Aborigines, Islanders apologise to their women

This is a story by Rick Morton, Social Affairs Writer with The Australian. It appeared on Sept 1, I missed it and don’t recall any commentary at the time.

Looks like a step away from the victim culture towards responsibility. Not a great story for the MSM I suppose.

THE STORY

An apology to all indigenous women for family violence meted out against them has been signed by more than 200 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and is being hailed by advocates as the crucial first step in restoring responsibility in community.

The Nipaluna (Hobart) statement, signed this week, is proof that “not all men are victims” of a culture that has allowed them to blame others, including their colonisers, for abuse and violence against women.

The signatories say they must work “to continue to develop strategies to ensure our roles as grandfathers, fathers, uncles, nephews, brothers, grandsons and sons caring for our families”.

“We commit to taking responsibility for pursuing a healthy, happier life for our families and ourselves that reflects the opportunities experienced by the wider community” the statement says.

“We celebrate the relationships we have with our wives, mothers, grandmothers, granddaughters, aunties, nieces, sisters and daughters.”

The statement follows an indigenous domestic violence resource released by government-funded organisation Our Watch, which was branded by Aboriginal women leaders as being the product of well-meaning “white feminists” because it listed colonisation as an underlying cause of family violence in Aboriginal communities.

Indigenous woman Josephine Cashman, a former defence lawyer and prosecutor, said the men who signed the statement ought to be heard. “(Men) are capable of contributing to positive change and taking personal responsi¬bility,” she said.

Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT chief John Paterson, a leader behind the statement, said it came about because men needed to agree on a future for themselves and their families.

“If we are going to make inroads on domestic violence at all, then we needed to agree to change,” he said.

Helen Fejo-Frith, chair of the Bagot Community Council in Darwin, said she had read the statement and had been warmed by it.

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10 Responses to Aborigines, Islanders apologise to their women

  1. Confused Old Misfit

    Looks like some, at least, are taking or trying to take another faltering step toward modernity.

  2. duncanm

    good to see. Needs more exposure.

  3. Elle

    well-meaning “white feminists”

    Well-meaning feminists? That’s a bit of an oxymoron.

  4. .

    it listed colonisation as an underlying cause of family violence in Aboriginal communities

    Oh god.

    On the other hand, stuff like this is just man bashing like useless crap such as White Ribbon.

  5. jupes

    it listed colonisation as an underlying cause of family violence in Aboriginal communities

    Aboriginal culture is the underlying cause.

    Aborigines have always bashed their women.

  6. Louis Hissink

    In tribal culture individual rights mean nothing – survival of the tribe becomes paramount. IF any individual does get into difficulties, the tribe acts to protect him/her/it. Collectivism reigns supreme.

    In large populations this doesn’t happen, especially with the appearance of strangers, and hence individual rights had to be developed.

    Do we aim for traditional tribally based communities, or do we assimilate the tribes into the major culture?

  7. Shy Ted

    My prediction based on the theory “when you do something that doesn’t do anything it makes the problem worse” will be that numbers will rise.

  8. Roger

    The statement follows an indigenous domestic violence resource released by government-funded organisation Our Watch, which was branded by Aboriginal women leaders as being the product of well-meaning “white feminists” because it listed colonisation as an underlying cause of family violence in Aboriginal communities.

    I was recently reading an early account of the white settlement of the Darling Downs. A settler near what is now Warwick enjoyed the protection of a local ‘tribe’ from a rival tribe because he had rescued a young member from drowning in the Condamine river. The wife of the tribal king, however, who had connections with the other tribe, later developed a grudge against the man for some reason and urged the king to order the young warriors to attack him, an animosity the settler soon became aware of. The ‘king’ soon approached the settler and advised him not to worry; after tiring of his wife’s urging he had hit her with his hunting club, breaking her arm in the process.

  9. Confused Old Misfit

    Do we aim for traditional tribally based communities, or do we assimilate the tribes into the major culture?

    The choice is not binary.

  10. Confused Old Misfit

    Aborigines, Islanders apologise to their women

    60,000 years of abuse will not disappear overnight.
    It has not in the rest of the world.
    But, one step forward…

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