Open Forum: August 25, 2018

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1,720 Responses to Open Forum: August 25, 2018

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  1. zyconoclast

    Italy Threatens to Halt Payments Amid Migrant Row, EU Gives Tough Response

    Italian Deputy Premier Luigi Di Maio warned on Thursday that Italy could stop making financial contributions to the EU budget next year unless other member-states agreed to take in migrants stranded on a coastguard ship in Sicily.

    “If tomorrow nothing comes out of a European Commission meeting on redistributing migrants from the Diciotti ship, the 5-Star and I will not be willing to give 20 billion euros each year to the EU,” Di Maio said in a video posted on Facebook, adding that he was saying this as the head of the Five Star movement.

    “The soft line does not work, the hard line will be to withhold funds if they don’t listen to us,” he said on Italian television on Friday.

  2. Pedro the Ignorant

    Bran nue day.

  3. Oh come on

    Trumble speaketh:

    The people who chose — Peter Dutton and Tony Abbott and others — who chose to deliberately attack the Government from within, they did so because they wanted to bring the Government down.”

    No, they wanted to bring you down. Because you sucked. They have done to you what you did to them. Get over it.

  4. zyconoclast

    ALBANY — Dozens of convicted s3xual predators deemed too dangerous to be returned to the community after their release from prison are among the thousands who received conditional pardons from Gov. Cuomo, giving them the right to vote, the Daily News has learned.

    At least 77 s3xual predators sent to civil confinement in state psychiatric hospitals after their prison time was up are affected by the widespread pardons, various records show.

    While the names of those in civil confinement are often shielded, a comparison of records showed the 77 predators shared one of two addresses — both of which happened to be upstate mental hospitals that house the civilly confined. One of the predators is Hector Aviles, 61, who was known as the “voodoo [email protected]” Aviles was convicted of second-degree [email protected] in Westchester County in 2008 after telling three of his victims — the oldest of whom was 16 — that if they participated in a s3xual “ritual” with him, he could help them with their problems. If they didn’t, he said, bad things would happen to them and their families.

    The rest of the list of 77 is littered with convicted p3d0philes and [email protected] and other violent s3xual abusers. All were granted conditional pardons from Cuomo under a new policy designed to give back the right to vote to those who leave prison.

  5. Nick

    Reading Fairfax’s chutzpah about MPs destabilizing the Government

  6. struth

    Why not.
    Blacks are big on witchcraft.
    Howdo voodoo.
    So is this show in back and white?

  7. zyconoclast

    from Zero Hedge
    As Bloomberg notes, Morrison’s victory represents a defeat for the party’s right-wing, which advocated conservative policies similar to those that led to the rise of U.S. President Donald Trump and the vote for Brexit. He has a narrow window to unite the party and make up ground against the main opposition Labor party, which has benefited from the government’s inability to enact coherent policies from taxation to energy.

    Annette Beacher, head of Asia-Pac research at TD Securities issued the following note:

    “PM Morrison is the most market-friendly option, having successfully negotiated through multiple portfolios such as Social Security, Border Security, and more recently presiding over a substantial improvement in the budget balance as Treasurer.”

    “Parliament and the markets will be closely watching post-vote polls to gauge if Morrison can even up the balance towards the Liberal-National coalition and away from the Labor Party under Bill Shorten. The skew towards the Labor Party at this stage ensures they they will form government at the next election.”

  8. zyconoclast

    Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky denounced Republican leaders Thursday for attempting to block his latest amendment to block Planned Parenthood, questioning both their commitment to the preborn and the credibility of their campaign promises.

    The opthamologist and libertarian Republican introduced an amendment last week to the Senate appropriations package funding the Departments of Defense, Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education that would forbid money appropriated for those departments from directly or indirectly going to any entity that performs or finances most abortions.

    But Senate GOP leadership quickly moved to fill the last open slot in the amendment tree with a placeholder to block Paul’s addition, out of fear it would jeopardize pro-abortion senators’ support for passing the overall bill.

  9. zyconoclast

    ‘All women are beautiful’: Trevor Noah explains controversial joke

    During the recent sit-down interview, which was conducted in Melbourne, Hurley said it was the logic underpinning the joke that offended so many people.

    “In this country, white men have long joked about their entitlements,” she said. “Especially s3xual violence upon Aboriginal women. There are really offensive terms that are still in use in this country, that [suggest] Aboriginal women aren’t necessarily desirable or attractive but good for something else.”

    Her co-host, Bond, agreed.

    “We laugh at different things,” she said. “[But] that joke had currency for certain people. Whether or not you intended it to, that’s our reality of it.”

    While Noah didn’t apologise for making the joke, he said the chat taught him a lot.

  10. Cpt Seahawks

    Why is the world always behind on the news? Sometimes I feel like a future man wandering around the past while wondering what I myself am behind on. Layers of weird.

  11. squawkbox

    I think Australia is going to be the new Italy – a new PM every two years but no one will really think it matters.

  12. Nob

    squawkbox
    #2800782, posted on August 25, 2018 at 12:57 am
    I think Australia is going to be the new Italy – a new PM every two years but no one will really think it matters.

    And a feral bureaucracy that erects roadblocks to enterprise just to enrich/employ themselves. Already there.

  13. JC

    Hearing from multiple people that Special Counsel Robert Mueller plans to claim that Donald Trump Jr made false statements to the Congress over the Trump Tower meeting

    If this is true, the base will go fucking nuts and could end up ugly- like really ugly.
    I reckon it’s just a twitter rumour.

  14. None

    I think Australia is going to be the new Italy – a new PM every two years but no one will really think it matters.

    We already have an Italian senate.

    Just laughing at Nikki Savva again who thinks Turnbull’s delaying gave Morrison and Bishop time to get their act together. Er no. Turnbull was out to save himself. Hmm Morrison was an opportunist and was spooked by Dutton on Monday. So he sucked up to Turnbull to win his votes. Bishop was never in the hunt. She knew she was a gonner regardless so she could have been humiliated or just go out trying for the top job. She tried the latter and scored a whole 11 votes. So much for Miss Congeniality. LOL.

  15. None

    Nick
    #2800770, posted on August 25, 2018 at 12:09 am

    Turnbull got spooked by Dutton and called the first spill. Turnbull brought himself down. Too good. I see the Oz is reporting that Dutton would have won back voters from One Nation. Morrison just lost a lot to Australian Conservatives. Liberals are stupid.

  16. A number of Victorian Police recruits have resigned after an orgy was exposed
    The orgy had reportedly happened off campus and while recruits were off duty
    However after hearing bragging another recruit reported it to their superiors

    Forced to resign for having sex?
    They sure take this “a copper is never off duty” thing seriously in Viccostan.

  17. Tom

    A cryptic cartoon from Larry Pickering on the political death of a giant ego who imagined he was
    our saviour.

  18. Tom

    Bob Moran (London Daily Telegraph) on Jeremy Corbyn and Brexit.

  19. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Nah, it’s only 8pm here in Norway, Struth, at this very nice Airbnb apartment we have booked, with some great mountain and sea views. It’s very full of tricky smart hanging lights to brighten up the dull day, as the sun was in and out inbetween rain and I am getting some washing done. The laundry room on the Hurtigruten Midnatsol was such a jungle; a Frenchwoman stuck her washing in my financially reserved dryer and proceeded to use up my minutes just as I arrived to take out my washing with one minute to spare and get it into my dryer. She pretended at my protestations about ‘my turn’ that she didn’t speak English so I switched to French and she pretended she was hard of hearing and couldn’t understand me anyway (my Parisian accent has been called pretty good, btw), simpering back at me Anglais, Anglais, throwing up her hands at her own joke. Meanwhile, her laundry was blowing away my token. I gave up and went to buy another one and stand around till another dryer came free. Women were reaching the tear each others’ hair out stage by then.

    We drove down today to Stavenger from Bergen in a large Toyota SUV thing from Avis that I haven’t seen in Australia; Hairy going bananas at its inability to start up fast on the two ferries we had to take on the way down. He pressed start as we prepared ready for ferry exist, the monster started, then stopped and said ‘wait a while…’. Stormily, Hairy pressed the start again, and got the same response. He did it a third time, swearing at the thing angrily, still woulnd’t start. I put my seatbelt on in case it was that, but it wasn’t. Then I remembered. I’d seen some sign on the back of it saying ‘Hybrid’. I think it’s electric and doing its Green stop and start thing because we are not immediately getting going, I say. Also, you can tell whether the engine is running or not, and the dashboard info in Norwegian doesn’t help.

    I collapse in amusement at Hairy having hired a hybrid piece of green nonsense.
    I didn’t ask for dat, he snarled at me, as we lurched forward at last. Effin EU directives, he mutters.
    Norway is not in the EU though because they like shooting bears, fishing lots, and drilling heaps of oil and doing other non-EU things like still killing whales. They just import the friggin’ cars.

    We went to a shopping centre to buy some alcohol from the alcohol monopoly they have here (Vinmonopolot; known as Vinmo for short) and some food for tonight (ready cooked, I am not cooking on holiday).

    We were given a special discount on our parking voucher because we had an electric car!
    You win some, I say comfortingly, but he was not amused. It just set him off again.

    Anyway, just to say that there are other things going on in the world but the rise of ScoMo. 🙂

  20. H B Bear

    I declare this thread a Waffleworth free zone. Almost.

    Thanks again Peter Dutton.

  21. Tom

    Look at this slimey leftard creep trying to disown his utterly unethical behavior:

    The Nine Network’s political editor has denied his bureau has any agenda after one of his junior Canberra correspondents asked a government minister why he would appear on Sky News.

    Chris Uhlmann has been in the spotlight after he accused News Corp newspapers, including The Australian, and broadcasters Sky News and 2GB of plotting to bring down Malcolm Turnbull’s prime ministership. After his comments went viral, Uhlmann was selected as one of the few journalists ­allowed to ask Mr Turnbull a question at his last press conference as prime minister.

    The Nine Network’s Airlie Walsh asked Education Minister Simon Birmingham why he agreed to appear on Sky News ­recently, considering the “conservative media” allegedly played a role in Mr Turnbull’s downfall.

    “Minister, you’ve just appeared on Sky News. Why would you agree to appear on such a program when some of your colleagues have been blaming the conservative media for stoking the fire?” Walsh asked.

    Senator Birmingham replied: “I have a regular spot as the manager of government business ahead of each sitting week and I honour those commitments.”

    Uhlmann said he did not direct Walsh to ask the question but did reveal he had asked MPs in the past why they would appear on the channel regularly.

    “I didn’t direct Airlie to ask that question. There is no agenda,” he said. “I have never urged ministers to not appear on Sky News or 2GB. I have, on occasion, openly wondered in some conversations with MPs why they would go on a station (Sky) where it is only going to echo when they make a mistake.”

    Uhlmann said he had no ­agenda in targeting conservative media outlets but he did not regret his comments this week.

    “I have no agenda (when it comes to Sky News or conservative media) … they are a group who beat people to death and then wet themselves when anyone ­raises a question.”

    Mr Turnbull allowed only one News Corp journalist, Kieran Gilbert from Sky News, to ask a question at his final press conference as prime minister.

    Uhlmann was selected along with the ABC’s Laura Tingle, The Australian Financial Review’s Phil Coorey, Guardian Australia’s Katherine Murphy and Fairfax’s David Crowe. But Uhlmann was not in the prime minister’s courtyard to answer Mr Turnbull’s call, “because I was in the studio as part of the live coverage”.

    Uhlmann said on the Today show on Thursday that sections of the media had “waged war” on the Turnbull government.

