Open Forum: September 15, 2018

This entry was posted in Open Forum. Bookmark the permalink.

1,194 Responses to Open Forum: September 15, 2018

  1. JC

    OCO

    Interesting how that scumbag was allowed to harass people like that, but Robinson was thrown in jail for much, much less. In fact, Robinson was jailed for just attending a protest.

  2. JC

    I don’t know. I think the moment the scumbag began to confront his kid, he should have made a move on him and cracked his jaw. Mogg should have either ignored it and immediately walked inside or whacked the prick. He shouldn’t have stood there taking it – especially with the family around. One of the kids was clutching onto nanny from fear.

  3. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Trioli lost the baby, likely due to stress. That is the tragedy. She should not have been working at that time doing IVF. Babies are serious business and worth taking leave if for she knew she was pregnant. Those early stages are crucial for development and in my experience the first 3 months are the hardest part of pregnancy. Enormous hormonal changes occur, the tiredness is immense, the sickness can be awful, and staggering on at work is a modern feminist malaise.

  4. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    For if not if for. Wretched phone blogging.

  5. Nick

    Any Cats flying into or out of HK after midnight tonight, check your flights

  6. Oh come on

    Fresh from implicitly blaming Baaaahnaby for causing her IVF failure that stemmed from the blowback caused by her on-camera unprofessionalism, we hear yet more of Trioli’s tragic trials:

    The bloke crossed the wide, open floor of The Age newspaper Christmas party — smart-arse smile, arms wide, that 2:00am sway.

    Chin up, chest out he loomed over me.

    “Well, we’ve taken a vote,” he said, his beer tilting slightly in its glass.

    “And we’ve decided that you’ve got the best tits in the place.”
    (…)
    My colleague may have been drunk, but he knew his stuff.

    I was pinned. He waited.

    I’m afraid I can’t tell you what I said, or what I did. I have no idea.

    There’s a fugitive memory of a half-laugh, a semi-scoff.

    Did I stride off? Did I throw back my head and laugh? Did I tell him to f**k off?

    A part of me suspects I burst into tears, but we all know that if there’s one thing a working woman has steeled herself never to do in the workplace, it’s to cry in front of these guys. Never.

    We save that for later.

    What self-indulgent, maudlin tripe. This woman is so incredibly soft but fully believes she’s tough. She is an embarrassment to the female gender.

    What’s more, the story is a load of shit, innit, Vinegar Titsoli?

  7. cohenite

    Cripes what was that; all those sheilas with wings and big norgs.

  8. jupes

    Any Cats flying into or out of HK after midnight tonight, check your flights

    They’ve changed our flights so we are now flying out just 2 hours before the fucking thing is expected to hit.

    I suspect they are just kicking the can down the road …

  9. Delta A

    cohenite
    #2817191, posted on September 15, 2018 at 4:19 pm
    Cripes what was that; all those sheilas with wings and big norgs.

    That’ll get the boy Cats scrolling back. 🙂

  10. zyconoclast

    Original story: The University of Maryland at College Park announced Friday a new diversity support group to create a “safe space” for white students to discuss their feelings about “interactions with racial and ethnic minorities.”

    Update: After publication of this article, University of Maryland-College Park changed the name of the group to “Anti-Racism and Ally Building Group,” along with a shorter description, which reads, “Do you want to improve your ability to relate to and connect with people different from yourself? Do you want to become a better ally? Members will support and share feedback with each other as they learn more about themselves and how they can fit into a diverse world.”

  11. Oh come on

    A part of me suspects I burst into tears, but we all know that if there’s one thing a working woman has steeled herself never to do in the workplace, it’s to cry in front of these guys. Never.

    We save that for later.

    Harden the fuck up. Seriously, this is just pathetic.

    We all know what happened here. Vinegar was blotto at the Xmas work do, let the drunk colleague pick her up, and has subsequently turned her drunken regret-sex session into a me-too moment where she’s the heroic victim, scarred but never unbowed.

  12. egg_

    Virginia Trioli on the incident where she made the “crazy” gesture about Barnaby Joyce:

    I can tell you there was absolutely nothing political or biased about that moment.

    Fact check: bullsh1t!*

    *Grade A, certified.

  13. zyconoclast

    USAID Spends $89.7 Million Finding Jobs for 55 Afghan Women

    Promote is USAID’s “largest single investment to advance women globally” and was tasked with helping over 2,000 Afghan women find jobs. The program has reached 2.6 percent of its goal.

  14. Oh come on

    I think the moment the scumbag began to confront his kid, he should have made a move on him and cracked his jaw. Mogg should have either ignored it and immediately walked inside or whacked the prick.

    Hrm I don’t think he should have belted the scumbag in front of his kids. I don’t think bundling them all inside would have been a good look, either. Showing you aren’t intimidated yet can keep your cool is a good move, and I think the nanny also showed considerable class, too.

  15. Nick

    I’m guessing Cathay, Jupes? Check as much as you can. HK airport will resemble a refugee zone organised by the UN for two or so days, it won’t be fun. I’m escaping tonight.

  16. zyconoclast

    Foreign Minister Taro Kono tells World Economic Forum that Japan is ready to accept more workers from abroad

    Japan is gearing up to accept more foreign workers as its population is on the brink of a steep decline, Foreign Minister Taro Kono said Thursday.

    Kono told a World Economic Forum meeting in Hanoi that Japan gains “value added” by accepting foreign people, especially since its aging population and low birth rate mean the country is shrinking by half a million people a year.

    “We cannot sustain our society like that,” he said in response to a question during a panel discussion. “We are opening up our country. We are opening up our labor market to foreign countries. We are now trying to come up with a new work permit policy so I think everyone shall be welcome in Japan if they are willing to assimilate into Japanese society.”

    Japan has traditionally resisted accepting migrant workers, at times easing such restrictions but then re-imposing them during economic downturns. Many Japanese are uncomfortable with outsiders who might not speak their language or conform to expectations for how to behave.

    Still, there are millions of foreign people living in Japan, including those who work in technical training-related programs or labor-short industries such as restaurants, construction and elderly care.

    The country has gradually been loosening restrictions to enable families to hire domestic help. It also has short programs to bring in foreign nurses from Indonesia and other countries. But language requirements have made long-term employment in such jobs difficult.

    Kono cited sports stars including tennis sensation Naomi Osaka, the daughter of a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, as an example of the benefits of welcoming outsiders. Osaka, who was born in Japan but raised in the United States, is being lauded by Japanese following her U.S. Open win.

    “It’s good to have diversity. It’s good to have an open policy,” Kono said.

  17. egg_

    A part of me suspects I burst into tears, but we all know that if there’s one thing a working woman has steeled herself never to do in the workplace, it’s to cry in front of these guys.

    Only recently on air did she state that she was never a victim of workplace bullying, implying that only softies make such claims.
    Others were your victims, ma’m?

  18. zyconoclast

    The thorny issue of immigration sparked the most animated exchanges during the Quebec leaders’ debate Thursday, with the front-runner in the polls having to defend his position to expel immigrants who fail a French test after three years in the province.

    Coalition Avenir Quebec Leader Francois Legault was hit from all sides for his controversial position, which he says is necessary to preserve Quebec’s language and identity from waves of non-French-speaking immigrants.

