John Constantine: Great Safe Cow Cull

How the Cull of grazing animals to meet turnbull’s Paris treaty will work.

In Australia, stocking rates depend upon the access to water, the original settlers drove their herds from water source to water source, and the expansion of grazing enterprises always depended upon innovation and infrastructure making water supplies more plentiful and reliable, even in desperate times.

Only under our New Class has Australia turned its back on abundant and cheap water supplies, and began the long march returning to the dry and dusty rewilding of the interior, just like our back has been turned on cheap and reliable electricity as we walk away from industry.

Central planning control of the rivers of the Murray Darling Basin now sits in Canberra, and Turnbull has borrowed billions to buy central planning control of the water of the Snowy River for Canberra as well. Plus the treaties to save the Great Barrier Reef, which open the way for central planning control of the waters that flow from Queensland farmland to interact with the Reef.

The State will not send squads to shoot the sheep and cattle, when the time comes, they will simply squeeze the supply of water off, and market forces will respond with a slow and remorseless destocking.

Control the water supply and you control the number of stock that can be depastured.

Australia’s livestock drinking and fodder growing water is now centrally controlled by a New Class that has the political will to use this control as a tool to enforce their transnational treaties.

The rainfall deficiency created droughts can be managed, but the left’s treaty and paperwork created droughts will be inescapeable and eternal.

This entry was posted in Guest Post. Bookmark the permalink.

27 Responses to John Constantine: Great Safe Cow Cull

  1. Fat Tony

    Comrades (You left it off, John)

  2. IRFM

    Worried about getting your greenhouse emissions down
    In Australia there are at least 80 million ruminants all producing abundant methane gas whenever they belch.
    The proportions of the main groups are 40:20:20. Which one do you cull first – the answer might surprise you.
    They also produce CO2. In terms of BMI the next group of CO2 producers is of course mankind itself.
    Still worried about your emissions levels – out of the four which one do you now cull?

  3. stackja

    Cull Canberra. Turn off the electricity and water. Commonwealth, nice idea, time to change.

  4. A Lurker

    Cull Canberra. Turn off the electricity and water. Commonwealth, nice idea, time to change.

    Good idea, as Canberra only produces hot air I think the culling ought to begin there. Ground zero Parliament House since it is the biggest emitter of hot air in Australia.

    Leave the cows alone, they at least are useful.

  5. None

    I have no doubt this will be the case. The greenies have long turned against water – against dams, against irrigation, against anything resembling progress. And especially against eating meat.

  6. A very interesting proposition indeed and one that can be eminently believed.

  7. 132andBush

    We’ll just import all our food.

  8. Mallee Miss

    I’m waiting for them to decide to eradicate Mycoplasma bovis and enforce a cattle cull a la NZ. There are disputes about the spread of the disease in Australia, but I can see some bright spark will think it is a good way to reduce the CO2 emissions under the guise of increasing herd productivity.

  9. Tel

    I have no doubt this will be the case. The greenies have long turned against water – against dams, against irrigation, against anything resembling progress. And especially against eating meat.

    That should be a political vulnerability, if we can push a sufficiently simple message out there to get through to your average Facebook viewer.

    Something like, “More Dam Permits!”

    Every time anyone starts talking about drought and farming: “More Dam Perimits!”

    When they talk about floods: “More Dam Permits!”

    When they start talking about trees, “Hey let’s put the water on the plants, it works better than Brawndo and right now we are throwing it into the ocean”.

    Green Party policies are now sufficiently stupid that they actually look obviously stupid even to people who don’t know much.

  10. Jessie

    Valuable post, thank you.
    Drought Proofing a Dry Continent is another v good read on the matter.

    source: Carbon Sense Coalition

  11. .

    It is sort of funny we don’t build dams. Look at Natural Sequence Farming/Holistic farming; dams/weirs are used to make water movement slower – it is a better environmental process and better for farmers. It probably also retains water table for use by all.

    But actually building a large dam on a river – no, we can’t do that! I don’t see why not. If fish ecology is the issue, a few shallow, warm water dams towards to the end of the Murray Darling will protect some endangered species (Catfish, Silver Perch; they will actually breed well in impoundments). As for Trout Cod and Macquarie Perch, they are coming back and popping up here and there (the idea that Trout Cod are endangered is even a bit dubious). Otherwise, fish ladders have been around for decades.

    There would simply be more water left over for ponds, lagoons and so on if we slowed major river flows down a bit. Dams cannot stop floods entirely; slowing down the water will raise the water table.

    Which is a good thing, and is not the cause of salinity. Show me the salinity of a farm with green fields and ample water.

  12. .

    The carbon sense article makes a good note of “ghost” dams.

    Don’t forget Needles Gap, Devil Grip Gorge, Murray Gorge and Jingellic.

  13. Entropy

    Something like, “More Dam Permits!”

    I am all for new dams, starting with Wolfedene. Trouble is such a slogan would bring out the nutcases promoting the Bradfield scheme. Something that only made some kinda sense on an A4 map of Queensland and a complete lack of appreciation of scale and energy requirements.

  14. .

    The Roman aqueducts, if only one written source was found on the matter with no relic archeology (let’s say it got buried) would look like nonsense.

    I’m not saying to go down on that path but you don’t need much fall at all.

    It makes more sense than the NBN. Of course, we shouldn’t piss the money away if it fails a CBA, etc. Letting infrastructure decisions go to a lower level of aggregation or the private sector makes sense; in as much as it lower financial risk.