    “Everyone from the prime minister down has pointed out to me that they believe there is a campaign being waged against them by … News Corp … The Australian, Daily Telegraph and all of those tabloid newspapers … 2GB in Sydney (owned by Fairfax), led by Alan Jones and Ray Hadley, and Sky News, in particular,” he said.

    Mr Turnbull also used his final press conference to make similar attacks. “There was a determined insurgency from a number of ­people both in the partyroom and backed by voices, powerful voices, in the media,” he said.

  22. None

    Chris Orman doesn’t like it when other people play lefties’ games, Tom.

  23. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Saw way upthread that Johanna is upset about me again, as I am a ‘fake blonde’.
    OK, I’ll come clean, I do touch it up a bit, but it’s really natural underneath. 🙂

    Also, last comment, typo: you can’t hear the electric motor running, not can.

  24. OldOzzie

    How a scorned Malcolm Turnbull took his revenge – Simon Benson

    Malcolm Turnbull’s payback was furious and swift.

    Within hours of their resig­nations, the 13 ministers who had dared to challenge the Prime Minister were sent official notices from the head of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, Martin Parkinson.

    Their staff were warned that the department had been directed by the Prime Minister’s office to cut off access to all communi­cations, including emails and phones, immediately.

    Parkinson said, in at least one message recounted to The Weekend Australian, that this was not the approach the department would normally take.

    Usually departing minsters and their staff are given a few days’ grace to sort out affairs: things as simple as putting out-of-office ­notices on their emails. Parkinson was acting under instructions.

    “They just began shutting shit off,” one MP said. “It was brutal. It was vindictive.”

    Another source said: “Some of the offices had to negotiate with departments to get more time but others were booted out.”

    One minister claimed his newspaper subscriptions had been cut off within hours of his resignation letter being received.

    None of the rebels was spared the humiliation. Parkinson had given a cabinet minister just enough time to transfer his number to a new phone before his was disconnected.

    It was regarded by Peter Dutton’s backers as an overt move to try to sabotage their leadership push. Yet this would not come close to the wrath brought down upon Dutton himself in the bid by Turnbull to ensure conservatives were kept out of The Lodge.

    From Tuesday, Turnbull was briefing that if he was turfed from office, Julie Bishop, Craig Laundy, Darren Chester, Julia Banks, Kevin Hogan and others could ­either go to the crossbench or quit parliament, sparking by-elections and forcing a general election.

    “They will deliver Bill Shorten the top job within weeks if they win,” a Turnbull supporter said.

    Turnbull’s fear campaign was aimed at blowing up support for Dutton and calling into question his ability to maintain a majority in the House of Representatives.

    Before Turnbull’s news conference on Thursday, during which he confirmed he would quit parliament and force a by-election in Wentworth, his office was briefing that he wasn’t going anywhere. “He’ll stay in parliament even if he loses. He won’t walk,” a Turnbull adviser said.

    Nobody believed the spin. In truth, Turnbull was meeting MPs, fanning instability and pushing a narrative against Dutton.

    The dirty tactics bought precious time for Scott Morrison, who by then had reached an ­accord with Turnbull that, with the Prime Minister’s leadership terminal, he would work to ­deliver the leadership to the ­Treasurer.

    Whether Turnbull knew it or not, Morrison had pushed the button on his own campaign a week ago.

    While Morrison is conser­vative, he is not regarded as one of the conservative tribe in the parliamentary party, largely due to his decision in 2015 to back Turnbull over Tony Abbott.

    When Dutton was pushed early into declaring his hand ­during a radio interview the Thursday before last, Morrison’s people were quietly telling people not to rule out his name in a leadership contest. In the meantime, he remained loyal to Turnbull.

    A pivotal moment for Morrison had come during the fallout of the national energy guarantee. Morrison had held a snap news conference, during which he was asked about a Nationals plan to intervene in the electricity market. “Well, price control has never really been a Liberal Party policy. It’s never been a Liberal value as my understanding of the Liberal Party — and I have a pretty reasonable one — you won’t find that enshrined in Liberal philosophy, I don’t think,” Morrison said on August 15.

    The remarks publicly rejected Turnbull’s pledge in The Australian to target major energy retailers, and force them to lower energy bills. The following day he backflipped. The shift in language was followed by a news conference with Turnbull and Josh Frydenberg, during which the trio effectively killed the NEG and pledged to adopt a radical ­Nationals plan that included a threat to divest assets of the major energy companies.

    It was Frydenberg who would come to play a key role in getting the three votes that delivered Morrison the leadership. Within 24 hours of the surprise leadership ballot called by Turnbull on Tuesday, Morrison’s numbers men Alex Hawke, Ben Morton and Stuart Robert were busy working on colleagues.

    “They were in and out of ­people’s offices all day,” one MP said.

    While Hawke and Morton later denied any involvement, they were slowly peeling votes from the Dutton camp.

    Dutton was prepared to give Morrison the deputy leader’s position, and allow him to remain as treasurer, if he would back him in the second leadership ballot.

    The only deal Morrison was interested in was one where he was prime minister and Dutton was his deputy.

    Frydenberg voted for Turnbull but had pledged his vote to Dutton in a second ballot. This didn’t come to pass. Sometime between Tuesday and Thursday, a deal was believed to have been done for Frydenberg to become Morrison’s deputy if he won.

    Frydenberg was spruiking on Thursday night that he would be an “unaligned” candidate for deputy.

    Fellow Victorians were unhappy with Dutton’s choice of Greg Hunt as running mate. It is believed Frydenberg brought several Victorian votes over to Morrison, which in the end might have been the difference.

    It wouldn’t have been, however, had the campaign to blow up Dutton’s ambitions not been so vengeful. Turnbull began telling colleagues early in the week that his leadership rival would be forced to a general election because he couldn’t command numbers on the floor, nor win crossbench support.

    Turnbull had also opened communications with Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove.

    “He was telling everyone the G-G would not endorse a Dutton government,” one MP said.

    Turnbull’s meddling was nothing more than an attempt to stall for Morrison, who by then had become his proxy candidate. It was exposed by Sir Peter through a spokesman, who confirmed that the governor-general “by convention acts on the advice of the prime minister”.

    Turnbull had effectively wielded the section 44 smear against Dutton — fuelled by Labor — to call into question Dutton’s eligibility over his family’s ownership of two childcare centres. Engaging the Solicitor-General to review Dutton’s status bought another 24 hours for Morrison to get his ducks in a row.

    Turnbull arrived in his office yesterday at 8am, relaxed and confident of the outcome. The Dutton camp was confident as well. They believed Dutton’s numbers were holding firm. No one believed Bishop was a threat in a three-horse race.

    What unfolded yesterday morning bordered on the insane.

    Turnbull was bunkered in his office, facing increasing public pressure to call a partyroom meeting and end the crisis.

    On Thursday night, Liberal Party president Nick Greiner, who had been Turnbull’s pick for the role, sent him a message, ­demanding the crisis be resolved the next day. All state Liberal Party presidents agreed. But Turnbull wouldn’t budge until he saw the petition for a partyroom meeting with the 43 signatures — a majority of the 85 members of the party who he believed were his traitors.

    Turnbull had reverted to the barrister that he was, invoking the fig leaf of due diligence and ­proper process. Fed up, Dutton marched to his office and handed it over in person. A colleague of Dutton commented: “This prick is now playing hard ball.”

    Turnbull had spent the morning with the government’s house leader, moderate powerbroker Christopher Pyne; Laundy, the member for Reid; and senator ­Arthur Sinodinos, who had ­returned to Canberra amid the crisis to give counsel to Turnbull, despite still being in recovery from cancer treatment.

    The lunacy shifted to another level when government whip Nola Marino was forced to ring everyone on the list to verify whether they had signed the ­petition.

    The familiar scene of a prime minister walking through the parliamentary halls to the political gallows was played out at midday. MPs began entering the Liberal partyroom at 12.17pm. When Marino emerged just ­before 1pm to read out the result, Dutton’s camp was in shock: 45 votes for Morrison, 40 for Dutton.

    Turnbull’s campaign had worked.

    Dutton and Mathias Cormann, the two senior conser­vatives, had buttressed Turnbull’s leadership for two years despite increasing pressure from conservative colleagues.

    Turnbull in many ways owed the longevity of his leadership to the loyalty these two conser­vatives afforded him, in spite of his progressive agenda.

    In the end, he could not abide a government that would elevate Tony Abbott back into the cabinet, as would be almost assured under Dutton.

    The final act came when the Prime Minister’s office leaked a photo of the petition to the media, with the names of the 43 “insurgents”, who numbered more than half of the partyroom.

    “It was a bastard act,” a now former cabinet minister said.

    And so it was that the decade-long Abbott-Turnbull war came to an end.

  25. I am the Walras, Equilibrate, and Price-Take

    Oh come on
    #2800767, posted on August 25, 2018 at 12:07 am
    Trumble speaketh:

    The people who chose — Peter Dutton and Tony Abbott and others — who chose to deliberately attack the Government from within, they did so because they wanted to bring the Government down.”

    No, they wanted to bring you down. Because you sucked. They have done to you what you did to them. Get over it.

    Now beginneth the bitching and moaning.

    ‘It was all other people’s fault. They were so nasty and brutish and unfair.’

    LOLOLOLOL!!!

    Zero self awareness!!!

    LOLOLOLOL!!!

    Abbott and Dutton goaded the gormless preening wanker into blowing himself up. Probably the funniest thing I’ve ever seen happen in Australian politics.

    Thank heavens he is gone. Even having the waste of space Reversed Undies in the Lodge is an improvement. What an execrable abomination. May he disappear forever up his own fundament and never be seen again.

  26. Eyrie

    “And a feral bureaucracy that erects roadblocks to enterprise just to enrich/employ themselves. Already there.”
    Ask anyone in Australian general aviation. Perfectly describes CASA.

  27. I am the Walras, Equilibrate, and Price-Take

    Within hours of their resig­nations, the 13 ministers who had dared to challenge the Prime Minister were sent official notices from the head of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, Martin Parkinson.

    Their staff were warned that the department had been directed by the Prime Minister’s office to cut off access to all communi­cations, including emails and phones, immediately.

    Parkinson said, in at least one message recounted to The Weekend Australian, that this was not the approach the department would normally take.

    Usually departing minsters and their staff are given a few days’ grace to sort out affairs: things as simple as putting out-of-office ­notices on their emails. Parkinson was acting under instructions.

    “They just began shutting shit off,” one MP said. “It was brutal. It was vindictive.”

    Yeah, we know.

    We all remember what happened to Fiona Watson’s moggie.

  28. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull – Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  29. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull – Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  30. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull – Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  31. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull – Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  32. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull – Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  33. Gary

    Tom

    Part of the problem is people don’t have same scepticism towards media PR as they so with Politicians. When you point out something is BS most times they say “but they did a fundraiser for X” and get a free pass.

  34. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2800811, posted on August 25, 2018 at 5:29 am

    How a scorned Malcolm Turnbull took his revenge – Simon Benson

    Malcolm Turnbull’s payback was furious and swift.
    “It was a bastard act,” a now former cabinet minister said.

    And so it was that the decade-long Abbott-Turnbull war came to an end.

    And TA is still in the fight. Does ScoMo want another war?

  35. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Saw way upthread that Johanna is upset about me again, as I am a ‘fake blonde’.
    OK, I’ll come clean, I do touch it up a bit, but it’s really natural underneath. 🙂

    Also, last comment, typo: you can’t hear the electric motor running, not can.

    And .. at last a School of Social Science has come up with some useful research. Every explanation you’ve ever heard, or never heard, about why the queues are longer in the women’s toilets than in the men’s. On timings, we need 1.6 more toilets than men need. Glad to see that they include in their calculations that some men, mentioning no names of course, do sneak around corners of boatsheds, even in pristine Norway, and whip it out and into the sea from the wharf, should the need and possibility take them.

