more of our 2005 carbon dioxide emissions?

    Pragmatism and principled inaction is the correct policy to ­address the non-problem of human-induced climate change promoted by the Paris accord. But do our politicians have the courage to thoughtfully do nothing?

    We are in an electricity crisis because we are trying to decrease human emissions of carbon dioxide and have tied climate policy and electricity generation costs to emissions. A reality check is needed. Even if human-induced global warming could be shown, a reduction in Australian emissions, comprising 1.3 per cent of global annual emissions, is dwarfed by annual increases of 2 per cent globally and 4 per cent by China.

    Australia’s symbolic suicidal climate policy just makes everybody poorer.

    We face further turnover of prime ministers and governments until the costs and reliability of electricity are addressed and until the fundamentalist religious mantra that emissions drive global warming is rejected.

    Politicians need to realise that the electorate wants cheap electricity and a reduction of emissions concurrent with subsidies for unreliable weather-dependent electricity can neither reduce costs nor increase reliability.

    Meanwhile, employment-generating businesses will close, household costs will become impossibly high, international competitiveness will fall and governments will change.

    Emissions must be banned. From the language. Not from coal-fired power stations that have provided cheap, reliable electricity for generations. It is only then that we will have stable government and cheap reliable electricity again.

    Emeritus professor Ian Plimer’s latest book, Climate Delusion and the Great Electricity Rip-Off, is published by Connor Court.

  126. John Constantine

    In all seriousness, we have imported millions of poor people from the world’s poorest places, and our elites have given them interest only mass lines of consumer debt.

    Told them to go hang themselves up on consumer debt lines and sail upon the seas of Ponzi property multiple jnterest only mortgages.

    It will be revolutionary when the millions of Ponzi dollars evaporate.

    Comrades.

  127. calli

    As with all matters environmental, it’s essential we have the right knowledge to make informed decisions. After looking at all this data, here are the things I’d like you to remember:

    whatever bag type you use, use it as many times as possible
    choose bags made from recyclable materials
    avoid bags that have printing or decorations — these alone can add significantly to the environmental burden of the bag
    never allow a bag to become litter — recycle, reuse and repurpose your bags.

    The people at the Conversation are the dumbest people on earth.

  128. Baldrick

    Apple, Facebook, Spotify, YouTube (Google) all banned Infowars within 12 hours of each other.

    Analogue Book Burning – Germany, circa 1933

    Digital Book Burning – Silicon Valley, circa 2018

  129. Bruce of Newcastle

    Obama could calm the oceans but not stop violence in his home town. Funny that.

    He’s just been awarded another peace prize.

    Former President Barack Obama has received another peace prize.

    The former president was named a Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Ripple of Hope laureate Monday. The award honors those who “work toward a more just and peaceful world.” The RFK nonprofit tweeted that it is “honored to present Barack Obama” with the award.

    I suppose it is a numbers thing, eventually one of these awards is sure to work.

  130. Snoopy

    The people at the Conversation are the dumbest people on earth.

    Hey! They’re the cream of Australian academia.

  131. Now the states rely on the weather and compete to reach the bottom. South Australia is winning…

    Liberty quote.

  132. Meanwhile, employment-generating businesses will close, household costs will become impossibly high, international competitiveness will fall and governments will change. frequently.

  133. Baldrick

    Because shut up right-wing conspiracy theorist …

    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    Facebook and other tech firms ban pages of high-profile right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones

  134. Eddystone

    I just watched that interview of Lauren Southern and Stephan Molyneux.

    It has to be one of the worst train wrecks a professional? interviewer could have.

    They wiped the floor with him.

    Molyneux reached out to shake his hand at the end, almost in apology for the drubbing he had just handed out, so Southern did too, but she pulled her hand back straight after shaking hands, as if she had accidentally touched something really nasty.

    PS Lauren looks to have a nice set of pins.

  135. Mother Lode

    The great thing with the boy all aflutter talking to Southern and Molyneux was the way he stopped him finishing what he was saying about IQ.

    If you believe the person you are interviewing is about to say something stupid, and you believe your audience are smart, then you would sit back and let the interviewee make a fool of themself. You would chortle at how they had done your job for you.

    So this interviewer has the typical MSM reflex to shut people up before the audience can hear what they say.

    I have no doubt the interviewer is convinced that Molyneux was wrong – he would feel it in his gut (even if he didn’t understand why). So, it must be that he thinks his audience stupid, and they they could be seduced to doubleplusungoodthink by a siren song that would appeal to their secret prejudices.

    And, of course, this is exactly how the MSM think.

    What is telling, however, is that the ABC does it to. It would seem they distrust the intellect of viewers too.

    Here we are in agreement.

  136. Des Deskperson

    “Federal Labor MP Emma Husar clocked up a $570 taxpayer-funded Comcar bill for a trip from her home in Sydney’s west to catch an interstate flight by allegedly having her driver wait for hours in the city while she attended a breakfast fundraiser and Bill Shorten policy launch……Guidelines for MPs’ taxpayer-funded travel are strict in stating Comcars are available only for direct transport between home and a local airport for parliamentary business or political party meetings.”

    I dunno whether these guidelines have been very recently introduced or whether they only apply to trips to the airport, but it certainly is or was common to see Comcars in Canberra waiting outside restaurants while polies had long lunches inside. That parvenue-ish restaurant diagonally opposite the Cathedral in Manuka used to be one place to spot them.

    Meanwhile, according to Fairfax – or should I now say ‘Nine”:

    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/politics/federal/fighting-to-survive-emma-husar-details-her-side-of-the-story-20180806-p4zvva.html

    Husar claims that the instigator of the campaign was one Jeremy [of course!] Anderson, dismissed because he ‘performed poorly as a policy and media advisor from the time he began in her office in June last year’. Two points here:

    Anderson would almost certainly not have been a MOPS employee. As a backbencher, Hussar would not have been entitled to a taxpayer funded media adviser, let alone a political adviser. I think it safe to assume that other complainants are also almost certainly ALP employees;

    Hussar told the FWC that Anderson’s employment period was too short, so the Commission had no jurisdiction to hear it. It sounds rather like one of the nasty trick that Labor is always accusing employers – especially small business – of performing.

