Fuel-efficiency regulation impact draft is a fantasy

Today in The Australian

Just two good things can be said for the government’s draft regulation impact statement on “improving the efficiency of new light vehicles”.

About Henry Ergas

Henry Ergas AO is a columnist for The Australian. From 2009 to 2015 he was Senior Economic Adviser to Deloitte Australia and from 2009 to 2017 was Professor of Infrastructure Economics at the University of Wollongong’s SMART Infrastructure Facility. He joined SMART and Deloitte after working as a consultant economist at NECG, CRA International and Concept Economics. Prior to that, he was an economist at the OECD in Paris from the late 1970s until the early 1990s. At the OECD, he headed the Secretary-General’s Task Force on Structural Adjustment (1984-1987), which concentrated on improving the efficiency of government policies in a wide range of areas, and was subsequently Counsellor for Structural Policy in the Economics Department. He has taught at a range of universities, undertaken a number of government inquiries and served as a Lay Member of the New Zealand High Court. In 2016, he was made an Officer in the Order of Australia.
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15 Responses to Fuel-efficiency regulation impact draft is a fantasy

  1. Entropy

    These people operate in a different plane of life that ordinary folk. Clearly they are paid far too much if it lets them disconnect from reality so easily.

  2. Fat Tony

    Just two good things can be said for the government’s draft regulation impact statement on “improving the efficiency of new light vehicles”.

    1. Save a lot of people the expense of owning & running a car.
    2. Allow a lot of people to reap the health benefits of walking everywhere.

    Anyway, who needs a car when everyone is packed into high-rise apartments & drinking recycled sewage water?

    Comrades.

  3. Bruce

    @ Fat Tony: “Anyway, who needs a car when everyone is packed into high-rise apartments & drinking recycled sewage water?”

    And eating Soylent Green.

    Will they change the Australian Design Rules to MANDATE these “light vehicles”, a.k.a., flimsy pieces of crap? Probably.

    Only the “more equal pigs” will be driving Toorak Tractors.

  4. John Constantine

    As their Lucy turnfailure laid out in her famous interview, her personal phantasy is for cities to progress past personal car ownership and use.

    Stalin proved the efficiency of the public transport in one lane and the other lane reserved for chauffeur driven limousines model.

    Let them ride buses.

    Comrades.

  5. John Constantine

    Imagine the efficiencies if we can engineer a change in Australian use of public transport, by mass importing a herd of replacement clients already socialised to accept being shoved into public transport pods like packed sardines?.

    Comrades.

  6. JohnA

    John Constantine #2785517, posted on August 10, 2018, at 9:16 am

    As their Lucy turnfailure laid out in her famous interview, her personal phantasy is for cities to progress past personal car ownership and use.

    Stalin proved the efficiency of the public transport in one lane and the other lane reserved for chauffeur driven limousines model.

    Let them ride buses.

    Comrades.

    Or the travel strips (See Isaac Asimov “Caves of Steel”)

  7. Art Vandelay

    The government’s regulation impact statements (like all their modelling of climate change and energy market policies) are complete works of fiction. Rather than being robust cost-benefit analyses as they claim, they’re rigged in advance to give the answers that the government/bureaucracy want.

  8. As I’ve noted previously, Australia is about 10 years behind the rest of the world as it moves on from ridiculous policies. Trump is now reviewing fuel-efficiency regulations for cars and light trucks and rolling back another of Obama’s job destroying, feel-good, crap.

  9. Helen

    I guess they will have to reinstate those water troughs in the streets for the horses which we will have to ride or drive to work and shop.

    And then they will have to figure out how to get rid of the horse poo.

    Oh hang on, werent we doing that just over 100 years ago?

  10. yarpos

    How do these idiots think that an Australian regulation has any impact on the performance of the suite of available cars we can obtain from the global market.

  11. Helen

    Ha! bemused, my gran used to have a sulky drawn by a horse called Ginger who was a natural pacer and could flog all the other horses on the road, he loved to win. Once my great Aunt was driving and turned him too sharply and ran over a policeman’s foot. Nan used to take him down the beach and swin him in the surf. He loved it. At home he had his own stable where tey would leave the house key if they were going out with out him. No-one could get near the key, not even people he knew.

    The people in that story you posted have simply no idea.

  12. The people in that story you posted have simply no idea.

    That is ever the way of the SJW and the Leftist loonies.

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