    Disgraceful behaviour. And then the shameless one has the hide to freak me out for taking a quick unauthorised leak in the heather on a forced march in the Shetlands. Now he’s online checking out what Stavangar has to entertain us tomorrow. Dere’s a petroleum museum, he offers hopefully.

    As I have already refused a 3.5 hour each way climb up to one of those famous rocks with a drop, I feel I must make concessions to avoid more heavy engineering of the type we (he) so enjoyed in that Edinburgh museum. How about we do that boat trip along the fjiord and just look up at it? I say.

    Done deal. 🙂

  36. stackja

    Alan Reid in 1960s and Laurie Oakes in 1980s played politics. Alan Ramsey was in and out of various roles. Hawke knifed Bill and AR on Bill’s staff supposedly cried. Fairfax backed Caldwell. Murdoch backed Gough then backed Fraser. Age tapes. Loans Affair. The list goes on. History repeats.

  37. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Their staff were warned that the department had been directed by the Prime Minister’s office to cut off access to all communi­cations, including emails and phones, immediately.

    Parkinson said, in at least one message recounted to The Weekend Australian, that this was not the approach the department would normally take.

    Agile and innovative? No, not really. All stolen from Theresa May when she told waverers at that famous Chequers meeting that the station was a long way away and they’d have to walk.

    Malcolm doesn’t have original ideas, say Hairy. Not even when it comes to bloody-mindedness.

  38. Twostix

    Poor motherless Turnbull. Rejected again.

  39. Twostix

    It’s a mum who teaches their son that scorched earth retribution isn’t a socially intelligent way to behave.

    Sad.

  40. stackja

    Dutton camp was blindsided in party room meeting
    SHERADYN HOLDERHEAD, The Daily Telegraph
    August 25, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    STATE OF UNCERTAINTY AS SPILL PUSHES MARGINALS TO BRINK

    AN angry voter backlash across the battleground seats of NSW could hand victory to Labor in the next election.

    Australian National University political analyst Dr Norman Abjorensen said the Liberals had been panicked into action by the Longman by-election in Queensland last month, where the party’s candidate Trevor Ruthenberg received less than 30 per cent of the primary vote.

    “Pushing Peter Dutton forward may have seemed like a good idea to impress people north of the Tweed River but I don’t think it would have gone well in NSW,” he said.

    However the choice of Scott Morrison, with his seat in the Shire, could salvage Liberal votes in NSW.

    Dr Abjorensen warned that former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull was popular in many Sydney seats.

    “I think we will still see a very angry voter backlash against the Liberal Party because of what has happened.”

    And he predicted angry Nationals MPs in country NSW seats would follow the lead of Page MP Kevin Hogan, who vowed to move to the cross-benches over the leadership spill.

    Mr Hogan is holding the seat of Page on the NSW north coast by a tiny 2.3 per cent margin. It is one of a string of seats sitting on a knife edge in NSW, where battle lines will be drawn for the next federal election.

    For Labor those include Lindsay, Macquarie, Richmond and Dobell, which are held on margins below 5 per cent.

    At particular risk for the Liberals are the traditional Labor seats of Banks in Sydney’s west and Reid in Sydney’s inner west.

    Banks is held by the Liberals with a margin of 1.4 per cent and Reid 4.7 per cent.

  41. Twostix

    It’s not the person if the policies are there.

    Cut immigration, abandon the weird ban on cheap electricity.

  42. Bruce of Newcastle

    Delingpole puts in the size 12s.

    Another Greenie Bites the Dust. Aussie PM Forced out by Climate Policy

    Though Turnbull is a member of the Liberal party – Australia’s conservatives – his politics are very much at the squishier end of the spectrum. An arch-globalist, nicknamed the Honourable Member for Goldman Sachs (where he was a partner), Turnbull is fairly typical of the centrist, ideology-free conservatives who have tended to make the running in western politics in recent years.

    Morrison is Australia’s seventh prime minister in 11 years.

    Don’t bank on this turnover rate being slowed any time soon.

    If Morrison doesn’t overturn the green energy scam he too will be booted.

  43. BrettW

    I am guessing Chris Uhlman never complained when Government ministers appeared on the ABC which basically campaigns against Coalition policies.

    I say good on Newscorp, 2GB, Sky for exposing the fraud of a Coalition that Turnbull was. His only question at previous pressed was asked by Murphy of the Guardian which says it all.

    Now we need to see some fight from Morrison and Fried if that is possible.

  44. 132andBush

    If Morrison doesn’t overturn the green energy scam he too will be booted.

    +1

    Does anyone from the so called Liberal party – Australia’s conservatives read this blog?

  45. Eyrie

    I guess Mal’s short description next to his name in the list of Australian PMs is “a nasty piece of work indeed”.

  46. stackja

    A brief history of Malcolm Turnbull and how he lost the plot
    Matthew Benns, Editor-at-Large, The Daily Telegraph
    August 24, 2018 10:00pm
    Subscriber only

    For a brief moment last year Australia had the Prime Minister it deserved when Malcolm Turnbull stood up to newly elected US President Donald Trump.

    “That was Turnbull’s finest hour,” Australian National University political analyst Dr Norman Abjorensen says.

    “He stood his ground.”
    Like many who know Turnbull personally, Abjorensen says the hope that came with Turnbull securing the top job was quickly tempered by a harsher political reality.

    “Most of us have watched his time in office with disappointment,” he says.

    “For the first three months after he deposed Tony Abbott all lay before him. The Australian public was in the palm of his hand,” University of NSW political researcher Dr Mark Rolfe says.

    “Then he stuffed it up.”

    “I think he would like to imagine his legacy is an economy running smoothly, job creation and innovation,” Professor Carol Johnson of the University of Adelaide says.

    “History will see him as a bit of a disappointment.”

    In 2016, when the Senate rejected the bills to reinstate the Australian Building and Construction Commission, Turnbull called an election.

    “He made political mistakes in the 2016 election campaign. He called it too early, it ran too long and his message did not cut through to the electorate,” Johnson says. He was returned to power with a one-seat majority.

    That slim majority and constant battle to get bills through the Senate required all of Turnbull’s negotiating skills to get things done.

    At the same time the house was dogged by the Section 44 eligibility crisis.

    Despite this, he held the same-sex marriage plebiscite, in which 61.6 per cent of Australians voted Yes.

    On 7 December last year, same-sex marriage was legalised, securing possibly Turnbull’s greatest legacy.His critics on the right of his own party were not impressed.

    Energy blackouts in South Australia and soaring energy prices also brought back the spectre of carbon emissions that had troubled him in 2009.

    Instead of tackling costs, Turnbull said last week he would legislate the Paris emission targets.

    Only when The Daily Telegraph broke the story of Peter Dutton’s possible challenge did Turnbull begin to realise how far he had got it wrong.

    On Monday he backflipped on the National Energy Guarantee.

    “The NEG was the straw that broke the camel’s back,” Johnson says.

    “This was meant to deal with the issue of cost and put the climate change issue to bed, finally. But he made so many concessions, virtually changing his position every day, it made people doubt him, his convictions and his judgment.”

    Stripped of his conviction and hostage to his rivals, Turnbull was rolled with no credibility left.

    His legacy from his refusal to leave office with good grace is a fiercely divided Liberal Party that will take a generation to fix.

    Rolfe says history would not judge him kindly.

    “He has got to be ranked among our lower levels of prime ministers,” he says.

  47. Eyrie

    Morrison is a fat cowardly opportunistic weasel who didn’t have the guts to challenge Turnbull directly but let Dutton do the hard yards. Useless turd. This will not go well.

  48. stackja

    This was a cathartic end to a disgraceful 48 hours
    MIRANDA DEVINE
    Miranda Devine
    August 25, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    MOMENTS after Australia’s new Prime Minister Scott Morrison won the Liberal leadership ballot yesterday he told his colleagues a new generation of Liberal is “closing the door” on the Turnbull-Abbott era.

    And the party room cheered, according to one insider.

    It was a cathartic end to a disgraceful 48 hours in Australian political history. The final ambush of the Tony Abbott insurgency came shockingly fast, in the form of Peter Dutton’s two-part spill motion. The coup was bungled, despite months of planning, but Malcolm Turnbull was mortally wounded and reputations lay in tatters.

    Turnbull handled his departure with more grace than he will be given credit for, with a relaxed press conference in the prime ministerial courtyard surrounded by his wife Lucy, and grandchildren. No angry tears, just a pointed barb or two at the jihadists who blew up his prime ministership for no reason that an apolitical Australian would understand.

  49. Nick

    just a pointed barb or two at the jihadists who blew up his prime ministership

    Surely that’s worthy of a complaint to Soupandasarnie?

  50. stackja

    Of all the PC demands, this is surely the worst
    JAMES MORROW
    James Morrow
    August 25, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    THE whole concept of “trigger warnings” has been well overdone, but before we begin, it is only fair to let readers of this column know what they are in for.

    So here we go.

    The following paragraphs may contain mentions of body parts that might make less mature readers giggle. It may also contain references to progressive attempts to change the language that should make other readers fume.

    Still here? OK, here’s the story: Apparently it’s not politically correct to say “vagina” anymore.

    Rather, according to America’s Healthline.com website, to be inclusive one should instead use the term … wait for it … “front hole”.

    As the website explains in their “LGBTQIA-inclusive safer sex guide”, “this is gender-inclusive language that’s considerate of the fact that some trans people don’t identify with the labels the medical community attaches to their genitals.”

  51. .

    Have a look at the pic with Senator McKenzie in the background.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/live/2018/aug/24/liberal-spill-malcolm-turnbull-peter-dutton-scott-morrison-liberal-spill-politics-parliament-live

    Her body language looks uncomfortable but a little hard to read.

    Of course, “Independent” Cathi McGowan has made a comment about the Nats and Libs.

  52. .

    FFS someone needs to teach ScoMo to dress himself or get a bloodywell tailored suit now he’s PM.

    A few awkward moments at the commission. Maybe we’ve got real people as our rulers now?

    Frydenberg as Treasurer?

    Not hopeful. Give him a few weeks and an even chance before we predictably and unceremoniously throw him under the bus.

  53. Nick

    It’s going to be fun seeing the Fairfax press and the ABC both lamenting the way in which Turnbull was brought down, doing the same to Morrison.

  54. .

    Chinless lost
    Malcolm Running Flat
    So Much Wasted Potential
    A dead battery
    Then end now

  55. Mater

    Despite this, he held the same-sex marriage plebiscite, in which 61.6 per cent of Australians voted Yes.

    I’ll start listening to these ‘experts’ when they demonstrate what should be basic knowledge of a professional political commentator; such as the difference between a postal survey and a plebiscite.

  56. .

    Go shove it up ya front hole, ya front holes!

    Get front holed you front holed front hole.

    Derek and Clive will have a field day with this in hell.

  57. I am the Walras, Equilibrate, and Price-Take

    I noticed in the FairFacked 1991 Good Weekend piece on Lord Waffleworth that someone posted earlier this week that:

    1. Bill Leak had covered the SpyCatcher case for the BBC;

    2. Turnbull had bought Leak’s pictures from the case, including the ‘roughs’, from Leak as a memento;

    3. Leak later discovered that Waffleworth had used them in his book about the case without seeking Leak’s permission;

    4. Leak sued Waffleworth over this unauthorised use; Waffleworth settled out of court.

    Waffleworth commented in the FairFacked piece: ‘This was an act of absolute opportunism by Leak’.