  137. cohenite

    Here is the Lloyd piece on steffen and some abc hysteria. Follow the links at your peril. But this is what steffan wants:

    The paper says collective human action is required to steer the Earth system away from a potential threshold and stabilise it in a habitable interglacial-like state.

    “Such action entails stewardship of the entire Earth system — biosphere, climate and societies — and could include decarbonisation of the global economy, enhancement of biosphere carbon sinks, behavioural changes, technological innovations, new governance arrangements and transformed social values,” it says.

    Talking ain’t gonna beat these nutters.

  138. calli

    she pulled her hand back straight after shaking hands, as if she had accidentally touched something really nasty.

    Self preservation. She realised she was at the Event Horizon of Dumb and felt the suction.

    I, for one, do not judge her.

  139. Mother Lode

    The reposte about whether it was racist to infer maoris have no sense of humour was a beauty.

    You ever heard that clicking sound when a CD ROM drive is damaged, as it tries and tries again.

    This guy, having convinced himself that he is not racist through certain ostentatious rubrics and rituals, is suddenly confronted by the revelation that these practices are implicitly racist. “I will fight for Maoris, Blacks, Muzzies etc – because they are too stupid and week to fight properly for themselves against the superior forces of white people. It takes another whitey!”

  140. calli

    decarbonisation of the global economy

    Can we de-carbonise Steffan first, just so we know what to expect?

  141. H B Bear

    Talking ain’t gonna beat these nutters.

    The ALPBC were running that climate insanity on the 6am radio news. The place is even more unhinged under Googles G than The Nice Mr Scott. Rabz the joint.

  142. Myrddin Seren

    Thanks to Pedro for the Cat Deep Cover recce from Digger & Dealers – which was so good no one else had a word to say overnight.

    Keynote speaker José Manuel Barroso is, as Pedro noted, the former PM of Portugal and later President of the European Commission.

    Señor Barosso sniped at The Don’s trade tariffs, slagged the US “about face” on free trade and bagged the UK Brexit. Very upbeat on world peace and global investment, however.

    Globalists are always upbeat on ‘world peace’, once national governments are taken out of the picture. And one presumes ‘global investment’ from his keynote podium largely revolves around renewballs.

    In his university days, he was one of the leaders of the underground Maoist MRPP (Re-Organized Movement of the Proletariat Party, later PCTP/MRPP, Communist Party of the Portuguese Workers/Revolutionary Movement of the Portuguese Proletariat).

    A pedigree like quite a few others in globalist institutions.

    Then he had a miraculous political seachange:

    In December 1980, Barroso joined the right-of-centre PPD (Democratic Popular Party, later PPD/PSD-Social Democratic Party), where he remains to the present day.

    …the party is made up of many factions, mostly centre-right (including liberal democrats, Christian democrats and neoconservatives) as well as quasi-social-democrats and former Communists:

    Sounds like the Turnbull United Party – a pack of leftist entryists looking for a life absent the icepick politics of mainstream Leftism, but with much better career prospects – while they progress the Revolution from within.

    And Barroso’s career is pretty creamy: current non-executive chairman at Goldman Sachs International.

    And keynote speaker at that nexus of capitalism – Digger & Dealers. I am not sure if this tells you more about Barosso and the success of Leftist entryism or the supine surrender of corporate Australia to Leftism in pretty much all its forms ?

  143. John Constantine

    The take home message from their left is that wealth inequality in Australia is obscene and must be struggled against.

    Importing mass millions more poor people makes the wealth inequality even more glaring, but it does create revolutionary freedom fighting battallions to Struggle for Wealth Justice.

    Anybody that thought that the property population Ponzi rort crashing would slow the insane decolonialisation through deindustrialisation and mass migration push is wrong.

    We can create a Stalinist Australia by simply deindustrialising agriculture and breaching the dams, then mass importing millions of revolutionaries to vote and struggle for Sin Fines to take the stolen wealth of racism.

    Stack the imports into dogboxes, file them like human files in a packed filing cabinet, 30 millions in Melbourne and Sydney, all living on water from recycled sewerage and eating rations of fungus and algae grown on nutrient rich dewatered sewerage sludge. Heavily medicated for control purposes.

    We will be unwavering in our compliance with our signed united nations compact on Big Rewilded Decolonialised Stalinist Gulag Australia.

    Comrades.

  144. thefrolickingmole

    Hey! They’re the cream of Australian academia.

    Thats stuff that floats to the top, its not always cream.

    See: swamp, septic tanks and piggery effluent ponds.

  145. Mother Lode

    Self preservation. She realised she was at the Event Horizon of Dumb and felt the suction.

    LOL

  146. John Constantine

    Ever notice how their left now are screeching as they mock those that deny mass migration science?.

    ” They are afraid the newcomers will take all their money”

    Their left go to this talking point first, because mass wealth redistribution is exactly their intent.

    As always. [ but the orcs at the bottom all assume they will get to do the redistributing.]

    I listened to some earnest human rights law students once, they had driven around yarragrads mansion precinct, walking up to mansions with their blonde hair and blue eyes and screeching girlvoices to demand money be donated to the Revolution.

    They also were making lists about which dwellings were underutilised, and come the revolution could rehome large numbers of Revolutionaries. This is living the dream for their left.

    Comrades.

  147. cohenite

    Yeah, that handshake. Miss Southern is startled. It’s known that some strange people can generate electricity. It’s as though the normal brain electricity has been redirected to other parts of the body. Perhaps the interviewer is one of them.

  148. Mother Lode

    Regarding Candace Owens – the left is always trying to prove the right is aggressive. And yet it is invariably the left rioting, screaming, shouting, putting on masks and wielding poles and so on.

    Candace can’t even sit in a restaurant and eat breakfast without whooping apes driving her out.

    Yet, if you openly question the right of a man in a dress to go into the girls toilets you are an extremist.