    Legault dismissed suggestions his policy would affect many people.

    “Why should someone fail a French test if they can take French classes for free?” he said, referring to the province’s subsidized language classes for newcomers.

  19. zyconoclast

    Belgium announces plans to lock up migrants in transit

    Detaining migrants who are in transit, doubling the number of places in holding centres, and increasing police controls: Belgium on September 10 announced a vast new plan to fight illegal immigration.
    Belgium continues to crack down on migration. Following a Royal Decree in August – which cleared the way for detaining families with children – the Belgian government on Monday unveiled a string of new measures to combat illegal migration.

  20. zyconoclast

    As many as 1,000 migrant families separated by the Trump administration under its “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy will get a second chance to apply for asylum under an agreement brokered between the Department of Justice and lawyers representing those families.

    The agreement, submitted in federal court late Wednesday, will halt deportation proceedings to give another opportunity to parents who failed the first stage of the asylum application process, where they must demonstrate they have a “credible fear” of returning to their home country.

  21. zyconoclast

    Feds discover 3 more girls in genital mutilation case

    The federal government has found three more female genital mutilation victims who traveled to Michigan for the procedure — all of them elementary school girls from Illinois who came here with their mothers for religious cuttings, prosecutors say.

    One of the girls was cut on Valentine’s Day in 2015; another at the start of her 2015 school year, court records show. The third was cut in March 2015.

    All three Illinois girls were about 7 years old at the time of the procedures, according to a new indictment filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Detroit, where eight people are facing charges in the nation’s first genital mutilation case, including two doctors and four mothers.

    Prosecutors have now identified nine victims in the case: two 7-year-old girls from Minnesota; four Michigan girls ages 8-12, and the three Illinois girls.

    According to the new indictment, one of the Michigan girls was given Valium ground up in liquid Tylenol during her procedure in 2015.

    The lead defendant in the case is Dr. Jumana Nagarwala, 45, of Northville, whom prosecutors have estimated performed genital mutilation on at least 100 girls over a 12-year-period.

    For Nagarwala, this latest indictment comes with some bigger headaches as the government re-charged her with a crime that could send her to prison for 30 years if convicted: conspiracy to travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct.

    Nagarwala had initially been charged with a similar crime — it carried a life sentence — accusing her of transporting a minor with intent to engage in “sexual activity.” A federal judge dismissed that count eight months ago, concluding there wasn’t merit for it, as the defense argued.

    But this time around, the prosecution added in a tweaked version of that crime, accusing Nagarwala of “illicit sexual conduct” as opposed to “sexual activity.” This charge involves the 2017 cuttings involving the two Minnesota girls who described the procedures as painful.

    According to court documents, one girl said that she got a shot, screamed, and “could barely walk after the procedure, and that she felt pain all the way down to her ankle.” The other said she was “laid on an examining table with her knees near her chest and legs spread apart,” that she was “pinched” in the genital area, that it “hurted a lot” and that there was “pain and burning.”

    Both girls were told to keep the procedures a secret, court records show. One said “the doctor made her (friend) cry.”

  22. Rae

    I am a Welsh blonde

    Of course you are. Little Richard wrote this song about you.

    Try not to be impolite, Hun.

  23. .

    Geezs that “son of a surgeon” is a c***.

    He’s an idiot. He’s only going to make JRM more popular.

    Can’t fog the Mogg!

  24. .

    Basically, Jeeves Jr is pissed off he wasn’t Master Pennybags. The truth of the matter is that he had a privileged life and is a capitalist to support himself, but wants communism and would like very much to be in the inner party – whilst fraudently cloaking himself under the mantle of “anarchism”.

    Mr Bone’s father was a butler for Sir Gerald Coke, the grandson of the Earl of Leicester, so his family lived in a cottage situated on the Coke family’s Hampshire estate.

    In an interview with the Guardian, he said the experience made him grow up “bitter and resentful”.

    He says he found out about anarchism at the age of 15 after reading an article about it in a copy of Punch magazine in a dentist’s waiting room.

    He was the first in his family to go to university.

  25. OldOzzie

    Turnbull stirs Liberal turmoil with advice on Dutton – Gerard Henderson Columnist

    Malcolm Turnbull is primarily responsible for the present turmoil in the Liberal Party. It was Turnbull who destroyed his own leadership when, on August 21, he called a leadership spill without consulting the vast majority of his parliamentary supporters.

    When, virtually without notice, Peter Dutton scored 35 out of 83 votes, it was obvious that the days of Australia’s 29th prime minister were numbered.

    Following that, Turnbull refused Dutton’s request to call ­another partyroom meeting to ­re­solve the matter of the leadership. The Liberal Party tradition is that two members can call a spill. Alternatively, the leader can agree to hold a meeting at the request of a challenger.

    That’s what happened in September 2015, when Turnbull prevailed over Tony Abbott.

    Turnbull’s insistence that the Dutton camp obtain the names of 43 parliamentarians to hold a special partyroom meeting abandoned the secret ballot. This has never happened in the Liberal Party before.

    The effective introduction of a show-and-tell ballot created considerable unnecessary tension as Dutton’s supporters worked to get the required names before the party­room meeting on August 24.

    Having lost the spill motion, Turnbull did not contest the ballot, in which Scott Morrison prevailed by 45 to 40 over Dutton.

    Turnbull soon resigned as the member for Wentworth, initiating an unnecessary by-election. This decision deprived the Coalition of its majority in the House of Representatives — pending the result in his old seat.

    And now, from New York City, Turnbull is urging his former colleagues to cross the floor and vote with Labor and the Greens to refer Dutton’s eligibility to sit in the House of Representatives to the High Court.

    If such an eventuality were to transpire, it could possibly lead to a by-election in Dutton’s seat of Dickson near Brisbane.

    All this against the background of Turnbull’s dreadful performance in the 2016 election, in which he blew the comfortable majority he inherited from Abbott’s near victory in 2010 and big win in 2013 — losing 14 seats in the process. Turnbull made the disastrous decision to call an eight-week campaign and neglected to take the fight up to Bill Shorten and Labor.

    In the history of the Liberal Party, only Turnbull has lost the leadership twice, first as opposition leader in 2009 and then as prime minister this year. Both occasions witnessed the resignation first of junior frontbenchers and then senior frontbenchers.

    In 2009 as well as in 2018, Turnbull was unable to unite his party and lost the support of many of his ­colleagues.

    The truth is that, while successful in business, Turnbull was not very good at politics.

    This was demonstrated in the recent Super Saturday by-elections when he fell into the trap of saying that the outcome would be a test of leadership between him and the Opposition Leader.

    Since a government has not won a seat from the opposition in a century of by-elections, this was a silly thing to say.

    After Labor’s victory in Longman in southern Queensland, Turnbull was close to being mortally wounded.

    The problem was that Shorten and Labor had successfully framed Turnbull as a multi-millionaire who lived in a harbourside mansion and was out of touch with average Australians. One example illustrates the point.

    Almost all Australians would like to live in the official residence, Kirribilli House on Sydney Harbour. However, when he became prime minister Turnbull declared that he had a better house at Point Piper. This made possible the “Mr Harbourside Mansion” refrain that proved so damaging.

