Open Forum: August 11, 2018

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1,235 Responses to Open Forum: August 11, 2018

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  1. Harlequin Decline

    Second perhaps?

  2. C.L.

    Donald J. [email protected]
    1h1 hour ago

    I have just authorized a doubling of Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum with respect to Turkey as their currency, the Turkish Lira, slides rapidly downward against our very strong Dollar! Aluminum will now be 20% and Steel 50%. Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!

  3. zyconoclast

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2786021, posted on August 10, 2018 at 8:12 pm
    “Clint
    #2786009, posted on August 10, 2018 at 7:58 pm
    grubby little Muslim man spit at my feet and called me a filthy J*w.

    So many j ews advocate for mass immigration so I have zero sympathy when the diversity they championed bites them in the arse”

    Here is Oz it is simply not true that so many J*ws advocate for mass immigration. Whilst some do, most don’t.

    Support for mass immigration may or may not be true but hatred of free speech and support 18C and hate speech laws is something that is dearly loved.

    THE NSW J3wish Board of Deputies (JBOD) and the J3wish Community Council of Victoria (JCCV) have united in support of keeping Sections 18C and 18D of the Racial Discrimination Act (RDA) in their present form.

    However, Dr Dvir Abramovich, chairman of the J3wish group B’na! B’r!th’s Anti-Defamation Commission, said the two men do not speak for the broader community.

    “Through our work combating bigotry and anti-Semitism, we have found that effective protections against racial and religious vilification are a necessary tool in countering the unique harm caused by this type of hate speech and incitement,” he said.

    Executive director of the Australia/Israel & J3wish Affairs Council, Dr Colin Rubenstein, said in a statement section 18C, while important, must be administered better.

    Mr Peter Wertheim, executive director of the Executive Council of Australian J3wry, was one of 10 ethnic groups to urge the government not to “weaken” the Racial Discrimination Act by removing sections 18C and 18D

  4. zyconoclast

    Strengthened hate speech laws pass NSW Parliament in ‘great day’ for Australia

    The Alliance’s spokesman, Vic Alhadeff, has been striving for change for more than 15 years with the J3wish Board of Deputies and is “exhilarated” it has finally come.

  5. zyconoclast

    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A Canadian gold mining company on Thursday won the right to go after Venezuela’s prized U.S.-based oil refineries and collect $1.4 billion it lost in a decade-old take-over by the late socialist President Hugo Chavez.

    Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark of the U.S. Federal District Court in Delaware made the ruling in favor of Crystallex, striking a blow to crisis-wracked Venezuela, which stands to lose its most valuable asset outside of the country — Citgo.

  6. BrettW

    I am guessing the ADF now regrets letting Chris Masters get so much access to SAS members in Afghanistan. Nothing good has come of it.

    #I’llridewithBenRoberts-SmithVCMG

  7. Leigh Lowe

    Mitch M.

    #2786015, posted on August 10, 2018 at 8:04 pm

    What a bunch of girlie throws.
    Three seasons of cricket or baseball before you get your hands on a grenade.

  8. Whalehunt Fun

    Seventeenth I guess

  9. zyconoclast

    Elon Musk, Crony Capitalist
    The billionaire should spend his own money, not the taxpayers’.

    And there were many other successful ventures that made Musk into one of the most successful businessmen in the world. According to Forbes, Musk is worth $14.3 billion. Much of his wealth is the result of producing brilliant ideas, creating value for others and revolutionizing the way we do business.

    More recently, however, Musk has used his wealth to invest in space travel, solar panels, and electric cars. There wasn’t anything wrong with that until Musk dragged the government into it. Tesla Motors, SolarCity, and SpaceX—a few of his highest-profile projects—have relied heavily on government subsidies. According to a 2015 article in the Los Angeles Times, these three companies “together have benefited from an estimated $4.9 billion in government support.” And though none of these projects is profitable on its own, Musk is making a mint.

  10. Stimpson J. Cat

    Jake Tapper
    @jaketapper
    Esquire: James Bond Producers Are Leaning Toward Idris Elba As the Next 007.

    Ben Shapiro
    @benshapiro
    Idris Elba is fantastic. Good choice.

    F$cking Little Benny Jesus Christ.

  11. Mindfree

    Currently at Bonavista (north east Newfoundland) the oldest permament European settlement discovered by John Cabot in 1497
    Famous for the Puffin seabirds that change the colour of their beak based on their mood so im told – they fly and settle feet away and do not expect food unlike sea gulls
    Wetook in some spectacular seascapes and at the cape and Elliston
    Excellent little village with a ton of history of the area over the last few hundred years
    Glad to be here for now and not putting up with the shite in Oz
    Getting Fox news on the car radio so catching whats going on in the US and Canada
    BTW seems two of the shooting victims in Frederickton in New Brunswick were cops

  12. None

    The Alliance’s spokesman, Vic Alhadeff, has been striving for change for more than 15 years with the J3wish Board of Deputies and is “exhilarated” it has finally come.

    Vic Alhadeff and the three J*ws he represents are enemies of the state. All other J** in Australia should distance themselves from this little fascist. Remember the alliance he leads is full of lefties who absolutely hate J*ws, hate Israel, are BDS advicates and hate free speech. It astonishes me time and time again how so many diaspora J**s are just the useful idiots of resident fascists. To think that some of my forefathers died for their freedom so they could now take away mine. Fuck ’em.

  13. JC

    Having a black guy as James Bond is like having a white dude play Mandingo.

  14. Infidel Tiger

    Donald J. [email protected]
    1h1 hour ago

    I have just authorized a doubling of Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum with respect to Turkey as their currency, the Turkish Lira, slides rapidly downward against our very strong Dollar! Aluminum will now be 20% and Steel 50%. Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!

    This is awesome. Turkey needs a slap.

  15. Mark A

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2786100, posted on August 11, 2018 at 1:52 am

    Jake Tapper
    @jaketapper
    Esquire: James Bond Producers Are Leaning Toward Idris Elba As the Next 007.

    Ben Shapiro
    @benshapiro
    Idris Elba is fantastic. Good choice.

    F$cking Little Benny Jesus Christ.

    On the site it says, “people really want Elba to play the JB”

    Who are these people?

  16. Infidel Tiger

    Shapiro is a sawn off little shit. He’s an internet hall monitor and a douche.

    His only claim to fame is that he is good at debating. He’s not good at anything else. He’s actually a shit of a person and has zero original or interesting thoughts.

  17. Infidel Tiger

    Shapiro is the ultimate cuck.

  18. JC

    You can’t agree with someone 100%. Artie. Shapiro does mostly good work.

    Stimson just doesn’t like him for some reason and rsgs on him all the time. Stop being swayed.

  19. squawkbox

    Quite – his career has been one long running audition to be the next George Will

  20. squawkbox

    which is seriously not a compliment

  21. squawkbox

    And in any case you can’t trust short people

  22. DrBeauGan

    Executive director of the Australia/Israel & J3wish Affairs Council, Dr Colin Rubenstein, said in a statement section 18C, while important, must be administered better.

    Yes, Colin Rubenstein is the guy who put up a Çat article praising 18C. He got some opposition here. I was left feeling many dzhwz don’t understand the idea of letting the loonies put their nutty ideas out there to be debated. Pity.

  23. None

    Shapiro is scary smart. He is a lawyer – Harvard law graduate – a practising lawyer with a legal consultancy firm and he’s married to a doctor. This on top of all of his media and advocacy work. He has a really grating annoying voice but 90% of the time is actually spot on in his analysis.

  24. DrBeauGan

    Squawkbox, I had never heard of George Will, so I checked him out. Shallow as a damp pavement.

    Saying anyone is trying to be the next one is very unkind. I don’t think little Benny is that bad. 😊

  25. classical_hero

    https://www.newsbusters.org/blogs/nb/nicholas-fondacaro/2018/08/08/gop-reps-arrest-gets-7x-coverage-entire-scandal-democrat

    It’s good to be a Democrat because the media generally ignores your charges but highlights Republican charges.

  26. DrBeauGan

    None, little Benny is articulate in spades, somewhat glib, quick witted, but not a deep thinker. He’s not as smart as Trump.

  27. .

    This is “scary smart”.

    Wolfram was a wunderkind. By age 15, he began research in applied quantum field theory and particle physics and published scientific papers. Topics included matter creation and annihilation, the fundamental interactions, elementary particles and their currents, hadronic and leptonic physics, and the parton model, published in professional peer-reviewed scientific journals including Nuclear Physics B, Australian Journal of Physics, Nuovo Cimento, and Physical Review D.[35] Working independently, Wolfram published a widely cited paper on heavy quark production at age 18[2] and nine other papers,[20] and continued research and to publish on particle physics into his early twenties. Wolfram’s work with Geoffrey C. Fox on the theory of the strong interaction is still used in experimental particle physics.[36]

    He was educated at Eton College, but left prematurely in 1976.[37] He entered St. John’s College, Oxford at age 17 but found lectures “awful”,[20] and left in 1978[38] without graduating[39][40] to attend the California Institute of Technology, the following year, where he received a PhD[41] in particle physics on November 19, 1979 at age 20.[42] Wolfram’s thesis committee was composed of Richard Feynman, Peter Goldreich, Frank J. Sciulli and Steven Frautschi, and chaired by Richard D. Field.[42][43]

    A 1981 letter from Feynman to Gerald Freund giving reference for Wolfram for the MacArthur grant appears in Feynman’s collected letters, Perfectly Reasonable Deviations from the Beaten Track. Following his PhD, Wolfram joined the faculty at Caltech and became the youngest recipient[44] of the MacArthur Fellowships in 1981, at age 21

  28. None

    None, little Benny is articulate in spades, somewhat glib, quick witted, but not a deep thinker. He’s not as smart as Trump.

    He spends most of his ‘public’ time talking to college students (who are not that bright) or media (ditto) which is why he comes across as not a deep thinker. He may well be as shallow as formica but the evidence is not there.

  29. squawkbox

    Dr BG, quite. Little Benny is a high school debating society dweeb. And he will never say anything that might derail his planned career progression to NYT/Washington Post official fake conservative..

  30. Mater

    Donald J. [email protected]
    1h1 hour ago

    I have just authorized a doubling of Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum with respect to Turkey as their currency, the Turkish Lira, slides rapidly downward against our very strong Dollar! Aluminum will now be 20% and Steel 50%. Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!

    MOnty said the other day that any new free speech platform would struggle to get the inroads and reach of the established ones (paraphrased). I tended to agree.
    However, it has just occurred to me that if POTUS changed over to a new platform/s, it would give them one hell of a kickstart. 54 million followers (including nearly every world leader and all media personalities) would change with him. How could they not?
    I think he’d also do it, too…if the platform was right.

  31. Mater

    Yes, Colin Rubenstein is the guy who put up a Çat article praising 18C. He got some opposition here.

    18C is in a symbiotic relationship with identity politics.
    They feed and are fed by the other.
    Whilst one exists, so will the other.
    Both are malignant, and must be removed if stability is to be returned to political discourse.

  32. rickw

    No one is going to take the risk of importing one AK and one mag – and that raises the question of the ammo.

    Gangs will be tooling up to deal with each other and the police.

    Nope, they won’t risk importing one, and the container won’t get anywhere near customs. I think in 2015-2016 Customs were honest enough to admit that they had lost track of at least 20 containers believed to contain arms.

    The Ammo is not a problem, it is readily available, large numbers of bolt action rifles are chambered in it.

  33. DrBeauGan

    They’re all good today, Tom. Many thanks.

    Lester for me, confronting some hard facts.

  34. Tom

    Liberty quote:

    18C is in a symbiotic relationship with identity politics.
    They feed and are fed by the other.
    Whilst one exists, so will the other.

    Mater

  35. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    We spent most of the morning, after a substantial breakfast, at a site called Jarlshoff, which is currently awaiting World Heritage Listening, and justly so. It is the Skara Brae of Sheltland and in some ways more interesting than that Orkney site, because it is a sequential site covering all eras, from the Neolithic circle huts, to the more advanced Neolithic bronze age dwellings (if that is what they are) and then to the Broch period of c. 500bc iron age to 100ad (and some later even than this). Brochs are circular tower fortresses found on the western shores of the trip around Orkney and Shetland then down to the Western Isles of Scotland. They probably indicate an aggressive sea peoples operating in the whole region. Prot0-Vikings. Then came the real Vikings who took over the Shetlands (and its women) and finally, overlaying the archaeology, is the medieval Scottish world as it traded Shetland away from Norway as part of the dowry they demanded for marrying their prince to the little Princess Margaret of Norway. We have seen a couple of rather good medieval square tower castles (with additions to them, but nothing grand) on our visits.

    We had a beautiful field mushroom soup and steak ‘baguette’ (bread roll) for lunch in the hotel restaurant at Jarlshof, named by Sir Walter Scott in his book ‘Pirates’, and meaning Earl’s Home, for us looking over the sea on a clear blue day giving a better vista than he allowed (he thought the place and its derelict old castle was miserable). The vistas here have a clarity only found in these latitudes when the weather in fine. Sea so blue, and the outlines of the horizon and cliff edges so stark, emerald green to the edges which then fall in a soft granite grey, edges sharp in outline, to the sea. The perspective is so crips that it all looks like stage scenery, painted on canvas. Houses in grey granite if old, and in brightly painted Norwegian village colours if wooden and new. Get used to it Lizzie, says Hairy, for we will be seein’ a lot of this stuff as we take that trip up into the Arctic. All Norwegian villages look the same, and we might get heartily sick of it.

    Everywhere there are plenty of empty crofts, roofless with their stone gable ends still standing, fireplaces intact, side walls and windows like eyes and a nose, and the roof bald, gone. Victims of The Clearances, when land was consolidated and the Scottish emigration commenced in the early C19th. It’s beautifully calm, says Hairy enjoying a beer just now at day’s end (still very light) looking from our hotel room window out at a seacape and hills of late-sun lit fields of grass. Few trees anywhere, except one irritating one near our window! They are very PC here, very anti-Brexit, as they, like Ireland, have done so well out of the EU pouring money into ‘disadvantaged’ regions. The roads, as in Ireland, are EU funded, and as main roads are great for spinning around the countryside. The side-roads tell you something of what it was like before.
    For the hotels, it is either feast or famine. Feast when the rigs are being repaired, bringing in many workers and locals sighing about the glory days of the 80’s when accommodation was so tight and new hotels sprung up in houses everywhere, and famine when there is not much action on the rigs because everything is running smoothly, the building phase of the rigs is over, and only a few workers remain to work the automated machinery. In a famine period it’s fairly cheap here (you can tell by the price structures) and a good way to have a great holiday. In winter, of course, no-one comes and the bar at our small private country hotel becomes the local pub, the locals the only clientele. Daylight hours are between 10am and 3pm, so the locals going stir-crazy with cabin fever congregate for a drink and a chat.