  149. Myrddin Seren

    “Such action entails:

    …behavioural changes,…

    Interminable propaganda and banning stuff people like is slow going. I think forcibly tranqing people to accept the Brave New World is the more recent suggestion.

    …new governance arrangements…

    Yeah, yeah, yeah – end real democracy ASAP for governance by unelected elites. Clive Hamilton beat you guys to it years ago. Welcome to Panem.

    …. and transformed social values,”

    Accept the joy of waiting quietly in your eco-housing unit in a 100-storey building until your number is called to joyously present yourself at the Soylent Green Centre for biospheric enhancement.

  150. 132andBush

    Southern regarded that idiot the same way a cat regards an incapacitated rodent.

  151. Perhaps the interviewer is one of them.

    Maybe a dead cold vampire hand?

  152. I mean we have a real (walking dead) zombie as premier in Victoristan. Anything is possible.

  153. Eddystone

    Patrick Gower sits down with his progressive mates and explains his poor showing.

    Admits “they nailed me”, but otherwise totally misses the point.

    Gets consoling handshake from bloke next to him, who manages to not immediately wipe his hand.

  154. Snoopy

    Regarding Candace Owens – the left is always trying to prove the right is aggressive. And yet it is invariably the left rioting, screaming, shouting, putting on masks and wielding poles and so on.

    Nonsense.

  155. Two excellent essays on the recent ‘development in doctrine’ by Bergoglio on capital punishment by Sandro Magister, and, by Edward Feser .

  156. thefrolickingmole

    Pedro

    Relative of mine owns D&D forum now, any suggestions?

    Oh and does the talented skimpy have a website, I need it for…reasons.

    Event Horizon ( was only watching this 2 nights ago, old movie holds up pretty well)

    “We dont need brains where were going”…

  157. C.L.

    Yesterday we discussed ‘Brigadier’ Whats-Her-Name getting an AC for being in the ADF for four years.

    So it’s nice to see somebody get a gong who deserves it …

    Rosemary has been selling poppies for returned servicemen for 97 years.

    Good on you, Rosemary!

  158. Roger

    Two excellent essays on the recent ‘development in doctrine’ by Bergoglio on capital punishment by Sandro Magister, and, by Edward Feser .

    Thanks dover.

  159. Snoopy

    Patrick Gower sits down with his progressive mates and explains his poor showing.

    Admits “they nailed me”, but otherwise totally misses the point.

    He can barely string three words together. How he got his job would be a story in itself. Is he somebody’s baby? A diversity hire?

  160. Andreas

    Regarding Candace Owens – the left is always trying to prove the right is aggressive. And yet it is invariably the left rioting, screaming, shouting, putting on masks and wielding poles and so on.

    Will mUnty ever have the realisation? ‘Are… are we the baddies?’

  161. Mother Lode

    frollicking,

    I started re-watching Event Horizon recently too.

    One thing that leapt out (for me anyway) was the flag on Sam Neill’s suit. It was an Australian flag, with the Union Jack removed, and replaced by that awful Aboriginal tea-towel.

    Only a little thing, doesn’t impact the rest of the movie. But someone on the film thought it a point worth making.

  162. Roger

    Skimmed from thee morning headlines:

    25% of Australian households are in financial distress with > $1000 in the bank. Rising cost of living and slow/no wage growth to blame.

    90% of migrants settle in Sydney or Melbourne.

    Also, given the rise in the non-conformist vote at the recent by elections, it seems more Australians are realising that the Uniparty, which is responsible for the above state of affairs, is not their friend but their enemy.

  163. H B Bear

    Also, given the rise in the non-conformist vote at the recent by elections, it seems more Australians are realising that the Uniparty, which is responsible for the above state of affairs, is not their friend but their enemy.

    With compulsory preferential voting – so what?

  164. calli

    Lauren Southern frightened Paddy Gower? Really?

    Weaponised hair flicks?

    I note the Useful Idiot crowed about them losing money, so it was a “win for Nu Zullund”, snork, snork.

  165. C.L.

    Traditionally, the Catholic Church taught that while capital punishment is generally not licit, exceptions must be made for circumstances where convicted wrongdoers cannot be safely ore reliably incarcerated. I’ve cited the hanging of the ‘man burners’ in Lonesome Dove as an example of this. Captains “Gus” McCrae and Woodrow F. Call were in frontier country, with no law enforcement, jails or courts in the vicinity. In the Wojtyla era, the Church began diluting even this qualification. Thus, in the CCC …

    2267 Assuming that the guilty party’s identity and responsibility have been fully determined, the traditional teaching of the Church does not exclude recourse to the death penalty, if this is the only possible way of effectively defending human lives against the unjust aggressor.

    If, however, non-lethal means are sufficient to defend and protect people’s safety from the aggressor, authority will limit itself to such means, as these are more in keeping with the concrete conditions of the common good and more in conformity to the dignity of the human person.

    Today, in fact, as a consequence of the possibilities which the state has for effectively preventing crime, by rendering one who has committed an offense incapable of doing harm – without definitely taking away from him the possibility of redeeming himself – the cases in which the execution of the offender is an absolute necessity “are very rare, if not practically nonexistent.”

    The current pope’s statement about capital punishment being wholly “inadmissible” will therefore be promoted as doctrinally unremarkable, even as a Newmanesque “development of doctrine.” I think that is simplistic. In the non-Western world – and in modern modes of war fighting, in particular – there are still places and circumstances that may require dangerous offenders to be executed for the safety of the broader public. Instead of trolling the United States, the pope and his advisers would do better to strengthen the Catechism’s insistence that ‘Western’ notions of a rule of law must henceforth be regarded as normative for all human beings.

  166. Myrddin Seren

    Victoriabad.

    You know who the untouchable elites are and who the hapless Proles are by who gets to enjoy police protection:

    The Melbourne tradie accused of coward punching a complete stranger has been charged with a second assault but will remain on bail.

    Frankston South local Ryan Wells, 32, was this morning charged with the alleged assault that occurred in Somerville in June after he turned himself into police.

