This is why Trump won

The AFR have republished the anonymous “Senior White House Official” oped from the New York Times.

This paragraph stood out for me.

This isn’t the work of the so-called deep state. It’s the work of the steady state.

Yes. Indeed. That is why the electorate voted for person whose motto was “drain the swamp”.

SK STEVE KATES ADD-ON – NOT SINCLAIR: I didn’t want to start a second thread on this same topic, but I was going to link to the NYT article in the AFR, but also mention the AFR’s editorial titled, “ScoMo must have a crack at real economic reform”. So let me just note that there is a “resistance” here in Australia as well, some of it in the public service, if you will pardon the expression, and some even within the Liberals’ own party room. The words “economic reform” are a platitude; even the folks in Venezuela began with the promise of “economic reform”. The “resistance” in PDT’s administration are holdovers from Obama, who never once had the economy reach even three percent growth. So let me just add this from Breitbart.

For the first time since those passenger planes hit the World Trade Center 17 long years ago, Trump has at long last returned America to peace and prosperity… Something so rare, no one under the age of 30 even remembers what it’s like.

Well, let me tell you, I remember peace and prosperity, I recognize it when I see it, I see it now, and it is glorious and long overdue and hard-earned, and the guy who deserves the most credit for delivering it — all I can say is God bless his style, and goddamn the hysterics trying to gaslight me into caring about anything other than the substance his style delivers.

I have the same attitude to Scott Morrison. He seems to have the right instincts and would like to do the kinds of things I want done here. But there is resistance at every turn. For all that, he likes coal-driven energy, wants to limit the power of unions, seeks to balance the budget and add momentum to private sector activity by cutting regulations and other artificial impedements. You wouldn’t get any of that from our erstwhile PM and you certainly won’t get it if Labor wins the next election.

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73 Responses to This is why Trump won

  1. Leo G

    The root of the problem is the president’s amorality. Anyone who works with him knows he is not moored to any discernible first principles that guide his decision making.

    Which could refer to the ethical principles involved in a pledge by a senior government official to accept lawful directions from executive government.
    The NYT article is, overall, an obnoxious lie published with an intent to mislead others and to justify grossly unethical conduct.

  2. Tel

    The AFR have republished the anonymous “Senior White House Official” oped from the New York Times.

    You forgot to use their proper title, that’s “Racist New York Times”.

    I’ll overlook this one occasion…

  3. feelthebern

    NYT column written by a snivelling gollum.
    Snowden would be shaking his head at how far the NYT has fallen.

  4. Known suspect

    And got the person who is a swamp all by himself….?

  5. thefrolickingmole

    I beginning to think these people dont know just how stupid they are.
    They have been getting high off their own supply so long as “experts” without a grounding in the real world they literally dont know they dont know how 90% of people outside their bubble live.

  6. cuckoo

    I tend to believe those people who say this was written by the NY Times themselves. How exactly does this deep cover “resister” do their work? Someone’s watched too many episodes of Hogan’s Heroes where Hogan and his men slip out of the camp, blow up a train and slip back into camp in time for fruhstuck. If these people are just not doing what Trump wants (which is the only action available to them) does he not notice this? Doesn’t he wonder why the things he asks them to do don’t get done? The op-ed is trump-hater fan fic.

  7. sabena

    “The root of the problem is the president’s amorality. ”
    So how many Australian PM’s were moral?

  8. candy

    I reckon it’s written by NYT too, or perhaps in collusion with an 18 year old or a gardener who loves Obama.

    But when an article says “sources say” or it’s anonymous you must assume it’s not true until proven by actual people with evidence. Even then. To believe something written by an “anonymous” is dumb.

  9. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Well said Sinc.

    The swamp hates nothing more than “peace and prosperity”. Particularly peace.

    That foam party loving, neo-con, Lil Marco is already out there trying to drum up an invasion of Venezuela.

  10. Tim Neilson

    This isn’t the work of the so-called deep state. It’s the work of the steady state.

    What’s in a name?

    Whether this is fake or real, it’s a colossal own goal by Trump’s enemies.

    Like here in CFMMEUistan, where the swampmeisters tell us that the home invasions and carjackings aren’t done by ‘gangs’, only by ‘groups’. Who cares?

    Similarly, no-one in the USA, except incurable TDS sufferers, will read this and think “oh that’s all right then, the unelected unaccountable taxpayer-funded bureaucrats who are trying to undermine the duly, lawfully, democratically elected President aren’t the ‘deep state’, they’re the ‘steady state’, so we should be on their side, not the President’s”.

  11. Ant

    The root of the problem is the president’s amorality. Anyone who works with him knows he is not moored to any discernible first principles that guide his decision making.

    Depends where that amorality plays out.

    DJT shagged porn stars. BHO (figuratively) shagged Iranian mullahs. HRC (figuratively) shagged anyone or thing that made a campaign contribution.