    If Turnbull had called an election soon after becoming prime minister in September 2015, he probably would have led the Coalition to a substantial victory. But he didn’t. In the August 2016 election, Turnbull lost seats where Abbott had his greatest appeal — Queensland, northern NSW and western Sydney.

    The Liberal Party’s only gain was by Julia Banks in Chisholm in eastern Melbourne, where there was strong opposition to the state Labor government among sections of the electorate.

    The 2016 election demons­trated that Turnbull was not a vote winner. Moreover, he was a weak campaigner.

    It is true that Abbott caused Turnbull considerable problems in recent times. However, Abbott ­behaved professionally between being deposed as prime minister and the 2016 election, and campaigned effectively for his colleagues in some seats.

    Turnbull’s decision to have a double-dissolution election also led to a situation where more minor party candidates and independents won Senate seats than otherwise would have been the case. Pauline Hanson’s One Nation obtained four seats as opposed to what probably would have been just one in a normal half-Senate election. This put pressure on the Liberal Party and Nationals parliamentarians, particularly in Queensland, NSW and Western Australia.

    And then there was a deeper problem. Many Liberals believed that, to cite Margaret Thatcher’s term, Turnbull was not “one of us”.

    Those who knew Turnbull were aware of his fondness for Labor heroes such as Gough Whitlam and Neville Wran.

    Moreover, former Labor senator Graham Richardson commented occasionally about how Turnbull had approached him a quarter-century ago or so ago with a view to becoming a Labor Party senator.

    In April 2010, I wrote a column supporting Turnbull’s decision to resign from parliament at the election later that year. He changed his mind.

    My position was that on climate policy Turnbull was closer to Labor than to his Coalition colleagues. And I argued that on social policy Turnbull was being outflanked by Labor.

    For example, in 2008 then prime minister Kevin Rudd criticised the showing of photographer Bill Henson’s depiction of naked prepubescent children.

    Turnbull backed Henson and was praised by journalist David Marr for doing so. It seemed to me that Rudd’s position had greater support in suburban and regional Australia, where most marginal seats are located, than that of the (then) Liberal leader.

    What John Howard and Abbott have in common is that they always want the Coalition to be in government and Labor to be on the opposition benches.

    Turnbull’s lobbying from New York raises the question as to whether he has a similar loyalty to the Liberal Party that made him prime minister.

  26. DrBeauGan

    You can get a day trip to Thera from Herakleion, Lizzie. And visit Akrotiri. And stand on what remains of the biggest volcanic event in the Mediterranean, which destroyed Atlantis, according to legend. Although modern opinion is that it only set it back a decade or so.

  27. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    That fgm report makes me angry. What sort of a trained doctor claiming to be civilised enough to live and practice in a civilised country would do that to little girls? 30 years in the can sounds like justice to me.

  28. Bruce of Newcastle

    Silly science time!

    Boss revenge, self-colonoscopy studies win 2018 Ig Nobels

    Liang and her colleagues found that abusing a virtual voodoo doll instead of your boss will make you feel better without getting you fired or thrown in jail, according to a study that earned them a 2018 Ig Nobel, the annual prize sponsored by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research for comical but practical scientific discovery.

    Winners recognized Thursday included a Japanese doctor who devised a revolutionary new way to give yourself a colonoscopy; a British archaeology lecturer who figured out that eating human flesh isn’t very nutritious; an Australian team that found that people who buy high-tech products really can’t be bothered with the instruction manual; and Spanish university researchers who measured the effects of shouting and cursing while driving.

    The winners, who as usual journeyed to Massachusetts at their own expense, also received a cash prize of 10 trillion virtually worthless Zimbabwean dollars.

    Maybe we should pay climate scientists with Zimbabwe dollars too.

  29. .

    The sex trafficking charges are nonsense but that doc. won’t suffer too long, she’s female, a short gaol sentence awaits.

    Nearly all FGM is carried out by females (who get shorter gaol times). This is in turn why the deterrence doesn’t work well enough, other than ambit claims by prosecutors.

  30. DrBeauGan

    calli
    #2817218, posted on September 15, 2018 at 4:51 pm
    Ahhhhh…Santorini.

    It’s very beautiful, Calli, but the hotel staff are thieves. Lock your valuables up, Lizzie.

  31. Oh come on

    He’s an idiot. He’s only going to make JRM more popular.

    This is of course correct. Only the most extreme leftists would not side with JRM in that exchange.

  32. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Dr BG, we did discuss doing that but time was too short then to properly explore Crete. Also we’ve both been to Santorini although not together. However, neither of us has seen Akrotiri, which is on The List.

  33. OldOzzie

    Tony Abbott my local Federal Member will be getting my Vote at the next HOR but Liberals and Nationals will be last on the NSW Senate Paper behind Labor and Greens because that is all the Liberals are worth

    Tony Abbott re-endorsed for Warringah amid ‘uproar’

    Former prime minister Tony Abbott has been re-endorsed as the Liberal candidate for the Sydney northern beaches electorate of Warringah despite a reported attempt to roll him.

    Mr Abbott stood unopposed and was chosen despite grumblings from a vocal minority of grassroots members at a branch meeting last night.

    The Daily Telegraph reports more than 30 per cent of the estimated 90 members present voted against his renomination. The move was a protest by moderate members angry at his failure to honour his “no wrecking, no sniping” pledge, Fairfax Media reports.

    No one stood against Mr Abbott, and the meeting reportedly erupted into “uproar” when the party’s state director decided to withould the results of the ballot.

    “You may have voted against me but I’ll continue to be your member,” Mr Abbott was quoted as saying.

    The result comes three years to the day since the 2015 leadership spill when Malcolm Turnbull toppled Mr Abbott as prime minister.

    BREAKING: Tony Abbott has tonight been re-endorsed for Warringah. Attempts to roll him failed, but the result was tight and the final vote was not released – which outraged some. Abbott told those in attendance he would continue to be their MP even if they voted against him.
    — Sharri Markson (@SharriMarkson) September 14, 2018

    Last night’s failed coup against @TonyAbbottMHR by the Left faction in Warringah is yet more proof that the Photios/Campbell mafia is destroying @LiberalAus.

    To roll an enduringly popular, high profile MP like Abbott in his seat would’ve been self-destructive stupidity! #auspol pic.twitter.com/KJr2S9FuE2
    — #BringBackAbbott (@TeamTAbbott) September 15, 2018

    Mr Abbott who has held the seat of Warringah since 1994 doesn’t seem to be making plans to leave politics any time soon.

    He is the only former prime minister to remain in the current parliament after losing leadership.

    In an interview on 2GB Mr Abbott told Alan Jones that he thought Scott Morrison had “got off to a very good start”.

    “After a very difficult period with quite a lot of self-inflicted wounds, we are now again on the right track,” he said.

    Mr Abbott has called on the Morrison government to sharpen the political contest with Labor ahead of the election by moving to lift the prohibition on nuclear power, as Bill Shorten leaves the door open to reviving the now “dead” national energy guarantee.