    The tradie appeared in court this morning and was escorted by a heavy police presence as he walked free on bail.

    Just to rub salt in to the wounds of the hapless Proles:

    Victoria Police defended the private escort today, saying they have a “duty to protect” the public.

    Feel free to quote your favourite moment of VicPol doing SFA to protect the public. A personal favourite remains them taking down Joker and Harley Quinn, because dangerous supervillians or something. Public saved !

    Notwithstanding the Hi-Viz thug and his brother apparently have their own business, I would strongly be suspecting bikie and/or/and CFMMEU connections:

    Mr Wells, who police allege was high on cocaine and drugs,

    cocaine AND drugs….mmmmmm

  167. calli

    That terrible Nazi Southern and her hair flicking…

    Terrible stuff

  168. .

    A two degree rise in global temperatures could spark a “Hothouse Earth’’ cascade of feedbacks with terrible consequences.

    Absolute bullshit and ignorant of the natural history of the earth. Humans have lived through wild variations of climate. Only the last 7,000 years has been remarkably stable.

  169. Eddystone

    Lauren Southern frightened Paddy Gower? Really?

    Apparently so.

    They had sneakily prepared and practiced their arguments of “nitpickery”, and were well prepared.

    This is a frightening prospect for a television interviewer.

    I wonder if Paddy’s career is about to auger in?

  170. calli

    without definitely taking away from him the possibility of redeeming himself

    The Pope must know that no one can redeem themselves.

  171. .

    Instead of trolling the United States, the pope and his advisers would do better to strengthen the Catechism’s insistence that ‘Western’ notions of a rule of law must henceforth be regarded as normative for all human beings.

    That’s a good call. Now, can the church rebuke our rulers for their idiotic and oppressive “unexplained wealth” *laws*?

  172. Roger

    With compulsory preferential voting – so what?

    1. It deprives the Uniparty of some (at least) public funding.

    2. It sends a message of voter dissatisfaction which they won’t be able to easily ignore if it continues to grow.

  173. ‘Western’ notions of a rule of law must henceforth be regarded as normative for all human beings

    Charles I, Napoleon, Barry I, Julia v3.76 and Malcolm I all believe(d) that they were/are above the law.

  174. C.L.

    Democrats acting on the orders of Maxine Waters, bash elderly Sihk man who is a Republican:

    CBS.

    Malhi has been active in the Turlock community for years, raising thousands for homeless and fire victims, using trucks from his trucking company to deliver supplies. He’s a strong supporter of the Republican Party. The campaign signs he placed that night were for Congressman Jeff Denham and other members of the Stanislaus County GOP.

    “I’m American 100 percent, no doubt, so they say, go back to my country? This is my country,” Malhi said. “If you are a real American and you love America, you should not do that. That is not the American way.”

    Malhi still has headaches and dizzy spells, but says he’s received an outpouring of support from political leaders and members of the community during his recovery.

  175. .

    That was very weird Calli.

    I’d rather hear Edith sing, or have Mimi explain quantum physics to me.

  176. Jo Smyth

    It’s happening. Was never a fan of Alex Jones and Info Wars but the Marxists have managed to band together and get him completely wiped from the internet. He is the first, others will soon follow. How long before the Cat suddenly disappears.

  177. Cassie of Sydney

    “Jo Smyth
    #2782928, posted on August 7, 2018 at 10:16 am
    It’s happening. Was never a fan of Alex Jones and Info Wars but the Marxists have managed to band together and get him completely wiped from the internet. He is the first, others will soon follow. How long before the Cat suddenly disappears.”

    My thoughts too Jo. You don’t have to particularly like Alex Jones or Infowars to be outraged by this.

    Sargon has uploaded an analysis this morning,….”first they came for Alex Jones”.

    And will come after Catallaxy, of that I am sure.

    Oh, whilst the left delight in going after Alex Jones for “conspiracies”, it is the left who have invented and promulgated the biggest conspiracy of all time….Russiagate.

  178. Mater

    Patrick Gower sits down with his progressive mates and explains his poor showing.
    Admits “they nailed me”, but otherwise totally misses the point.

    At 02:39, that idiot says that “the market has spoken”. What???
    They had sold out shows but were unable to do them due to intimidation.
    The mob has spoken. Nothing more, nothing less.

  179. .

    Honestly, who has the middle name “Emric”?

  180. .

    Good comments from Glenn Beck:

  181. 132andBush

    Patrick Gower sits down with his progressive mates and explains his poor showing.

    Good to see NZ has its fair share of sniveling amoebas.

  182. thefrolickingmole

    On Chicago and the leftist cargo cult inhabiting its offices of power.

    RTWT
    https://www.city-journal.org/html/chicago-violence-16098.html
    Meantime, Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel and Illinois attorney general Lisa Madigan recently celebrated the issuance of a 232-page draft consent decree for the Chicago Police Department, possibly the longest police consent decree ever written. Among numerous other red-tape-generating provisions, it requires the CPD to revise its protocols regarding “transgender, intersex, and gender non-conforming individuals,” to make sure that the CPD policies properly define these terms and that officers address intersex, transgender, and the gender non-conforming with the “names, pronouns and titles of respect appropriate to that individual’s gender.” Last Thursday, a so-called anti-violence march shut down Lake Shore Drive to demand that the CPD hire more black officers and that City Hall spend more on social programs in the black community. Few voices, in other words, are tackling the actual cause of Chicago’s violence: the breakdown of the black family structure and a demoralized police department.


    A court granted the ACLU of Illinois and Black Lives Matter Chicago permission to intervene in the consent decree negotiations. This is the same ACLU that muscled the CPD into introducing a new three-page stop, question, and frisk form in January 2016 that contributed to Chicago’s shooting spike, already accelerating due to Black Lives Matter-driven anti-cop hatred. The ACLU and BLM Chicago will also be able to enforce the new consent decree in court, spelling further trouble for professional policing.

    Need more money for those pr0grams’…. (note everyone in the comic is a stereotype)

  183. Myrddin Seren

    Another military procurement triumph – this time the Krauts.