    We checked out the airport terminal on the way to Jarlshof. To reach both you have to cross the runway, guided by a set of traffic lights and your own good sense to look up and see if anything is landing, or down to see if anything is taking off. This is the second most scary airport of our trip: nothing beats the lacadaisical nature of the Masai Mara strip, where pilots were their own air traffic controllers and the only sign of security or administration on the ground was two people with large rifles ready to let fire as required. No check in required at all. Just get on your plane under the one engine that was turn off while the other one spun, hoike up the steps and you get a passenger list tick off if anyone can be bothered.

    I love travel. Now Hairy tells me the Hungarians have just dismissed Gender Studies from their universities. Apparently the job market has no call for it. Good stuff. See Breitbart. 🙂

  36. Tom

    You have the writer’s gift, Lizzie. Superb.

  37. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    That’s World Heritage Listing, not ‘listening’. Sorry for not proof-reading; Hairy is always urging me to get off da blog and go out, get in da car, go to dinner, or whatever. Right now, it’s to go to dinner.

    I do hope they get it. The site is marvellous and very well organised and displayed.

  38. None

    This is why independent private sites like this are better than big tech fascists
    https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/08/10/big-tech-starts-to-censor-climate-skeptics/
    Until they start shutting down or shadow banning small sites

  39. None

    Nine will regret taking over Fairfax. All cashed up and ready to sue. Ben S-R already lodged. Good.

  40. Bruce of Newcastle

    Thanks Tom! I thought the cartoons yesterday were not as bitey as usual but that is made up by today. Awesome bunch. Hard to pick. I think I’ll go with Henry Payne for the endangered polar bear sticker.

  41. OldOzzie

    Thanks Tom

    Ben Garrison today although Lisa Benson a close second

  42. OldOzzie

    Tom
    #2786137, posted on August 11, 2018 at 5:02 am


    You have the writer’s gift, Lizzie. Superb.

    Lizzie, agree with Tom, +1 from me

  43. Geriatric Mayfly

    Hungary Discontinues Gender Studies Programs: ‘Ideology, Not Science’
    The Hungarian government is discontinuing programs in gender studies at state-run universities after determining the programs serve no identifiable purpose and are based on “ideology rather than science.”

    Central Europe maybe the harbinger of the New Enlightenment. It gives great comfort to read something like this, and if the lamentations of the wimminzes reach the stratosphere with their screeching, it will be music to my ears.

  44. OldOzzie

    Who knows how the Victorian government’s Orwellian social experiment will end? – Janet Albrechtsen Columnist

    “We’re destroying words — scores of them, hundreds of them, every day. We’re cutting the language down to the bone …

    “Don’t you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it.”

    My son is studying George Orwell and we chatted about Nineteen Eighty-Four over breakfast this week. If he chooses to look, this book is jumping to life all around him. Books are cleansed of words that must not be said. Books by Enid Blyton, mind you. And Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn,too.

    Speaking at university has become dangerous if you don’t repeat ortho­dox thinking. Comics have given up playing to snowflake student audiences. Words such as sexual assault and sexual harassment are being defined down to include the telling of a bad joke. At his school, boys were told not to use the word moist because it could offend girls. The cleansing of language and ideas has become disturbingly quotidian.

    And this week’s live-streaming of Nineteen Eighty-Four comes to us from Australia’s biggest social laboratory where the Andrews Labor government has a tighter grip on thought crimes than on it does on marauding South Sudan­ese gangs. On Thursday, Victorian Minister for Transport (and censorship) Jacinta Allan banned Sky News from television screens at Metro Trains stations because one host conducted one interview with far-right ratbag Blair Cottrell last Sunday. Sky News apologised and leading Sky names such as David Speers rightly condemned giving a platform to a moron who likes Hitler. But the Labor government banned an entire news organisation so that train commuters “can see something they may be a bit more comfortable with”, to quote Allan, who maybe hasn’t spent much time perusing her portfolio platforms. The Cottrell interview was not part of the Sky News feed that plays at train station screens.

    Allan has snookered herself with her hysterical over-reaction. The Transport Minister can’t switch platform TVs to an ABC news feed or the Seven Network or Ten because all of them have aired or tried to air Cottrell. Perhaps a 24-hour stream of E! News and Kimmy K will keep commuters “comfortable”. When the state decides to censor for comfortable ideas, we have reached a deeper level of trouble for our liberty.

    Victoria’s Nineteen Eighty-Four moment a week earlier involved the state’s Department of Health and Human Services telling public servants what pronouns to use, with the first Wednesday of each month set aside as “They Day”.

    A video for public servants made by public servants features enforcement officer Naomi Shimoda and others talking about the need for inclusive gender-neutral pronouns. It allows people to “self-define” and to “make space so their pronouns are legitimate and respected.”

    Some will say that people should be able to choose whatever pronoun they want and that it is only polite that others respect that choice. Others will say “blah, blah, blah” and wave the kerfuffle away as just another episode of nutty political correctness by busybody social activists. The sceptics know to be beware of the blah, blah, blah because the battle over gender-neutral pronouns in other countries is a hint of where we may be headed. Not for nothing, the self-appointed pronoun police behind the “They Day” video included an enforcement officer. Silly-sounding nonsense has a habit of attracting enforcers, be they vigilante-style citizens or bureaucrats and legislators, who tell us what we are allowed to say, read, watch, even laugh at. And inevitably, what we are allowed to think. It is the death of liberty by a thousand cuts.

    Language police in the ACT Labor caucus want to do away with references to Mr, Miss, Mrs or Ms in the ACT parliament. No more Madam Speaker. And it is Member Smith instead of Mr Smith. The Bolsheviks wanted to do away with gender too, so why not just call him Comrade Smith, source some bleak-coloured Bolshevik uniforms and declare victory?

    Labor’s proposals are not about respecting diversity. This is an agenda to force the same grey and genderless linguistic uniform on everyone. Cleansing gender from pronouns is about killing difference. Being polite is one thing; but political correctness moved beyond civility long ago, if that was ever the aim. When the cleansing of language is backed by directives, regulations or laws, it compels us to speak in one particular way. By stopping us from speaking freely, the aim is to stop us thinking freely. And that is antithetical to freedom in a liberal society.

    An obscure Canadian psychologist became a cultural rock star because he explained, in a calm and reasoned manner, why he would not be forced to use speech prescribed by the state. Nor would he stop using words proscribed by the state. Less than two years ago, Jordan Peterson took a stand against Canada’s proposed Bill C-16, which effectively compels the use of gender-neutral pronouns by adding legal protection to “gender identity” and “gender expression”.

    Peterson was on to something long before the rest of us. Within six months of the bill becoming law, Lindsay Shepherd, a teaching assistant at Wilfrid Laurier University in Ontario, was called into a university administrator’s office and condemned by professors for showing a clip that was “threatening” and “transphobic”. Her professorial accusers said it created a “toxic climate” for students and was the equivalent of “neutrally playing a speech by Hitler”. She was accused of breaching C-16 laws. Shepherd’s crime was to show her students — during a tutorial on how language affects society — a televised debate between two people with different views about gender and pronouns. One of the speakers was Peterson.

    We know the details because a teary Shepherd recorded the meeting, which could be slotted seamlessly into chapter 5 of Nineteen Eighty-Four just before Winston discusses with Syme, a specialist in Newspeak, how the dictionary of approved language is progressing. C-16 has weaponised gender-neutral pronouns in the hands of human rights bureaucrats and complainants, and that is a chilling threat to freedom.

    Ten years ago, the Alberta Human Rights Commission investigated a complaint brought against Ezra Levant for publishing the Danish cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. The complaint was dropped, but not before a bur­eaucrat questioned Levant about his intention in publishing the cartoons. The interrogation reminded Levant of Hannah Arendt’s “banality of evil”.

    “No six-foot brown shirt here, no police cell at midnight,” he wrote. “Just Shirlene McGovern, an amiable enough bureaucrat, casually asking me about my political thoughts, on behalf of the government of Alberta. And she’ll write up a report about it, and recommend that the government do this or that to me … I had half-expected a combative, missionary-style interrogator. I found, instead, a limp clerk who was just punching the clock … In a way, that’s more terrifying.”

    O Canada! How it has made a mockery of being “The True North, strong and free”. A free society is curtailed by stealth when out-of-sight bur­eaucrats investigate the free expression of words, ideas and cartoons. And freedom lost is not easily reinstated. An Australian law compelling us to use certain pronouns may not be far off because we have followed Canada before. We pick­ed up Canada’s gift to the world, multiculturalism. And just as the Canadian Human Rights Commission has gone awry, accused by founder Alan Borovoy for falling into disrepute, our own Australian Human Rights Commission has wrecked its reputation, too. When was the last time the AHRC focused on core human rights such as free speech or property rights? Instead, it is a bloated bureaucracy whose enforcers protect hurt feelings, not human rights.

    And dob-in-a-dissident was sanctioned when Race Commissar — oops, Commissioner — Tim Soutphommasane touted for business when The Australian’s Bill Leak drew a cartoon that threw into sharp relief the complex issues of individual responsibility and the dismal plight of indigenous children. Yet Soutphommasane had nothing to say about a dance performance in Melbourne this year where white people were told to wait in the lobby while the performance began inside the theatre. His departure is a blessing for anyone committed to genuine human rights.

    The AHRC’s wretched handling of complaints against three Queensland University of Technology students who posted on Facebook about the absurdity of racial segregation only confirmed its role as an anti-human rights bureaucracy. The career epitaph of former commission boss Gillian Triggs should read: “Sadly you can say what you like around the kitchen table at home.”

    Examples abound of bureaucracies that have run amok when armed with social engineering laws that were once seen as innocuous nonsense. Applauding the recent decision of the US to pull out of the UN Human Rights Council, Liberal MP Julian Leeser has pointed out that this council is not some harmless bureaucracy.

    Delivering the 2018 B’nai B’rith Human Rights Address, Leeser said that human rights had often been hijacked and “in the (UN) Human Rights Council we see a blatant attempt by those who oppose liberal democratic ideals to commandeer the apparatus of human rights so that they might hide and obstruct its abuses”.

    “We read Orwell as a warning; they read Orwell as a textbook,” he said. The young MP then took aim at the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights, established by Kevin Rudd’s Labor government. Leeser, who has served on the committee for two years, called for its abolition on the grounds that it is not really a committee of the parliament.

    “It is a bureaucracy that has appropriated the name of the parliament. The committee is about bureaucrats judging parliament, rather than the parliament judging human rights.” And just about every report attacks the government’s legislative agenda “in the form of rehashed talking points from left-wing and social justice groups that have no connection to ‘real’ human rights”.

    In 1994, before he became prime minister, John Howard warned about the rise of cultural McCarthyism in this country. Talk about mission creep. Who could have foreseen their reach and influence? Short of securing legislative wins, social engineers under­stand that getting, holding and extending their power through unelected bureaucracies is critical to the pursuit of creating public-free zones where real power vests, far away from prying democratic processes. No one knows how the current batch of social experiments will end. But history shows that something that sounds harmless, like a friendly video about gender-neutral pronouns put out by bureaucrats, can end up curtailing our liberty.

  45. calli

    Lizzie, you’ve convinced me to pop over to the Orkneys on our Great UK Road Trip. Why stop at John O’Groats? 🙂

    Good stuff.

  46. OldOzzie

    Ben Roberts-Smith hits Fairfax Media with defamation suit – Paul Maley – DEFENCE EDITOR

    Australia’s most decorated war hero, Ben Roberts-Smith, has lashed out at a small band of disgruntled former SAS troopers who he accuses of running an anonymous smear campaign that has ­ruined his reputation and seen him accused of everything from war crimes to violence against women.

    In an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with The Weekend Australian,Mr Roberts-Smith broke his silence to respond to years of rumours that he abused Afghan prisoners while he was a trooper with the SASR, that he bullied and assaulted fellow troops in the field and that he was involved in an ugly domestic violence incident with a young woman after a function at Canberra’s Parliament House.

    The Victoria Cross recipient said he had yet to be interviewed by the Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force, who is conducting an inquiry into alleged war crimes in Afghanistan.

    He added that in 20 years of military service no formal allegation of wrongdoing had ever been put to him.

    Mr Roberts-Smith also gave his most thorough account yet of a battle in 2006 in which an Afghan spotter was shot dead and Mr Roberts-Smith was awarded the Medal of Gallantry for his bravery under fire.

    An at-times emotional Mr Roberts-Smith said rumours and reports about his service record in Afghanistan had had a “devastating’’ effect on his life and family and left him in profound shock.

    “My family and I sit here and wonder, what’s next?” he said. “What’s the next lie that’s going to run in the paper? I’m not a politician, I’m not famous. I went and fought for my country, and I’m being attacked because I fought for my country and I got a medal. I just don’t understand how I today am sitting here in this position. I really don’t.’’

    The VC recipient’s comments followed reports in Fairfax Media yesterday alleging he had engaged in an extramarital affair with a woman who had then accused him of domestic violence.

    Mr Roberts-Smith said the truth was very different. He said that during the period in question he was separated from his wife, their marriage having come under “significant pressure’’.

    In that time, he began a relationship with a woman who, along with Mr Roberts-Smith, attended a function at Parliament House on March 28. Mr Roberts-Smith said that, after the function, while he was summoning a car, the woman, who he said was heavily intoxicated, fell down a flight of stairs.

    “When I got there, there were two federal police officers; they were basically holding her up. She had a huge lump on the top of her head and what appeared to be a scrape on the top of her eye and she said she had a sore hip.

    “But she was very intoxicated to the point of being incoherent, so they were literally holding her up.’’

    An ACT Police spokeswoman refused to say if an investigation had been initiated, or even if a complaint had been made.