    Picking between the three shouldn’t be difficult.

  12. H B Bear

    I have the same attitude to Scott Morrison. He seems to have the right instincts and would like to do the kinds of things I want done here.

    Hmmm … dare I say Potential Greatness? Not while the Lieborals have their hands on the levers. Nor Peanut Head and the dregs of the R-G-R Liars either.

  13. Exit Stage Right

    Beat me to it Bear. I was going to say steady on Sinc, plaudits to the new PM before he has done anything but talk. Remember what happened to the last Potentially Great PM.

  14. Gary

    So let me just note that there is a “resistance” here in Australia as well, some of it in the public service, if you will pardon the expression, and some even within the Liberals’ own party room.

    That’s a keeper, you must have British ancestors to be so understated.

  15. H B Bear

    Beat me to it Bear. I was going to say steady on Sinc, plaudits to the new PM before he has done anything but talk

    Sinc is the battered wife of the Lieboral Party. Just back from Emergency after getting stiched up, “But it will be different this time.”

  16. a happy little debunker

    Supposing Trump were as unhinged as cited.

    The stupidest, most dangerous & irresponsible thing to do with such an op-ed would be to write it and have it published, whilst Trump remained in Office.

  17. jupes

    DJT shagged porn stars. BHO (figuratively) shagged Iranian mullahs. HRC (figuratively) shagged anyone or thing that made a campaign contribution.

    Picking between the three shouldn’t be difficult.

    Ant! I’d forgotten all about you.

    Seems like the therapy might be working. Keep it up.

  18. jupes

    Speaking of recovering from a huge loss: RUOK Sinc?

    Have you been on bender or therapy with Ant?

  19. Colonel Crispin Berka, Kings' Fusiliers Corps.

    You’re fussing over the internal squabbling of a foreign country’s politicians when today and Monday are the last chance to make formal objections to a threat much closer to home in Australia.
    https://digitalrightswatch.org.au/2018/08/19/defend-encryption/

    The east Germans lost their privacy and productivity because they lost a shooting war with the USSR.
    We may lose the same things simply because we were so distracted by Trump blog squirrels we couldn’t spend 5 minutes to type our name and click a button.

    Had a similar comment on Wednesday’s thread.

  20. areff

    Unlike the states, where the Tea Party ranked and rated Republicans, we meekly accept whoever (whatever) the Libs put up deserves a vote. Clearly some do, but the others …
    Not while the Lieborals have their hands on the levers.

    A report card on all Liberals, with mailouts targetting the likes of Zimmerman, Henderson in Corrangamite and, before she jumped in a snit, Julia Banks, would be a useful tool to have in place before the next election.

    A win with so many wets in the squad would be no win at all.

    A loss that winnowed the party to a principled core from which it could re-grow would be, in effect, a long-term win.

  21. Roger

    Lordy, I think Sinc just draped the mantle of potential greatness around SloMo’s shoulders.

  22. Rafe Champion

    Trump is guided by love of his country and his people and the quest for win/win deals.
    His people include the downtrodden of all colours who he reached out to in his campaign.
    He is not a classical liberal and he will make mistakes but his instincts and his unorthodox but highly successful personal style are moving mountains.
    The conservative lady got it right when she was challenged on Trump’s pussy grabbing talk, she said she was fundraising to elect a President not a choir boy (or words to that effect).

  23. John Comnenus

    I find Alexander Downer’s bit part in the spy gate saga very troubling. Just to recall the basic facts,
    – Downer was our High Commissioner to the UK
    – Downer pops into a London gin bar alone and coincidentally meets George P, a low ranked volunteer in the Trump campaign.
    – Downer recognises George P, strikes up a conversation and tells Downer about someone telling him the Russians have Clinton’s emails.
    – Downer reports this directly to the USA Embassy in London.

    Now here is what I find interesting and very troubling. Devin Nunes, Chair of the US House Intelligence Committee has seen all the unredacted documents and says unequivocally that there was no 5 eyes intelligence report about this meeting. Downer apparently reported this meeting directly to the US Embassy in London rather than follow the normal 5 eyes protocol and report this ‘intelligence’ back to Australia for analysis, assessment and transmission to the US counterparts through the established channels.

    This raises the question: was Downer working for a foreign intelligence service whilst being employed as Australia’s High Commissioner to the UK? It certainly seems so. All very coincidental and no reporting to Canberra.

    Were Bishop and or Turnbull aware Downer was working for a foreign intelligence service? Did they approve him to work for a foreign intelligence service? Has Mr Downer been questioned by Australian authorities to determine whether he was working for a foreign intelligence service which I assume would be illegal.
    Was Australian Intelligence involved in the plot to bring down Trump? All very troubling.