    Making sure that under no circumstances will they be capable of ‘kinetic engagement’.

    Germany’s state of the art Puma tank not suitable for tall soldiers

    Germany’s cutting-edge Puma vehicle might have trouble doing what it was designed for – carrying and protecting troops in the battlefield. Its troop compartment came to be too low for tall soldiers, a media report revealed.

    Tall soldiers should not expect comfy seats in Puma’s crammed troop compartment. Its ceiling is so low that it can only seat six infantrymen not taller than 1.84m

    Die Welt suggests that German military planners failed to predict the rising height of future soldiers while using medical stats over 15 years ago, when the Puma was undergoing initial design phase. At the time, Puma developers purportedly decided to sacrifice inner space to better protection that included installing special anti-blast seats which made the compartment even narrower.

    German military says “it is still to be clarified” if the Puma can be redesigned in light of the revelation.

    Defense sources told Die Welt the incorrect size standards prompted the army to revise the list of equipment borne by Puma crews as well as to alter hiring standards.

    Christopher Pyne will be frantically making notes – this is a corker. Kit unfit for purpose AND forces the army to drop recruitment standards to enlist only hobbits for the mech battalions.

    This is on Russia Today – so that chortling noise you hear is Vlad Putin.

    The whirring noise you may hear is the ghost of Heinz Guderian spinning in his grave at ultra-high RPMs.

  184. .

    A story on government greed.

    ReasonTV
    Published on Oct 23, 2017
    Gilbert Hyatt’s 25-year legal battle is a story of greed, harassment, anti-semitism, and the abuse of power.

    Never make a deal with an extortionist. They don’t view themselves as public servants, they view themselves as bounty hunters…

    California Tried to Seize Millions of This Inventor’s Fortune. He Fought Back. And Won.

  185. H B Bear

    An explosion of drive-by shootings erupted on Chicago’s South and West sides this weekend. At least 74 people were shot, and 11 killed, between 3 p.m. on Friday and 6 a.m. on Monday. In one seven-hour stretch, starting around midnight on Saturday, at least 40 people were shot, four fatally…

    Sounds like Chicago could do with a really good Community Organiser. Anyone spring to mind?

  186. Sounds like Chicago could do with a really good Community Organiser.

    Nope. They need a few gunslingers.

  187. Roger

    Traditionally, the Catholic Church taught that while capital punishment is generally not licit, exceptions must be made for circumstances where convicted wrongdoers cannot be safely ore reliably incarcerated.

    The Catholic Church in contemporary times, along with many Protestant churches, appears to have followed humanistic law rather than Divine law on this matter, discarding the satisfaction of justice as the first principle of criminal punishment, i.e., in layman’s terms, the punishment must fit the crime, which is apparent to human reason as well as a matter of Divine revelation.

    Here is Augustine on the licitness of capital punishment:

    The same divine authority that forbids the killing of a human being establishes certain exceptions, as when God authorizes killing by a general law or when He gives an explicit commission to an individual for a limited time. The agent who executes the killing does not commit homicide; he is an instrument as is the sword with which he cuts. Therefore, it is in no way contrary to the commandment, ‘Thou shalt not kill’ to wage war at God’s bidding, or for the representatives of public authority to put criminals to death, according to the law, that is, the will of the most just reason. The City of God, Book 1, Chapter 21.

    Augustine’s view prevailed in Christendom even after the Reformation(s), as all of the magisterial reformers (Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Cranmer, Knox) looked to him as an authority who in this instance interpreted scripture correctly. The move away from his view, imv, came as a result of the spread and adoption of the views of the radical Reformers (Anabaptists, later Quakers, etc. the “lunatic fringe” of Christianity, if you will), which exhibited a definite subversive tendency once they gained influence in the halls of power of the bodies politic of the West, particularly the Anglosphere.

    Cf. Romans 13:3-5 .

    The civil authorities may make allowances for mitigating circumstances in cases of homicide, but it remains the case that capital punishment is licit and upholds, rather than denigrates, the value of life.

  188. Mater

    Patrick Gower sits down with his progressive mates and explains his poor showing.

    Oh, and I see ‘The Project’ is a contagious disease that appears to have jumped the Tasman.

  189. Geriatric Mayfly

    Need more money for those pr0grams’…. (note everyone in the comic is a stereotype)

    Please reassure me that the cartoon strip was not done by First Dog on the Moon.

  190. stackja

    Terrified Darwin motorists attacked with rocks
    NATASHA EMECK, NT News
    August 7, 2018 12:30am
    Subscriber only

    DARWIN motorists are being terrorised by rock throwing criminals, following a spate of incidents over the weekend.

    Police are yet to find the culprits responsible for hitting a taxi driver in the head with a rock while he was driving along McMillans Rd on Sunday.

    Darwin taxi driver Muhammad Hossain said drivers like him were often targeted by people who threw rocks.

    “One of my close friends was a victim to a similar assault a few months ago,” he said.

    “Kids were throwing rocks at the cab and broke his windows. It tends to happen a lot, especially around the Aboriginal communities in Minmarama Park, Litchfield Crt and Bagot Rd.

    “I just don’t understand why they do it.”

  191. Chicago – At least 74 people were shot, and 11 killed

    How does this compare to the weekend in Mogadishu, Kabul or Gaza?

  192. “Kids were throwing rocks …
    “I just don’t understand why they do it.”

    Hmm. Because they don’t have access to spears, machetes and handguns?

  193. thefrolickingmole

    Geriatric Mayfly

    Definitely not, it would probably get first flog to death grip his crayon and soil his underpants if he saw it.

  194. Jo Smyth

    Alex Jones being shut down is really, really troubling but will be totally intentionally ignored by the MSM. This is exactly the reason Donald Trump was elected. A lot of people will be waiting to see how he deals with it.

  195. stackja

    incoherent rambler
    #2782950, posted on August 7, 2018 at 10:54 am
    “Kids were throwing rocks …
    “I just don’t understand why they do it.”

    Hmm. Because they don’t have access to spears, machetes and handguns?