    Mr Roberts-Smith categorically denied any suggestion he was violent towards the woman and said he had never been contacted by the police about it.

    He said he accompanied the woman to the airport the next day and even saw her a few more times before breaking off the relationship a week later.

    He said the domestic violence allegation had come “completely out of the blue’’.

    He said his wife knew about the relationship and they were back together, in love, and had resolved to work things out.

    “The fact that I have to explain why my wife and I decided to have a break in our relationship, it’s a bit harsh,’’ he said.

    Mr Roberts-Smith received the commonwealth’s highest bravery honour, the Victoria Cross, in 2010 and the Medal of Gallantry in 2006 for his courage during a battle in Afghanistan’s Chora Valley. That engagement has been mired in controversy amid suggestions the six-man patrol, led by Mr Roberts-Smith, shot a young Afghan on the grounds he was a Taliban spotter.

    Mr Roberts-Smith said any suggestion the young man was an innocent shepherd, and not a Taliban scout, failed to understand the full context of the battle and the numerous witness reports that followed it.

    “There had been a significant battle that had played out prior to that spotter looking for us,’’ he said. “Post that battle, on the valley floor, we were engaging insurgents with aircraft. What that meant was they knew there had to be a team somewhere identifying where to drop the bombs.’’

    Mr Roberts-Smith said there were guys walking “all over the hill’’, including other spotters who were too far away to disclose the patrol’s position and therefore not worth engaging.

    “Let’s say he might have been a shepherd,’’ Mr Roberts-Smith said. “There was no sheep up there. It’s hard to be a shepherd if there’s no sheep. The guy was a spotter. He was engaged and when he was engaged there was some kind of ordnance that he was carrying, whether it was a flare, a smoke grenade and RPG booster — whatever it was, that detonated. That essentially confirmed he was a spotter.’’

    Mr Roberts-Smith denied claims he had physically assaulted Afghan detainees. He said a report that he had to be physically pulled off a detainee by two other members of his patrol did not happen. “That is a fabrication and a blatant lie and that will be vigorously defended,’’ he said.

    Mr Roberts-Smith’s denials come as the IGADF nears the end of his two-year secret investigation into allegations members of Australia’s special forces breached the laws of war during the decade-long battle in Afghanistan.

    Judge Paul Brereton, who is running the inquiry for the IGADF, is expected to hand in his report this year and there is an expectation within Defence that at least some claims of misconduct will be deemed credible.

    Mr Roberts-Smith said he had not been interviewed by the Brereton inquiry and that the only contact he had had with the IGADF was through his own lawyers in relation to reports about his service.

    Mr Roberts-Smith, the Seven Network’s managing director in Queensland, yesterday lodged a defamation action in the Federal Court in Sydney against Fairfax Media.

    He accuses the publisher of conducting a long-running “hatchet job’’ on him, led, he says, by a small band of disgruntled SAS troopers.

  47. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Thanks for reading my paragraphs telling of travel impressions, Tom and OldOzzie and being nice about them. They are written very much on the fly so they are hardly literary efforts, but I hope they bring to those interested some new impressions of places many Cats might like to hear more about; or refresh their own memories of similar visits. If not, scrolling is the solution.

    I did forget to mention that this afternoon we visited St. Ninian’s Isle, which is a beautiful little acreage island connected by a tombola (a neck of beach) to the mainland. You can walk across to it in ten minutes from the car park, and then it is five minutes climb up a sandy path to see where a C7th Chapel once stood, now showing only the ruins of the C13th Church that stood there, and where a very fine Pictish treasure hoard of silver was buried near the altar. It is thought by scholars that St. Ninian, the C5th (thus very early post-Rome) founder of Whitehaven (Casa Candida), the first British church on a similar sort of off-shore yet connected island in Cumbria’s Galloway, probably never did found this Chapel or visit this little isle, but his name is somehow attached to it. It is the prettiest place to view from the shoreline near the car park, with a semi-circle collar of golden sand fringed on each side by a flat blue sea drawing you inexorably to take the trouble to walk across and visit it. No-one lives there any more; just the ghosts of the hermit monks who made it their life’s mission to bring Christianity to the Shetland Picts, in the footsteps of St. Colomba who in the sixth century missionised the Picts from his island retreat on Iona. The Ninian connection was probably made to give an even earlier date to Christianity in Shetland (who knows? I don’t actually discount the Ninian tradition as there is often some sort of truth in old traditions; Ninian is not even well attested in Whitehaven, truth be told). The Pictish stone grave cists there still show some pagan influences, although they feature Christian crosses.

  48. johanna

    Just been watching the Looney Tunes classics on the teev, and it dawned on me – Donald Trump is Bugs Bunny! The similarities are unmistakeable.

    The episode I watched was the one where Bugs accidentally gets launched into space, and ends up on a hostile planet. He never loses his confidence, outwits them all, and ends up safely home, without for a moment appearing to be an ‘intellectual.’ He’s a street-smart bunny whose creators and promulgators were Noo Yok Joos.

    Bugs is never fazed, and doesn’t give a rat’s about other people’s opinions. He will dress up or pretend in other ways to get what he wants. He’s a winner.

    True, Trump is an Aryan blond, but in every other respect he is Bugs Bunny, the Jooish Noo Yok huckster critter transplanted into the heartland to make him popular.

    Hmmm – now I’m thinking of Top Cat, but let’s leave that for another time. 🙂

  49. johanna

    Still on the Naughty Step, I see.

    Oh please, please, Mr Schoolmaster, may I go to the toilet?

    No! is the stern reply. You have sinned, and must suffer and repent.

    My response is best not posted on a family blog.

  50. Tintarella di Luna

    Lizzie love your writing, it is as Tom says, superb, it’s like being a scarf around your neck and seeing it all – if that’s writing on the fly, happy trails and thanks for posting here, because I know I’ll never get there.

  51. OldOzzie

    It’s a universal truth: renewables mean higher costs – Judith Sloan
    Contributing Economics Editor

    Tell me anywhere in the world where a higher penetration of ­renewable energy has been associated with lower electricity prices.

    It certainly isn’t Denmark, which went crazy about wind power and has some of the highest electricity prices in the world.

    It also isn’t Germany, which fell in love with wind and solar power — yes, solar power in Germany — and has some of the highest electricity prices in the world. Did I also mention, notwithstanding the substantial taxpayer and customer subsidisation of renewable energy, Germany will fail to meet the 2020 emissions reduction target it set ­itself and may well fail to meet its 2030 target? Germany also has finished constructing a new brown coal-fired power station recently.

    In Spain, electricity prices were below the European average in 2009. They are now significantly above that average in the context of a massive expansion of subsidised renewable energy. This link finally was accepted by the government and the subsidies have been dramatically curtailed.

    It also isn’t the Canadian province of Ontario, where retail electricity prices have doubled since 2005, notwithstanding assurances by the progressive government, which recently has been convincingly voted out of ­office, that this would not happen. The Ontario government forced the premature closure of its coal-fired power stations and piled on the subsidies for renewable energy.

    When the head of Environmental Defence Canada was asked whether he was concerned that the Ontario government’s plan, as enacted through the Green Energy and Green Economy Act 2009, would lead to ­higher electricity prices for consumers in the province, he simply replied: “No, not at all.”

    It’s a different story today and the newly elected premier, conservative Doug Ford, recently has cancelled a government auction for more renewable energy. He also has vowed to take on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who is planning to impose an escalating carbon tax on all provinces deemed to be failing to reduce emissions to the required degree.

    Not that things are going swimmingly for Trudeau, who is having to tweak his carbon tax plans ­because of the potential blow to the competitiveness of Canada’s energy-intensive, trade-exposed industries.

    With the incipient trade war with the US in the background, the Canadian government is seeking to lower the burden on EITE firms lest they sustain falling profits and possibly close. Trudeau is finding that it’s not easy being green.

    And let’s consider some states in the US whose governments have decided the promotion of ­renewable energy is the way to go.

    One of the hidden costs of ­renewable energy is the extra cost of transmission lines that are used only infrequently. Solar and wind farms are typically spread out, which increases the costs.

    As ­Michael Shellenberger, energy contributor to Forbes, notes: “It would take 18 solar farms to produce the same amount of electricity that comes from the one nuclear power plant (in Diablo Can­yon, California). Where just one set of transmission lines is required to bring power from Diablo Canyon, 18 sep­arate transmission lines would be required to bring power from solar farms. These transmission lines are in most cases longer because solar farms are far away in the desert where it is sunny and land is cheap.”

    So let’s look at the data. For the US as a whole, electricity prices rose 7 per cent between 2009 and 2017. (Oh, that we were so lucky.)

    In North Dakota, electricity prices rose 40 per cent while the penetration of renewables (wind and solar) went from 9 per cent to 27 per cent.

    In South Dakota, it was a similar story: electricity prices rose 34 per cent while renewables went from 5 per cent to 30 per cent.

    In California, an epicentre of green politics and party to a carbon cap-and-trade scheme, electricity prices rose 22 per cent while the share of ­renewables rose from 3 per cent to 27 per cent.

    Are there exceptions to this rule — a higher penetration of ­renewables leading to lower electricity prices? In Texas, renewables have gone from 5 per cent to 15 per cent — note the latter is still quite low — and electricity prices fell by 14 per cent across the period. But this was mainly the result of falling gas prices, with Texas the hub of gas fracking. ­Environ­men­tal groups in Australia, of course, are fiercely opposed to fracking.

    As Shellenberger concludes: “Integrating solar on to the grid is much easier to do when you can easily turn natural gas plants up and down to accommodate their intermittency. And it’s much ­easier to do when it is 12 per cent of your electricity instead of 20 per cent.”

    The real issue with renewable energy is its non-synchronous and intermittent nature. In short, it cannot produce electricity when and where it is needed. And at times it produces too much electricity in relation to demand. Peak solar production, for instance, ­occurs at 1pm; peak demand is much later in the day.

    This has led to the extraordinary situation in California and Germany where neighbouring states/countries are actually paid to take the excess electricity. Mind you, Poland has become jack of ­accepting Germany’s excess renew­able energy output, fearing for the commercial future of its coal-fired power stations.

    Malcolm Turnbull is wont to tell us electricity is all about economics and engineering. The Prime Minister may be right, but he fails to understand the core features of the economics and engineering — the physics, ­really — that mean the higher penetration of renewable energy will almost always lead to higher electricity prices, including in Australia. And note that we are not blessed with ample supplies of cheap gas, as is the case in the US. So in arguing the case for his beloved national energy guarantee, he must explain how the promotion of more renewable energy, via the imposition of a reviewable emissions reduction target, could possibly lead to lower electricity prices when this has not been the case around the world.

    We know that the modelling undertaken by the Energy Security Board is completely shonky ­because it assumes a competitive market in which the cost of capital and system costs miraculously fall as result of the NEG. At the very least, the ESB should have insisted the modellers undertake sensitivity analysis on their findings and subject them to an independent expert committee.

    The public is right to be sceptical about the modelling prediction of lower prices under the NEG. It’s just a pity no one called out the modellers when the renewable ­energy target was being reviewed.

    It is probably the case that ­renewable energy can be made to work in Australia — it is relatively sunny and windy in parts. But the costs, many hidden ­including transmission, storage and the provision of inertia services, are likely to be substantial and ongoing.

    The last thing the renewable energy players really want is lower electricity prices. After all, what will sustain their supernormal profits after the large-scale renewable energy certificates peter out in the early 2020s?

    But think of it this way. Most of our large energy-intensive plants will have closed by then and so ­demand will have fallen away. We can all be happy watching the turbines turn and the solar panels heat up and be satisfied that we are doing our bit to reduce global warming — or not.

  52. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hungary Discontinues Gender Studies Programs: ‘Ideology, Not Science’

    Who knows how the Victorian government’s Orwellian social experiment will end? – Janet Albrechtsen

    I just now read Keith Windschuttle’s editorial in Quadrant, which is very pertinent to both the above stories.

    The Secret World of Academia (29 July)

    At Oxford, Professor Biggar held his conference in utmost secrecy, with no announcement about its existence, no advertising and no social media promotion. Several attendees insisted their identities and attendance be kept secret. One of those who gave a paper under his own name was Professor Jeremy Black, whose views on the current academic debate over the British Empire, and the student violence that erupted over the issue in London earlier this year, were published in Quadrant’s June edition.

    One of those invited to the secret conference was Sumantra Maitra, a doctoral researcher at the University of Nottingham, who interviewed Biggar for the Australian online magazine Quillette. As academic activist tactics spread on campus, Maitra wrote, secrecy seemed to be the only way to continue research without the worry of mob violence. Biggar told him: “If I want to hold lectures or seminars on the topic of empire, I will do so privately, since I cannot be sure that my critics will behave civilly.” One young scholar only attended the Gilley conference “on condition his name nowhere appears in print, nor his face on any photograph, lest his senior colleagues find out and kill his career”.

    It is a measure of the Left that now if one wants to discuss history you have to do so with “utmost secrecy” in case you are assaulted and made unemployable. Freedom is dying.

  53. Nick

    Perhaps if Roberts-Smith had been accused of raping a girl at a youth camp, the media would presume innocence and not comment at all.

  54. OldOzzie

    Lizzie,

    if you are interested in Monastic History

    if you have not already read The Cadfael Chronicles, then I would recommend them as a good read

    The Cadfael Chronicles is a series of historical murder mysteries written by the linguist-scholar Edith Pargeter under the name “Ellis Peters”.

    Set in the 12th century during the Anarchy in England, the novels focus on Benedictine monk Cadfael who aids the law with solving murders.

    In all, Pargeter wrote twenty Cadfael novels between 1977 and 1994. Each draws upon the storyline, characters, and developments of previous books in the series. Pargeter apparently planned the 20th installment as the final book of the series; Brother Cadfael’s Penance brings together the loose story ends into a tidy conclusion. Pargeter herself died shortly after its publication, following a long illness. Many of the books were adapted into both radio episodes in which Ray Smith, Glyn Houston and subsequently Philip Madoc played the monk, and a television series starring Derek Jacobi as Cadfael.