    The former chair of the Aus­tralian Nuclear Science and Tech­nology Organisation and current chair of NBN Co, Ziggy ­Swit­kowski, told The Weekend Australian yesterday it was sensible to clear the regulatory pathway for the next generation of small ­nuclear reactors.

    The push to revive the nuclear debate follows Scott Morrison declaring the NEG dead, while opposition energy spokesman Mark Butler this week held out the prospect of Labor moving to revive the policy in government following engagement with industry.

    From the Comments

    – Where is the high profile candidate that Niki Savva told us for years would push Tony Abbott out of Warringah?

    What about all those who because of the high vote for marriage equality have said that Tony Abbott was finished?

    Then all those claiming that Tony Abbott wasn’t being nice to Malcolm Turnbull? Tony Abbott behaved as he said he would behave on losing the leadership. Please don’t change history. It was after the 2016 election when Turnbull showed us that he didn’t know how to campaign, and lost 16 Liberal seats, that Tony Abbott felt entitled to speak.

    Let everyone be advised that it was Tony Abbott who got the millions to help build the new FAR WEST CHILDRENS establishment. It’s going to be a beautiful building of eight floors to provide help for country children.

    Tony Abbott’s achievements for Warringah are here for all to see. Remember it was he who first raised immigration without the infrastructure having been completed.

    The Liberal Party needs Tony Abbott more than ever. We will fight for you.

    This isn’t the first occasion Photios et al have attempted to have TA removed from his seat of Warringah. Says much more about TA’s competence and perseverance than will ever be attributed to those who have tried in vain to remove him. Every politician has those voters who dislike them, but when those that like, out gun those that don’t, clearly the voters know best.

    Bet MT is spitting chips, and frantically trying to invent ways this by-election should be declared null and void. Having, so far, had no luck attempting to oust PD, it would seem the king of revenge is not getting his own way.That mist be a first, and hard to take.

    – NEG was a Labor policy negotiated by Labor Turnbull. Warringah has been infiltrated by the left wing termites call a Flick Man.

    – well done Tony,

    I always thought the campaign against you was never much more than hot air from a few blow hards.

    Seems they couldn’t even organize someone to contest the nomination.

    This Photios left faction really is a cancer within the Libs.

    – There was no other candidate because the Left knew that Abbott was sure to win a ballot (as he won renomination.

    Consequently, it is clear that this was just a part of the Turnbull camp’s dummy spit. Spiteful Turnbull wants to pull the party down with him.

    Good on you Mr Abbott, the Nation needs honest blokes like you

    Onya Tony. We love you mate!

    – Despite the hysteria, it seems 7 out of 10 local members want Abbott as their representative. If Abbott is that unpopular why didn’t other candidates stand? The answer is in the result.

  34. None is right, Greeks in politics are generally poison.

  35. calli

    It is lovely. Spent a day there, and took the photo that every visitor takes.

    The enormous eruption was mentioned by our guide in Egypt and is recorded there. Apparently there was a disruption to the climate and flooding. There are links to the Exodus, though that may be a stretch.

  36. Oh come on

    In case you missed the video of communist filth screaming abuse at small children, here it is again.

    That Ian Bone guy has overnight become the most punchable bloke in Britain. Makes Bob Geldof look like a complete amateur.

  37. Boambee John

    From Zycon at 1628

    everyone shall be welcome in Japan if they are willing to assimilate into Japanese society.

    That’s a big “if”! Imagine the outrage here if the word “assimilate” were to be used.

  38. OldOzzie

    OECD has nothing useful to teach us – By Kevin Donnelly

    It beggars belief that so soon after the Australian curriculum has been bedded down, and it is still impossible to know whether it has been effective in raising standards and providing an enriching and rigorous education, schools are about to undergo a new round of experimentation and change.

    Even worse is that the proposed new national curriculum will draw heavily on the OECD’s project The Future of Education and Skills 2030 and, according to Rob Randall, chief executive of the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, will be ready in 18 to 24 months.

    The OECD’s Learning Framework 2030 repeats all the cliches and politically correct language used to justify forcing nebulous 21st-century learning on schools. The world is “rapidly changing”, and we now live in a world characterised by “a new explosion of scientific knowledge” and “complex societal problems”.

    At the same time that societies are “changing rapidly and profoundly” we are facing myriad threats and challenges, including: global warming, the depletion of resources, growing “inequalities of living standards” and the impact of “migration, urbanisation and increasing social and cultural diversity”.

    As a result of an uncertain and unpredictable future the OECD’s Paris-based bureaucrats argue schools around the world must adopt its globalist groupthink and prepare students “for jobs that have not yet been created, for technologies that have not yet been invented, to solve problems that have not yet been anticipated”.

    In this “new ecosystem of learning” the purpose of education is to enable students “to contribute to and benefit from an inclusive and sustainable future”. Students are described as “change agents” and “future-ready” and 21st-century classrooms are those “where everyone should be considered a learner, not only students but also teachers”.

    In this brave new world of uncertainty and unpredictability the OECD educrats argue the school curriculum must embrace “co-agency”, “personalised learning” and “competencies to transform our society and shape the future”.

    Instead of teachers teaching, they are told to adopt collaborative, negotiated goal setting where the classroom is characterised by “interactive, mutually supportive relationships that help learners to progress towards their valued goals”.

    Even though there is minimal, if any, evidence proving the benefits of this approach, the OECD model argues teachers must allow students to “design their own learning projects” in collaboration with others. Worse still, much like the dumbed down and substandard Gonski 2.0 report on how to achieve educational excellence, the OECD’s Education 2030 model prioritises competencies to the exclusion of the subject disciplines that have stood the test of time and that form the foundation of any education worth its name.

    The OECD’s preferred competencies include: using knowledge and information interactively, relating and co-operating with others, managing and resolving conflicts, acting autonomously, forming and conducting life plans, creating new value and taking responsibility. Such competencies represent a content-free approach to the curriculum that is guaranteed to further lower standards.

    The OECD rationale for placing competencies centrestage is also guilty of a false dichotomy when arguing that a liberal view of education based on the established disciplines is only concerned with “the basic reproduction of accumulated knowledge”.

    By arguing its competencies go well “beyond taught knowledge and skills”, those responsible for the OECD approach ignore the reality that a liberal approach to education is deeply imbued with an ethical and moral framework.

    Such a framework empowers students to be creative, critical minded and able to relate to and co-operate with others, and none of these skills is new to schools and teachers.

    A liberal education is based on what Matthew Arnold describes as “the best that has been thought and said” and what the Victorian Blackburn report describes as “our best validated knowledge and artistic achievements”.

    As such it also teaches students the difference between right and wrong, what constitutes the good life and the importance of reason, rationality and truth.

    Unlike these postmodern times where knowledge is subjective and relative, or simply an expression of power, a liberal education also champions Enlightenment concepts such as empiricism and the scientific method.

    Since the 2011 release of the original Gonski report the debate has been about establishing a fair and equitable funding approach: one no longer based on the flawed model that disadvantages Catholic schools.

    Equally important, if not more, is defining the purpose of education and what constitutes the officially mandated curriculum. It is also vital that schools and teachers have a degree of ownership instead of being dictated to by distant OECD bureaucrats far removed from the realities of Australian classrooms.