    More OPM needed.

  196. egg_

    The Prophet of Doom is Will Steffen

    There’s a lot of the 3rd rate bastards but steffen, karoly and flannery are at the top of the turd pile.

    Amen.

    The profits of doom.

    Flanners knows an earner when he’s onto it.

  197. mizaris

    Just how bad are RCRs losses and how long have they known about it. Idiots trying to jump onto the RET train after it had well and truly left the station.

  198. C.L.

    The Catholic Church in contemporary times, along with many Protestant churches, appears to have followed humanistic law rather than Divine law on this matter, discarding the satisfaction of justice as the first principle of criminal punishment, i.e., in layman’s terms, the punishment must fit the crime, which is apparent to human reason as well as a matter of Divine revelation.

    The question revolves around a few things, one of which is ‘what constitutes a crime?’
    Our Lord forgave – spiritually and practically – several people who were, according to the laws and norms of His time, destined for capital punishment. His last conversation before death was with the Good Thief. We wouldn’t crucify a thief today, would we? It’s simplistic to assert that Divine law offers us a functioning jurisprudence for law and punishment. Clearly it doesn’t. As for Augustine and Aquinas, they were writing before the advent of nation states, in an era when bands of dangerous criminals could not easily be incarcerated. Libertarians are especially conflicted on this topic; they seem to be in favour of capital punishment (even if only on financial grounds), yet they define themselves by their justifiable distrust of the state. Dot just posted a very interesting story from Reason.com about the tax authorities of California attempting to rob from and destroy the life of an inventor. We should not afford such functionaries the right to execute people. Obviously.

  199. C.L.

    Dot, what California did to that man over a quarter century is utterly sickening.
    If you want to top up your hatred of the state, watch Dot’s video.

  200. egg_

    “Such action entails stewardship of the entire Earth system — biosphere, climate and societies — and could include decarbonisation of the global economy, enhancement of biosphere carbon sinks, behavioural changes, technological innovations, new governance arrangements and transformed social values,” it says.

    Sounds like more “suspension of Democraceh!” stuff from the looney Left.

  201. stackja

    The Daily Telegraph editorial: Who’s watching our super?
    Editorial, The Daily Telegraph
    August 7, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    As Hodge noted: “Of course, trustees are surrounded by temptation.”

    Temptation in the banking sector is one reason why the big banks and AMP will shortly be compelled to have teams of ASIC authorities embedded in their organisations.

    These ASIC observers will be given responsibility for conducting surveillance in the banks and investigating their practices in an attempt to stop them ripping off Australians.

    “Having ASIC officers physically inside a bank each day, asking the tough questions and getting the answers is a constant reminder to banks to do the right thing and that ASIC is on the job and will take swift action if need be,” ASIC chairman James Shipton told The Daily Telegraph.

    It’s a good idea. It might apply for super funds, too.

  202. Snoopy

    Oh, and I see ‘The Project’ is a contagious disease that appears to have jumped the Tasman.

    You don’t believe Channel Ten invented that dross do you?

  203. thefrolickingmole

    One of our younger workers is living the dream.

    last year, invited to Switzerland by the incredibly wealthy familied girl he was banging, this year over east at a music festival banging a group of ladies in a punk band with the name cock rocket or similar.

    Worst thing is hes a nice bloke so you cant do anything other than cheer him on.

  204. stackja

    AGW:

    Batlow Old Tumburumba Rd
    SNOW AND ICE
    Started today 6:14am, last checked today 10:07am
    Impact: Impact Traffic affected in all directions.
    Attending: RMS
    Advice: Reduce speed
    Exercise caution

  205. Top Ender

    Bandana Man gets a booting again at the Oz:

    Australians won’t fall for a bandana republic

    Pic: The Fairfax commentator’s rag-topped, shaggy profile discourages us from taking him or the movement seriously.

    NICK CATER
    COLUMNIST
    12:00AM AUGUST 7

    The republican movement has its work cut out. Before it can get around to replacing the Queen it apparently has to remove its hapless spokesman.

    Pollster Mark Textor predicts the push will fail unless “blokey” men such as Australian Republic Movement chairman Peter Fitz­Simons step aside.

    “I just think it’s an ego trip for bandana man,” Textor told Fairfax in June. “His ego is getting in the way.”

    Asked to respond to Textor’s criticism, FitzSimons, 57, from the battler-free Sydney suburb of Cremorne, replied: “Whatev.”

    The Fairfax commentator’s rag-topped, shaggy profile discourages us from taking him or the movement seriously. Rather, his appearance and somewhat truculent manner bring to mind those Japanese troops who fled to the jungle in August 1945, adamantly doubting the veracity of the formal surrender.

    The 1999 referendum was Brexit and Trump rolled into one, a popular call for common sense and a rebuttal of those presuming to be their intellectual betters.

    The republic was revealed as an elitist obsession; the strongest predictor of the vote was education, not income or political allegiance. Blue-collar seats like Banks in Sydney’s west stuck loyally by the Queen while the toffs on Sydney’s north shore sipped expensive coffee salted with tears.

    There is scant evidence voters have changed their minds. The Australian Electoral Study, one of the most reliable longitudinal measures of political and social sentiment, found that support for a republic in 2016 was at its lowest level since 1993, when the question was first asked.

    Significantly, support for the status quo has strengthened among younger voters and ­migrants.

    No political party that aspires to win the middle ground would willingly launch a second round of this contentious debate. Bill Shorten’s agenda, however, is determined by the urban sophisticates, to whom the former workers’ party now belongs. The Opposition Leader must feed their tragic addiction to ­causes, even at the risk of seeming remote.

    Cooler heads in the republican movement know that a carbon-copy 1999 referendum would be certain to fail. Turning around a 5 per cent deficit in the national vote is inconceivable; winning a majority in four out of six states is probably impossible.

    Queenslanders, 62.5 per cent opposed last time, are a lost cause. The odds in Tasmania (59.6 per cent) and Western Australia (58.5 per cent) are insurmountable.