    Pargeter’s Cadfael Chronicles are sometimes credited for popularizing what would later become known as the historical mystery.[1]

  55. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Lizzie, you’ve convinced me to pop over to the Orkneys on our Great UK Road Trip. Why stop at John O’Groats? 🙂

    These are wonderful areas, Scotland and above, for tourists who don’t want the rush and bother of the third world or even the busy world to intrude on their enjoyments. Haven’t seen a single letter box, and very few black robes or even headscarves unless they are of the type worn by Her Maj. Skara Brae and Jarlshoff are also the heritage areas for many of us with a little Viking blood (me, via my mum’s Reiver father), and the neolithic tribal stuff is heritage for all European peoples. We did once have our own tribes and traditions and we still live with parts of them today. For Christians, there are many early sites of conversion as well as the Nordic world’s cathedrals and churches, which are so interesting in themselves as well.

    If you do Orkney, try to also take in Shetland. Check the various ferries. Viking Group go to Shetland from Aberdeen and also then from Shetland to Orkney and it’s easy to get back to the Scottish mainland from Orkney then. We went on separate occasions to these two key sites, but if you combine these with other Scottish Heritage sites then you buy a combined ticket at greatly reduced cost. However, the entry fees are extremely reasonable anyway. The comparison of Skara Brae and Jarlshof is very well worth doing; as you walk around both sites the sense of time hangs fire over it all. Both were uncovered by fierce winter storms, which suggests that winter is a season to avoid. 🙂

  56. OldOzzie

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2786168, posted on August 11, 2018 at 7:52 am

    Hungary Discontinues Gender Studies Programs: ‘Ideology, Not Science’

    Who knows how the Victorian government’s Orwellian social experiment will end? – Janet Albrechtsen

    I just now read Keith Windschuttle’s editorial in Quadrant, which is very pertinent to both the above stories.

    I think the comment in that Quadrant Article

    One young scholar only attended the Gilley conference “on condition his name nowhere appears in print, nor his face on any photograph, lest his senior colleagues find out and kill his career”.

    Was Chilling

  57. Cassie of Sydney

    “None
    #2786102, posted on August 11, 2018 at 2:20 am
    The Alliance’s spokesman, Vic Alhadeff, has been striving for change for more than 15 years with the J3wish Board of Deputies and is “exhilarated” it has finally come.

    Vic Alhadeff and the three J*ws he represents are enemies of the state. All other J** in Australia should distance themselves from this little fascist. Remember the alliance he leads is full of lefties who absolutely hate J*ws, hate Israel, are BDS advicates and hate free speech. It astonishes me time and time again how so many diaspora J**s are just the useful idiots of resident fascists. To think that some of my forefathers died for their freedom so they could now take away mine. Fuck ’em.”

    I agree with you 100%. I and others in my community have distanced ourselves from these putrid individuals and the rank, shallow leftist organisations that they represent. Don’t get me started on the Alhadeff…..a grub. A new J*wish organisation was set up last year by David Adler called the Australian J*wish Association (AJA) to represent people such as myself who are conservative/libertarian/right-wing, who wish to see Section 18C gone, who believe in free speech and who believe that cretins such as Alhadeff and the organisations that they supposedly speak for do not represent us. I can tell you that the AJA is doing quite well however the mainstream organisations and grubs like Alhadeff are doing their utmost to undermine the AJA. Two weeks ago, the AJA invited Lauren Southern to walk down a street in Bondi towards a synagogue precisely to point out the difference between the two religions and their respective adherents and to show that Southern could safely walk down a Bondi street without having a police officer stop her and tell her that if she continues she will be breaching the peace. Well, of course….the shit hit the fan so to speak. The usual leftist suspects and grubs basically said that Lauren was a right-wing extremist and associated with nazis. And of course the AJA has now been accused by the ECVJ (Executive Council of Vic J*wry) and all the other grubs (all infested with leftists) of promoting extremism and racism and engaging in islamophobia….you know, the usual cheap smears that the left love to throw about. Quite laughable really.

    I have long said and will continue to say that the best speech for the J*wish community is free speech.

  58. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I’ve read the name Cadfael somewhere, not related to this , OldOzzie, so I think it must be the name of a real monk of the period (or perhaps earlier, around the period of The Synod of Whitby).

  59. Geriatric Mayfly

    I have just authorized a doubling of Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum with respect to Turkey as their currency, the Turkish Lira, slides rapidly downward against our very strong Dollar! Aluminum will now be 20% and Steel 50%. Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!
    This is awesome. Turkey needs a slap.

    Who was that brown chap again in the White House, who used to tiptoe through the tulips?

  60. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    OldOzzie, many of us here on the Cat know that we, or our loved ones, would be picked out for ‘special treatment’ by the left if our true identities became known. In my case, I have had more concerns in this regard for my husband Hairy than for myself, especially given some of the work he was doing when I first started to comment here. The issue of suffering career loss of various sorts (as well as loss of fair-weather friends) due to opinions one holds is very pertinent to many Cats, which is why Sinc stresses so strongly the virtues of anonymity and maintaining that on the blog.

    Thankfully, Hairy is more inclined these days, with a lot of the pressure off as he has pedaled back on work for health reasons, to let his opinions rip far more freely than he could do five years or more ago. Hence we both feel freer now to meet up with other Cats IRL than we may have done previously.

  61. Who knows how the Victorian government’s Orwellian social experiment will end? – Janet Albrechtsen Columnist

    “We’re destroying words — scores of them, hundreds of them, every day. We’re cutting the language down to the bone …

    Janet, you were cockahoop about redefining marriage just recently. You ought to have the decency to sit this debate out.

  62. BrettW

    Interesting article by Grace Collier in the Oz page 22 about NDIS.

    The hourly rates for services in the NDIS price guide are a good indication of how this well meaning scheme is going to be rorted and cost all taxpayers a huge amount. If somebody can post the three paras with the rates would be appreciated. One example a 1 hour workplace assessment $187 per hour.

  63. Shelley

    I read of your travels with interest Lizzie. Having traveled through the Hebrides and Orkney about ten years ago. I didn’t get to Faroe Is unfortunately but it is on my list for next time. Skara Brae well worth the visit. We stayed here at the Gearrannan Black Houses.

  64. Helen

    BrettW

    The NDIS has a 2018-19 price guide for NSW, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania that took effect on July 1. The document is complex and prices for services are capped, but the hourly rates look more than ­acceptable, and sometimes too generous. To help a person co-­ordinate their NDIS support, a provider can charge up to $182.74 an hour for “specialist support co-ordination” to assist the “participant to connect with NDIS supports, negotiate solutions with multiple stakeholders and build capacity and resilience”.

    To help with “increased social and community participation”, a provider can charge up to $57.32 an hour for “individual life skills development and training including public transport training and support, developing skills for community, social and recreational participation”. To help with “finding and keeping a job”, a provider can ask up to $182.74 an hour for a workplace assessment “to determine adjustments or modifications to the workplace or work processes to ensure employment is maintained and matches the employee’s capabilities”.

    Under “improved health and wellbeing”, a provider can charge up to $148.69 for “individual ­advice to a participant regarding exercise required due to the ­impact of their disability”, and up to $182.74 an hour for “diet plan ­development”.

  65. Helen

    oops wrong email

    BrettW
    The NDIS has a 2018-19 price guide for NSW, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania that took effect on July 1. The document is complex and prices for services are capped, but the hourly rates look more than ­acceptable, and sometimes too generous. To help a person co-­ordinate their NDIS support, a provider can charge up to $182.74 an hour for “specialist support co-ordination” to assist the “participant to connect with NDIS supports, negotiate solutions with multiple stakeholders and build capacity and resilience”.

    To help with “increased social and community participation”, a provider can charge up to $57.32 an hour for “individual life skills development and training including public transport training and support, developing skills for community, social and recreational participation”. To help with “finding and keeping a job”, a provider can ask up to $182.74 an hour for a workplace assessment “to determine adjustments or modifications to the workplace or work processes to ensure employment is maintained and matches the employee’s capabilities”.

    Under “improved health and wellbeing”, a provider can charge up to $148.69 for “individual ­advice to a participant regarding exercise required due to the ­impact of their disability”, and up to $182.74 an hour for “diet plan ­development”.

  66. Cassie of Sydney

    Darling Lizzie, your travel diaries are wonderful. You write beautifully.

  67. Helen

    am i in moderation?

    BrettW
    The NDIS has a 2018-19 price guide for NSW, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania that took effect on July 1. The document is complex and prices for services are capped, but the hourly rates look more than ­acceptable, and sometimes too generous. To help a person co-­ordinate their NDIS support, a provider can charge up to $182.74 an hour for “specialist support co-ordination” to assist the “participant to connect with NDIS supports, negotiate solutions with multiple stakeholders and build capacity and resilience”.

    To help with “increased social and community participation”, a provider can charge up to $57.32 an hour for “individual life skills development and training including public transport training and support, developing skills for community, social and recreational participation”. To help with “finding and keeping a job”, a provider can ask up to $182.74 an hour for a workplace assessment “to determine adjustments or modifications to the workplace or work processes to ensure employment is maintained and matches the employee’s capabilities”.

    Under “improved health and wellbeing”, a provider can charge up to $148.69 for “individual ­advice to a participant regarding exercise required due to the ­impact of their disability”, and up to $182.74 an hour for “diet plan ­development”.

  68. Geriatric Mayfly

    At his school, boys were told not to use the word moist because it could offend girls.

    How dare they! This is a Cat special, reserved for certain types, and used sparingly. ABC feminazis are a prized target especially when they are riding high on one of their hobby-horses, eg a certain high ranking prelate.

  69. Helen

    Nup, must be something in the text below

    The NDIS has a 2018-19 price guide for NSW, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania that took effect on July 1. The document is complex and prices for services are capped, but the hourly rates look more than ­acceptable, and sometimes too generous. To help a person co-­ordinate their NDIS support, a provider can charge up to $182.74 an hour for “specialist support co-ordination” to assist the “participant to connect with NDIS supports, negotiate solutions with multiple stakeholders and build capacity and resilience”.

    To help with “increased social and community participation”, a provider can charge up to $57.32 an hour for “individual life skills development and training including public transport training and support, developing skills for community, social and recreational participation”. To help with “finding and keeping a job”, a provider can ask up to $182.74 an hour for a workplace assessment “to determine adjustments or modifications to the workplace or work processes to ensure employment is maintained and matches the employee’s capabilities”.

    Under “improved health and wellbeing”, a provider can charge up to $148.69 for “individual ­advice to a participant regarding exercise required due to the ­impact of their disability”, and up to $182.74 an hour for “diet plan ­development”.

  70. OldOzzie

    ‘Disability leave’ for all in ACTU’s brave new world of work – Grace Collier – Columnist

    Here is a little snippet for you, one unlikely to prove entirely uplifting. Between now and 2021, it is estimated that one in five of all new jobs created in Australia will be related to our National Disability Insurance Scheme.

    The ACTU, at its recent congress, released a policy document that says that when the NDIS is fully operational, it “is intended to provide services to 460,000 people, around 2 per cent of the population”. Those numbers sound about right, surely — 2 per cent of our population is disabled to the extent they need funded support to assist their dignified participation in life, work and society.

    Unfortunately, those numbers are not right at all. According to the ACTU, they are woefully ­inadequate. Apparently, after all the billions that will be spent on the NDIS and all the new jobs are created, still “the majority of people with disability will not be ­entitled to NDIS support”.

    This is because, according to the policy document, “almost one in five working age Australians has a disability”.

    Disabilities come in all forms, and can be acquired via “psychosocial hazards”. We can find ourselves struck down with “primary and secondary psychological injuries (for example, workplace stress, gendered violence, fatigue, violence, and bullying)”. Further, “modern working arrangements” such as “outsourcing, privatisation, corporatisation and competitive tendering of previously stable full-time jobs” can “create a heightened exposure to psychosocial hazards”.

    The answer to all this is fairly clear, according to the unions’ policy agenda.

    First, we need “disability leave”. This is a new entitlement, in addition to sick and ­annual leave. It is “paid leave for activities inherently associated with a worker’s disability, for ­example to attend physical therapy or rehab­ilitation sessions”. “In particular”, the ACTU says, workers with disability “should not be required to take annual leave or sick leave to attend NDIS planning meetings”, and it will ­develop a “discussion paper for consultation” about “a minimum entitlement to disability leave in Australia”.

    Just imagine what the future might hold: just under one in five workers categorised and registered as disabled, and all ­applying for paid disability leave so they can have therapy or whatnot and attend NDIS planning meetings.

    If almost one in five working Australians is disabled and needs support then surely two in five workers will be needed to work in disability-related jobs to provide this support.

    The ACTU says the unions must “play a central role in the ­development” of Australia’s disability sector, which sounds as though it will be gargantuan.

    Its policy notes the present funding model for the NDIS is based on service delivery, where “funding follows the service user who has choice and control in the delivery of their supports”. The big problem with this, though, is the funding model is “contestable” and “risks increasing employment insecurity for the disability support workforce”.

    The ACTU says the only way the almost one in five disabled workers will be able to access “quality care and support” is via a workforce that has access to “fair wages and decent working conditions”, including “career progression, attraction and reten­tion, training and education, worker regulation and provider accreditation, and best practice disability support management”.

    In particular, the policy expresses concern about the “low and capped prices of the NDIS and the negative impact they have on the wages and conditions of the disability workforce”.

    The NDIS has a 2018-19 price guide for NSW, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania that took effect on July 1. The document is complex and prices for services are capped, but the hourly rates look more than ­acceptable, and sometimes too generous. To help a person co-­ordinate their NDIS support, a provider can charge up to $182.74 an hour for “specialist support co-ordination” to assist the “participant to connect with NDIS supports, negotiate solutions with multiple stakeholders and build capacity and resilience”.

    To help with “increased social and community participation”, a provider can charge up to $57.32 an hour for “individual life skills development and training including public transport training and support, developing skills for community, social and recreational participation”. To help with “finding and keeping a job”, a provider can ask up to $182.74 an hour for a workplace assessment “to determine adjustments or modifications to the workplace or work processes to ensure employment is maintained and matches the employee’s capabilities”.

    Under “improved health and wellbeing”, a provider can charge up to $148.69 for “individual ­advice to a participant regarding exercise required due to the ­impact of their disability”, and up to $182.74 an hour for “diet plan ­development”.