  24. Elle

    For those not subscribers. Have copied it here.
    The Financial Review. OPINIONSep 7 2018

    ‘I love Australia. Who else loves Australia?’: PM

    by Andrew Clark

    “We’re with you”, “we’re here to help”, “we’re on your side”, “we’re proud supporters of you”, it’s “for all of us”, and “we’re all in this together”.

    In a game of “spot the difference”, all the above catchlines are lifted from banking and superannuation industry television advertisements, except one. “We’re on your side” is the buzz phrase of Scott Morrison’s 15-day-old Coalition government. Its political significance lies in the fact that the phrase fits seamlessly into the most successful theme in Australian advertising – bonding with the consumer/voter. 

    Bonding, or generating a warm, common interest and familiarity between the messenger and those receiving the message, has a proven track record in Australia, but as far as the current global political zeitgeist is concerned, Scott Morrison is the odd man out. He wants us to “feel the love”, but it’s “crazytown” in US President Donald Trump’s chaotic White House, Brexit threatens to unhinge UK politics, and much of Europe has swung to the rancid right over refugees.

    Meanwhile, in Australia Morrison is, as he says, on our “side”. The sentiments are genuine. Politically speaking, they are central to Morrison’s plan for a shaky Coalition government to survive the next eight months, and even past the next election, although the divisions of the past three years, and the bedlam, bitterness and payback of recent weeks suggest this is a big ask.

    The Industry Super Funds “We are all in this together” campaign. .

    It’s the Morrison vibe, not the Turnbull policies, that are set to change – or at least are intended to change – after the divisions that scarred Malcolm Turnbull’s 35½ months in government, ending in such a nasty, bloody, mendacious party room putsch on August 24.

    Attempting to flick the switch from Liberal Party beastliness to bonding, Morrison knows from years of experience dealing with advertising campaigns – as head of the Australian Tourist Commission and onetime director of the NSW Liberal Party – that, in Australia, promoting a bond between the advertiser and the consumer is a proven winner.

    It’s not surprising, therefore, that one of the first comments he made after becoming prime minister was that the government is “on your side”. Later, addressing a Menzies Centre gathering in Albury, the birthplace of the Liberal Party in 1944, Morrison warmed further to the theme: “I don’t think that, for someone to get ahead in life, you’ve got to pull others down. I believe that we should be trying to lift everybody up at once – that we get away from this politics of envy,” he said, also aiming a barb at Opposition Leader Bill Shorten.

    “You can’t just be about what you’re opposed to. You’ve got to be about what you’re for – as a country, as a political party, as an individual, as a family,” he told the Albury gathering.

    “We all love Australia, of course we do. But do we love all Australians? That’s a different question, isn’t it?” he challenged. “You love all Australians if you love Australia,” came the answer, and in a folksy nod to multiculturalism, Morrison added: “Whether they’ve become an Australian by birth 10 generations ago … or if you came last week.”

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison unveiled his warm, fuzzy, folksy approach in Albury.

    Reacting to the new Scott Morrison political zeitgeist, Greg Daniel, co-head of the Social Media Advisory Group at KPMG, and who has 30 years experience in devising the National Party’s advertising for federal and Queensland elections, provides the crucial political marketing context. “I think the Liberal Party research, like all research, will be showing that people are fed up with politicians, particularly politicians in the same party, fighting each other. They much prefer them to be fighting for the voters.

    “One thing Scott Morrison is trying to address is this issue of growing distrust of institutions and the political process by using this political appeal, which is quite powerful for a lot of Australians, of helping your neighbour in a communitarian way.

    “Australians have always had a great history of helping their neighbours, [with organisations like] the rural fire service and surf lifesaving associations. Scott Morrison needs to be seen as a healer, as well as a leader, by appealing to the emotion of coming together.”

    Morrison’s challenge is to “take on that problem” of distrust exacerbated by fractious politicians talking about themselves and “turn it on its head” by “appealing to Australians emotionally”, and urging them to “come together in times of trouble”, Daniel says.

    David Rowe

    As a former chairman and managing director of Clemenger BBDA, at one time Australia’s second-biggest advertising agency by billings, and a onetime campaign adviser for former NSW Liberal Party leader (and current Liberal Party national president) Nick Greiner in his successful campaign in the 1988 NSW election, Daniel knows the bonding technique has been employed effectively in a raft of beer ads in the past few decades.

    “You can get it drivin’, you can get it divin’, you can get it mixing cement. A hard-earned thirst needs a big beer, and the best cold beer is Vic – Vic Bitter”  etc, etc. A similar work-reward bonding theme is contained in Morrison’s Albury speech, with phrases like “I believe in a fair go for those who have a go in this country” and “if you put in, you get to take out”.

    For a man who was treasurer for nearly three years before his elevation into the PM’s job after such a spectacular Liberal Party boil over, Morrison may be more familiar with the recent attempts of the banking and superannuation industries to project a positive image.

