Electric cars leave carbon emissions behind?

From a story about the innovative subsidy farmer Elon Musk in The Weekend Australian.

Technology commentator Anthony Agius in Melbourne said he put his name down for the Model 3 in 2017.

The focus was simply on leaving carbon emissions behind by owning an electric car.

Where does this technology commentator think the electricity is going to come from?

Last year the news from inside the Chinese bureaucracy was about a big push for electric cars to reduce air pollution. Someone must have realised where the power comes from so they have resumed construction of coal-fired power plants. In any case CO2 is not pollution, it is plant food, and it is well below the optimum level for plant growth.

PS Alan Kohler is amusing on the power issue as well:)

Another Kohler gig. helping the Australian Conservation Foundation to save the Galilee Basin.

This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to Electric cars leave carbon emissions behind?

  1. miltonf

    Rafe they really are that dumb- no knowledge of basic high school science.

  2. I’ve long noted that tech heads all too often seem to be the most ardent believers in climate change (if the various technical forums are anything to go by) and they really don’t seem to know much about the reality of this propaganda. This is his level of his expertise: https://www.pcauthority.com.au/author/anthony-agius-752247.

    And for those that analyse specifications and performance metrics, delve into advertising hype etc of technology and technology companies, it beggars belief that they just seem to leave their brains behind when it comes to anything to do with climate change.

  3. Pedro the Ignorant

    The future of electric vehicles and the battery minerals required to run them was the subject of much “over a beer” discussion at the recent Diggers and Dealers mining conference in Kalgoorlie.

    There is a lot of investment money about for exploration and recovery of lithium, graphite and nickel, especially for the expansion of existing operations, much less so for the yet to discovered greenfield sites.

    The consensus seems to be that while it may be worthwhile to get in early on these opportunities, it will soon be found that EVs have many inherent problems, and that they will be a bit of a flash in the pan with a shrinking, rather than growing, market.

    A tiny market that will be driven by taxis, city based light couriers, warehouse vehicles and inner city eco-loons.

    Most Australians, outside of the major cities, will reject EVs with a vengeance.

  4. RobK

    In some congested places, as cities maybe, electric cars and vans may play a part . It is a step on from electric forklifts in warehouses. Having coal fired power stations outside city limits is a good idea.

  5. Mak Siccar

    Which Skimpy was the best

    was the subject of much “over a beer” discussion at the recent Diggers and Dealers mining conference in Kalgoorlie.

    (sorry Pedro.)

    Seriously though, Dilldo’s like Agius forget that electrickery is required not only to power the vehicle on an ongoing basis but also to build the rotten things in the first place! And of course, where does the electrickery come from???

  6. Bruce of Newcastle

    Technology commentator Anthony Agius in Melbourne said he put his name down for the Model 3 in 2017. The focus was simply on leaving carbon emissions behind by owning an electric car.

    There’s just a teensy little problem with that…

    Study: Tesla car battery production releases as much CO2 as 8 years of driving on gas

    IVL The Swedish Environment Institute has, on behalf of the Swedish Transport Administration and the Swedish Energy Agency, investigated the climate impact of lithium-ion batteries from a life-cycle perspective. The batteries for electric cars were included in the study. The two authors—Lisbeth Dahllöf and Mia Romare—have done a meta-study, that is, reviewed and compiled existing studies.

    Mats-Ola Larsson at IVL has calculated how long you need to drive a gasoline or diesel car before it released as much CO2 as the battery manufacturing produced. The result was 2.7 years of CO2 emissions for a battery the same size as a Nissan Leaf and 8.2 years for a Tesla-sized battery, based on a series of assumptions.

    And after 8.2 years your battery is cactus, so you have to replace it. Which means another 8.2 years to pay off the emissions impact of the new battery. By which time you are up for the next battery…

  7. RobK

    Electric transmissions have worked well on off-road dumptrucks, trains and ships and some small cars. Hybrids may well suit many future commuters. Fuel cells are still a work in progress with feed stock purity and distribution an issue. Batteries have come a long way in the past decade or two and it’s possible they will continue to improve, they are still a way off replacing ICE for longer trips.
    To counter the progress in EVs, the technology of making modern ICEs has progressed as well, with still plenty of potential gains in precision and economy of production in the long term.

  8. Rafe Champion

    Thanks Bruce, I thought about the manufacturing stage and I suspected what you found but decided to keep the post minimal:)

    A bit like the CO2 produced to provide the concrete and steel for birdmincers.

  9. Dr Faustus

    Electric transmissions have worked well on off-road dumptrucks, trains and ships…

    This is true; but the operational advantage comes mainly from the simplified drive train. The energy efficiency/emissions advantage is a moot point and significantly depends on operating conditions.

  10. H B Bear

    Technology commentator Anthony Agius in Melbourne said …

    Tech commentators are among the most uninformed j’ismists of all. They are basically J School magpie nerds attracted by new and shiny things. Isn’t that right mUnty?

    Blair had a great story on ALPBC tax munching D lister Bernie Hobbs and her quest to save Gaia here.

  11. Boambee John

    bemused at 1300

    And for those that analyse specifications and performance metrics, delve into advertising hype etc of technology and technology companies, it beggars belief that they just seem to leave their brains behind when it comes to anything to do with climate change.