    For me, it brings a darker perspective to Waffleworth’s disinclination from protecting leak from the predations of the HREOC Nazis.

  58. Mater

    m0nty
    #2800705, posted on August 24, 2018 at 11:08 pm

    Improvements in battery capacity will eventually make coal obsolete. Good riddance.

    Not that I want to join the pile-on, sdfc, but you can’t just assume that the scientific obstacles to building better batteries will be overcome. Ye canna change the laws o’ physics Cap’n, as a wise man once said (or will say in future).

    I can’t believe I’m going to say this but m0nty has just come up a rung in my estimation of him. He’s still pretty low on the ladder, but it’s a start.

  59. mh

    Stackja,
    Miranda? You’re trolling again.

  60. Entropy

    Eyrie
    #2800813, posted on August 25, 2018 at 5:32 am
    “And a feral bureaucracy that erects roadblocks to enterprise just to enrich/employ themselves. Already there.”
    Ask anyone in Australian general aviation. Perfectly describes CASA.

    Here are four kinds of public servants
    The counter staff types who are just doing a nine to five type job, and work to be frank does not define them;
    The politically connected types on the make, frothing with personal ambition and a willingness to walk over others, that you would not want your son or daughter to bring home. Most common in executives in corporate areas as they know nothing else but the public service’s internal machinations;
    The line agency types that provide services to industry and are often captured by industry and sometimes are very well regarded. This incidentally makes then hated by the second and fourth types. The traditional classic would be agriculture department types in regional offices
    The fourth are regulatory agency types. They follow rules. They are inflexible and unimaginative. They have to be that way to do their job. A recent variety though treat it as a religious vocation, with a zeal that can be quite frightening to observe. Traditionally in the environment space, but diversity agenda areas and other new roles in an ever expanding purview for the priesthood too. Every problem requires a regulatory impediment, or else. And this type loves reports and reporting as an end in itself, and the clipboard warrior career path it brings.

  61. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    No angry tears, just a pointed barb or two at the jihadists who blew up his prime ministership for no reason that an apolitical Australian would understand.

    huh? how about for being a globalist leftist closet green bordering on useless who gave us fagg*t weddings and took away our lightbulbs

  62. Twostix

    On 7 December last year, same-sex marriage was legalised, securing possibly Turnbull’s greatest legacy.His critics on the right of his own party were not impressed

    Only the liberals could take our guns, only the liberals could shove fag marriage onto us, only the liberals coild dump africans into australian country towns.

  63. mh

    Let us not forget that Andrew Bolt has always heavily promoted IPA miscreants on his shows. Now we have seen the real agenda of these creeps, they should have no place or influence in the Liberal Party.

  64. RobK

    Go shove it up ya front hole, ya front holes!
    I was at a regional centre in mid-west WA, listening to some loud dialogue in a parking area, between two groups of picaninies recently; the term “big hole” is obviously the common vernacular in that context.

  65. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull – Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  66. Cactus

    Wake up. Take a deep breath and enjoy the moment that Turnbull is no longer PM.

  67. Eyrie

    Let alone being a delusional psychopath.

  68. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull – Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. .
    This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  69. Twostix

    Australians elected Everyman Abbott in an historic landslide.

    They loathed monocled Turnbull since 2009 and always have since.

    The alternate reality the the bugman class has conjured up about that situation is a worry.

  70. stackja

    This was a cathartic end to a disgraceful 48 hours
    MIRANDA DEVINE
    Miranda Devine
    August 25, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    Terry
    6 minutes ago

    I always laugh when Abbott is blamed for the poor policy decisions made by Turnbull and his “yes” men. Turnbull and his “yes” men should be ashamed of themselves for showing disloyalty and disrespect to Abbott and come and and accusing Abbott and his “supporters” of the same thing. i don’t know how they can look at themselves in the mirror everyday. I am glad that they got rid of Turnbull, but I am not sure that they got it right with Morrison. Unless he comes out and say that wii leave the Paris Accord, build HELE coal power stations, reduce immigration (until infrastructure catches up), build dam for flood, draught and hydro power, then he will be in trouble with the conservative voters.
    FlagShare
    LikeReply
    Avatar for Jamie
    Jamie
    13 minutes ago

    Miranda you hitched your credibility to a typical arrogant, looney leftist in Turnbull. Maybe time you started writing for the Guardian.
    FlagShare
    LikeReply
    Avatar for P.A
    P.A
    30 minutes ago

    It will take more than passages from the Bible to fix the mess left by Turnbull. The main things that will bring voters back are, lower the level of Immigration, throw Paris and the NEG in the bin and stop all subsidise to Alternative power and build coal/gas power stations, drought proof the bush by building real dams and stop the PC madness that has permeated our society. Then and only then will people believe this change is for the better.

    Either he bites the bullet on these things or the leaking of votes will continue, including mine. The prospect of Shorten and Labor claiming victory looms large and frightening on the horizon and that in itself should be significant enough for any conservative Government to act for the majority, not the minorities that have held sway for so long.
    FlagShare
    11MTerryPaulJohnLikeReply
    Avatar for Jim
    Jim
    31 minutes ago

    Miranda: MT is gone. Now what? No more delusions? What has been conserved?
    DeleteShare
    2TonyPeterLikeReply
    Avatar for Davo
    Davo
    31 minutes ago

    Have you no shame Miranda? Turnbull’s behaviour in the past 2 days has shown what an egotistical, spiteful and self-centred man he is for those who didn’t already know this.
    FlagShare
    4PaulJohnTerryTonyLikeReply
    Avatar for swagman
    swagman
    7 minutes ago

    Davo… replace “Turnbull” with ‘all of the liberals ‘ and you’re onto something …
    FlagShare
    LikeReply
    Avatar for swagman
    swagman
    36 minutes ago

    Conservative political suicide has been achieved ….

    Now bring on the election so we can have the burial…

    then recommence governing and advancing Australia…. ( whilst the conservatives inevitably split, as the small L moderate liberals and the hard-right, religious , social-engineering conservatives, lead by Abbott, can never again co-exist) ….

    Morrison is but a ‘band-aid’ on a terminal wound…
    FlagShare
    3TonyDarylDebLikeReply
    Avatar for Deb
    Deb
    31 minutes ago

    They stopped parliament to continue their fighting! They haven’t done their job for some time because of the infighting.

    It will be a glorious day when Labor wins the election and wet rid ourselves off these ineffectual lying bunglers.
    FlagShare
    1swagmanLikeReply
    Avatar for Geoff
    Geoff
    56 minutes ago

    I’m sure Brendon Nelson and Tony Abbott would not see Turnbull in the light you paint him in.

    Abbott didn’t go around leaking to the press, he was upfront with his views on policies.

    He wasn’t captured by the delusional ABC as your mate was/is.

    In 1990 he sat in Richo’s office begging to become a Labor Senator… any path to power.

    And do not forget 38 Newspolls.

    Good riddance.
    FlagShare
    13PaulTerryJohnTonyLikeReply
    Avatar for Philippe
    Philippe
    1 hour ago

    Mon Dieu, Miranda! I was a follower for years of your columns… you coined the word “delusional” butit now applies to you… take your blinkers down…
    FlagShare
    11TerryTonyPeterThirdWorldHereWeComeLikeReply
    Avatar for Michael
    Michael
    2 hours ago

    Only a fool would think this is over. The war is between the conservatives and the rest of the party. They might have been vanquished BUT they will regroup and learn from their mistakes whilst a weak leadership will talk unity, as those before have done. There will be no moving forward whilst half the party wants to go back.
    FlagShare
    7JohnTonyDarylThirdWorldHereWeComeLikeReply
    Avatar for John
    John
    51 minutes ago

    @Michael The war in Labor is just below the surface for now.It was only weeks ago that Albo was plotting to challenge the mendacious Shorten if any of the bi elections fell short.The Libs will heal from here,where Labor wont.

    TJ
    FlagShare
    5PeterWendyJPhilRobertLikeReply
    Avatar for Deb
    Deb
    41 minutes ago

    John, it was the media and the coalition that made that up. It’s all BS but you have to raise it because you think it makes your lot look a bit better. It doesn’t and anyone with half a brain knows it’s BS.

    After a week of absolutely appalling behavior from your side where they even cancelled parliament to continue their argument, you say they’ll heal and labor won’t?

    Totally deluded.

    Try again.
    FlagShare
    1DarylLikeReply
    Avatar for Francis
    Francis
    2 hours ago

    I know one person who will not be speaking to the new PM – Ray Hadley
    FlagShare
    4JohnPeterDarylRobertLikeReply
    Avatar for Pamela
    Pamela
    17 minutes ago

    Dutton won’t be either because he will lose his seat
    FlagShare
    LikeReply
    Avatar for Deborah
    Deborah
    3 hours ago

    Morrison is just an MT clone and waffler as well- and Josh facing the “greening” of his own electorate and master of the NEG will not change the direction of the party at all. Same old same old- Shorten must be delighted.
    FlagShare
    10JohnTonyPeterChrisLikeReply
    Avatar for Deb
    Deb
    33 minutes ago

    It would’ve been a cakewalk if Dutton was PM, but after the antics of this week, it’ll be an easy task to roll this godawful govt.
    FlagShare
    2TonyDarylLikeReply
    Avatar for Alastair
    Alastair
    3 hours ago

    Remember, we still have to pay this millionaire, egotistical, cry-baby destroyer of a Government, an extortionate amount of pension funds, travel allowance and all of the perks that the average retiree does not get, or has to suffer an assessment to get basics.

    So we have to give Turdbull thanks and support for his betrayal of our Country. SHAME !!!!!!!
    FlagShare
    6JohnTonyThirdWorldHereWeComeRobertLikeReply
    Avatar for Keeping the Whigs Honest
    Keeping the Whigs Honest
    48 minutes ago

    I’d anticipate the only benefactor of these payments you are so against will be Turnbulls favourite charities, just as they were throughout his time as PM.

    Your hatred should be directed elsewhere…
    FlagShare
    3JeffreyJohnPhilLikeReply
    Avatar for John
    John
    37 minutes ago

    @Alastair What betrayal of the country are you talking about?Turnbull worked hard for Australia.Its Bill Shorten who will destroy it.Perhaps if you made up your own mind via analysis instead of listening to Jones and Bolt you would come to a different conclusion.

    TJ
    FlagShare
    1JeffreyLikeReply
    Avatar for Peter
    Peter
    7 hours ago

    Miranda surely you are joking to suggest that Turnbull handled his exit with grace. A more bilious, disgraceful and arrogant press conference could not have been scripted. Once more Turnbull chose to blame everyone bar himself for his downfall. The man was a fool from start to finish and shares along with Kevin Rudd the mantle of being the most self-centred PM in this country’s history. I for one am glad he’s gone.
    FlagShare

  71. Anthony

    Turnbull scored his revenge in true islamic terrorist style: He blew himself up. Blown to pieces like a dead pussycat.

  72. OldOzzie

    Peter Dutton win ‘would have hurt One Nation’ – Geoff Chambers
    CANBERRA BUREAU CHIEF

    A Peter Dutton-led Coalition government would have peeled votes away from Pauline Hanson’s One Nation and put him in a position to hold on to his marginal Queensland seat of Dickson, according to an exclusive Newspoll.

    A Newspoll conducted for The Weekend Australian, based on 1764 voters across the evenings of Aug­ust 22 and 23, revealed Mr Dutton would have increased his primary vote by five points if he were Liberal Party leader.

    But the poll showed that the ­attacks launched by Labor and Malcolm Turnbull questioning Mr Dutton’s constitutional eligibility had an immediate impact on support in Dickson. After the section 44 saga was played out in parliament on Wednesday, Mr Dutton’s primary vote peaked at 43 per cent if he was leader, but only 38 per cent with Mr Turnbull as leader.