  39. DrBeauGan

    calli
    #2817227, posted on September 15, 2018 at 5:04 pm
    It is lovely. Spent a day there, and took the photo that every visitor takes.

    The enormous eruption was mentioned by our guide in Egypt and is recorded there. Apparently there was a disruption to the climate and flooding. There are links to the Exodus, though that may be a stretch.

    You know the links with the Atlantis legend, Calli? That started in Egypt.

  40. How is Trump colluding with Wussia if Manafort was pro-Ukraine?

    Not pro-Ukraine as such, pro Putin’s candidate to run Ukraine as a puppet regime.

    But the stuff that Mueller will get Trump on is not Ukraine related. The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

  41. Death Giraffe

    Instead of teachers teaching, they are told to adopt collaborative, negotiated goal setting where the classroom is characterised by “interactive, mutually supportive relationships that help learners to progress towards their valued goals”.

    ..
    Does NOT work.
    And leaves the weakest students even further behind.
    Utter bastardry.

  42. DrBeauGan

    OldOzzie
    #2817231, posted on September 15, 2018 at 5:10 pm
    OECD has nothing useful to teach us – By Kevin Donnelly

    Everything lefties touch turns to shit. The education system is something they really want to turn to shit, and they’ve already gone a long way.

    More power to Donnelly.

  43. The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    Boys and girls, in case you forgot, monty hails from that side of politics that labeled itself the ‘evidenced-based’ community.

  44. Oh come on

    But the stuff that Mueller will get Trump on is not Ukraine related. The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    LOL so bow you can take this to the bank – Trump’s in the clear on the Manafort front.

  45. OldOzzie

    Menzies Centre’s Union Inc points to CEPU, ETU business interests – Grace Collier

    Staggering news this week, to those not acquainted with this column. Many of the unions, you see, are wildly rich and growing richer by the minute, despite the fact that their membership has plummeted.

    Some of us have always known this, but now, thanks to the Menzies Research Centre, the hard data has been compiled and is in front of policymakers in easy-to-understand terms.

    Unions Inc, written by research director John Slater, is a sobering read and proves that large sections of the Australian union movement are not really functioning as unions but more as businesses, with special advantages.

    Some unions are not functioning as businesses with special advantages but more like Australia’s mafia, because they rely on the use of business models that no one else could dream of accessing.

    Most important, even though the situation is alarming and concern for the future is serious, everyone in a position of power seems powerless or unwilling to do anything about it.

    All unions function as businesses without the penalty of taxation and outside the constraints of company regulation and competition law. Decades ago, membership decline was anticipated, so other revenue streams were decided on and arranged.

    There is nothing wrong with making money, of course, but if unions want to operate as genuine industrial organisations and pay no tax, then they must simply be unions.

    If they want to be businesses, then they must pay tax and abide by company and competition law.

    It is concerning that many unions make increasing amounts of money from arrangements that resemble third line forcing, so their business success is not earned in the free market with a great product or service, but is rather snaffled in a series of dodgy deals selling rubbish to the ignorant and powerless.

    Third line forcing is a form of exclusive dealing where the supply of goods or services is contingent on the purchaser buying goods or services from a particular third party.

    Some unions are harvesting money from deals with businesses, running those funds through a vast network of trusts, and compiling asset pools of gargantuan proportions.

    The private sector is where we need to look for the most interesting cases.

    The report points out that the Communications, Electrical and Plumbing Union, between 2003 and 2016, had a 19.2 per cent decrease in membership but a 271 per cent increase in income.

    Its assets over the same period, have risen from $28.9 million to $152m, representing an increase in asset wealth of 426 per cent. Its Victorian division the Electrical Trades Union has the highest revenue of any union branch in Australia. Since 2003, it has signed up 343 new members but boosted its annual revenue by $6,394,751, an increase of 71.2 per cent.

    Between 2003 and 2016, it received $26.9m in management fees, $16.6m in administration income, $5.9m in trust distributions and $3m in directors’ fees.

    This is just a tiny union, with 17,485 members in 2016.

    Slater’s research describes the source of union wealth quite aptly as “monetising enterprise bargaining”.

    It also describes how some employer groups are facilitating these arrangements and even taking some of the profits.

    Generally speaking, head contractors in construction, telecommunications and other heavy industries, when winning government jobs, sign enterprise agreements with unions.

    This is where the first action of third line forcing occurs. Governments often require these firms to have “relationships” with unions or enterprise agreements in order to win the work.

    Even though these firms have no staff who are going to perform “on the tools” work, they still make enterprise agreements that cover these types of workers.

    As part of these agreements, the employer must buy, for all their workers, products from union-owned businesses, such as income protection insurance.

    In turn, the head contractor forces all their subcontractors to have the same agreement. So head contractors control the wage rates of their subcontractors, and force their subcontractors to buy products for all their workers from union-owned businesses.

    The result of this cascade of enterprise agreement making is that all the workers on the same government job have contributions made on their behalf to union-owned businesses in exchange for products that are sometimes dubious in nature.

    There is no suggestion that any official in any union is planning to make off with any of this money, or use it to fund private pursuits.

    Generally speaking, union officials are motivated not by money but by power.

    If you have power, you don’t need money, because people with money will take you anywhere you want to go and pay for it all anyway.

    Regardless, the real questions for policymakers are: what are the unions planning to do with all the power this wealth will buy, and should the rest of us be worried about it?

  46. candy

    Last night’s failed coup against @TonyAbbottMHR by the Left faction in Warringah is yet more proof that the Photios/Campbell mafia is destroying @LiberalAus.

    Turnbull (from afar) , Bishop/Pyne and PM Morrison’s PMO office I believe are deliberately working to rid themselves of the 3 A’s – Abbott, Abetz and Andrews, to become the centre right progressive party they wish to be. Apparently the PMO does call them “the 3 A’s”.

    Despite Turnbull being rolled, this is still the goal.

  47. egg_

    The effective introduction of a show-and-tell ballot…

    Trying to shame the 43 were the final nails in the idiot’s coffin.

  48. egg_

    Last night’s failed coup against @TonyAbbottMHR by the Left faction in Warringah

    LMFAO.
    Never go full retard!

  49. Delta A

    As such it also teaches students the difference between right and wrong, what constitutes the good life and the importance of reason, rationality and truth.

    That is chilling, especially when read with OECD’s Paris-based bureaucrats argue schools around the world must adopt its globalist groupthink.

    Hello, 1984.

  50. wivenhoe

    But the stuff that Mueller will get Trump on is not Ukraine related. The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    Can anyone tell me which comes first. The wishing and dreaming, or the delusion?

  51. Oh come on

    There is no such thing as a “centre right progressive party”.

  52. Boys and girls, in case you forgot, monty hails from that side of politics that labeled itself the ‘evidenced-based’ community.

    RIP the nothingburger, how many Trumpkin is it now who have been indicted and/or convicted? Could break Nixon’s record at this rate.

  53. Boambee John

    m0nty at 1713

    But the stuff that Mueller will get Trump on is not Ukraine related. The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    And what else did Bob tell you when you spoke to him this morning?

  54. I like how Makka is just straight up running QAnon stuff now. Might as well, that is where the rest of you are headed if you stay in the tribe.