    Westpac, one of the big four, has run a series of television ads featuring catch phrases like “We’re with you”, “We’re here to help”, “help when it matters – that’s what Australians do” and “we’re proud supporters of you”, while NAB’s current ads end with the call sign of “more than just money”. It’s similar in the superannuation industry, with Cbus ads proclaiming “for all of us” and the Industry Super Funds campaign declaring “we’re all in this together”.

    Former Queensland premier Peter Beattie was a master at projecting a warm image. Harrison Saragossi

    The “together” theme resonates for Scott Morrison. “We want to keep Australians together,” he told his Albury audience. “I’m bringing my party together around the values and the beliefs that I’ve outlined to you today…..Do we love all Australians? We’ve got to. That’s what brings a country together.”

    “Bringing Australia together” was the theme for Labor leader Bob Hawke’s highly successful election campaign in 1983, when he trounced Liberal prime minister Malcolm Fraser’s cross-grained administration. The theme was articulated within minutes of Hawke toppling Bill Hayden as Labor leader by former ALP national secretary, South Australian federal Labor MP, and later government minister, the late Mick Young.

    They are vastly different people, but what Hawke and Morrison have in common is a natural, unfussy love for the ordinary things in life that everyday Australians hold so dear – a stroll on the beach, a swim in the ocean, and a corny joke – reinforced by an instinctive emotional and tactile nature. Despite the enormous political challenge the times pose for the Liberal Party, the Morrison approach has potential because its sponsor is a natural fit for what some may regard as a corny marketing pitch, but others would characterise as the “real” Australia.

    Put another way, can you imagine a Malcolm Turnbull or a Tony Abbott, or even a John Howard or a Robert Menzies, saying: “Do we love all Australians. We’ve got to.” Or could you see any of these former leaders walking arm in arm with their No.2, as Morrison did with deputy Liberal Party leader Josh Frydenberg after the August 24 party-room vote.

    Bob Hawke, left, successfully adopted the “Bringing Australia together” theme for the 1983 election campaign. 

    The closest modern political comparison to Morrison is in fact former Queensland Labor premier Peter Beattie, who, like Morrison, was also the senior state (in Morrison’s case, NSW Liberal) apparatchik before entering the Queensland (or federal for Morrison) Parliament.  

    Beattie, premier of Queensland for nine years from 1998 to 2007 always projected a warm image as the man who put his state and electors first, and his party second. Shortly before the 2001 Queensland election, Beattie faced a crisis with a state Criminal Justice Commission inquiry into widespread vote rigging within the ALP. No problem: Beattie, the leader of the ALP in the state and the party’s former state secretary, launched a powerful attack against Labor’s “rorters”, sacked several and returned to office with a thumping majority.

    In a similar vein, the August 24 Liberal Party room coup, which ended Turnbull’s prime ministership, was preceded by dark plotting, intimidation and bullying of MPs by party hacks, particularly aimed at female Liberal MPs, before the final vote. Morrison was not involved in the bullying, but his supporters were up to their armpits in pre-party-room-vote intrigue. Like Beattie before him, however, Morrison adroitly manoeuvered around a sticky political problem by jumping in front of it.

    “I think a lot of people would have been absolutely disgusted by it, but we are a great country,” Morrison acknowledged to the ABC the day after he was made prime minister. “People are going to get back to where they have to have their heads and where they should have their heads and that is where I am going to get their heads.”

    Whether he succeeds or not could be the decisive political factor over the next eight months.

    David Rowe

  25. mh

    Rafe Champion
    #2811466, posted on September 7, 2018 at 5:28 pm
    Trump is guided by love of his country and his people and the quest for win/win deals.

    Win/win? In his book Think Big, Trump states that the best deal is not win-win but win-lose. When Trump wins, of course. I expect he has the same attitude as President as he did in business.

  26. mh

    After the last week, everyone who follows US politics now knows that the Resist movement is the Washington Establishment.

    The enemy is now out in the open. And desperate.

  27. Roger

    Beattie, premier of Queensland for nine years from 1998 to 2007 always projected a warm image as the man who put his state and electors first, and his party second.

    And yet I can never find someone who’ll admit to voting for him, let alone liking him or trusting him.

    Whoever Morrison is, let’s hope he’s not Beattie redivivus.

  28. mh

    Gorka: NYT Anonymous White House Op-Ed a National Security

    Sebastian Gorka — former deputy assistant to President Donald Trump, Fox News national security strategist, and author of “Why We Fight: Recovering America’s Will to Win” — speculated that an anonymous New York Times op-ed ostensibly written by a senior administration official is either a national security issue or a hoax.
    Gorka offered his remarks in a Thursday interview with Breitbart News Editor-in-Chief Alex Marlow on SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Daily.

    Gorka said, “If this is true, then this is a national security issue.”