    On a two-party-preferred basis, based on the first night of polling on August 22, the former home ­affairs minister would have been deadlocked with Labor at 50-50, even with Mr Turnbull as leader. But as leader, Mr Dutton would have edged Labor 51-49 per cent, with One Nation’s primary vote plunging from 10 per cent under Mr Turnbull to 4 per cent if the Queensland MP led the Coalition.

    Following the fallout of the section 44 allegations, and after two days of polling, Mr Dutton’s two-party-preferred support fell to 50-50 as leader but blew out to 52-48 behind, under a Turnbull leadership. The Newspoll results support Liberal National Party claims that the ­Coalition under Mr Turnbull’s leadership would have sparked a statewide wipe-out

    Yesterday’s leadership spill was partly triggered by the government’s performance in the Longman by-election on July 28. The seat, adjacent to Dickson, was held by the LNP before Labor won it back at the 2016 federal election, following a backlash against former Turnbull-ally Wyatt Roy.

    Mr Turnbull campaigned in Longman with LNP candidate Trevor Ruthenberg, who was plagued by scandal in the final days of the campaign. Mr Ruth­en­berg’s primary vote was only 29.6 per cent, with One Nation claiming almost 16 per cent of the first-preference vote.

    Labor’s Susan Lamb comfortably retained the seat with a primary vote of almost 40 per cent.

    The Longman result sent shockwaves through the LNP and sparked Mr Dutton’s failed run for the prime ministership.

    LNP president Gary Spence, who had lobbied in support of Mr Dutton, yesterday circulated a ­letter to members outlining the party’s concerns ahead of the next federal election.

    “We all know the public is frustrated with the mainstream political parties and believes its concerns are not being listened to. The inevitable consequence, more so in Queensland than elsewhere, has been a drift to minor parties that promise much but deliver nothing,” he wrote.

    “We saw the results in Longman where our primary vote crumbled in what was pitched as a ‘contest of leadership between the Prime Minister and Bill Shorten’.

    “The voters spoke and declared their position on the issue.”

    YouGov Galaxy managing ­director David Briggs, who conducted the Newspoll, said Mr Dutton had always retained strong support from One Nation voters, according to previous surveys.

    He said Mr Dutton’s ability to pick up One Nation primary votes would have been viewed positively by Queensland MPs facing challenges in their marginal seats.

    He said the challenge for Mr Dutton, who has come under huge pressure from the unions and GetUp! in recent campaigns, ­remained the head-to-head contest with Labor.

  73. Twostix

    Is there any evidence the coup was an Abbott months long conspiracy with Dutton his mere puppet?

    It seemed an open shut revolt against Turnbull working with Labor to secretly implement the paris thing.

    They know its 2009 all over again but they’re ready for Abbott this time they think to themselves.

  74. stackja

    A daggy dad who is up for the fight
    Sharri Markson, National Political Editor, The Daily Telegraph
    21 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    SCOTT Morrison follows Paul Keating and John Howard as treasurers elevated to the office of prime minister.

    And like Howard, Morrison is the epitome of middle-Australia — it doesn’t get more suburban than the Shire.

    He’s a daggy dad. He loves his footy team, the Sharks.

    He eats meat pies — not with a knife and fork — and has his mates over for a barbecue. He’s a cultural warrior, a social conservative who opposed same-sex marriage and is not afraid to stick it to the leftie-luvvies at the ABC. One of the government’s most experienced politicians, his track record includes the border protection crackdown. And, as treasurer, he has put the economy back on track to an early surplus.

    Morrison will be a prime minister of conviction.

    While Malcolm Turnbull struggled to appease the conservatives, Morrison actually is one. If conservatives dislike him it’s because of his perceived disloyalty to Tony Abbott — not because he abandoned any of his core beliefs or values. This is the man who took a lump of coal into Parliament and is a Pentecostal Christian.

    He can sell a message in simple terms people can understand. He does not aspire to be liked by all sectors, and he can take the fight to Bill Shorten.

  75. stackja

    Liberal leadership 2018: New Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s olive branch to Peter Dutton
    EDITOR ON DUTY: Staff writer
    40 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    NEW Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to offer his rival Peter Dutton a frontbench position in his new cabinet, after the Liberal leadership shake-up.

    Mr Dutton vacated the home affairs portfolio to make his run against now-former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull for the party’s top job.

    Mr Morrison said he would head a “new generation of Liberal leadership”.

    Meantime, the Liberals face weeks of rebuilding after the infighting which has resulted in the toppling of Malcolm Turnbull and elevation of Mr Morrison as prime minister.

    Mr Morrison and his new deputy and treasurer Josh Frydenberg were adamant they remained loyal to Mr Turnbull through the tumultuous week, while colleagues campaigned for failed leadership contender Peter Dutton.

    Mr Turnbull blamed Mr Dutton, former leader Tony Abbott and other Liberal “insurgents” for the destabilisation of the party.

    It was especially galling as the coalition was narrowing the gap with Labor in internal polling until the navel gazing began.

    Mr Morrison may be in for an early electoral test with Mr Turnbull’s retirement expected to trigger a by-election in the Sydney seat of Wentworth.

    However he said he relished the chance to campaign on his new theme of being “on your side”, referring to voters disgruntled over the recent political circus. He said not to expect a general election until it is due in the first half of 2019.

  76. mh

    David Leyonhjelm giving a good reference for Scott Morrison as far as a cooperative working relationship.

  77. stackja

    Twostix
    #2800872, posted on August 25, 2018 at 7:46 am

    MT just showed his agile innovation.

  78. Shy Ted

    Iconic TV show Bewitched gets an inter-racial ABC reboot with witch Samantha re-created as a black single mom married to ‘white slacker’ Darren
    Probably be renamed WeBitched. Can’t wait to see African-American Samantha wiggle her pretty little nose

  79. Twostix

    Sky is being attacked because bolt published the NEG that Turnbull sent to Labor before his own party on his blog and went to town on his show.

    That is why this all happened.

    The worry is that the media all knew what Turnbull was doing (secretly working with labor to give our energy policy to the UN) and were going to go along with it and keep it quiet because they are ideolgical lunatics who agree that should happen, in secret.

    Enemies of the people.

  80. stackja

    Anthony
    #2800869, posted on August 25, 2018 at 7:43 am
    Turnbull scored his revenge in true islamic terrorist style: He blew himself up. Blown to pieces like a dead pussycat.

    As someone here posted. MT suicided twice.

  81. H B Bear

    Martin Parkinson, good little NAZI, just following orders.

  82. stackja

    Twostix
    #2800883, posted on August 25, 2018 at 7:54 am

    ALP and MSM go a long way back.

  83. Farmer Gez

    Chris Uhlmann has been in the spotlight after he accused News Corp newspapers, including The Australian, and broadcasters Sky News and 2GB of plotting to bring down Malcolm Turnbull’s prime ministership. After his comments went viral, Uhlmann was selected as one of the few journalists ­allowed to ask Mr Turnbull a question at his last press conference as prime minister.

    Uhlmann is shitty with SKY since his move to Nine that has seen his profile plummet without the taxpayer funded mega pulpit that the ABC gave him.
    Old fashioned grafting journo’s are beating him to the story. The attack on SKY is pure spite from a guy who knows his marriage leaves him totally compromised when seeking contact with conservative pollies.
    Gilbert and Speers have his number and he knows it.

  84. stackja

    2GB Hadley blamed by MT camp. Hadley fell out with ScoMo.

  85. Entropy

    We all know the public is frustrated with the mainstream political parties and believes its concerns are not being listened to. The inevitable consequence, more so in Queensland than elsewhere, has been a drift to minor parties that promise much but deliver nothing,” he wrote.

    The only thing they promise is to not be liberal or labor. For increasing numbers of people these days, that’ll do.

  86. H B Bear

    The longer this goes the greater the beclownment for Mr Gai Brodtmann. This would never happen to the old Jabba.

  87. Elle

    Sounds like Shari Markson is going to be to Morrison what Miranda Devine was to Turnbull. Vomit.

  88. Shy Ted

    In his first speech after the leadership vote yesterday, Mr Morrison singled out the drought as his most urgent priority. Miracle number 1, we are saved. Malcolm couldn’t make it rain.
    Damn, link not working – http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-25/liberal-mps-tasked-with-reinstating-trust-after-week-of-chaos/10162982

  89. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull
    – Janet Albrechtsen Columnist

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.


    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  90. Bruce of Newcastle

    For a brief moment last year Australia had the Prime Minister it deserved when Malcolm Turnbull stood up to newly elected US President Donald Trump.

    “That was Turnbull’s finest hour,” Australian National University political analyst Dr Norman Abjorensen says.

    ROFLMAO.

    Trump Schadenfreude List adds Australian PM (Don Surber, 24 Aug)

    There are two rules readers should obey in life.

    1.Never bet against Donald John Trump.
    2.Never feud with Donald John Trump.

    Because no one has ever won a bet or a feud with The Donald.

    Malcolm Turnbull, the ex-prime minister of Australia, learned this the hard way.

    Everything was going swimmingly for Turnbull in January 2017. Then this story appeared, “Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull mocks Donald Trump in leaked recording. Australia’s prime minister has poked fun at US President Donald Trump, parodying his mannerisms and citing his ties to Russia, in a tape leaked to the media.

    So we add Turnbull to the Official Trump Schadenfreude List, and congratulate Scott Morrison, who is now the 30th prime minister of Australia.

    Figures that a Turnbull faceplant should be regarded a great victory by an ANU politics academic.

  91. calli

    They’re already flying the idea of Maolcolm being Australia’s first President.

    Watch this space.

  92. stackja

    Shy Ted
    #2800882, posted on August 25, 2018 at 7:54 am
    Iconic TV show Bewitched gets an inter-racial ABC reboot with witch Samantha re-created as a black single mom married to ‘white slacker’ Darren
    Probably be renamed WeBitched. Can’t wait to see African-American Samantha wiggle her pretty little nose

    Endora?

  93. Mak Siccar

    Sorry if this has been posted before. Janet A admits her error of judgement and gives Turdball both barrels.

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull

    JANET ALBRECHTSEN
    COLUMNIST
    12:00AM AUGUST 25, 2018

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  94. mh

    Listening to the ABC, they are pushing the idea to their listeners that President Trump’s impeachment could happen any day now. It simply isn’t going to happen.

  95. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull
    – Janet Albrechtsen Columnist

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.


    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  96. stackja

    shoba
    3 minutes ago

    Hi and welcome to our live coverage of Scott Morrison’s first day as Prime Minister. We’ll be bringing you all the latest updates as they come after one of the most chaotic weeks in Canberra.

    Too young to remember Gough 1975?

  97. stackja

    just now

    8.02AM AEST: TURNBULL TO QUIT NEXT WEEK

    There are reports former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull will resign from parliament as soon as next week. News Corp understands Mr Turnbull will step down and not return to parliament when it resumes next month, triggering a by-election in his Sydney seat of Wentworth.

    There has been speculation Tony Abbott’s sister Christine Forster may contest the electorate.

  98. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull
    – Janet Albrechtsen Columnist

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.


    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    End Part 1

  99. Mak Siccar

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull
    JANET ALBRECHTSEN
    COLUMNIST
    12:00AM AUGUST 25, 2018298 COMMENTS
    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  100. H B Bear

    Being married to Liar politicians is obviously not a problem at their ALPBC. In fact a look across the staff co-op a casual observer might be mistaken for thinking it was a prerequisite. The postcards from the Liars minister and their newsreader on a bicycling tour of Southern France don’t help.