    Nevertheless, the prices NDIS providers can charge are not high enough, the ACTU says. They need to ensure that “minimum ­industrial benchmarks are met, allow scope for bargaining above minimum industrial standards and accommodate meaningful career structures for disability support workers”, and to ensure this, “a nationally consistent disability workforce registration and accreditation scheme should be established”, comprising “pre-employment screening; mandated minimum qualifications; ongoing professional development; and worker registration”.

    We sit on the cusp of an inspiring economic model, courtesy of government and the ­labour move­ment. For every five Australian workers, one will be disabled and needing support, two might be engaged in providing that support, and the other two will be doing something else, presumably productive.

  71. Helen

    Sorry BrettW, tried three times to post paras but spam and bad word filter wont allow.

    It will come up once someone looks at it no doubt

    but the fees were

    up to $182.74 an hour for “specialist support co-ordination” to assist the “participant to connect with NDIS supports, negotiate solutions with multiple stakeholders and build capacity and resilience”.

    $57.32 an hour for “individual life skills development and training including public transport training and support, developing skills for community, social and recreational participation”.

    $182.74 an hour for a workplace assessment “to determine adjustments or modifications to the workplace or work processes to ensure employment is maintained and matches the employee’s capabilities”.

    $148.69 for “individual ­advice to a participant regarding exercise required due to the ­impact of their disability”,

    182.74 an hour for “diet plan ­development”.

  72. calli

    the neolithic tribal stuff is heritage for all European peoples.

    Have you been to Carnac, Lizzie? Well worth it. The alignments seem to go on forever.

    We went at a not-so-busy time, and you could lose yourself amongst the stones.

    I’m an Ellis Peters fan (Cadfael through to Felse), Old Ozzie. Shrewsbury is on the list!

  73. Snoopy

    Shock! TheirABC comes out AGAINST socialism!

    National Broadband Network users who choose to pay thousands of dollars out of their own pocket for a high-speed internet connection are inadvertently paying to upgrade their neighbours’ connections as well as public infrastructure, the ABC has learned.
    >
    >
    She paid $6,500 to have her home hard-wired to the NBN connection point about 80 metres away from her house.
    >
    >
    She was surprised to be told by the installer that the five homes in between her house and the connection point would now be able to get FTTP connections to their homes at a much cheaper price, as she had paid for most of the necessary infrastructure.

    The ABC understands these houses would now only have to pay about $2,000 to connect to NBN fibre.

    “I was quite angry — that’s just not fair you know,” Ms Gaud said.

  74. Rae

    Nine will regret taking over Fairfax. All cashed up and ready to sue. Ben S-R already lodged. Good.

    Ben S-R (sic) already lodged? Lodged what? Robert-Smiths lawyer sought an injunction to prevent Fairfax publishing their story in the weekend papers on the grounds that it breached Commonwealth Law. That application failed.

    Ben S-r (sic) has not yet sued. Maybe he won’t.

  75. Old School Conservative

    Well done Rowan.

    “As a lifelong beneficiary of the freedom to make jokes about religion, I do think that Boris Johnson’s joke about wearers of the burqa resembling letter boxes is a pretty good one,” Atkinson wrote in a letter to the London Times newspaper, published on Friday.

  76. BrettW

    Thanks Old Ozzie for putting up Collier article.

    Oz also covering Ben Roberts Smith VC MG story.

    One of the incidents mentioned involves the killing of a spotter by Ben’s patrol. I have yet to see a newspaper article mention the US SEALs incident as depicted in movie Lone Survivor. Only one from the team survived after being seen by a local who tipped off the Taliban. Not only that a Chinook with 19 (?) more operators went down whilst trying to rescue them. This happened a year before Ben’s team killed the spotter. I would think all Special Forces worldwide would have been well aware of this scenario. Similar story with British SAS patrol Bravo Two Zero in Gulf War One.

    Seems some might prefer Ben’s team killed in order to protect one Afghan spotter.

  77. None

    The hourly rates for services in the NDIS price guide are a good indication of how this well meaning scheme is going to be rorted

    did Brett the NDIS was never a well-meaning scheme. As I had said for years before it’s implementation it was a ponzi scheme, designed to breed and feed fat cats, and a cruel hoax for the disabled. Some States already had a disability voucher scheme and these should have been expanded instead. The NDIS was one of those stupid things that the LNP did in opposition, that is, it voted with Labor to implement this behemoth. At that means the fuckwits I now committed to keeping it. I say it again our grandchildren will curse and curse this generation and rightly so if any of them are awake and not speaking Chinese.

  78. Elle

    OldOzzie, many of us here on the Cat know that we, or our loved ones, would be picked out for ‘special treatment’ by the left if our true identities became known. 

    I am surrounded by leftists at work and including activists in both the Aboriginal and LGBTI communities. I am “in the closet” with my right of centre political views at work, but do have friends, on both sides of the political spectrum, I am “out” to.

  79. Empire 5:5

    Relocating the swamp:

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is moving two agencies and roughly 700 federal employees out of Washington, D.C., to save money and improve the department’s service to taxpayers.

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/08/10/usda-employees-move-dc/

  80. Old School Conservative

    Dear Rae, if the SMH is your only source for news then you will fall into the “War hero (Ben Roberts Smith) fails to stop publication of allegations”. line of thinking.

    However, The Australian contradicts your assertion with
    “Mr Roberts-Smith, the Seven Network’s managing director in Queensland, yesterday lodged a defamation action in the Federal Court in Sydney against Fairfax Media.”

    QED.

  81. None

    Janet, you were cockahoop about redefining marriage just recently. You ought to have the decency to sit this debate out.

    +1000.
    I’ve never understood why people thought Janet was some sort of Champion for Liberty. She’s just another wet Liberal supporter, meaning she’s a lefty and a slapper.

  82. calli

    Boris and Rowan on letterboxes:

    Confirmed.

  83. Bruce of Newcastle

    “As a lifelong beneficiary of the freedom to make jokes about religion, I do think that Boris Johnson’s joke about wearers of the burqa resembling letter boxes is a pretty good one,” Atkinson wrote in a letter to the London Times newspaper, published on Friday.

    Fun headline:

    Tories Could Send Boris Johnson for ‘Diversity Training’ over Burqa Comments

    Boris Johnson could be sent on ‘diversity training’ instead of being sanctioned by the Conservative Party after he compared the appearance of women wearing the Islamic face veil to “letterboxes” and “robbers”.

    Senior Tories have reportedly told the centre-right Telegraph that the leading Brexiteer will likely not have the whip removed (be suspended from the party), but may attend training should a formal investigation find the former foreign secretary had breached the party’s “code of conduct”.

    The launching of the initial investigation prompted a backlash from Johnson’s supporters within the party, with criticisms directed at party chairman Brandon Lewis.

    I hope they do send him on diversity training, and that someone tapes the whole thing and uploads it. It’d be hilarious.

  84. Geriatric Mayfly

    Not even moderation now, just a black hole gobbling up posts.

  85. calli

    Atkinson has had a ball lampooning the English clergy.

    I hope he puts his money where his mouth is and has a go at the Imams.

    If not, why not?

  86. Spider

    Infidel Tiger

    Shapiro is a sawn off little shit. He’s an internet hall monitor and a douche.

    I can’t get past the whiney nasal voice. It drives me to distraction.

  87. Cassie of Sydney

    “Elle
    #2786205, posted on August 11, 2018 at 8:57 am
    OldOzzie, many of us here on the Cat know that we, or our loved ones, would be picked out for ‘special treatment’ by the left if our true identities became known.

    I am surrounded by leftists at work and including activists in both the Aboriginal and LGBTI communities. I am “in the closet” with my right of centre political views at work, but do have friends, on both sides of the political spectrum, I am “out” to.”

    Elle and Lizzie, I’m the same, I just keep shtum at work. Workplaces are now no fun, infested with Orwellian group think. I work for a large private company and yet it it riddled with the same toxic PC and identity politics as anything found in the public service. Quite unbelievable. However, I do some dissident things at work when I can, a few months back our HR section decided to have a day dedicated to LGTBIQ (or whatever) people. I went to have lunch and noticed that the large table in the kitchen area kitchen was deliberately strewn with brochures about LGTBIQ stuff that we were being encouraged to read. I picked it all up, threw it in the rubbish bin where it belonged and sat down and had lunch. Another girl noticed and giggled and said well done.

    However, all my family and friends know of my political views and they do enjoy listening to my right-wing rants.

  88. C.L.

    Bolt is shocked this morning that a man in a dress is erratic.
    Calls him ‘she’ and ‘her’ throughout.
    Affirming the self-deluding lies of such people will always end this way.

  89. Stimpson J. Cat

    but 90% of the time is actually spot on in his analysis.

    Yes yes, a political analyst who is spot on 90% of the time who just happened to be completely and utterly wrong in every way about the biggest political happening of the last fifty years.
    We must respect Never Trumpers.

  90. johanna

    Yep, ‘beautifully written,’ Lizzie. I must admit you are getting better. It is less like trying to swim through chilled molasses than it used to be.

    Who knows, one day you might be able to write clear, crisp prose with minimal adjectives, adverbs, and references to self.

    BTW, how’s the book going?

    Anyway, from the Naughty Step I am here because I am infuriated by a report of a Canadian TV production of Anne of Green Gables which transforms many of the characters into lesbians.

    For blokes and younger females, L M Montgomery’s series of books about Anne Shirley of Prince Edward Island in Canada, first published in 1909, are classics.

    Anne was an orphan, shunted from place to place to work. Aged eleven, she turned up at Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert’s place in PEI. They had asked for a boy to help Matthew on the farm, but bureaucratic mixups are embedded in their DNA, than as now.

    Anne won them over and ended up staying. A series followed.

    I loved my Anne books growing up. I would get a new one at Christmas and on birthdays. She was very clever but also dreamed of a dress with puffed sleeves.

    Thing is, Anne of Green Gables is utterly infused with Presbyterianism. Mrs Allan, the Minister’s wife, is a role model for Anne. Everyone goes to church, and participates in church activities. The desire to do good, and be good, permeates the culture. Anne’s many failures from the ideal (often funny) are the whole point of the stories.

    The thought of these clever and classic children’s books being turned into lesbian propaganda makes me sick.

    I loved (and love) those books, but it didn’t make me turn into a Presbyterian. What I liked was a clear system of belief, and that if you agreed to do something, that was it. That’s how come Anne stayed at Green Gables, and the same went for Davey and Dora down the track.

    To suggest that Marilla and Racchel Lynde are secret lesbians – these people are deranged

  91. Geriatric Mayfly

    I hope they do send him on diversity training, and that someone tapes the whole thing and uploads it. It’d be hilarious.

    This would send every single ABC ‘comedy’ show into oblivion. What an absolute hoot, with Bozza being harassed by caring, sharing Lezzos. And him probably giving his responses in Latin.

  92. None

    Cheers Cassie. I’m glad to hear that many members of the J*wish community of fighting back against those a holes. What you wrote in that post should be front page news. Of course free speech is one of the best protections firstly because you will find out who your enemies are because they won’t be able to help spouting their s*** and secondly because you will have a voice to fight back.

  93. Chris

    Lizzie, thanks so much for your travels. The very names drip with implications and your ‘dashed-off lines’ are blossoms on the briars of the Open Fred.

  94. C.L.

    Female genital mutilation trio acquitted in NSW:

    It was the defence case at trial that ‘symbolic khatna’ had been performed with no cutting involved, described by Magennis as a ceremony whereby “skin sniffed the steel”.

    The appellants also argued a cut or nick did not amount to mutilation.

    So there you have it: it is now legal to have a mutilation ceremony and to just ‘cut or nick’ the clitoris.
    Absolutely astonishing.

    Also astonishing was the original sentence for the mother and ‘nurse’:

    The mother and Ms Magennis were sentenced to 11 months’ home detention, while Mr Vaziri received a maximum 15-month full-time custodial sentence and was later granted bail pending an appeal.

    Slice your child’s genitals and get some home detention. The two women should have been sentenced to a custodial jail term of at least 10 years, the wacko cleric to life.

  95. Senile Old Guy

    The ABC is rubbish.

    On a piece, they have this:

    Offender rate times higher than population size – less than 1 indicates over-representation and more than 1 indicates under-representation.

    The graphics below this have the opposite.

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-11/melbourne-sudanese-crime-statistics-victoria/10065402

  96. Stimpson J. Cat

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    Democrats, please do not distance yourselves from Nancy Pelosi. She is a wonderful person whose ideas & policies may be bad, but who should definitely be given a 4th chance. She is trying very hard & has every right to take down the Democrat Party if she has veered too far left!

  97. johanna

    Being kept on the Naughty Step/shadow moderation for hours and hours,

    So threatening! 🙂

  98. None

    Affirming the self-deluding lies of such people will always end this way.

    Basically what I said on his blog and also pointed out how John Hopkins Hospital was very right not to pander to such delusions once, for spund psychiateic reasons, but of course my comment wasn’t published ( I will note that The Daily Telegraph never publishers my comments on tranny criminals and the like either; I suspect the Gaystapo is engaging in some major lawfare there). Bolt has one major weakness. He wants to be liked.

  99. H B Bear

    I am about to use my last free plastic bag as a bin liner. From now on I will be adding additional plastic into the waste stream.

  100. None

    We must respect Never Trumpers.

    Hate to break it to you Stimpy but Trump is not the Messiah. That job’s already been taken. And Shapiro is J*wish.

  101. Elle

    Agree with you, Cassie. I know many J*wish people in my community who are right-wing and who wish to see Section 18C gone. Alhadeff is indeed a grub and does not speak for me, my family and my J*wish friends.

  102. egg_

    Shock! TheirABC comes out AGAINST socialism!

    National Broadband Network users who choose to pay thousands of dollars out of their own pocket for a high-speed internet connection are inadvertently paying to upgrade their neighbours’ connections as well as public infrastructure, the ABC has learned.

    But cross-subsidisation of ruinables is OK, because Envireligion.

  103. egg_

    But cross-subsidisation of ruinables is OK, because Envireligion.

    How soon before ICEs become “clunkers” to be removed from the roads?

  104. Stimpson J. Cat

    And Shapiro is J*wish.

    You say this like it is supposed to mean something.
    What does it mean?
    Is he special somehow?
    Immune from critique or criticism?
    Is life harder for him because of his height?