  55. jupes

    I’m guessing Cathay, Jupes? Check as much as you can. HK airport will resemble a refugee zone organised by the UN for two or so days, it won’t be fun. I’m escaping tonight.

    Yeah I think I might be escaping too.

    My travel agent (wife) is on to it as we speak.

  56. Rohan

    There is no such thing as a “centre right progressive party”.

    Well I guess that all depends on whether you think Che Guevara was centre left or not. Because if you do, then Trumble and the Termites really are Australia’s “centre right progressive party”.

  57. OldOzzie

    Let me Repeat – Read and Form your own opinions

    Paul Manafort’s Plea…

    Former convention delegate manager Paul Manafort, entered into a plea deal today with Special Counsel Robert Mueller for issues related to his lobbying firm and FARA registry violations. The plea has nothing to do with candidate Trump, president-elect Trump, or President Trump. Manafort agrees to cooperate with federal prosecutors regarding other issues surrounding his lobbying network and affiliates.

    Rather than read media opinion of the plea agreement HERE IS THE PLEA. You can read it. Earlier tonight Rudy Giuliani appeared on Fox News with Sean Hannity to discuss:

  58. Nick

    My guess is flights to just after midnight will go. Cathay have already cancelled 12pm to 7pm tomorrow, I’m guessing this period will be bigger. The flow on effects will take a couple of days to clear. If you’re staying in HK, it’s worth requiring if your hotel has space for a couple of nights should you need it m.?

  59. Pete of Perth

    Synchronised hula hoops on SBS. Some gymnastics comp in Kazan. Wonders never cease.

  60. Bruce of Newcastle

    Interesting study:

    Religious upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood

    Participating in spiritual practices during childhood and adolescence may be a protective factor for a range of health and well-being outcomes in early adulthood, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers found that people who attended weekly religious services or practiced daily prayer or meditation in their youth reported greater life satisfaction and positivity in their 20s—and were less likely to subsequently have depressive symptoms, smoke, use illicit drugs, or have a sexually transmitted infection—than people raised with less regular spiritual habits.

    All well and good, except I wanted to know what the data was like for the various religions. So I went and read the paper and looked at the supporting data.

    No breakdown by religion. At all.

    But the clue is in the data. The respondees who reported attending religious services at least once a week had mothers who were 97% white and 95% married.

    So the actual finding of the paper should be “Christian upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood”.

    I’m amused that they bent themselves over backwards to avoid any comparison of the religions whatsoever.

    (The people interviewed were from the very large Nurses’ Health Study II, hence the overweighting towards white women.)

  61. deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    That is how epic the humiliation 2016 was to Democrat zombies; nothing less can assuage their loss of face.

  62. Snoopy

    deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    That’s a comprehensive, detailed scenario. Maybe it’s a bit rash to jump in and mock Monty.

  63. Oh come on

    RIP the nothingburger, how many Trumpkin is it now who have been indicted and/or convicted?

    I think he’s started to believe his bullshit. Sad.

  64. jupes

    Ahhhhh…Santorini. 😀

    As I write this, I’m looking at a photo taken of a whole bunch of people at Santos winery with the volcano in the background.

    My wedding.

  65. None

    There is no such thing as a “centre right progressive party”.

    Correct.
    And to Abbott’s credit he’s out there still proposing policy for the Libs to win against Lavor instead of harping on about petty internal matters like the rest of the fuckwits do. In fact putting the focus on nuclear is a perfect wage policy because labour can’t complain about a zero emissions energy source and it also register fuckwhit lefties in the Liberal and National parties.
    I have never been a member of a political party and never want to be and have never paid attention to internal factional wars until a few years ago when I started posting on Twitter and locked horns with a few New South Wales Liberal branch presidents and realise just what a bunch of fakes, frauds and Fifth estaters they were. In fact when a couple of state councils ago I mused out loud on Twitter about the Gaystapo making a move to stop the rank and file for voting for their own candidates and one of the gay branch presidents absolutely went ape s*** on Twitter accusing me of being male, a green, some sort of imposter etc etc. I don’t live in New South Wales; I just guessed this all by listening to these fuckwits on Twitter and clearly the paranoid gay fuckwit thought I was some sort of internal spy. Well they got away with it at that stage Council but in the coming years the absolute filth and corruption of the New South Wales Liberal party started to be exposed and I hope it continues to be exposed with filth like Photios ( not just in politics Dover; Greeks should be banned from all public life; deport the sods) and the Gaystapo which extends to other states – hello Tim Wilson you don’t fool anyone.

  66. jupes

    My guess is flights to just after midnight will go. Cathay have already cancelled 12pm to 7pm tomorrow, I’m guessing this period will be bigger. The flow on effects will take a couple of days to clear. If you’re staying in HK, it’s worth requiring if your hotel has space for a couple of nights should you need it m.?

    We were just transitting through HK on the way to the US. My travel agent has been on the phone for the last 2.5 hours. She has wrestled control of our flights from Cathay, given them back to Qantas and it sounds like she has just about wrangled a flight to NY through Dubai. Fingers crossed.

    She is a champion.

  67. Delta A

    Nick
    #2817258, posted on September 15, 2018 at 5:33 pm

    Nick, you truly are the Travel Guru.

    (Okay, your travelogues are too brief, but when it comes to the serious stuff, you are the go-to Cat.)

  68. Nick

    Wow Jupes, the earlier you can get out before midnight the better. Good work getting another airline to take over , I had a Swiss Bus class ticket on Cathay, neither of them wanted any responsibility.

  69. Former convention delegate manager Paul Manafort

    LOL no, he ran the whole campaign.

    That talking point about none of the charges relating to Russia has a fairly small half life. Enjoy it while you still can!

  70. Makka

    I like how Makka is just straight up running QAnon stuff now. Might as well, that is where the rest of you are headed if you stay in the tribe.

    Hey fatfuck mOron, can you show where I’ve linked to Qanon? Any Q quotes or something ?

    You seem to know a lot of Q type intel , mOron. Have they tasked you with that from your lefy retard boards?

  71. Mark A

    .
    #2817145, posted on September 15, 2018 at 2:12 pm

    I reckon being dual married to Joanna Krupa and Catherine Bell would mitigate the need for rhino powder.

    I hate to ask, but how on earth do you people know so much about so many of these celebrities?
    I’m not exactly a hermit but never heard of most of them, I’m wearing Google out looking them up, and sometimes regretting it.

  72. OldOzzie

    Santorini

    stayed in the Mill Houses with magnificent view from our balcony (strange system seemed to be a number of groups owning apartments in the block going down from the road), but the piece de resistance was dinner at the MYLOS SANTORINI RESTAURANT & BAR on top of the Mill Houses

  73. .

    I hate to ask, but how on earth do you people know so much about so many of these celebrities?
    I’m not exactly a hermit but never heard of most of them, I’m wearing Google out looking them up, and sometimes regretting it.

    Largely because of the Daily Mail spam Bruce used to inflict on us. It has so much crap loading in different banners now it is unreadable.

    You would only regret Joanna Krupa if your wife found out.