  101. Rafe Champion

    Don’t miss the update to Follow the Money on Unreliables.

  102. OldOzzie

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull- Janet Albrechtsen

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.


    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    End Part 1

  103. Farmer Gez

    ScMo is a bit like opening a present when you’re a kid.
    It’s the right shape…the right weight….bugger a board game!
    “Thanks Mum that’s great”.

  104. Elle

    He’s quitting? Such a sore loser.

  105. stackja

    mh
    #2800901, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:03 am
    Listening to the ABC, they are pushing the idea to their listeners that President Trump’s impeachment could happen any day now. It simply isn’t going to happen.

    Nixon could have done a Andrew Johnson and survived. I don’t see Congress picking a fight with DT. MSM deluded. Is Daniel still ABC?

  106. Mak Siccar

    Two attempts to post Janet A’s spray against Turdball have gone to the sin bin.

    JANET ALBRECHTSEN
    COLUMNIST
    12:00AM AUGUST 25, 2018
    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    Etc etc

  107. Entropy

    Shy Ted
    #2800894, posted on August 25, 2018 at 7:59 am
    In his first speech after the leadership vote yesterday, Mr Morrison singled out the drought as his most urgent priority. Miracle number 1, we are saved. Malcolm couldn’t make it rain.

    Labor usually comes to power at the tail end of a big drought:
    See Whitlam 1972, Hawke 1983, Keating 1994, Rudd 2007, Shorten 2019

  108. stackja

    shoba
    3 minutes ago

    8.05AM AEST: SCOMO TO SPEND WEEKEND CHOOSING CABINET

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison is set to spend the weekend deciding who will be in his new Cabinet. His challenge is creating unity within the Liberal Party and last night was warned by senior Liberal sources that Peter Dutton’s backers will expect more conservative MPs to be included. Mr Morrison has offered his challengers Julie Bishop and Peter Dutton the option to come back but their roles are not clear.

    However, it is understood that former prime minister Tony Abbott will not be given a role in Cabinet.

    So TA can continue the fight.

  109. OldOzzie

    If any other Cat can work out how to do it, I have been trying to post
    Janet Albrechtsen – I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull but it just disaooears

    cannot see any forbidden words but it won’t post but is worth a read – can anyone else post it?

  110. Bruce of Newcastle

    However, it is understood that former prime minister Tony Abbott will not be given a role in Cabinet.

    That was my test for ScoMo.
    He just failed.

  111. mh

    All the Democrats have to offer is ‘Impeach Trump’. They have absolutely nothing else in the cupboard.

    No record, no ideas, no patriotism. Nothing.

  112. Leigh Lowe

    Anthony

    #2800869, posted on August 25, 2018 at 7:43 am

    Turnbull scored his revenge in true islamic terrorist style: He blew himself up.

    Using the same carefully restored suicide vest he used in 2009.

  113. Snoopy

    The upside of Dutton being pipped by Morrison is that it be Morrison that disappoints us first.

  114. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2800917, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:13 am
    If any other Cat can work out how to do it, I have been

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull
    Malcolm Turnbull’s ‘Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down’. Picture: Ray Strange
    Malcolm Turnbull’s ‘Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down’. Picture: Ray Strange
    JANET ALBRECHTSEN
    12:00AM AUGUST 25, 2018328
    Facebook
    Twitter
    Email
    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  115. calli

    Ozzie, have you checked the URL? It may have one of the birdwords in it.

  116. stackja

    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull
    Malcolm Turnbull’s ‘Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down’.

  117. mh

    Mr Morrison has offered his challengers Julie Bishop and Peter Dutton the option to come back but their roles are not clear.

    A bit disingenuous describing them as Morrison’s challengers. All 3 put their hand up for the vacant position.

  118. C.L.

    The campaign begins today: to destroy Morrison/Frydenberg.
    They have to go.

  119. stackja

    Mr Turnbull, you said people must be held accountable. At a lunchtime press conference on a tumul­tuous day in Canberra, you demanded they nail their names to the mast. Let me go first, my name on the mast. I was entirely wrong about your abilities.

    Fourteen years ago, I wrote that the Liberal Party should be a broad enough church for a bloke like you, articulate and smart with your free-market instincts and successful career. The Quadrant crowd looked askance at me for years, they thought me naive or stupid, or both. I stared the nay-sayers down, convinced that you were smart enough to put aside your historical ego and narcissism in exchange for the privilege of being prime minister of Australia.

    In 2015 I thought you would do a better job than Tony Abbott as prime minister. Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base. Abbott didn’t govern as the team player or the Liberal that many of his supporters thought he would. He seemed to be a nervous PM, ignoring advice from the most senior Liberals who had his best interests and the country’s future at heart.

    Three years on, you have proven me wrong.

  120. stackja

    Your turn now, Mr Turnbull. Care to hold yourself to the same standards as you have asked of others? In the spirit of being held to account, let me help you grasp how you hit rock bottom.

    You never intended to run a broad church as Liberal prime minister. You tried to appropriate the mantle of Menzies when the ego of Whitlam suits you better. As prime minister, you promised to provide economic leadership. But you failed to tell a good story, even though there is a decent economic story to relay. Your retail political skills are woeful. It doesn’t help that your cabinet fan club is the weakest link. This week, minister for dark arts Christopher Pyne asked MPs to act in the best interests of the party. He is a clown, insulting our intelligence. Marise Payne barely says boo and Simon Birmingham managed to incense the Catholic education system where so many conservative ­voters are found.

    All those early thought bubbles were a sign of a man out of his political and policy depth. Raising the GST? Dealing with negative gearing? They went nowhere fast. Remember your “big idea”? You said you had been working on it for some time: to give states the ability to levy income tax. That bubble burst in less than 48 hours. Your superannuation changes were a betrayal of good Australians who saved for their retirement.

  121. stackja

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

  122. stackja

    Then that election in 2016. It was a tediously long eight-week campaign that even you refused to join on occasion. You didn’t see “Mediscare” coming despite being warned by smart operatives about the magnitude of the threat. You knew better. Your “jobs and growth” mantra didn’t have a verb to explain how you would get there. But you knew better. And your excited talk of innovation and agility during that campaign scared the bejesus out of voters who feared they would lose their jobs. You knew better there, too.

  123. stackja

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister. Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

  124. stackja

    To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister.

  125. stackja

    Not about politics, anyway. You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt.

  126. stackja

    Instead there was that awful sulking on election night in 2016. I was at the hotel in Sydney where your faithful and weary supporters waited and waited to hear from you. Remember that night? The one you almost refused to attend because you were at home choking on sour grapes. I left 10 minutes before you arrived, telling a senior Liberal it wasn’t worth waiting for your filthy mood. The senior Liberal rolled his eyes and said he too wished he could escape that. Then you arrived, and with clenched fists delivered an angry spray, not once mentioning the good MPs who lost their jobs that night or the voters you let down. If we must be held accountable, then that history is yours to own.

    Don’t forget the way you turned citizenship problems into a circus. You confected rage over imaginary witch-hunts and had to be dragged kicking and screaming to deal with this, as you dragged your feet over MP entitlements.

    Now for the past week. In the spirit of being accountable, how do you account for your dying days in politics, the tricky tactics and delusion? You shut down parliament on Thursday rather than face up to the mess of the Turnbull government. The government had your name on it; the buck stopped with you. Abbott didn’t cause this, he exploited a weakness: you.

    Blaming your travails on bullies inside and outside the party was comic, given the behaviour of your shrinking band of supporters. Ask them about their bullying of MPs who had lost faith in you. And did you really think the entire media would be ABC-like in grovelling for your plans to transform the Liberal Party into the Turnbull Party? John Howard coped with critics in the media. So did Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard. Every politician does. It happens in a democracy with an independent and curious press. This is not Russia and you are not Vladimir Putin.

    How is this being-held-to-account jig going so far? On Thursday you also tried to transform a secret ballot into an open one, demanding 43 names on a letter before you would call a partyroom meeting. You said these were momentous times and people must be held accountable. Momentous? Not really. The revolving door to your office has been in perfect working order for a decade. And your absurd new rule was sad and embarrassing. Did you think we wouldn’t notice the delaying tactic or how this rule allowed your bullies to chase down people by name? When you challenged Abbott for the top job, the letter to Abbott had 20 names. You couldn’t fight fair, Mr Turnbull.

    You tried to nobble your challenger with a constitutional argument that you didn’t raise until Peter Dutton signalled he would be a better leader. Can you really be such a poor loser? Resigning from a one-seat majority government is a final “f..k you” to a party that made you prime minister.

    Are you going to hold yourself to account for this? It is almost a decade since you took the leadership from Brendan Nelson on September 16, 2008. Looking back, the decline of the Liberal Party and Australian politics, with the repeated sacking of leaders on both sides, accelerated under your ego.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    You cannot work out that greatness comes from both humility and confidence, each needed at different points in the performance cycle. You said once you didn’t know what humility meant. You told a friend you wanted to be prime minister by the age of 40. When he asked “For which party?”, you said it didn’t matter.

    Your Rudd-level narcissism means you are headed the same way, into political oblivion, bridges burned, a political party in disarray and a country let down. Yes, people should be held to account.

  127. Infidel Tiger

    Just making my sure – Turnbull is not PM right?

    A beautiful day!

  128. OldOzzie

    Thanks Stackja

    calli
    #2800925, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:19 am

    Ozzie, have you checked the URL? It may have one of the birdwords in

    Yes tried it without the url and did try 2 parts – Stackja’s 3 Parts worked obviously

  129. a happy little debunker

    Betcha, pennies to a pound of poo, Turnbull’s price to Morrison (to stay for just a while longer) – is that Morrison does not elevate Abbott to the front bench.

  130. stackja

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2800936, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:26 am
    I was wrong to support you three years ago, Mr Turnbull

    Yes.
    After: “To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister.” Triggers some filter.

  131. Cassie of Sydney

    I have to say that it is soooo nice to wake up and know that Malturd is no longer PM of this country.

  132. I am the Walras, Equilibrate, and Price-Take

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2800918, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:13 am
    However, it is understood that former prime minister Tony Abbott will not be given a role in Cabinet.

    That was my test for ScoMo.
    He just failed.

    The Reversed Undies.

    All you have to remember.

  133. calli

    Thanks, Stacks. I tried to post it too – it broke the blog. 😀It’s a spray all right. And truth.

    Those who know you well, away from the cameras, know that you share much in common with Rudd and Gough Whitlam. All the bad stuff. But more Rudd than Whitlam, who remained an icon of Labor. Who was it that said of Rudd that those who knew him couldn’t bear him; only those who didn’t know him would vote for him? Rudd and Whitlam are in the history books for winning elections from opposition. Your legacy is the rise and rise of Bill Shorten, a man of no substance.

    I hope Janet doesn’t own a moggie.

  134. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2800940, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:27 am

    After: “To steal a line from a sassy girl in Game of Thrones, you know nothing, prime minister.” Triggers some filter. Leaving it out worked. Mystery!

  135. calli

    Here’s the offending para:

    You can quote Thucydides or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a mangy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Surely it isn’t the Greek? 🙂

  136. calli

    Here’s the offending para:

    You can quote Th…… or some such ancient philosopher during a morning paddle on Sydney Harbour with visiting dignitaries, but your tin ear in politics is settled beyond a doubt. On that note, you still haven’t taken responsibility for turning a government with a 14-seat buffer into a m-ngy rump with a one-seat majority.

    Surely it isn’t the Greek? 🙂

  137. OldOzzie

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2800918, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:13 am

    However, it is understood that former prime minister Tony Abbott will not be given a role in Cabinet.