    Gorka continued: “If it is somebody in the White House, this is the definition of sedition. Just look it up in the Merriam-Webster, right now. Sedition is a crime. It is the overt or covert attempt to undermine a lawful authority or a constitutional order. If you disagree with the president, you are not elected to undermine him.

    Gorka added, “I was a politically commissioned officer. My job was to be loyal to his agenda and his policies. If you don’t like him, you resign and leave. If you actively admit to being quote-unquote part of the resistance inside the White House, you are committing sedition, sabotage, and subversion.”….

    https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/09/06/gorka-nyt-anonymous-white-house-op-ed-a-national-security-issue-or-a-hoax/

  29. Tom

    The thing that astounds me – really, really astounds me — is that Bob Woodward cares more about his extremist political ideology (now followed by 90% of journalists) that demands a democratically elected US president must be destroyed than he does about journalism. Woodward was prepared to make up quotes, to invent a narrative (the opposite of journalism’s commitment to factual truth) that destroys his legacy as a respected journalist and trashes a lifetime’s work.

    To use the American vernacular, history will now remember Woodward not as a journalist whose diligence brought down an American president in the 1970s, but as a two-bit political bomb-thrower who defended a cabal of unelected technocrats that tried subvert American democracy in 2018.

  30. That is why the electorate voted for person whose motto was “drain the swamp”.

    Trump lost the popular vote by three million. He populated his Cabinet with billionaires who are now looting the treasury for personal benefit like he is. He doesn’t even know how to pronounce populist.

    He lied to the white working class that he would improve their lot. He is coasting on Obama’s recovery which did sweet Fanny Adams for them. He is now trying to lie to them again. They aren’t buying it, his numbers are in the toilet.

  31. Exit Stage Right

    Monty you are such a clown. Why do you bother as your arguments, such as they are, are so easily dismissed. How much did he win the College vote by? The popular vote is not how the POTUS is decided.
    Obama’s recovery. You have to be joking, right?

  32. a happy little debunker

    He lied to the white working class that he would improve their lot.

    The economy in the US is resurgent – so resurgent that even Colin Kaepernick can get a job.

  33. candy

    Unemployment at all time lows, and unemployment amongst blacks as well lowest for a very long time, an excellent thing.

    It’s crazy that Democrats don’t see that as good, but must work to get Trump impeached.

  34. Roger

    He lied to the white working class that he would improve their lot.

    Unemployment at its lowest in 17 years and workers without college degrees – black and white – enjoying wage rises.

    I wish our politicians could fail to deliver on their promises like that!

  35. Rising prices have erased U.S. workers’ meager wage gains, the latest sign strong economic growth has not translated into greater prosperity for the middle and working classes.

    Cost of living was up 2.9 percent from July 2017 to July 2018, the Labor Department reported Friday, an inflation rate that outstripped a 2.7 percent increase in wages over the same period. The average U.S. “real wage,” a federal measure of pay that takes inflation into account, fell to $10.76 an hour last month, 2 cents down from where it was a year ago.

    Trump’s pro-cyclical tax cuts are not trickling down.

  36. Ubique

    Trump’s pro-cyclical tax cuts are not trickling down.

    Spare a thought for the two million now employed who didn’t have a job before President Trump revitalised the economy.

  37. sdfc

    Employment growth hasn’t accelerated under Trump.

  38. Infidel Tiger

    Employment growth hasn’t accelerated under Trump.

    No not all. These record job numbers every month are terrible.

  39. sdfc

    They’re not record job numbers. Payrolls have grown at least 2m a year every year since 2010.

  40. Indeed sdfc, it has been in the same band since Obama smoothed it out in 2011.

    Trump has done nothing for the economy. He has done fabulous things for rich shareholders by inflating their already sky-high stock portfolios with share buybacks funded by the tax cuts. Doing things for the benefit of the stock market is not the same as doing things for the economy.

  41. Snoopy

    that destroys his legacy as a respected journalist and trashes a lifetime’s work.

    Without Mark Felt, Bob Woodward would have been fuck all.

  42. Infidel Tiger

    No. This is not a blog for lying.

    Even dimbulbs must acknowledge they are record job numbers. And record GDP growth.

    But most importantly Trump has created a conservative majority on all the important courts for at least two generations.

    We must never stop owning the libs.

  43. Tom

    LOL. Monty, the American political establishment’s bumboy in the non-voting colonies.
    Do you know he once liked to imagine he was a fearless truth-teller for the little people?

  44. This is not a blog for lying.

    Hahahahaha!

  45. mh

    Monty is slipping down a very dark ravine attempting to grasp onto anything at hand.

    Wooaaaaaaaahhhhh!

    🍿🍿🍿

  46. Lee

    What a load of cobblers, Monty.
    U.S. elections have never been about who won the most votes, despite your uninformed (including about the economy) rant.
    Many elections have been lost in the U.S. (and in state and federal elections in Australia) by the party which clearly won the “popular” vote.