  74. Makka, the meme about how Trump is just about to break a massive rock spider network of Democrats was started by Q. If you are running it now then you are one of the suckers who have bought into the long-since-exposed grift. If you don’t even know that is what you are doing then you are just ignorant. So what is it, are you a willing accomplice or are you just dumb as dog droppings?

  75. .

    LOL no, he ran the whole campaign.

    Sure, Bannon was just collecting coke cans for scrap in 2016, amirite?

  76. calli

    My wedding.

    You ol’ softie, jupes! I guessed it. 🙂

  77. Gab

    LOL monty and his rabid ilk have been impeaching Trump since Jan 2017.

    Who’s the president today? Still Trump. 😀

  78. old bloke

    Anne, get yourself in here, we need answers to this question; Why has the New Mexico solar observatory, 6 solar observatory web cams around the world, and SOHO observatory all been shut down?

  79. Makka

    The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    mOron.

    Really, that’s it? Pathways and other stuff. The extent of your intellect?

  80. calli

    The Roswellians took the wrong toin at Albuquerque.

  81. mh

    I knew the name Kimberley Guilfoyle but nothing about her as apparently she is a former Fox News host.

    Now l’ve learnt she is Don Jnr’s new squeeze. Good sort.

    Donald Trump, Jr., Kimberly Guilfoyle Hit Campaign Trail in Ohio to Keep State Red in 2018
    https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/09/14/donald-trump-jr-kimberly-guilfoyle-hit-campaign-trail-in-ohio-to-keep-state-red-in-2018/

  82. 2dogs

    Religious upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood

    There is a possible effect here apart from the moral exhortation. In the copy I noticed:

    33% less likely to use illicit drugs

    which appears to be one of the stronger effects, and may be causing the others.

    Since religious analgesia is available to them, they would have less need to turn to illicit drugs if they acquired a painful condition which legal drugs could not fully satiate.

  83. Bruce of Newcastle

    Why has the New Mexico solar observatory, 6 solar observatory web cams around the world, and SOHO observatory all been shut down?

    This may have something to do with it:

    http://www.spaceweather.com/

    A HOLE IN THE SUN’S ATMOSPHERE: A jagged hole in the sun’s atmosphere is facing Earth and spewing a stream of solar wind toward our planet. Estimated time of arrival: Sept. 17th. Because the gaseous material will reach Earth only a few days before the onset of northern autumn, it may be extra-effective at sparking auroras–a result of “equinox cracks” in the geomagnetic field.

    A big flare/CME would probably damage sensitive instruments.

  84. cohenite

    The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    If you weren’t such a fuckwit it would be sad.

  85. Gab

    Wish a safe journey to any Cats in Hong Kong.

  86. .

    What’s going is pretty weird Bruce. Evacuated by the FBI. Couldn’t the director of the Dept. just send them home?

  87. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    But the stuff that Mueller will get Trump on is not Ukraine related. The charges Manafort pled to yesterday are a pathway to get Manafort to deliver Trump’s head on a silver platter for other stuff.

    someone is picking his boogers in public and eating them

  88. Bruce of Newcastle

    What’s going is pretty weird Bruce. Evacuated by the FBI. Couldn’t the director of the Dept. just send them home?

    When a Carrington Event may be about to occur?
    For a solar scientist that would be the event of the century.
    You’d need crowbars to get them away from their instruments.

    I have no idea what is going on. A Carrington Event would be bad. About Richter level 9.9 in the badness stakes. Except maybe for Apple, who would make lots of money replacing iPhones.

  89. DrBeauGan

    Religious upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood

    I’m doing pretty well with atheism. Mind you I was the product of a mixed religion marriage, Catholicism on one side and demon worship on the other. At least, that’s what the catholic grandmother reckoned.

  90. Makka

    mOron, if you have me quoting or linking Q put it up. You obviously follow Q so it shouldn’t be hard for you.

    Now, if you are telling us you are quite ok with Podesta’s taste in art then fine. I’m not surprised you would enjoy this creepy kind of progressive stuff.

  91. old bloke

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2817296, posted on September 15, 2018 at 6:16 pm

    A big flare/CME would probably damage sensitive instruments.

    That’s true, could do a lot of damage to electrical grids too, but it won’t impact Earth for another two days. So, why shutdown various web cams in many different locations now?

  92. DrBeauGan

    A Carrington event now would be bad, but in a century would be fatal. Keep your bank records on paper.

  93. Mitch M.

    There is a possible effect here apart from the moral exhortation. In the copy I noticed:

    33% less likely to use illicit drugs

    which appears to be one of the stronger effects, and may be causing the others.

    No, it relates to something I posted earlier this week: The Roseta Effect. It’s not mysterious, it has bugger all to do with faith and everything to do with the how living within a strong supportive community has huge implications for stress responses and the sympathetic-parasympathetic balance.

  94. calli

    Are there communities other than faith-based ones that would supply the Roseta Effect?

  95. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    State run Swedish kindergarten forces boys to wear a dress
    The children are not to be called “he” or “she”, they must all be called “hen”, a gender neutral pronoun with boys being forced to dress like girls.

    Popular children’s books such as Emil and Pippi have been discarded and replaced with children’s books on trans and homosexuality.

    Group discussions with children as young as one and two talk about boys falling in love with boys and girls falling in love with girls. At times the children are asked about whom they are in love.

    One little boy, looking confused, answered: “My LEGO”, Anna explains.

  96. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    A mosque in the Swedish town of Botkyrka could be under investigation for electoral fraud after allegations that the imam had offered up to 3,000 votes to the Moderate Party in exchange for building permits.

  97. calli

    Group discussions with children as young as one and two talk about boys falling in love with boys and girls falling in love with girls. At times the children are asked about whom they are in love.

    I’m sure there will be enough millstones, but it will be a close thing.

  98. Keep leaning in to that rabbit hole, Makka.

  99. Catholicism on one side and demon worship on the other.
    At least, that’s what the catholic grandmother reckoned.

    Mixed marriages.

  100. Makka

    As usual mOron, you got nuthin’. Like what occupies that great void between your ears.

  101. Mitch M.

    Are there communities other than faith-based ones that would supply the Roseta Effect?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Zone

  102. 2dogs

    No, it relates to something I posted earlier this week: The Roseta Effect. It’s not mysterious, it has bugger all to do with faith and everything to do with the how living within a strong supportive community has huge implications for stress responses and the sympathetic-parasympathetic balance.

    No, the Roseto Effect requires a very specific kind of strongly supportive community to work. Only a very small percentage of people – very small percentage of even religious people – would live in such a community.

    The Harvard study was a broad population study. The portion of test subjects affected by the Roseto Effect, if any, would by negligible.

  103. 2dogs

    Apparently, not even Roseto itself is that kind of community anymore.

  104. Cold-Hands

    NZ vs RSA 29-36 with 15 minutes to go. Would be great to see the All Blacks get done at home…

  105. Boambee John

    m0nty at 1756

    are you just dumb as dog droppings?

    Who better than you to judge?

  106. Mitch M.

    Apparently, not even Roseto itself is that kind of community anymore.

    And as it lost that community spirit CVD rates rose to typical levels.

    No, the Roseto Effect requires a very specific kind of strongly supportive community to work.