    That was my test for ScoMo.
    He just failed.

    +1 Morrison has failed at the 1st Hurdle

    He is definitely Turdbull’s Lackey and show his Pettiness by continuing Turdbull’s Pettiness – obviously Osmosis at work as shown by his incompetence under Turnbull as against how he shone under Tony Abbott.

    If ScoMo keeps Martin Parkinson (Lucy;s Best Mate) who Tony Abbott sacked, but was re-instated by Turdnull, then ScoMo is Dead Man Walking

  138. calli

    Lol. It’s either Greek historians or doggy skin diseases.

    Who knew? 😄

  139. stackja

    calli
    #2800945, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:29 am

    I remember the relative calmness of Menzies. Of course, Evatt was the gift that kept giving. I believe the Liberals have never recovered from the loss of Holt. Whether Gough could have won against Holt we will never know.

  140. stackja

    shoba
    6 minutes ago

    8.28AM AEST: DUTTON AS PM WOULD’VE HURT ONE NATION

    An exclusive Newspoll for The Weekend Australian today reports that if Peter Dutton was Prime Minister, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation would have lost votes – leaving him to retain his marginal Queensland seat of Dickson.

    More than 1700 voters across the evenings of Aug­ust 22 and 23 were polled and it showed Mr Dutton would have increased his primary vote by five points.

    But the poll also showed that the ­attacks on his eligibility to sit in Parliament had impact on voter support in Dickson. Mr Dutton’s primary vote peaked at 43 per cent if he was leader, but only 38 per cent with Mr Turnbull as leader.

  141. Farmer Gez

    Labor usually comes to power at the tail end of a big drought:
    See Whitlam 1972, Hawke 1983, Keating 1994, Rudd 2007, Shorten 2019

    Nearly right Entropy except Keating won in 93 and brought on a big drought in 94.
    That prick sucked the juice out of everything.

  142. calli

    Agreed, Cassie. I had a spring in my step on the walk this morning.

    Won’t last of course. Disappointment awaits.

  143. Infidel Tiger

    Turnbull is dead.

    Put out your cats.

  144. stackja

    calli
    #2800948, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:35 am

    Thucydides

  145. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #2800939, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:27 am

    Just making my sure – Turnbull is not PM right?

    A beautiful day!

    This morning there was a certain lightness in the air as the first rays of the sun touched the golden daffodil petals, ushering in the first day in the Post Potential Greatness epoch.
    (Apologies to Elizabeth Ferrally)

  146. Baldrick

    Frydenberg voted for Turnbull but had pledged his vote to Dutton in a second ballot. This didn’t come to pass. Sometime between Tuesday and Thursday, a deal was believed to have been done for Frydenberg to become Morrison’s deputy if he won.

    But apparently Josh had his hands tied, according to the LNP hack …

    LNP insider
    #2800122, posted on August 24, 2018 at 3:19 pm
    I know there is alot if anti Frydenberg sentiment here, but only to be fair to him I will point out he had his hands tied by Turnbull on delivering within a certain policy parameter. He was on a short leash.
    Plus putting energy and environment together is a deliberate ploy to fuck hom by Turnbull.
    Josh could redeem himself.

  147. From AoSHQ

    Some wag has put together a short vid of Sarah Sanders mocking the press.

    http://acecomments.mu.nu/?post=376738

  148. stackja

    calli
    #2800950, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:36 am
    Lol. It’s either Greek historians or doggy skin diseases.

    Who knew? 😄

    The Greek. Th..

  149. Infidel Tiger

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2800918, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:13 am
    However, it is understood that former prime minister Tony Abbott will not be given a role in Cabinet.

    He would have promised that to Turnbull.

    Abbott would never accept it either. They haven’t spoken for 3 years.

    Any way, being a cabinet minister for 3 months would suck. All work, no reward.

  150. Infidel Tiger

    #2800939, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:27 am

    Just making my sure – Turnbull is not PM right?

    A beautiful day!

    Wonderful news.

  151. md

    Essential viewing: Fox opinion piece on Comey and Mueller:

    http://video.foxnews.com/v/5821221630001/

  152. calli

    mangy rump

    We can do without those dodgy ancient historians, but how can we survive without evocative insults?

    Hang your heads in shame you banner Spartans.

  153. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Donald J. Trump

    Verified account

    @realDonaldTrump
    Follow Follow @realDonaldTrump
    More
    “Department of Justice will not be improperly influenced by political considerations.” Jeff, this is GREAT, what everyone wants, so look into all of the corruption on the “other side” including deleted Emails, Comey lies & leaks, Mueller conflicts, McCabe, Strzok, Page, Ohr……
    ….FISA abuse, Christopher Steele & his phony and corrupt Dossier, the Clinton Foundation, illegal surveillance of Trump Campaign, Russian collusion by Dems – and so much more. Open up the papers & documents without redaction? Come on Jeff, you can do it, the country is waiting!

  154. Who is PM?

    A sock full of cookie dough apparently

  155. Infidel Tiger

    posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:45 am
    Who is PM?

    Shorten. They are just taking a while to swear him in.

    Remember last month the media telling us Shorty was in trouble and Malmentum was surging? Bwahahaha!

  156. Geriatric Mayfly

    a Frenchwoman stuck her washing in my financially reserved dryer and proceeded to use up my minutes just as I arrived to take out my

    My neighbour recounts her recent cruise where several people were put off the ship in Perth after warfare in the ship’s laundry.

  157. H B Bear

    The best wander down memory lane is Blot’s short piece written the day after Waffleworth knifed Abbott from a day or two ago. Spot on, word perfect and exactly the way it played out.

    Waffleworth, like KRudd, were both complete narcissists. Utterly defective individuals who fell straight from the pages of the DSM IV handbook. The real question is how they both rose to lead their respective branches of the UniParty? The answer there, for me at least, is the nature of the “professional” politician (read party hack) whose life experience rarely features any sort of life experience outside the artificial confines of Parliament House and ministerial offices. In such an environment the sort of treachery and tactics, such as that displayed by Waffleworth over the last few days, is mistaken for smarts.

  158. Not what I meant Carpe.
    Morrison’s nickname must “Who” because everybody I have told that Morrison is PM says “Who”

  159. Elle

    From my home in the eastern suburbs of Sydney I can hear wailing. 😭

  160. Dave in Marybrook

    Even last night, Mal was telling the gathered faithful that Malmentum was gaining. “Within striking distance” I think he said.
    They swallowed it whole.

  161. OldOzzie

    Thamks Carpe Jugulum
    #2800961, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:42 am

    From AoSHQ

    Some wag has put together a short vid of Sarah Sanders mocking the press.

    http://acecomments.mu.nu/?post=376738

    That was Fun – Sums up Press Journalists well

  162. Cassie of Sydney

    “stackja
    #2800953, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:38 am
    shoba
    6 minutes ago

    8.28AM AEST: DUTTON AS PM WOULD’VE HURT ONE NATION”

    Well of course he would’ve! And that’s precisely why the Turd stalled the vote till yesterday and why ScoMo the Clown will not change anything. Dutton would’ve made changes on immigration and energy and he would have been able to lure back a lot of the base in QLD…….you know…the base that the Turd despised…….the electorates where the Turd couldn’t be bothered campaigning because he was too busy fellating the ABC and inner city Labor voters and whilst I am on that note……did anyone else notice, at his last press conference yesterday, the Turd’s continued fellating of ABC and Guardian journos whilst mostly ignoring News Limited journos? Way to go Liberals, that’s the cretin you installed as PM almost three years ago. Aren’t you proud? FMD! Anyway, the Libs are completely toast under the Clown coz the Clown made a deal with the Turd and that grotesque fool called Photios and that means NOTHING will change. I need to go and live on another planet.

  163. calli

    My neighbour recounts her recent cruise where several people were put off the ship in Perth after warfare in the ship’s laundry.

    Fantastic! We’re on the Queen Lizzie next year and it was so heavily subscribed that the only room we could get was near one of the laundries. I must remember to pack 🍿.

  164. stackja

    incoherent rambler
    #2800974, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:49 am
    Not what I meant Carpe.
    Morrison’s nickname must “Who” because everybody I have told that Morrison is PM says “Who”

    “Who’s on first”

  165. stackja

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2800981, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:55 am

    Yes!

  166. Caveman

    ScoMo is MT’s ied, its triggered when MT resigns from parliament.

    He couldnt risk a ScoMo fluking a win as new PM.

  167. Entropy

    Gez, here is a better presentation of how Australi’s climate works, goes back a bit further than suits the Bureau.

  168. lotocoti

    Who is PM?

    You can be, if you’re interested in a short term, gig only contract.

  169. Cassie of Sydney

    “Elle
    #2800975, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:50 am
    From my home in the eastern suburbs of Sydney I can hear wailing.”

    Hiya Elle, I am in the eastern suburbs of Sydney and I hope you can hear my shouts of joy.

  170. stackja

    2GB sound bite: ACCI disappointed no NEG.

  171. stackja

    Entropy
    #2800987, posted on August 25, 2018 at 9:00 am

    Yes. Long Paddock.

  172. Not Uh oh

    Has Morrison had his first adverse Newspoll yet?

  173. Farmer Gez

    Gez, here is a better presentation of how Australi’s climate works, goes back a bit further than suits the Bureau.

    The interesting thing about the drought maps is that while there are large general droughts, regional droughts can be just as bad. Sometimes the SE can be delinked from Northern Australia. WA does their own thing entirely. From memory WA had a fair year in 1982 when everywhere else was a desert.

  174. OldOzzie

    stackja
    #2800983, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:57 am

    incoherent rambler
    #2800974, posted on August 25, 2018 at 8:49 am
    Not what I meant Carpe.
    Morrison’s nickname must “Who” because everybody I have told that Morrison is PM says “Who”

    “Who’s on first”

    “What’s on Second”

  175. stackja

    On 2GB Cory this morning.

  176. stackja

    During the 1870s and 1880s the economy was booming, but a severe drought lasting four years from 1890 crippled the economy, resulting in widespread unemployment, poverty and industrial strikes.

  177. Entropy

    NW WA has geernally had I prving conditions the last half century. I wonder if the cycle will kick back the other way eventually.

  178. Gab

    Now we can we get our incandescent light globes back? If Morrison does this, he’ll win the next election. Believe me.

  179. stackja

    2GB G&P, ScoMo MT lite’?

  180. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2800999, posted on August 25, 2018 at 9:07 am

    Yes!

    I DON’T GIVE A DARN!

  181. Baldrick

    Has Morrison had his first adverse Newspoll yet?

    He’ll likely get a bounce in his first couple of Newspolls but once the cheering subsides and the reality sets in that he and Frythemburgers are just Turnbull-Lite, the gnashing of teeth will start again.

  182. Aaron

    I see the Bittered Sav is still pumping Turnbull’s tyres in The Australian this morning praising his skills as a political assassin. Hopefully her husband is out on his arse this morning but unlikely under SloMo.

  183. “Fscked if I know” as his deputy.

    Seriously which country would have a fast food menu entry as deputy PM?

  184. stackja

    Baldrick
    #2801008, posted on August 25, 2018 at 9:14 am

    2GB listener MT.2

  185. John Constantine

    Imagine the revenge.

    Shabby mcstabface frankenbishop keeps foreign minister chaos butterfly signing rights.

    Go off like saruman purging the Shire, it will.

  186. Philippa Martyr

    Turnbull is dead.

    Put out your cats.