  47. sdfc

    Trump has done nothing for the economy.

    Trump has been overwhelmingly positive for consumer and business confidence.

  48. Tel

    Even dimbulbs must acknowledge they are record job numbers. And record GDP growth.

    https://fred.stlouisfed.org/graph/fredgraph.png?g=l6Am

    That’s Nominal GDP (blue line) as compared with PPI and CPI (two types of inflation metrics) and all of them percent change from a year ago. The NGDP is growing at around 5% P/A which is not so unusual. When you look at the dip it was heading into late 2015 and early 2016 there was a real chance of sliding into recession there, but OK it’s picked up under Trump, and so has inflation. In real terms that’s unspectacular.

    So the Fed argues a little bit of inflation is good for us, maybe it is, things could be worse for sure. As for record breaking growth? Hmmm, that’s too much egg on the pudding, sorry. Trump’s mini-boom has avoided recession so far, that’s about the best you can say about it. These recessions have a habit of coming sooner or later anyway. You know eventually Tesla just has to crash, then Amazon, and then… I dunno could be others, that’s the way of things.

  49. Tel

    Trump has been overwhelmingly positive for consumer and business confidence.

    Yup, agree on that, Trump injected a bunch of confidence and gave the thing a shot in the arm at a time it was sorely needed.

    How long can just confidence keep it rolling though? There comes a point where you need something more tangible. I’m not rubbishing what Trump has done, and for that matter I think Yellen did about the best that could have been done under the circumstances, but it’s all fragile as shit still.

  50. Trump has been overwhelmingly positive for consumer and business confidence.

    It’s the vibe, LOL.

  51. Confused Old Misfit

    Win/win? In his book Think Big, Trump states that the best deal is not win-win but win-lose. When Trump wins, of course. I expect he has the same attitude as President as he did in business.

    But the whole idea is to make you THINK it’s Win/Win!

  52. Crossie

    Now here is what I find interesting and very troubling. Devin Nunes, Chair of the US House Intelligence Committee has seen all the unredacted documents and says unequivocally that there was no 5 eyes intelligence report about this meeting. Downer apparently reported this meeting directly to the US Embassy in London rather than follow the normal 5 eyes protocol and report this ‘intelligence’ back to Australia for analysis, assessment and transmission to the US counterparts through the established channels.

    This raises the question: was Downer working for a foreign intelligence service whilst being employed as Australia’s High Commissioner to the UK? It certainly seems so. All very coincidental and no reporting to Canberra.

    This always seemed odd to me as well until it came out how much Downer contributed to the Clinton foundation. It seems Australian politicians of all colours were competing to ingratiate themselves with the Clintons, admittedly some even with their own money, it makes you wonder what they expected in return.

    All I can say is sucked in.

  53. Crossie

    Without Mark Felt, Bob Woodward would have been fuck all.

    Ah Mark Felt, the original Deep Stater who was well named as Deep Throat. The only reason Nixon went down is because Felt was passed over for a promotion and exacted his revenge. The whole world may be different today if only feel Felt had got his promotion.

  54. Dave Brewer

    By a Senior White House Official

    In which administration?

  55. mh

    Trump’s Tight Labor Market Wins U.S. Construction Workers Higher Wages

    American construction workers are seeing their wages rise in the blue collar industry as President Trump’s “Buy American, Hire American” tightened labor market forces business to find and employ disenfranchised U.S. workers, rather than importing foreign workers.
    A recent report by the Miami Herald chronicled the rise in wages and business having to adapt to an economy with a tight labor market as immigration enforcement has been increased and unemployment has hit record lows.

    As admitted in the Miami Herald by industry insiders, the tight labor market has secured jobs for Americans willing to do the blue collar work and won them higher wages in the process….

    Sounds better than here where we have to pay the CFMEU not to sabotage projects.

  56. Trump’s Tight Labor Market Wins U.S. Construction Workers Higher Wages

    So the linked Miami Herald article quotes 2.9% wage growth. Inflation in the US at the moment as quoted above is… 2.9%.

    Correct my calculations if I’m wrong by all means, but that looks to me like it adds up to exactly zero real wage growth.

  57. mh

    Donald J. Trump

    @realDonaldTrump
    “The record is quite remarkable. The President has faithfully followed the agenda he campaigned on in 2016. People should focus on the results, and they’re extraordinary!” James Freeman – Wall Street Journal
    12:09 AM – Sep 7, 2018

  58. Infidel Tiger

    American wages unexpectedly climbed in August by the most since the recession ended in 2009 and hiring rose by more than forecast, keeping the Federal Reserve on track to lift interest rates this month and making another hike in December more likely.