  105. None

    You say this like it is supposed to mean something

    dear God Stimpy you always have a go at me for being humorless. Shapiro’s not going to buy the line that Trump is the Messiah.

  106. egg_

    I am about to use my last free plastic bag as a bin liner. From now on I will be adding additional plastic into the waste stream.

    When are Colesworths going full Greentard and issuing hemp bags?

  107. Rae

    Dear Old School Conservative. The Sydney Morning Herald and the Australian (the antipodes Breitbart), as sources of information, are both to be treated with a hefty amount of circumspection. I have previously made my views known about the media (not just the MSM) in a short discussion with Bruce of Newcastle. That being said there are nonetheless some occasions when published articles can be sufficiently accurate as to be useful in informing one on either topical or historical matters.

    QED

  108. Stimpson J. Cat

    Shapiro’s not going to buy the line that Trump is the Messiah.

    No one ever said Trump is the Messiah.
    He is the God Emperor.
    The difference is plainly obvious for anyone to see.

  109. Rae

    Is Johanna in permanent moderation?

  110. Bolt is shocked this morning that a man in a dress is erratic.
    Calls him ‘she’ and ‘her’ throughout.
    Affirming the self-deluding lies of such people will always end this way.

    Like Janet above, he wants a bob each way. He’ll criticize gender ideology but will call a man ‘her’ anyway.

  111. None

    He is the God Emperor.

    No-one ever told you about Titus either, huh?

  112. Elle

    Cassie, I work for an organization that has a float in the Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras. I can’t escape it. My choice to work for the organization – it pays well. I do have gay and lesbian friends who have varying views. A couple of examples – one objects to the negative attention the Mardi Gras brings to her lifestyle – she doesn’t condone the overt expression of sexuality. Another has never attended because he, being in a monogamous relationship, objects to the promiscuity it promotes. They are both private people. Others are out there and in your face about it all, with rainbow flags everywhere! Please note – a*seless leather chaps don’t look good on everyone!

  113. Cassie of Sydney

    “Bolt has one major weakness. He wants to be liked.”

    Yep, and therein lies the rub. You would think that after the court case against him and after being thumped in broad daylight by Antifa scum (who the NKVD police in Victoria are yet to find and arrest despite the incident being filmed), that he would have finally gotten the message and that he would finally understand that he (and we) are in the midst of serious warfare and that wars are not won by always being “civil” and “polite”. Bolt thinks that by being “civil” and “courteous” he’ll be okay when they break down his door. Hans’t he learnt anything? Andrew Bolt is at the top of their list.

  114. Gab

    Calls him ‘she’ and ‘her’ throughout.

    The media’s lawyer wouldn’t allow Bolt to call him otherwise.

    Also, I think Bolt has had enough of the punishment of lawsuits.

  115. Boambee John

    From the Judith Sloan article

    When the head of Environmental Defence Canada was asked whether he was concerned that the Ontario government’s plan, as enacted through the Green Energy and Green Economy Act 2009, would lead to ­higher electricity prices for consumers in the province, he simply replied: “No, not at all.”

    The head of Environmental Defence Canada answered honestly. The increase in electricity costs would be seen by that organisation as a feature, not a bug. The intent was and remains to make electricity unaffordable for many people.

  116. None

    You said it right, Cassie.

  117. calli

    “Bolt has one major weakness. He wants to be liked.”

    He wants to go about his day-to-day business without being baled up and belted.

    Understandable.

  118. johanna

    Naughty step.

    Naughty step.

  119. None

    The media’s lawyer wouldn’t allow Bolt to call him otherwise

    No law can compel a person to lie much list deny reality. A man with his dick cut off is still a male not that I think of that McGregor has had the guts to have had his dick cut off. And for anyone to call Macgregor a woman is an insult to us women, not to mention the irony of a man in lipstick tell us what a woman is supposed to be. If everybody stood up against this nonsense it would stop within 24 hours but once again the silent majority is irrelevant because they don’t stand up.

  120. Rae

    He wants to go about his day-to-day business without being baled up and belted.

    Or being sloshed with watercolours in a media stunt designed to draw attention to himself.

    Curious that no-one appears to have been charged over that.

  121. johanna

    My comment about the Naughty Step is in moderation.

    Go, Libertarians! 🙂

  122. Is that the first inkling of dawn I see?

    Italian Interior Minister: “Enough now with this ‘parent 1 and 2. I have restored mother and father”

    Music to my ears. What a blessed morning. Deo gratias!

  123. None

    Also, I think Bolt has had enough of the punishment of lawsuits.

    Bolt gets paid a motza and he also has the newspaper’s legal team as well as his own, whereas the little guys like Bernard Gaynor even have to sell their house to fight these Nazis. I get that hw is tired and he’s fed up but if that’s the case, he may as well shut up as well.

  124. None

    Yay the Italian interior minister. Go you good thing.

  125. Shelley

    I just keep shtum at work. Workplaces are now no fun, infested with Orwellian group think. I work for a large private company and yet it it riddled with the same toxic PC and identity politics as anything found in the public service.

    Glad I am not the only one. I left a very interesting well paying job in the public service about 10 years ago, it was a job that I thought (and did) truly made a difference to the sector we were to serve. But that was when the rot started to set in and I realised how radical public servants are and how they are the ones who actually make the policies and laws against the interests of the public. Didn’t meet many who didn’t like the idea of raising yet another levy or ramming through more red tape burdens. So I left and went private. Sad to say that 10 years on the corporations are now following suit (in some cases overtaking) the public service with their SJW push. So I just stay quiet but where I can, like the poster above, I do little things (removing flyers on the noticeboard, making sure I have a meeting/am away when there is some ‘recognition’ day for some cause or another). It is depressing though and truly there is no aspect of fun in the workplace at all.

  126. stackja

    2GB Dennis Shanahan maybe Federal election this year!

  127. Geriatric Mayfly

    Is that the first inkling of dawn I see?
    Italian Interior Minister: “Enough now with this ‘parent 1 and 2. I have restored mother and father”
    Music to my ears. What a blessed morning. Deo gratias!

    And Lezzo Studies copping it in Hungary. Add that to the list.

  128. stackja

    Gough ‘reformed’ the public service.

  129. stackja

    Regarding Ben Roberts-Smith. Since when were the ABC/Fairfax trusted?

  130. Bruce of Newcastle

    Chicken Little in the space age.

    NASA package that fell from sky with note mentioning Trump sparks alarm in New Jersey

    South Brunswick police say the package, attached to a parachute, was making a hissing sound and included a note that said: “NASA Atmospheric Research Instrument NOT A BOMB! If this lands near the President, we at NASA wish him a great round of golf.”

    [NASA] says a summer student employee wrote the note in a “misguided attempt to be lighthearted,” and that the student has been removed from the project.

    I don’t know whether to be amused by the hysteria or appalled by NASA’s treatment of the student.

  131. Stimpson J. Cat

    NASA Atmospheric Research Instrument NOT A BOMB! If this lands near the President, we at NASA wish him a great round of golf.”

    Keep laughing Commies.
    We have the Space Force now.
    You just became irrelevant.

  132. stackja

    Residents in Emma Husar’s electorate of Lindsay say they want help not dramas
    Sheradyn Holderhead, National Political Reporter, The Daily Telegraph
    August 10, 2018 10:00pm
    Subscriber only

    “The people of Western Sydney are not stupid,” Penrith man Adam Sandler exclaims.

    “We are actually aware of what is going on, we pay attention.”

    Talked about over the office water cooler, at the park and in the pub — there wasn’t a Lindsay local who Saturday Extra spoke to who didn’t know about the controversy surrounding Husar.

    Exclusive polling published today shows it’s hit support for Labor, which has tanked to losing 42 per cent on a two-party preferred basis.

    The ReachTel poll of 630 Lindsay residents shows a 10 per cent decline in first preference votes for Labor since the 2016 election, mostly shifting to One Nation.

    South Penrith local Nikki McGrath, 34, says Husar has always appeared “unprepared and amateurish”. “I feel for her. I feel like she was put up and maybe didn’t know what politics was all about,” she says.

    Lorraine Gardett, 51 of Erskine Park on the border of the electorate, says the scandal was a let-down after having been pleased a young, single mum had been elected to Parliament.

    “It’s pretty disappointing because bullying, if it’s true, is a big issue in the workplace,” she says.

    Labor insiders told Saturday Extra there are mixed feelings among local branch members. Most are shocked and upset by the allegations but some still support Husar believing she has been unfairly treated.

    There is no immediate plan B for Labor.

    Penrith Mayor John Thain has ruled out putting up his hand and local councillor Karen McKeown has been preselected as a candidate for the upcoming state election.

  133. Roger

    But that was when the rot started to set in and I realised how radical public servants are and how they are the ones who actually make the policies and laws against the interests of the public.

    Bingo!

    We can change the government but we’ll never change this state of affairs until someone comes along who is willing to drain the fetid billabong that is Canberra.

  134. lotocoti

    Since when were the ABC/Fairfax trusted?

    The ABC until James Dibble retired.

  135. stackja

    A DEGREE IN ‘STEVE IRWINISM’?

    After considering all science and zoology related courses available, the Bachelor of Natural Science at Western Sydney University was what Ben landed on. The course covers a broad range of animal and environmentally related subjects and is extremely hands-on. “Knowing that I wanted to work with animals, but not exactly sure in what capacity, the degree gave me a great foundation to pursue a career working with animals in a number of fields.”

  136. stackja

    Over-promoting the AFLW has created the problems we see now
    MARK ROBINSON, Herald Sun
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    CAN we have a discussion about women’s footy, the positives and negatives, without being accused of being misogynist, sexist or dismissive?

    Good.

    The goodwill produced two years ago, when the AFLW competition burst on to the football calendar and into the hearts and minds of hundreds of thousands of girls and young women, is under siege from multiple angles.

    It was over-hyped from the start, arguably underfunded, the product was poor and the AFL is largely to blame because it bit off more than it could chew.

    Dreams were built and believed and now they are shattered, the players say.

    The messy fight centres on the players wanting to play nine home-and-away rounds and two weeks of finals next year and the AFL initially wanting six rounds and two weeks of finals. It will likely end up at seven.

    Finding a window in which to compete that satisfies all parties in terms of commercial reality (it costs $10 million-plus to run the competition) and a fair competition (play each other once) is proving elusive and divisive.

  137. Snoopy

    Dreams were built and believed and now they are shattered, the players say.

    I know I shouldn’t laugh…

  138. This is because, according to the policy document, “almost one in five working age Australians has a disability”.

    But that’s okay, because, according to the left, countries can literally print as much money as they like. So much so, that they believe money is collected from taxpayers only to stop inflation, and such monies are effectively destroyed, and replaced with new money. I kid you not.

    Well, the destroying money thing is kinda true at least, when you consider governments get it.

  139. Anne

    More Q drops.

    >>2538860
    Re_read drops re: Haiti.
    At some point it will not be safe for them to walk down the street.
    PURE EVIL.
    HOW MANY IN WASHINGTON AND THOSE AROUND THE WORLD (IN POWER) WORSHIP THE DEVIL?
    Conspiracy?
    Fake News?
    The World is WATCHING.
    Q

    qanonposts.com

  140. Anne, we know that, even without “Q”. And remember, there is a reason why anons on 8Chan are anonymous.

  141. Whalehunt fun

    Bingo!

    We can change the government but we’ll never change this state of affairs until someone comes along who is willing to drain the fetid billabong that is Canberra.

    There is nothing the pub servants do that cannot ve contracted to India. Money saved and filth made destitute.
    Win win.

  142. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ben Roberts-Smith is only one of many it appears. Just saw this article:

    It beggars belief! Now witch-hunt targets men who served their country 60 years ago (11 Aug)

    Sam Bedwell said he had been contacted by [British] Government lawyers regarding “allegations of wrongdoing” by Britain in Cyprus between 1955 and 1960.

    Mr Bedwell, who served for 35 years in the Army before working as a civil servant for the Royal Navy, said: “I was in Cyprus 62 years ago. I was 21 at the time. It is ridiculous. How old are the claimants? They must be aged 80 to 90. It is absolutely bonkers. “I was there in 1956. The letter asked me to state whether I had or had not witnessed anything untoward during the operations.

    I had not. “What I witnessed was the exemplary way in which all duties were carried out by our forces under very trying conditions.”

    Mr Bedwell, who is now 83 and a bell ringer at his local church in Cornwall, added: “Anyone claiming compensation for anything that happened 62 years ago should have done it by now.

    “It seems to me that someone is pulling their strings and this Government is going along with it. It beggars belief.

    The rest of the article lists similar persecution of veterans from the Iraq, Northern Ireland and Mau Mau campaigns.

    No wonder that Britain is having trouble finding warm bodies to fill uniforms right now. These people have forgotten that soldiers stand between them and conquest. War hasn’t been abolished.

  143. Stimpson J. Cat

    Annie I love you but you need to hide your power level.

  144. C.L.

    Donald J. Trump @realDonaldTrump

    Democrats, please do not distance yourselves from Nancy Pelosi. She is a wonderful person whose ideas & policies may be bad, but who should definitely be given a 4th chance. She is trying very hard & has every right to take down the Democrat Party if she has veered too far left!

    Ahahahahahahaha.

  145. We can change the government but we’ll never change this state of affairs until someone comes along who is willing to drain the fetid billabong that is Canberra.

    I’ve been in echo chambers with less echo than the public service.

  146. Stimpson J. Cat

    The Daily Caller
    @DailyCaller
    [email protected]: “Everyone around me tried to pick my candidate for me. And then told me every time I said I liked Trump that I couldn’t say it out loud or my career would be over. I’d get kicked out of the black community because blacks … can only be Democrats and all.”

  147. Anne

    132
    We are under HEAVY attack.
    AB[C] took control.
    Tripcode compromised.
    No. 131 Last.
    TRIP UPDATE COMING.
    Q

    Aug 10 2018 14:35:30
    Q
    !!mG7VJxZNCI
    134
    Patriots-
    We are under [extreme] heavy attack by [3] intel agencies [Foreign & Domestic].
    We are in comm/coordination w/ necessary division(s).
    STAY STRONG.
    STAY TOGETHER.
    Q

  148. Anne

    The Great Awakening!

    You’re standing in it.