  15. .

    Actually Entropy, Townsville may need more dams elsewhere and pipelines to its main dam/reservoirs. My understanding is they are in a rain shadow relative to neighbouring valleys.

  16. Baldrick

    Of course the government can always control stock numbers by dialling up or down the temperature using their cleverly disguised carbon taxes on Safe Electricity.

    Apparently, they’re so good at controlling nature, they can fine tune a thermometer within fractions of degrees. No need for the cow cockie to do anything but pay his tithe to the alter of government controlled Gaia.

    Comrades.

  17. None

    Green Party policies are now sufficiently stupid that they actually look obviously stupid even to people who don’t know much.

    I wish I had your optimism, Tel. My own motto is that one should never underestimate the power of stupid people in very large groups. Still it’s a good strategy.

  18. Entropy

    .
    #2794745, posted on August 21, 2018 at 7:45 am
    Actually Entropy, Townsville may need more dams elsewhere and pipelines to its main dam/reservoirs. My understanding is they are in a rain shadow relative to neighbouring valleys

    Yes, it’s water supply doesn’t have a very large catchment and storage hasn’t kept pace with demand. They have put in a pipeline to Burdekin falls dam as a stop gap. That is practical and makes sense, unlike the bradfield scheme, multiple orders of magnitude bigger and for little feasible purpose. Building dams to supply locally will always beat a thousands of Km pipeline.

  19. .

    It really is crazy that since the 1950s we don’t have wall to wall dams, nuclear power, coal power and desalination with adequate gas pipelines everywhere along with coal to gas and cheap diesel and a developed interior.

    We’re choosing to be like the Great Southern Botswana. To save a pissant 0.5% of global CO2 emissions and for the “environmental purpose” of flushing fresh water out to sea.

    Every 40 coal-fired stations that China builds and every flood makes a mockery of our stupid, anti-civilisational policies.

  20. min

    Just heard a small bit of Alan Jobes and Susan Ley. She has come up with a water saving idea which she put up in parliament but only a few other members there, this morning she is going to speak with Ministers involved . jones seems to think it is a good idea will speak with her again tomorrow to see how it went.

  21. Tel

    Trouble is such a slogan would bring out the nutcases promoting the Bradfield scheme.

    Well great! It’s 10 minutes work to write out a permit for the Bradfield scheme, sign it as an official Commonwealth property deed and sell it at auction to the highest bidder. Not only that, it MAKES money to pay back our stupendous public debt.

  22. Mark M

    Prof debunks flatulence as major cause of global warming

    The U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the report to forecast that Himalayan glaciers might vanish within 25 years.

    Outside groups reacted to the U.N.’s claims by launching efforts to slow global warming by getting the public to go meatless one day a week, as way of lowering demand for livestock products.

    Mitloehner convinced the U.N. to recant its claim in 2010.

    http://helenair.com/news/state-and-regional/prof-debunks-flatulence-as-major-cause-of-global-warming/article_1c6c9c5e-2dbb-11e2-9e51-0019bb2963f4.html

  23. Bruce

    An interesting case is the “great dams” of the Brisbane Valley.

    The Somerset Dam was built on the Stanley river arm in response to spectacular flooding in the mid 1890s. In an unsurprising history, it was started in 1935, halted during WW2 and finally commissioned in 1959.

    NOT built as a serious reservoir.

    Then, of course, we had the spectacular 1974 flood and the Somerset Dam did basically nothing to alleviate because it was full AND much of the rain fell in other parts of the catchment areas.

    Enter the Wivenhoe Dam. This had been on somebody’s ‘back-burner’ for a while, but it took serious devastation of the Brisbane and area and large swathes to the west, to get it going, again.

    Fast-forward to 2010/2011. Here we go again. BOTH dams had been severely depleted during an extended drought, but enough rain had fallen to raise levels. Then we got another “severe rain event”. This dumped a prodigious amount of water over the region and large tracts of real estate were being submerged. Water had to be released from Wivenhoe to prevent damage to the structure. Once again, serious flooding in Brisbane.

    Pert of the problem of Wivenhoe was the steadfast refusal to dump some of the water earlier. There was a fatal mindset in the “authorities” that drought was a permanent thing and we needed to conserve water that was not being stored in the several other smaller dams that had been proposed but not built. Your life is in good hands; just ask them, they’ll tell you.

    During the drought, preceding that flood, a serious pipeline was built from Wivenhoe up, over the range to supply water to Tarong power station on the Darling Downs. This is a coal-fired station, virtually built beside a large coal deposit, but it was seriously lacking in a reliable water supply.

    Somebody worked out that it was more efficient to pump water to a huge coal field than to transport coal to a big waterhole.

    Since then, another pipeline has been run up and over the range to provide a “boost” to the water supply in Toowoomba.

    Water politics is serious stuff, both whet they get it right an, more importantly, when they get it wrong.

  24. old bloke

    I’m old enough to remember that there was once a political organisation called the Country Party. Their elected members would represent the farmer’s interests in our parliaments, usually in coalition with a conservative Liberal Party (I can also remember when they were a conservative party).

    Those were the good days when we could journey across the sunlit elysian fields with nary a care except to avoid the overflowing cornucopia. The days of plenty are behind us now, the UN rules and we must obey.

  25. rickw

    Cull Canberra. Turn off the electricity and water. Commonwealth, nice idea, time to change.

    Build a wall around it first, will make it a lot more entertaining.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.