    Didn’t m0nty, our local reactionary lackey of the fascist left establishment, state a few days ago that he ised to work as a technology j’ismist? This explains a lot!

  12. yarpos

    Quite enjoy Kohlers sense of humour in discussing finance and the economy, however he has drunk the climate kool aide deeply

  13. H B Bear

    Kohler has a good handle on Emmanomics.

  14. hasn’t Kohler have some tie up with a renewables company? Solar, I think so it makes his role as a commentator on these issues somewhat conflicted.

  15. Roger

    Meanwhile, policy wonks are planning to ban private cars from city centres by 2030.

  16. Speedbox

    At a media function in Sydney (June 14, 2018), Tesla insisted the Model 3 would touch down in Australia in “mid-2019” – nearly three and a half years after the original pre-order process commenced.

    However, even that arrival estimate could be optimistic, given Tesla Motors owner Elon Musk recently said right-hand drive Model 3 production will commence “probably mid next year”.

    Tesla first opened the books for Model 3 ‘registrations’ in March 2016, which led to considerable overnight queues from Sydney and Melbourne enthusiasts to pay a $1500 deposit for a place in the production cycle.

    Placed his order in 2017. Happy to wait until well into 2019 or possibly 2020 for an electric car! And a Tesla Model 3 to boot! Retard.

  17. Placed his order in 2017. Happy to wait until well into 2019 or possibly 2020 for an electric car! And a Tesla Model 3 to boot! Retard.

    It’s a bit like in the old Communist Germany, you put in an order for a Trabant and maybe you might be in the running in several years.

  18. Infidel Tiger

    Musk has developed a brilliant device to strip idiots of their money.

    Stuff poker machines. Electric vanity mobiles is where the action is.

  19. miltonf

    Well said IT- pretty much sums it up

  20. Dr Fred Lenin

    Put a windmill and solar panels on each car and save the world for the u.n,communust /soros fascists .
    Now that would be worth seeing comrades !

  21. RobK

    The free piston engine is potentially a development that will strengthen the case for hybrids. Fromhttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-piston_engine

    In June 2014 Toyota announced a prototype Free Piston Engine Linear Generator (FPEG). As the piston is forced downward during its power stroke it passes through windings in the cylinder to generate a burst of three-phase AC electricity. The piston generates electricity on both strokes, reducing piston dead losses. The generator operates on a two-stroke cycle, using hydraulically activated exhaust poppet valves, gasoline direct injectionand electronically operated valves. The engine is easily modified to operate under various fuels including hydrogen, natural gas, ethanol, gasoline and diesel. A two-cylinder FPEG is inherently balanced.[15]

    Toyota claims a thermal-efficiency rating of 42% in continuous use, greatly exceeding today’s average of 25-30%. Toyota demonstrated a 24 inch long by 2.5 inch in diameter unit producing 15 hp (greater than 11 kW).[16]

  22. Dr Fred Lenin

    Put a windmill and solar panels on each car and save the world for the u.n,communust /soros fascists .
    Now that would be worth seeing comrades !
    I am working on a novel solution to gerbil destruction fitting these pedal things in the car ,works like a big bike,not only saving the planet you get to exercise as well,investors sought .

  23. Toyota claims a thermal-efficiency rating of 42% in continuous use, greatly exceeding today’s average of 25-30%. Toyota demonstrated a 24 inch long by 2.5 inch in diameter unit producing 15 hp (greater than 11 kW).[16]

    Diesel engines already have 45+% thermal efficiency.

  24. duncanm

    The free piston engine is potentially a development that will strengthen the case for hybrids.

    the kids have a torch like that – permanent magnet thatbounces up and down inside some windings when you shake it to make electrickery.

    Looks and sounds like they’re wanking.

  25. Herodotus

    All of the above shows that the public are badly misinformed on a daily basis.
    There may be nothing we can do about this, given the large majority of leftists riffing continually in the media and the demonisation of any politician who tries to tell it like it is.

  26. JC

    There’s one potentially good thing about EVs if the tech can be refined some more. Zero reliance on the Gulf dickheads. This even trades off a few advantages of petrol engines.

  27. whf

    Kohler has the morals and intellectual vacuity of Hilary Clinton.

  28. Entropy

    I remember a few years ago young Anthony setting up a bitcoin farm out of old PCs in his back yard shed. This was early days and he was consuming an enormous amount of power for each Bitcoin. I wonder if he still had them when the price went nuts. Guessing he did, and disposed of them at the peak, they would pay for the Tesla.

  29. Entropy

    Toyota claims a thermal-efficiency rating of 42% in continuous use, greatly exceeding today’s average of 25-30%. Toyota demonstrated a 24 inch long by 2.5 inch in diameter unit producing 15 hp (greater than 11 kW).[16]

    So, similar efficiency to a diesel, but with piss weak power output. Hold me back.
    Seriously though, sounds interesting.

  30. RobK

    So, similar efficiency to a diesel, 
    ….but high power to weight/volume and few moving parts.

  31. RobK

    ……also multifuel adjustable because long stroke means compression ratio can be adjusted electronically.

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