    Shorten’s solution is subterfuge. First will come a plebiscite with a high-level yes/no question. Should the result be “yes”, there will be a referendum to decide the type of republic.

    Shorten appears to be immune to the charge of hypocrisy. For the record, however, he adamantly opposed the same-sex marriage plebiscite on the grounds of cost.

    The offence in Shorten’s proposal, however, is not the unnecessary expense but the cheapness of his politics.

    It avoids the hard work of persuading the public that a particular type of republic is better than a system that has functioned remarkably well since 1901.

    It displays contempt for the intelligence of voters, who Shorten imagines he can fool with his ­duplicitous plan.

    It is an extension of the conspiracy to bypass the Constitution that was hatched by Gough Whitlam in 1975, who used the external affairs provision of section 51 (xxix) to introduce the Racial Discrimination Act, thereby usurping the sovereign rights of the states.

    Whitlam expressed frustration at the demands of constitutional democracy, which required the party to gain the approval not only of electors but also of judges. “We were manifestly failing to do either,” he lamented after leaving politics. Yet even Whitlam, one suspects, would be startled by the audacity of Shorten’s plan that seeks to usurp not only the rights of states but the opinion of the general public.

    The remoteness of the republicans is revealed in their conviction that Shorten’s stunt might actually succeed.

    “The ‘yes vote’ for that question will look like Phar Lap at Flemington, like Bradman at Lord’s — well ahead of the field, and looking good!” FitzSimons told the Nat­ional Press Club.

    Yet anyone with their fingers on the public pulse would know that Shorten’s plan will fail. It will fail because Australians don’t like being taken for mugs. When trust in the political and media class is at a particularly low ebb, it is hard to imagine them falling for this one.

    Appetite for constitutional change can scarcely be detected, outside enclaves like the smug-drenched paddocks of the Byron Bay Writers Festival. In 1998 two-thirds of Australians answered “yes” to the in-principle question about an Australian presidential head of state in an AES survey. In 2016 the figure was 54 per cent, while a Newspoll in April found support had fallen to 50 per cent.

    With the passage of time, ­enthusiasm for a republic has been exposed as a type of post-traumatic stress disorder of the Left, triggered by the dismissal of ­Whitlam, a moment Donald Horne ­described as “the shock of ­assassination”.

    The movement gained traction in the 1980s and 90s as public intellectuals, tortured with self-doubt, wrote ponderous books and ­essays, anxiously urging Australians to look deep into their souls and ask, “What sort of a country do we want to be?”

    This elitist exercise in self-flagellation seemed somewhat strange to most Australians, who preferred Barry McKenzie’s assess­ment rather than that of the hand-wringers, holding that they live in “the greatest living country in the world, no risk”.

    This is more than blind patriotism; it is an objective assessment of a nation with an internal stabil­ity and outward reputation few ­nations can match.

    That Australasia is one of only two continents never to succumb to tyranny or host a civil war is hardly unrelated to our institutions and the system used to settle civic disputes embodied in the constitutional monarchy.

    The other continent, incidentally, is Antarctica.

    Nick Cater is executive director of the Menzies Research Centre.

    Link with comments open and amusing

  206. Bruce of Newcastle

    Regarding Candace Owens – the left is always trying to prove the right is aggressive. And yet it is invariably the left rioting, screaming, shouting, putting on masks and wielding poles and so on.

    Which for some reason the MSM is rather reluctant to cover.

    Fair Left Mobs Riot In 3 Major US Cities — Not One Mainstream Outlet Reports on the Widespread Leftist Violence (6 Aug)

    How strange that news organisations don’t report the news anymore.

  207. Stimpson J. Cat

    It’s War.

    KEEM 🍿
    @KEEMSTAR
    So @RealAlexJones Infowars was banned today on Facebook, Apple, Spotify & YouTube today.

    Look idk all the facts here but, I think there was some collusion going on!

  208. thefrolickingmole

    We wouldn’t crucify a thief today, would we?

    Police exist to protect criminals.
    Its often forgotten that without police criminals would be dealt with by whatever arbitrary punishment a victim (or their family) has the power to inflict.

    Horrible footage from shithole countries with no working justice system shows ordinary people doing horrific things to thieves and criminals when they catch them.

  209. Snoopy

    Alex Jones being shut down is really, really troubling but will be totally intentionally ignored by the MSM. This is exactly the reason Donald Trump was elected. A lot of people will be waiting to see how he deals with it.

    TheirABC isn’t ignoring it. Facebook etc have saved us all from a dangerous denier.

    Alex Jones has claimed September 11 was perpetrated by the government and Sandy Hook was a hoax

    No mention of Infowars’ recent allegations of Facebook, Google and Twitter colluding with the Chicoms.

  210. Dr Faustus

    …a constant reminder to banks to do the right thing and that ASIC is on the job and will take swift action if need be,” ASIC chairman James Shipton told The Daily Telegraph.

    This is the same ASIC. that has been on the job for the past 20 years?
    The one that moves with all the speed and grace of a startled slug?

    As with the NEG/AEMEC, we are seeing the agile and innovative ‘independent’ government agencies reinvent themselves as Judge Dredd.

  211. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Alex Jones is an FBI plant.

  212. Bruce of Newcastle

    Alex Jones is an FBI plant.

    So you’re saying he’s cactus?

  213. Myrddin Seren

    Alex Jones is an FBI plant.

    Is that – … a conspiracy theory ?

  214. Snoopy

    Alex Jones is an FBI plant.

    So you’re saying he’s cactus?

    He’ll be okay if Harvey Wankstain gives him a miss.

  215. Snoopy

    Is someone from AMP Super on the banking royal commission stand?

  216. Top Ender

    Something for everyone in today’s Strewth:

    Strewth: The Reich stuff
    JAMES JEFFREY
    STREWTH EDITOR
    12:00AM AUGUST 7, 20186 COMMENTS
    Sky News’s ill-fated chat with an Adolf Hitler fan on Sunday night prompted an expression of deep regret from station boss Angelos Frangopoulos and rage from some of its presenters.