  149. stackja

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2786292, posted on August 11, 2018 at 10:36 am
    Ben Roberts-Smith is only one of many it appears. Just saw this article:

    The forgotten soldiers buried in no man’s land
    Fify years ago, terrorists on Cyprus killed nearly 400 British soldiers. Now, with the help of Telegraph readers, they are at last to get a fitting memorial, reports Gordon Rayner.

    Gordon Rayner8:04PM BST 19 Apr 2009
    In an all but forgotten graveyard in the UN-patrolled no man’s land which divides Cyprus, a small group of ageing British veterans will gather today to remember 371 servicemen whose sacrifice remains unrecognised 50 years after they fell.

    Wayne’s Keep Military Cemetery, near Nicosia, is the last resting place of the soldiers, sailors and airmen murdered by Greek-Cypriot terrorists during four years of bloodshed which ended in April 1959. The vast majority of those killed were young men carrying out National Service, some of the last British conscripts to lose their lives in service of their country.

    Yet to date, no memorial has been built to honour them, and with Wayne’s Keep virtually inaccessible to the general public, their families and comrades feel a deep frustration at being unable to pay their respects.

  150. Anne

    Aug 10 2018 12:00:09
    Q
    !A6yxsPKia.
    129
    Does POTUS make statements that are false?
    Knowing what you know now…..
    [Start @ 12:00]
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOUFsCS7xYE
    Think Haiti [14:40]
    Think Watergate Commission [removed_why_investigate].
    Listen very carefully.
    TRUTH.
    Surrounded by EVIL.
    NEVER STOP PRAYING.
    WWG1WGA!!!!!!
    Q

    If you don’t know what happened in Haiti; the Clintons took the disaster money and their associate, Laura Silsby, was arrested for trying to steal 33 children.

    Clintons intervened, got her off, and she went to work for Amber Alert. You can’t make this stuff up.

    They control, own or run all the children’s services organisations.

  151. rickw

    Just saw the paper, that Africa AK-47 looks very fresh, you can almost smell the cosmolene on it.

    Very interesting.

  152. calli

    Have the Victims of Isandlwana lodged their compensation claim yet?

    If not, why not?

  153. C.L.

    Ben Roberts-Smith to sue Fairfax.
    He will destroy them and it will cost them a packet.

    “My family and I sit here and wonder, what’s next?” he said. “What’s the next lie that’s going to run in the paper? I’m not a politician, I’m not famous. I went and fought for my country, and I’m being attacked because I fought for my country and I got a medal. I just don’t understand how I today am sitting here in this position. I really don’t.’’

    Let me explain it to you, Ben. You’re a white heterosexual war hero who killed Muslim terrorist animals by the bushel. Leftists, Laborites, feminists and Islamaphiles – and probably 90 percent of the pansy desk jockeys of the ADF – hate you and the SAS.

  154. Anne

    And remember, there is a reason why anons on 8Chan are anonymous.

    What do you mean, Beer?

    You think I’m an Anon??? 🤔😂🤣

    Hardly. Those guys are autists.

  155. C.L.

    I note this new media/legal trend of running actual newspaper articles based on the testimony of disgruntled ‘victims’ who claim they were, first, not heeded and, second, that the prominent mark was indeed guilty and, third, that their claims should be re-assessed by the public and the authorities.

    So where is the woman who accused Bill Shorten?

    When will she be given another chance?

  156. lotocoti

    Just saw this article:

    Apparently there’s a squaddie from the NI days who’s being investigated for attempted murder because someone was injured by a ricochet.

  157. Woolfe

    Ben also tried to be loved by the left, and we all know how that always works out for those outside their tribe.

  158. Why the Right fails:

    What a smugly stupid moron! He portrays his self-serving, narcissistic behavior as a triumph of some sort, when in truth it is a disastrous, self-inflicted defeat for both justice and a free society. If this jackass is ever arrested, karma will be well-served if he finds himself facing a jury of avid gun controllers and is convicted on every count. Instead of doing his civic duty and upholding the Second Amendment he cited with such self-satisfaction, he ensured that the prosecution would get a second crack at packing a jury with anti-gun jurors.

    The Right’s idolatry of individualism is shortsighted and strategically disastrous. It is the philosophy of the crack addict, the rent boy, the cam whore, and the flytipper. It is the mindset of the parasite and the grasshopper. And it is not compatible with civilization, let alone advanced Western civilization.

    Not all collectivisms are equal. Identity politics are not communism. Defending your family and your nation, and working to advance their interests, is not wrong, it is the very sort of normal human behavior that created Western civilization….

    We cannot save civilization by running around like a bunch of headless chickens doing our best to avoid any and every responsibility to others.

    +100

  159. Top Ender

    SMH has an article on Husar trying to paint her in a good light, and saying that working in Parliament is very hard. In fact:

    One member of a busy crossbencher’s office – an office that like Husar’s was on the political frontlines but resourced as a backbencher’s would be – told Fairfax Media that within a year of starting his job he found himself huddled in the toilets in the Qantas lounge crying as he returned to Canberra for a sitting week.

  160. candy

    I feel for Ben Roberts-Smith having his personal life splashed over the media.

    The same for Emma Husar and Barnaby Joyce. We don’t really know the facts of Ms Husar and should not jump to conclusions, but it’s too late now.

    Bill Shorten escaped simply because Tony Abbott was PM at the time, and media wanted to limit damage to Bill Shorten as opposition leader. That’s the only reason.

    There truly is something rotten and vicious in the Australian media. Australia is also becoming a more violent country and is just not a nation to be proud of.

  161. Bill Shorten escaped simply because Tony Abbott was PM at the time, and media wanted to limit damage to Bill Shorten as opposition leader. That’s the only reason.

    +1

  162. OldOzzie

    Besides SMH seems to have introduced a Paywall (Why? – Easily Beaten))

    I only read SMH for occasional Domain, we have dropped Stan Subscription and stuck with Netflix, and also read some travel section and Drive is probably the one I most read

    For Cat petrol Heads

    every time I read review of VW, Audi, Skoda Mercedes etc with DSG Aoto System this is the verdict

    2018 Volkswagen Polo 70TSI Trendline Road Test Review
    New Polo is a grown-up city car for grown ups

    EXPERT RATING

    7/10

    DRIVE AWAY PRICE $24,092 BASIC SPEC

    Plus – Strong standard features
    Polished cabin
    Efficient engine

    Minus –Stop-start hesitation
    Three-year warranty
    Requires premium fuel

    Excellent on the open road, the engine’s appeal fades somewhat in city traffic. VW’s stop-start fuel saving system doesn’t pair particularly well with an engine that can be a little laggy at low revs, with a doughy initial response that can leave you behind leaders at the traffic light grand prix. The effect is magnified by a $2500 automatic transmission option, VW’s dual-clutch “DSG” unit, which requires a degree of familiarity for smooth progress at low speed.

    From my own experience with Son-In-Laws Skodas Rapide and Octavia DSG Lag off the mark is damn dangerous, especially when driving from stop into roundabouts and you press the accelerator and the car does not respond – Same with my son’s VW Golf DSG and Mercedes A Class DSG – besides problems with life and cost repairs of DSG Vehicles – Motor Forums full of disaster stories – not good second hand buys,

    Son-in-Law has changed to Kia 7 Seater SUV with CVT = have had 14 years experince with Honda Jazz CVT still running 2006 Honda Jazz CVT – as we do low stop/start Kms around City driving, have taken Belt and Braces approach, have changed CVT Fluid every 10000Km as well as using Mobil One Fully Synthetic Oil supplied by me for Honda Service, plus BP or Shell 98 Premium fuel (same approach on 1994 Toyota Series 80 4.5l EFI Petrol with Manual Gearbox. – drives like new)

    Only serviced Honda Jazz since new every 10000Km, which usually takes 1 1/2 years, drives as if new and am having troubles trying to talk wife into new car.

    Any other Cats had problems with DSG start delay?

  163. Boambee John

    About 10 days ago Dot suggested that Australia should consider a militia defence system.

    At the time, I commented that I would post some thoughts on such a system when I returned from travel. I will put the post in three parts, so as not to clag the thread up for those not interested in the subject.

    Herewith the first part, setting iut reality as I see it. Others night disagree!

    As Australia’s participation in the ‘Long War’ against terrorism winds down, amid political recriminations and allegations of possible war crimes (allegations notably not involving either the Taliban nor ISIS, both of which operate in continual breach of the laws of war), it is timely to consider the future.

    Enthusiasm for further foreign adventures has, not unexpectedly, declined, while an already tight budget is unlikely to be loosened. There are insufficient funds to equip the Regular Army to desired levels. In the Army Reserve, artillery units are being re-equipped with mortars rather than guns, and armoured units with protected mobility vehicles rather than tracked or wheeled armoured fighting vehicles. The future seems to be a two-level army, with the Reserve the poor cousin.

    Later parts to follow.

  164. Tel

    Instead of doing his civic duty and upholding the Second Amendment he cited with such self-satisfaction, he ensured that the prosecution would get a second crack at packing a jury with anti-gun jurors.

    If supporters of the Second Amendment must operate in stealth by keeping silent and constantly kowtowing to authority, then the cause is already lost.

    Even the Gramsci infiltrators, if you actually ask them about any socialist principle will not scurry away and hide, although they often use ambiguous language like “social justice” instead of the more direct terms such as “envy” and “redistribution”.

  165. cohenite

    Just saw the paper, that Africa AK-47 looks very fresh, you can almost smell the cosmolene on it.

    I reckon its a Chinese Type 56 AK. 10’s of thousands were imported into Australia in the 1980s. You could buy one set to semi-automatic but easily converted to auto with 2 30 shot mags and 150 rounds of 7.62 ammos for $150. No rego required.

  166. Bruce of Newcastle

    Via Lucianne:

    10 Places That Should Join the U.S. (RealClear History, 8 Aug)

    10. Jefferson. Composed of counties in northern California and southern Oregon
    9. Puerto Rico.
    8. Northern Mariana Islands and Guam.
    7. Marshall Islands.
    6. Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba.
    5. Coahuila, Tamaulipas, and Nuevo León.
    4. England and Wales.
    3. Taiwan.
    2. Liberia.
    1. Cuba.

    There you go. Australia is officially a zero.

  167. Boambee John

    Wayne’s Keep Military Cemetery, near Nicosia, is the last resting place of the soldiers, sailors and airmen murdered by Greek-Cypriot terrorists during four years of bloodshed which ended in April 1959. The vast majority of those killed were young men carrying out National Service, some of the last British conscripts to lose their lives in service of their country.

    Yet to date, no memorial has been built to honour them, and with Wayne’s Keep virtually inaccessible to the general public, their families and comrades feel a deep frustration at being unable to pay their respects.

    Another reason to remove Australian war graves from countries associated with Islam.

  168. calli

    Any other Cats had problems with DSG start delay?

    My Passat wagon had that – it was so annoying I disabled it. The lag made me feel vulnerable and hesitant at roundabouts.

    I have the same thing in my CX3 (i-stop). No problems, so still enabled. Also, it doesn’t kick in unless the brake pedal is fully engaged.

    May have something to do with ptw ratios, or diesel vs petrol.

  169. Snoopy

    One member of a busy crossbencher’s office – an office that like Husar’s was on the political frontlines but resourced as a backbencher’s would be – told Fairfax Media that within a year of starting his job he found himself huddled in the female toilets in the Qantas lounge crying as he returned to Canberra for a sitting week.

    Fixed in the pursuit of accuracy.

  170. Snoopy

    May have something to do with ptw ratios, or diesel vs petrol.

    Or Germans.

  171. H B Bear

    2GB Dennis Shanahan maybe Federal election this year!

    OK we can rule that one out then. Waldorf is nearly as bad as Statler on this stuff.

    Waffles has got nothing after Super Saturday. The only thing that will force his Lordship to the polls is the law.

  172. Rae

    Dear Old School Conservative. Having been exposed to Old Ozzies posting of the Australians article about Roberts-Smith I felt it was incumbent upon me to also read the relevant SMH article.

    I have to say I found it enlightening, especially the mention of numerous anonymous letter/email writers allegedly seeking to undermine/intimidate persons who have made statements under oath to the Inspector-Generals Inquiry. The apparent attempts by a “Danielle Kennedy” to intimidate the woman lawyer with whom Roberts-Smith had an affair are also disquieting. It will be interesting to see what, if anything, develops from further investigations into just who those letter/email writers might be.

  173. OldOzzie

    Boambee John
    #2786314, posted on August 11, 2018 at 11:14 am

    About 10 days ago Dot suggested that Australia should consider a militia defence system.

    At the time, I commented that I would post some thoughts on such a system when I returned from travel. I will put the post in three parts, so as not to clag the thread up for those not interested in the subject.

    Have you given thought to taking over from the British and Recruiting Gurhkas into the Australian Army with promise at end of Service Citizenship, if wanted, for them and their Family.

    Gurhkas have a long Army History

    This Article sums it all up well

    The Big Question: Who are the Gurkhas and what is their contribution to military history?

    Do they serve only in British forces?

    No. After the partition of India in 1947, an agreement between Nepal, India and Britain transferred four Gurkha regiments from the British to the Indian army. Its Gorkha Brigade (it changed the spelling) now has 120,000 Gurkhas in forty-six battalions. There are Gurkhas in the Malaysian army and the Singapore Police Force both bodies formed from ex-British Army Gurkhas.

    How tough are they?

    Around 28,000 Gurkha youths compete for just 200 places in the British Army each year. To qualify they must be able to do 75 bench jumps in one minute and 70 sit-ups in two minutes. Then they participate in the world’s most arduous military selection test, the doko – running 5km up a steep track in the foothills of the Himalayas, carrying 25kg of rocks on their back, in less than 55 minutes. No wonder the Gurkhas are famed for their resilience, self-restraint and courage.

    Are they really outstandingly brave?

    Their motto is “Better to die than be a coward”. In the First World War, in which 20,000 of them were casualties, they won almost 2,000 awards for gallantry. At the Battle of Loos in 1915 a Gurkha battalion fought literally to the last man. At Gallipoli they were the first to arrive and the last to leave. Sir Ralph Turner MC who served with them then wrote an epitaph: “Bravest of the brave, most generous of the generous, never had a country more faithful friends than you”. If there was a minute’s silence for every one of the 23,000 Gurkha casualties from World War II, the nation would have to fall quiet for a full fortnight.