    Sings: ‘A whole new worrrld …’ (Aladdin)

  187. cuckoo

    SBS were dutifully following the Democrat media in attacking Trump for daring to mention the killing of white farmers in South Africa. In her best ‘nyah nyah’ voice Prue Lewan (?) declared Trump is wrong yet again because – wait for it – killings of white famers are at a twenty year low and only 47 white farmers were killed last year. So there. What would she say if 47 journalists had been murdered in South Africa last year? Do these people ever listen to themselves?

  188. John Constantine

    The new cutting decks, with end delivery belts available for modern combine harvesters change fried out crop salvage options.

    High sheep prices underpin high hay prices.

    Not having to rake thin hay over clods means a big acreage is potential hay salvage.

    Can ninety feet of windrow , from two passes in opposite directions make enough bulk to feed a baler?.

  189. Infidel Tiger

    BREAKING: Nikki Savva writes crazed column blaming everyone but Malcolm.

  190. calli

    Shabby mcstabface frankenbishop keeps foreign minister chaos butterfly signing rights.

    Nothing has changed. They have learned absolutely nothing.

    The mangy rump will punish them and send them into oblivion. And they won’t have to lift a finger.

  191. stackja

    Cory: we going backwards.

  192. Infidel Tiger

    Savva believes Julie Bishop is going to be appointed GG.

    We truly are the most corrupt country on earth.

  193. Leigh Lowe

    Standby for “unnamed senior Liberal figures” being quoted in Fewfacts/ABC that the Gillard/Conroy media gag laws need to be dusted off and given a re-run.

  194. Gab

    Turnbull’s not gone. He’s lurking in the shadows of the turbull team. He’s still pulling the strings. I won’t feel safe until he’s completely gone.

  195. calli

    killings of white famers are at a twenty year low and only 47 white farmers were killed last year.

    Did it occur to this clown that as the target diminishes (through death or removal) the numbers must get lower?

  196. H B Bear

    I see the Bittered Sav is still pumping Turnbull’s tyres in The Australian this morning praising his skills as a political assassin.

    Waffleworth has got where he is by dragging people down and insider maaates ticket clipping. It is the one thing he is good at. The Bittered Sav finally has a stopped clock moment.

  197. stackja

    Cory: Senate better government.

  198. The insurgency must continue, brothers. We have won a glorious victory at Waffler’s Ridge. General Malatoo refused to take the field, the Performing Stick was banished, and a puppet, ScoMo, was appointed for the forseeable future. Enjoy your Saturday, but report for duty at 0600.

    Sinistra delenda est.

  199. H B Bear

    Savva believes Julie Bishop is going to be appointed GG.

    Haven’t we already had a peroxided bony crone?

  200. H B Bear

    The Senate is a very major part of the problem.

  201. calli

    Stick Hillary remains, Dover.

    It will take a thermonuclear device to dislodge her.

  202. Entropy

    The mangy rump will punish them and send them into oblivion. And they won’t have to lift a finger.

    Unfortunately, it will be the rebellion that will lose its seats while the Photosian Empire has ensured preselection in safe seats.

  203. Infidel Tiger

    We must never stop owning the libs.

  204. OldOzzie

    Massive retaliation


    The way for President Trump to handle the newly energized collusion investigation by is massive retaliation…

    1. Trump should advocate in public, and then if necessary assert through his authority, that the investigation of the election by Mueller is to be expanded to include all participants and all activities in the campaign without limit.

    Mueller’s new charge would be “to determine whether there were any irregularities of any nature whatsoever in the 2016 campaign from any source whatsoever,” with a special focus and separate report on the violence at Trump rallies. This separate report will include a description of the participants in the violence; their method of organization and transportation; their leadership – including the roles of Robert Creamer and Scott Foval, if any – and how, by how much, and from whom they were financed.

    The point is that Trump doesn’t fire Mueller, but rather, in the interest of justice, expands his remit.

    2. Then the second thing Trump does is to get a special counsel appointed to investigate whether the use by Hillary Clinton as secretary of state of unsecured communications did any damage to the national security and national interests of the United States in any way whatsoever and to prosecute any violations of the law found in the course of that investigation, including any irregularities in past investigations.

    Also investigate how, if at all, the joint income of Hillary and Bill Clinton of $85 million during Hillary Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state was related to her official duties and to prosecute any illegalities therefrom.

    3. Then the third thing Trump does is to get a special counsel appointed to investigate whether the payoffs by Congress to persons charging sexual misconduct by congresspeople were in-kind contributions to their campaigns at any point in time and whether they covered up any crimes by congresspeople and to prosecute those crimes. Also investigate any possible involvement by their associates and families, and prosecute them if involved.

    His argument: These critical issues have been brought to his attention by the investigation of Mueller and, in the case of Secretary Clinton, by his greater understanding of the importance of secrecy in national communications now that he is president. There’s also the importance of probity in office and of not profiting from public service in order to properly serve the public, which is a theme of his administration.

    Massive retaliation. The Republic is at stake.

  205. Mater

    THE TURNBULL COALITION TEAM – THE PLAN FOR A STRONG NEW ECONOMY
    Leader: Scott Morrison

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coalition_(Australia)

    He might think about changing the logo, the name, or both. That said, Turnbull did pay $1.75M for the naming rights.

  206. Fleeced

    Morrison is a fat cowardly opportunistic weasel who didn’t have the guts to challenge Turnbull directly but let Dutton do the hard yards.

    Oh, no – he’s much more weasely than that. He’s not merely an opportunist taking advantage of Dutton – he set it all up. This was his game. You can bank on it. Here’s how he got preselection in the first place.

    In the first round, he voted against the spill. “So, he was prepared to stick with Turnbull?”, you ask. No – he already knew there were 43 names, remember? BEcause of the list? So he could afford to keep his hands clean and be all loyal. Hell, I’m starting to think a lot of Turnbull’s demands were actually ScoMo’s idea. People say Turnbull is Machiavellian, but his is more the old-fashioned mob-style arm-twisting approach. ScoMo, on the other hand…

    That said, he could still pull it off with the right policies (unlikely, but possible – and if he’s the schemer I think he is, possible at better odds than people think).

  207. stackja

    Liberal spill 2018: How ‘Fixer’ Christopher Pyne played key role in coup to elect Scott Morrison
    INSIDE THE COUP, Matt Smith, Paul Starick, The Advertiser
    August 24, 2018 7:14pm
    Subscriber only

    As reports flowed that Mr Dutton was preparing a challenge — despite earlier pledging his support for the PM — Mr Turnbull and his allies, including key lieutenant SA MP Christopher Pyne, attempted to wrong-foot opponents and called a party room meeting.

    Mr Turnbull’s inner sanctum, including Mr Pyne, also drew attention to legal advice which cast doubt over Mr Dutton’s eligibility to even sit in parliament due to interests in a child care company.

  208. Infidel Tiger

    Turnbull is dead but this ain’t over… or plan for Pyne:

    “What now? Let me tell you what now. I’ma call a coupla hard, pipe-hittin’ n1ggers, who’ll go to work on the homes here with a pair of pliers and a blow torch. You hear me talkin’, hillbilly boy? I ain’t through with you by a damn sight. I’ma get medieval on your ass.”

  209. C.L.

    The insurgency must continue, brothers. We have won a glorious victory at Waffler’s Ridge. General Malatoo refused to take the field, the Performing Stick was banished, and a puppet, ScoMo, was appointed for the forseeable future. Enjoy your Saturday, but report for duty at 0600.

    Indeed.

  210. Fleeced

    Pyne will still be there… ugh. I really dislike that guy.

    OK. Turnbull gone. Take that win, I guess.

  211. Infidel Tiger

    One day a curious journo will publish a story on Morrison’s preselection.

  212. C.L.

    Turnbull is dead.

    Put out your cats.

    I got it.

  213. All wrong. The threat of Wile E. Trumble taking his box of dynamite into the tunnel was enough to swing 5 votes (maybe 7).
    Little did they know that the lighted match was already in the box.

    Election before Christmas.

    And behold! There was much screaming, wailing and gnashing of teeth by those who had been cast out by their electorate into depths of the no taxpayer funding hell.

  214. calli

    That made my day, bemused. You just know they’re reading SHS’s mind. What a gal.

  215. C.L.

    Michael Cohen’s lawyer apologises for lying:

    When The Post called Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, at the time to confirm the report, he said as an anonymous source that it was accurate.

    But Thursday, Davis, speaking on the record, apologized for confirming something he did not know to be true.

    “I regret that I wasn’t clear enough to The Post. I should have been more clear. I could not independently confirm the information in the CNN story,” he said.

    “I’m sorry that I left that impression. I wasn’t at the meeting. The only person who could confirm that information is my client.”

    Trump wins again.

  216. stackja

    Infidel Tiger
    #2801047, posted on August 25, 2018 at 9:56 am
    One day a curious journo will publish a story on Morrison’s preselection.

    Fleeced
    #2801040, posted on August 25, 2018 at 9:47 am
    Morrison’s preselection.

  217. stackja

    Tasmanian Liberal senators backed losing candidate Peter Dutton
    NICK CLARK, FEDERAL POLITICAL EDITOR, Mercury
    August 24, 2018 10:06pm
    Subscriber only

    THREE Tasmanian Liberal Senators played key roles in Liberal leadership chaos but ultimately backed the losing candidate Peter Dutton, who went down 45-40 to Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

    Eric Abetz, Jonathon Duniam and David Bushby were among the first 15 MPs to sign a petition which forced the party room meeting.

    Senator Richard Colbeck was not one of the 43 MPs to sign the petition.

  218. calli

    Tumbrils oiled and ready, Rambler. Pitchforks sharpened, pitch rags on poles.

    Do you think Arky will have the Model A ready in time? Head up the procession. We could display the loser standing in chains in the dicky seat.

    I’m still working on a suitable use for Greek Fire.

  219. Fleeced

    Those on “The List” can expect a number of hit pieces over the coming years. Not necessarily career ending – but promotion ending. Enough to create a cloud.

    Look, if Libs can pull back from Paris and a bunch of other nonsense, they might even be worth voting for. Can I vote for such vile people? Well, I’m not sure that Shorten is any less vile, but that’s not the point. We’ll see what happens. It might be better to burn it all to the ground, as Cats have been saying for a while.

  220. Arky

    I could not agree more with the pantsless bear.
    The real question is indeed how we keep getting malicious paychos selected to rise through the party ranks:
    ..

    Waffleworth, like KRudd, were both complete narcissists. Utterly defective individuals who fell straight from the pages of the DSM IV handbook. The real question is how they both rose to lead their respective branches of the UniParty? The answer there, for me at least, is the nature of the “professional” politician (read party hack) whose life experience rarely features any sort of life experience outside the artificial confines of Parliament House and ministerial offices. In such an environment the sort of treachery and tactics, such as that displayed by Waffleworth over the last few days, is mistaken for smarts

    ..
    Spot on H.B.

  221. stackja

    2GB question:

    Arthur “Cocky” Calwell, “Two Wongs don’t make a White” remark in Parliament in 1947

  222. Fleeced

    Food for thought: In 1672, a mob of angry Dutch killed and ate their Prime Minister.

  223. Tel

    Abbott, a lethally brilliant opposition leader, flailed about as prime minister. It was tragic to watch a man who grew up politically at the feet of John Howard bunker down in his office, listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base.

    At what point in time (even for 5 minutes) did Turnbull seem like a better alternative based on the criteria of “listening only to one person, flip-flopping over policy and letting down his base” ?

  224. candy

    Morrison is a deceptive character and smart and got the media on side now because he is anti-Abbott. Anti-Abbott is perfection for the Lefties.

    I expect he will take credit for the stopping the boats policy soon, and be acclaimed by the media for it.

  225. calli

    Thanks Fleeced. Greek-style barbecue it is then. PM with rosemary and lemon.

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