    Average hourly earnings for private workers increased 2.9 percent from a year earlier, a Labor Department report showed Friday, exceeding all estimates in a Bloomberg survey and the median projection for 2.7 percent. Nonfarm payrolls rose 201,000 from the prior month, topping the median forecast for 190,000 jobs, after a downwardly revised 147,000 advance. The unemployment rate was unchanged at 3.9 percent, still near the lowest since the 1960s.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2018-09-07/u-s-payrolls-rise-201-000-while-wage-gains-accelerate-to-2-9?cmpid%3D=socialflow-twitter-economics&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&utm_medium=social&utm_content=economics&utm_source=twitter&__twitter_impression=true

  59. mh

    From IT’s Bloomberg link:

    “The labor market looks great,” said Ward McCarthy, chief financial economist at Jefferies LLC in New York. Weak wage growth “had been the one fly in the ointment in the last few years. Perkier wages are the final confirmation the labor market is back to normal.”

  60. Average hourly earnings for private workers increased 2.9 percent from a year earlier, a Labor Department report showed Friday

    Don’t come to an economics blog with nominal stats when only real stats matter. Rookie error.

  61. struth

    I have the same attitude to Scott Morrison. He seems to have the right instincts and would like to do the kinds of things I want done here.

    No offence Sinc, but don’t put the Monty on him just yet, your last prophecy regarding a PM was complete wrongology.

  62. Iampeter

    Yes. Indeed. That is why the electorate voted for person whose motto was “drain the swamp”.

    Nah, Trump won because he ran as a big government leftist who was going to regulate immigration and trade which are things both conservatives and progressives agree on, while Hillary ran on being a woman and so lost a lot of Democrat voters to Trump across a large number of states.

    For the first time since those passenger planes hit the World Trade Center 17 long years ago, Trump has at long last returned America to peace and prosperity… Something so rare, no one under the age of 30 even remembers what it’s like.

    Wow, this is beyond even Chamberlain pre-WW2 levels of delusions.

  63. classical_hero

    I’m not tired of all this winning but I we could have some of it.

  64. DrBeauGan

    Hey m0nty, you forgot to give Obama credit for increasing ice cover in the Arctic and snow falls at Thredbo.

  65. Makka

    DJT shagged porn stars. BHO (figuratively) shagged Iranian mullahs. HRC (figuratively) shagged anyone or thing that made a campaign contribution.

    Picking between the three shouldn’t be difficult.

    Ant, you’ve turned the corner! Well done young man.

  66. Makka

    Trump has done nothing for the economy.

    Words of wisdom from the resident mOron. Now that Socialism is the core economic strategy of the Dems , you will be tickled pink with Venezuela’s stellar performance as a model, no?

  67. Iampeter

    I’m not tired of all this winning but I we could have some of it.

    And

    Words of wisdom from the resident mOron. Now that Socialism is the core economic strategy of the Dems , you will be tickled pink with Venezuela’s stellar performance as a model, no?

    Under the Trump Presidency we’ve seen Obama-style (or should I say Bush style?) trillion dollar spending bills, regulations of trade and immigration that are even further left than anything Obama cooked up and overall government spending that is out of control. Not to mention a failure to repeal Obamacare and real crooks selling books on TV while the President is under investigation by his own DOJ. And of course the cowardly appeasement of the worst dictators on the planet that if Obama was engaging in this forum would be quite rightly apoplectic.

    If this is winning what exactly do you consider losing?
    If this isn’t socialism, what exactly do you consider socialism?

    So Monty is wrong for being a leftist but the rest of you are wrong for being oblivious to the fact that you are leftists too.

  68. Iampeter

    Oh and I should add, the Democrats are now feeling confident to run openly socialist candidates because they can see there is no opposition to socialism from conservatives. Too many conservatives are laughing at this and woefully misreading the entire situation and just how totally they have failed.

  69. Elle

    An excellent piece in today’s Telegraph by Piers Akerman, Sinc.

    Subscriber only. Have copied and pasted it here.

    SCOTT Morrison demonstrated in Albury he has the potential to lead the Coalition to victory at the next election with his delivery of a couple of cut-through lines on his values and his policy direction.

    That they weren’t highlighted and headlined by hacks in Canberra says a lot about the direction the cosseted press corps would like to see Australia take.

    Morrison made an off-the-cuff speech which leant on the Menzies legacy. Bob Menzies, founder of the Liberal Party, made a landmark address at Mate’s Lounge in Albury just under 74 years ago in which he talked of what his new party would stand for.

    Menzies had been prime minister from 1939 to 1941. In 1944 as the world emerged from the last great war he forged the Liberal Party from 18 different parties united only in what they were against.

    As Morrison said in his remarks, Menzies brought them to Albury to unite them behind what they believed in.