    How many Gurkhas have won the Victoria Cross?

    There have been twenty-six awards of this highest badge of courage made to members of the Gurkha regiments, half to Gurkhas and half to their British officers – more than to any other regiment.

  174. Tailgunner

    I just keep shtum at work.

    Not me. I’m in the belly of the CFMMEU beast and proudly rock “Hillary for Prison, Lock Her Up” on the front of my hard hat, smug Pepe on the rear.
    Plenty of glares, no problems yet though.
    Oh, and I post plenty of Trump is God graffiti around the sites.
    I also have a few different Pepe/Red Pill stickers on my car – a note was left on my rear windscreen last week, “We don’t want your alt-right hate symbols in our neighborhood “. I printed up an epic laughing cheetah pic and left that on the rear screen with a warning that my vehicle was under constant video surveillance.
    Fight you Bastards, Fight!

  175. cohenite

    Judith Sloan gets into renewables:

    It’s a universal truth: renewables mean higher costs

    Judith Sloan The Australian August 11, 2018

    Tell me anywhere in the world where a higher penetration of ­renewable energy has been associated with lower electricity prices. It certainly isn’t Denmark, which went crazy about wind power and has some of the highest electricity prices in the world.

    It also isn’t Germany, which fell in love with wind and solar power — yes, solar power in Germany — and has some of the highest electricity prices in the world. Did I also mention, notwithstanding the substantial taxpayer and customer subsidisation of renewable energy, Germany will fail to meet the 2020 emissions reduction target it set ­itself and may well fail to meet its 2030 target? Germany also has finished constructing a new brown coal-fired power station recently.

    In Spain, electricity prices were below the European average in 2009. They are now significantly above that average in the context of a massive expansion of subsidised renewable energy. This link finally was accepted by the government and the subsidies have been dramatically curtailed.

    It also isn’t the Canadian province of Ontario, where retail electricity prices have doubled since 2005, notwithstanding assurances by the progressive government, which recently has been convincingly voted out of ­office, that this would not happen. The Ontario government forced the premature closure of its coal-fired power stations and piled on the subsidies for renewable energy.

    When the head of Environmental Defence Canada was asked whether he was concerned that the Ontario government’s plan, as enacted through the Green Energy and Green Economy Act 2009, would lead to ­higher electricity prices for consumers in the province, he simply replied: “No, not at all.”

    It’s a different story today and the newly elected premier, conservative Doug Ford, recently has cancelled a government auction for more renewable energy. He also has vowed to take on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who is planning to impose an escalating carbon tax on all provinces deemed to be failing to reduce emissions to the required degree.

    https://www.facebook.com/dallas.beaufort/posts/10155867689964370

  176. Tailgunner

    I’m still deciding whether to buy the number plates I want for my new SuperWagon though.
    TRUMPT
    Can’t be arsed carrying round a second set of normal plates and having to change over if parking on the streets to prevent attacks.
    But then again, I love trolling leftists too much.
    Maybe I’ll just go for it. Coles insurance covers malicious damage for me….

  177. Tailgunner

    Anne
    #2786288, posted on August 11, 2018 at 10:34 am
    More Q drops.

    Love your work, Anne!
    Great stuff.
    Comet Pizza is going down!

  178. Tailgunner

    Phew lads, nearly 18000 comments on that vid, dot!

  179. .

    A lot of them are blacks pissed off with D’rat politicians.

  180. Boambee John

    Old Ozzie at 1129

    Have you given thought to taking over from the British and Recruiting Gurhkas into the Australian Army with promise at end of Service Citizenship, if wanted, for them and their Family.

    A few months ago I suggested that we raise a Foreign Infantry Regiment, recruited on the basis that soldiers discharged after honourable service for a set period receive citizenship and residence rights for their family. I had in mind Pacific Islandeds as well as Gurkhas, Sikhs et al.

    That, however, does not solve the resource problem. We can only pay and equip so many full time soldiers with the oresent budget.

  181. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Teen rampage was just ‘kids being stupid’

    Tessa Akerman
    Reporter
    @TessaAkerman
    12:00AM August 11, 2018
    22 Comments

    The group of up to 100 Sudanese youths who damaged property and threw rocks at police cars in Melbourne’s northwest this week were acting like other Australian kids, a community leader says.

    Police were forced to call the riot squad and the air wing to a park in Taylors Hill as a planned fight over a failed relationship ­escalated into violence on Wednesday evening.

    Residents say they were called “white trash” and threatened, and that police told them to “stay inside and lock the doors”

    Federation of South Sudanese Associations chairman Kenyatta Dei Wal said the youths’ behaviour was “the kind of thing that most young people do”.

    “(It was) young people who are just behaving as young people and making stupid choices,” he said. “There’s nothing significant about it.”

    Mr Wal said the role of police was to ensure everyone’s safety and he praised their handling of the situation. “They responded on time and managed to disperse (the youths),” he said.

    The rocks thrown might not have been intended for the police and it was important to wait for the results of the police investigation. “I don’t think there was intent to damage police cars, but let’s wait for the investigation,” he said.

    From the Oz. Seriously?

  182. That, however, does not solve the resource problem.

    Think of boom time in cultural sensitivity training!
    I want to be a service provider!

  183. calli

    Interesting, Dot.

    Can’t have people coming up with solutions, however temporary, without the State becoming involved.

    The Walk of Fame deserves another Elvis star.

  184. Federation of South Sudanese Associations chairman Kenyatta Dei Wal said the youths’ behaviour was “the kind of thing that most young people do”.

    the kind of thing that most young South Sudanese people do
    FIFY

  185. .

    We should go hard with drones and nukes too.

    Like the MQ 25 and RQ 180.

    A small arsenal of W88 munitions will keep ambitious foreign powers in check.

  186. We should go hard with drones and nukes too.

    Mikey Trumble in a photo shoot with hand on the red button?

    Wee Willy with his dick resting on a nuke button?

    Neither have the self control and maturity for the job.

  187. Anne

    Excellent post at 11:36am

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=n6h7fL22WCE&feature=youtu.be

    Proof that Government power is the enemy of human community.

    Governments must, at all costs, prevent people from helping themselves or their fellowman.

  188. RobK

    Re: dot’s video post.
    People often ask who will look after the destitute if the state doesn’t. Before welfare good people took it upon themselves.

  189. Senile Old Guy

    Federation of South Sudanese Associations chairman Kenyatta Dei Wal said the youths’ behaviour was “the kind of thing that most young people do”.

    And this is why there is a problem. Too many in that community excuse the behaviour of the louts and thugs.

  190. Death Giraffe

    Part three and final of Dr. Richard Peppard interview:


    and yesterdays model A:


  191. John Constantine

    Four hundred million dollar SinFine levied on Monsanto in Kalifornia.

    Say goodbye to Roundup if this holds.

  192. Mater

    Teen rampage was just ‘kids being stupid’

    https://youtu.be/gGkKFick8E8

  193. Bruce of Newcastle

    Say goodbye to Roundup if this holds

    The Green Revolution overturned by revolutionary Greens.
    Holodomor 2.0 for Gaia.

  194. cohenite

    When you’re looking at renewables energy density comes into play. For instance a tonne of uranium is equal to a 2 – 3 million tonnes of coal and coal burnt in an Ultra Supercritical furnace is about 50% more dense than coal burnt in an ordinary plant.

    Comparing wind and solar to coal or nuclear is really a fool’s errand because wind and solar cannot power by themselves a modern grid. Wind and solar produce DC not AC and in surges. Wind and solar have NIL reliability and therefore despatchability, frydeneggs new buzz word, so a comparison is stupid but let’s look at it.

    If we assume a wind farm of 250 3 MW turbines costing over $2 billion, about the same as an equivalent HELE coal plant, operating at their IC of 750 MW, which they never do since they have a CF of about 20%, those 250 turbines will cover about 20 acres each or about 5000 acres or about 20 square kilometres. If we look at in terms of what the wind actually produce, 20%, then to have an equivalence with a 750MW coal plant in actual power produced the wind farm would cover 100 square kilometres.

    If we’re going to replace in Australia all coal power, about 20000MW, with wind and/or solar then you’re going to need about 3750 square kilometres.

  195. calli

    Arky, was it the connection of the firewall that you were trying to work out in one of your earlier videos? Were they the missing brackets that solved the problem?

    Drive-by gardening tip: have eyebaths ready when pruning Euphorbia spp. Sap as deadly as rust converter.

  196. Anne

    Part three …

    Where are Parts 1 and 2, Giraffe?

  197. .

    I saw a “century plant” being offered for sale in a nursery this morning and it had a sign basically lifted from Wikipedia. It was basically saying “please don ‘t buy me, you’ll be able to make drugs like scopolamine if you buy me…you really don’t want me, do you?”

    Very interesting. A botanist friend basically says that wattle, especially Cootamundra Wattle, the national plant is LOADED with DMT, specifically in the bark.

    I can imagine our government banning the national symbol.

  198. C.L.

    One member of a busy crossbencher’s office – an office that like Husar’s was on the political frontlines but resourced as a backbencher’s would be – told Fairfax Media that within a year of starting his job he found himself huddled in the [female] toilets in the Qantas lounge crying as he returned to Canberra for a sitting week.

    Somebody hand the boy a necktie.

  199. Death Giraffe

    Arky, was it the connection of the firewall that you were trying to work out in one of your earlier videos?

    ..
    Yes.
    The whole front of the car was flopping back and forth when I was putting the doors on.
    These much bigger brackets, plus fixing the wood under the dash should fix it.

  200. John Constantine

    The four hundred million Australian dollars was for just one case.

    Hundreds of cases lined up, thousands ready to get onboard.

    How much is ten thousand people with cancer that saw roundup times four hundy mill?.

    Comrades.

  201. Chris

    Where are Parts 1 and 2, Giraffe?

    I am sure you have the skillz to find them Anne.
    In the last Open Fred would be a good place to start.

  202. If supporters of the Second Amendment must operate in stealth by keeping silent and constantly kowtowing to authority, then the cause is already lost.

    That isn’t the lesson to draw at all. He was a pro-Second Amendment prospective juror in a case involving firearms. He should have shut his mouth, avoided grandstanding, and judged his peer accordingly.

  203. Cassie of Sydney

    None
    #2786263, posted on August 11, 2018 at 9:46 am
    The media’s lawyer wouldn’t allow Bolt to call him otherwise

    No law can compel a person to lie much list deny reality. A man with his dick cut off is still a male not that I think of that McGregor has had the guts to have had his dick cut off. And for anyone to call Macgregor a woman is an insult to us women, not to mention the irony of a man in lipstick tell us what a woman is supposed to be. If everybody stood up against this nonsense it would stop within 24 hours but once again the silent majority is irrelevant because they don’t stand up.”

    Hear hear.

    As for McGregor HE is a disgrace and HE is a nasty, nasty piece of work. Getting your dick cut off and swallowing hormones doesn’t make you a woman. Somebody should tell HIM to crawl back under the rock HE came from.

  204. Infidel Tiger

    KANYE West has given a very honest interview with late night host Jimmy Kimmel in which he speaks about his mental health breakdown and his support for US President Donald Trump.

    Kimmel asked whether he had concerns about his wife Kim Kardashian being alone with Mr Trump in the Oval Office.

    “Well, he is a player,” West said.

    It’s happening!

    He’s setting the slaves free.

  205. Death Giraffe

    Where are Parts 1 and 2, Giraffe?

    ..
    Scroll to the end of the video and the endcard links to part one.
    or…
    Go to my Youtube channel:

    ..
    and watch all 25 videos.
    Subscribe while you are there, why not?
    Get yourself a Youtube account and make your own commentaries.
    The more voices out there, the better.

  206. woolfe

    Or go into Youtube and search for Dr Richard Peppard

  207. Infidel Tiger

    The rapper went on to say he doesn’t want to follow the crowd or be told what to say or think.

    “Just as a musician, African American, everyone around me tried to pick my candidate for me and then told me that I couldn’t say that I like Trump,” he said.

    Kanye is a shepherd.

  208. Tel

    He should have shut his mouth, avoided grandstanding, and judged his peer accordingly.

    That means operating by stealth.

  209. Cassie of Sydney

    “Death Giraffe
    #2786367, posted on August 11, 2018 at 12:31 pm

    Get yourself a Youtube account and make your own commentaries.
    The more voices out there, the better.”

    Until the thought police shut our voices down.

  210. Death Giraffe

    I had an idea for a Youtube channel:
    About the same time Tom posts the cartoons on the cat, post a video reading out Trump’s overnight tweets and comment on them.
    IT should do it.

  211. Anne

    Thanks, Giraffe. I will. 🍿🍿🍿

  212. Anne

    It’s happening!
    He’s setting the slaves free.

    Yep!

    “If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.”
    ― Nikola Tesla

  213. That means operating by stealth

    Not at all. Jurors are supposed to listen and judge. He can talk once he’s rendered his verdict.

  214. John Constantine

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/24/magazine/what-the-mystery-of-the-tick-borne-meat-allergy-could-reveal.html

    It could soon be possible for State sponsored compulsory veganism to be enforced by vaccinating proles to be allergic to meat.

    Eat meat, go into shock and die.

    Comrades.

  215. John Constantine

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/10/business/monsanto-roundup-cancer-trial.html

    Post glyphosate [ which is now generic and off patent] the options for continual cropping and stubble retention and direct drilling fall back to closed loop systems.

    The seed and the spray and the cropping program all all owned by the company, and the peasant farmer simply pays fees for access to the system, like microsoft and computer software.

    Destroying roundup as a product empowers the closed loop Crony Companies to a degree never before seen in the world.

    Comrades.

  216. John Constantine

    “A California jury on Friday found Monsanto liable in a lawsuit filed by a school groundskeeper who said the company’s weedkillers, including Roundup, caused his cancer. The company was ordered pay $289 million in damages.

    The case of the groundskeeper, Dewayne Johnson, 46, was the first lawsuit to go to trial alleging that Roundup and other glyphosate-based weedkillers cause cancer. Monsanto, a unit of the German conglomerate Bayer following a $62.5 billion acquisition, faces more than 5,000 similar lawsuits across the United States.”

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