    But we wonder if ultimately it opens the door to exciting programming ideas. Off the top of our head: Aryan Eye for the Straight Guy; All Reich on the Night; The Fast and the Fuhrerious; Mein Kampf Rules; Puttin’ on the Blitz; and MasterRaceChef.

    Having aired this thought (such as it was) on Twitter yesterday, Strewth was inundated with more suggestions, among them Backyard Blitzkrieg and Gestapo’s Coming to Dinner. And it’s not as far-fetched as it sounds. In 1990, an evidently unprepared Britain found itself on the receiving end of a new TV sitcom called Heil Honey I’m Home! Created with the idea of lampooning shows such as I Love Lucy, it revolved around the home life of Hitler and Eva Braun and their fraught relationship with their J ewish neighbours, the Rosensteins.

    It will probably not come as a twist of any magnitude to learn Heil Honey I’m Home! was pulled after its pilot episode, though what did make it to air has since found eternal life on YouTube. In an interview last year, show creator Geoff Atkinson conceded it didn’t “entirely deliver”. Still, he is hoping Netflix will come begging for a reboot.

    Meanwhile the Hitler fan’s interviewer, the suddenly showless Adam Giles (the former Northern Territory chief minister), may now be hoping for something similar.

  217. Traditionally, the Catholic Church taught that while capital punishment is generally not licit, exceptions must be made for circumstances where convicted wrongdoers cannot be safely ore reliably incarcerated.

    I think is stretching the traditional teaching of the Church re CP. Traditionally, the Scriptures, the Fathers, the Doctors, and the Popes up to Francis (even Pope St. JPII) have maintained the licitness of CP.

    Our Lord forgave – spiritually and practically – several people who were, according to the laws and norms of His time, destined for capital punishment. His last conversation before death was with the Good Thief. We wouldn’t crucify a thief today, would we?

    Sure, but St. Dismas declares his condemnation by civil authorities just and merited and Christ does not contradict this, what He does is recognize and acknowledge the Good Thief’s contrite heart. Whether or not theft deserves CP is a prudential judgment that depends upon the prevailing conditions on the ground but the licitness of CP per se is clearly untouched by this example.

    As for the rest, we probably agree. I am certainly wary of empowering states with such powers but again these are prudential considerations. However, I would have no problem with the state executing Josef Fritzl after a fair trial. He merits that punishment abundantly.

  218. Top Ender

    Shocked! Now move on please….

    Premier Daniel Andrews says he is “shocked” by Corrections Victoria’s decision to allow a killer day release to play country football however the department claims the program benefits local communities and reduces reoffending.

    David Cassai’s mother yesterday expressed outrage that her son’s killer Dylan Closter was playing local football on day release.

    Closter is four years into a minimum six year jail sentence after fatal drunken attack on 22-year-old David Cassai in the Mornington Peninsula town of Rye on New Year’s Eve in 2012.

    Link

  219. thefrolickingmole

    four years into a minimum six year jail sentence

    Its like they are wanting families of victims to hire hit men….

  220. John Constantine

    WES Wes farmers sells out of their coal business.

    Astute investor cashing up.

  221. Eddystone

    the department claims the program benefits local communities and reduces reoffending.

    If a relative of the deceased was to cave in his skull with a cricket bat, that would also reduce his chances of re-offending, by 100%.

  222. Lysander

    Premier Daniel Andrews says he is “shocked” by ….

    With a 57/43 lead against the Libs in Victoria (even following attacks by vicious cars and gangs) Daniel Andrews could make shit a once-daily staple diet of Victorians and still win the next election.

  223. John Constantine

    The Grey’s online parent company halves in shareprice today.

    Sky tries to spin it as sign of good economy that old gear is kept working longer on projects instead of being traded in.

    I wouldn’t bother with a greys sale personally, and there might be a few like me around.

  224. Daniel Andrews could make shit a once-daily staple diet of Victorians …

    A bit slow. He implemented that a while back.

  225. John Constantine

    The branch stacking of yarragrad with voteherds is at the sweetspot of locking in labor victories, until the factional warlords become demographically strong enough to launch settlement community cultural parties.

    They will purge themselves, Comrades.

  226. Leigh Lowe

    Traditionally, the Catholic Church taught that while capital punishment is generally not licit, exceptions must be made for circumstances where convicted wrongdoers cannot be safely ore reliably incarcerated.

    Closter is four years into a minimum six year jail sentence after fatal drunken attack on 22-year-old David Cassai in the Mornington Peninsula town of Rye on New Year’s Eve in 2012.

    The prosecution rests.

  227. H B Bear

    Looks like the Hunchback of Spring Street is treating the neo-Marxist state of Victoriastan like Gillard treated Australia in the dying days of her regime.

    The only difference is that they will be re-elected.

  228. mh

    Blair Cottrell 🇦🇺

    @blaircottrell89
    Aug 5
    More
    Hey @theboltreport @Bolt_RSS if I really am a ‘Nazi thug’ like you just said in the Herald Sun, then you shouldn’t have any problem proving it on your show and exposing me to the whole country. I’m available anytime, unless you’re too afraid of open dialogue.

  229. C.L.

    If James Brayshaw goes into a coma and dies after being punched by Gaff, should Gaff be executed?

  230. thefrolickingmole

    C.L.

    Would a 4 year “suspension” from the game be a sufficient penalty?
    Not every murder deserves death, probably 5-10% should be removed as they contribute greatly to making prisons hellholes wrecking the idea of rehabilitation.

  231. Zyconoclast

    The branch stacking of yarragrad with voteherds is at the sweetspot of locking in labor victories, until the factional warlords become demographically strong enough to launch settlement community cultural parties.

    They will purge themselves, Comrades.

    Just like the US Democrats.
    The minority takeover and purging of long term white party hacks.

  232. Assault is (AFAIK) is defined uninvited physical contact.
    If you play a contact sport you are giving consent for others to make physical contact with you.
    There is implied consent given the nature of the sport.
    Lose your teeth from accidental contact? Suck it up (through a straw) or wear a mouth guard.

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