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison while making a speech for the Menzies Research Centre in Albury. Picture: Brad Newman

    Menzies had done his homework and set his agenda before the public in a series of thoughtful radio broadcasts, the most famous of which, his Forgotten People address delivered on May 22, 1942, has lost nothing over the years and I cannot recommend it enough to those who want to know what the Liberals should stand for.

    That script, and his others, won him the support of the Australian Women’s National League, a hugely effective lobby group, but they cut a shrewd and tough bargain with the new party before agreeing to join.

    The league’s leaders ensured that women were equally represented throughout the structures of the Liberal Party long before the era of affirmative action and it was agreed that the Liberal Party’s would reserve certain positions for women, that there would be a Woman Vice-President of the Party and also a Federal Women’s Committee, whose president would also sit on the Party’s Federal Executive.

    No bra-burning was required. Menzies recognised their force and realised their value, particularly as the contribution women had made through the long war years had been of inestimable value.

    Morrison is now appealing to the same strata of society, ordinary Australians, with the same core basic family values that swung the women’s vote — in the face of sneering from the media and social elites who view basic family values as attributes of the “reactionary Right”.

    “You’ve got to be about what you’re for,” he said.

    “As a country, as a political party, as an individual, as a family. It’s about what you’re for, not just what you’re against.”

    Family is key to Morrison’s character. The media wants it to be about his personal religious beliefs, his faith, and is attacking him for being true to himself.

    Being for family is not a sin nor a crime. The so-called progressives would like to see the family unit smashed and the care of children turned over to the ideologues of the union movement who want to create a unisex nightmare in which boys and girls are criticised for displaying normal behaviour.

    Morrison has to ignore the squeals of those, like most in the media, who will never vote for him and stick to his personal values.

    Former prime minister Sir Robert Menzies in 1964.

    Morrison also nailed the whole failure of energy policy by outlining Angus Taylor’s role — he is now the “Minister for getting electricity prices down”.

    His job is to maintain a safety net on power and “to put the big stick in to keep the big electricity companies in check, and thirdly to provide an environment where you can get more investment in new, fair dinkum power generation”.

    He drew a most important line in the sand saying: “What I mean by fair dinkum? Stuff that works when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing. That is the reliable power that we need in our system.”

    He might have rammed home the message to the Green-Left which has been effectively destroying the nation’s industrial base, driving up electricity prices and leaving the most vulnerable suffering, in some cases, dying, because they can’t afford the virtue- signalling renewable policies driven by both Labor and Malcolm Turnbull’s government.

    But underlining that his government is “absolutely focused on getting people’s power prices down” is a good start and there’s no denying the truth in his statement that “cheaper power is good for business, cheaper power is good for people’s household budgets”.

    It’s inevitable that the usual suspects will take offence at his remarks. There are already self-appointed leaders of the LGBTIXYZ (and another letter you care to name) “community” who claim he hasn’t given them enough time and there is a really weird group of conspiracists who claim that something called Big Coal brought Turnbull down. (Let’s be clear, Turnbull destroyed himself, having nearly succeeded in destroying the Liberal Party and the nation.)

    Morrison is now appealing to the same strata of society, ordinary Australians, with the same core basic family values that swung the women’s vote

    When Menzies was speaking in Albury, he was talking to an Australia that was being threatened by the Labor Party with full-blooded socialism, starting with the proposed nationalisation of the banks.

    He was speaking to men and women who knew Labor wanted to control their savings.

    Today, Labor wants to hand over the running of the country to the trade union movement and in particular, its big union donor, the CFMEU.

    Most thinking Australians know the record of the CFMEU is one of illegal activity and that it flouts the law.

    These are the values of those bankrolling Labor and its leader Bill Shorten.

    Morrison must target the ALP with the same vigour Menzies applied to Labor 74 years ago, winning election after election to make him the longest-serving prime minister.

    Morrison quoted Menzies’ truism “no party seizes the imagination of the people unless the people know the party stands for certain things”.

    Menzies said “we’ll fight for those things until the bell rings”.

    Morrison pledged to affirm the same beliefs. Until the bell rings. Just like Robert Menzies did, and his team, and they went on to do great things for Australia.

  70. Tom

    Menzies had done his homework and set his agenda before the public in a series of thoughtful radio broadcasts, the most famous of which, his Forgotten People address delivered on May 22, 1942, has lost nothing over the years and I cannot recommend it enough to those who want to know what the Liberals should stand for.

    That’s exactly what Trump ran on, which tells you everything you need to know about the abomination the Stupid.Fucking.Liberals have become under the Photios communists.

    After the past three years, there’s no redemption possible. Turnbull happened because the party believes in nothing, except the perks of power, which the backbench rabbits were worried about losing. SloMo ran as Turnbull’s man.

    The Lieboral party (which I voted for in 2013) must be burnt to the ground. It stands for nothing but treachery and disloyalty. Small government? Bwahahahahahahahahahaha!

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