    That which is slowly fading in the West. Every man for himself and f. you jack. Look at the Blue Zones link above, closely connected communities because they are populated by continuing family lines. There is another aspect of this I would like to explore which relates to Bowlby’s concept of “stranger danger” as initiator of unconscious stress responses but not here.

  107. Cold-Hands

    Ahhrggh. Not going to happen. Springboks get a Yellow card.
    Ref Nigel Owens succumbing to crowd pressure.

  108. Leigh Lowe

    Who do the Hawks play next week, mUnter?

  109. Eyrie

    “Why has the New Mexico solar observatory, 6 solar observatory web cams around the world, and SOHO observatory”
    They’ve discovered the Sun will go Nova in 1500 years and wipe out all life on Earth?

    (“The Songs of Distant Earth” A.C.Clarke)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEfJRXL3kJU
    The melody is over, the last transmission done. The cool of Earth is turned to flame with the dying of the sun. The nova flare will burn away the world of mankind’s birth And fire will be the ending of the songs of distant Earth. The sentence was pronounced, the death of Earth would come. The sun burn briefly bright, all history’d be done. And all the things they cared for — the laughter and the tears Would be ended by the nova’s flame in fifteen hundred years. But although die they must, Man might outlive his home. The stars were waiting there with planets of their own. The telescopes peered outward, the probes were sent to fly, To seek a world that they might seed, that Mankind need not die. No man of Earth may walk beneath a foreign sun, But the seedships sent their life — a new race has begun. On twenty worlds we’ve gathered — the human voice grows strong. And we carry on their writing, their poetry, their song. The melody is over, but the echoes linger on From the seeds of life they planted ‘gainst the dying of the sun. The echo’s growing stronger as it calls of Man’s rebirth And a score of worlds are singing now the songs of distant Earth.

  110. DrBeauGan

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2817312, posted on September 15, 2018 at 6:45 pm
    State run Swedish kindergarten forces boys to wear a dress
    The children are not to be called “he” or “she”, they must all be called “hen”, a gender neutral pronoun with boys being forced to dress like girls.

    Popular children’s books such as Emil and Pippi have been discarded and replaced with children’s books on trans and homosexuality.

    Group discussions with children as young as one and two talk about boys falling in love with boys and girls falling in love with girls. At times the children are asked about whom they are in love.

    One little boy, looking confused, answered: “My LEGO”, Anna explains.

    It would be ironic if the muslim immigrants saved Sweden from itself. Something tells me they wouldn’t tolerate this loony shit.

  111. calli

    I noticed in your link, Mitch, that faith was one of the indicators. The Sardinians and Sevvies are obvious, but the Okinawans too have a faith that is practised in the family home.

    Faith in something bigger than oneself might be the glue that holds these communities together and promotes a healthful atmosphere.

  112. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I walked around the Santorini volcano area in things. I was younger and cared less about comforts in those days. 🙂

  113. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Bloody, phone. In thongs. On my feet.

  114. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Probably thing underwear too. Can’t remember.

  115. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Effing phone. Thong thong.

  116. Snoopy

    To seek a world that they might seed, that Mankind need not die. No man of Earth may walk beneath a foreign sun, But the seedships sent their life

    I pray our descendants make room on the seedships for the southern black-throated finch.

  117. DrBeauGan

    When, Perth time, are we going to get our phones fried? I bam planning to bury mine six feet down for the duration.

  118. Cold-Hands

    Incredible resilience from South Africa.
    Springboks win, 36 to 34.
    Might push the Wallabies into 3rd in the Rugby Championship.

  119. Pedro the Ignorant

    Faraday cage, Dr BG.

    Like crystals and pyramids, only scientificky.

  120. Snoopy

    After 8 years of cuddly Camelot the ABC has rediscovered the evil of Pine Gap.

  121. areff

    I walked around the Santorini volcano area in things. I was younger and cared less about comforts in those days.

    You’d make a very poot Mexican gal, Lizzie. I’ve seen them climbing the Pyramid of the Moon in vertigo inspiring heels.

    Hispanic women, the Plumed Serpent’s gift to all men everywhere.

  122. Mitch M.

    I noticed in your link, Mitch, that faith was one of the indicators. The Sardinians and Sevvies are obvious, but the Okinawans too have a faith that is practised in the family home.

    I assumed some would focus on that. To focus on one variable while ignoring all the others is confirmation bias. Don’t do that. The picture is much more complicated than reaching for preferred conclusions.

  123. mh

    Trump-Basher Kathy Griffin to Receive ‘Comedian of the Year’ Award

    Comedian Kathy Griffin is set to receive a ‘Comedian of the Year’ award at the upcoming Palm Springs Comedy Festival in November.
    According to The Hollywood Reporter, Kathy Griffin will receive the award, in part, for her “comeback” over the last year following last summer’s controversy over her posing with a fake “beheaded” head of President Donald Trump….

    https://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2018/09/14/kathy-griffin-to-receive-comedian-of-the-year-award/

  124. Bruce of Newcastle

    “The Songs of Distant Earth” A.C.Clarke

    Dot likes that book because sortition. 😀

    I’ve just started “The Immortality Option” by James P. Hogan in honour of the Cassini pics of Titan’s lakes today. Ultra cool, in both senses.

    Cassini’s final view of Titan’s northern lakes and seas

    During NASA’s Cassini mission’s final distant encounter with Saturn’s giant moon Titan, the spacecraft captured the enigmatic moon’s north polar landscape of lakes and seas, which are filled with liquid methane and ethane.

    They were captured on Sept. 11, 2017. Four days later, Cassini was deliberately plunged into the atmosphere of Saturn.

    That is 9/11 Saturn-style. I hope no robots were under it.

  125. mh

    Jimmy Carter: I Would ‘Change All’ of Trump’s Policies if I Were President Again

    I’d be concerned if Jimmy Carter said anything else. He was hopeless.

  126. Bruce of Newcastle

    Jimmy Carter: I Would ‘Change All’ of Trump’s Policies if I Were President Again

    Compare and contrast:
    Carter
    Trump
    What can be said about those incidents which hasn’t already been said?

  127. It’s Remarkable

    Bloody welcome to country. Plus having run out with schoolchildren. Wrecks any focus by the players on the job at hand. But very PC and signalling.

  128. calli

    The picture is much more complicated than reaching for preferred conclusions.

    I was just speculating and understand “confirmation bias”. It has piqued my interest though, especially in view of what our society has become and what we have lost (your comment at 7:08).

    As you say, it’s complicated.

  129. miltonf

    Jimmy Carter- still hanging around like a bad smell.

  130. DrBeauGan

    Pedro the Ignorant
    #2817342, posted on September 15, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Faraday cage, Dr BG.

    Like crystals and pyramids, only scientificky.

    Not much use, Pedro. A Faraday cage would keep out only the EM radiation. What threatens my electronics is high speed ions. Not that an em pulse would be good, but that isn’t what is coming off the sun.

  131. calli

    Also, Empowered Women, Sunshine and Gardening were on that Venn diagram.

    Looks pretty good for this little black duck if true. 🙂

  132. mh

    Carter could have ordered Operation Eagle Claw to rescue him from the crazed rabbit.

  133. Oh come on

    Kathy Griffin is unintentionally hilarious. Remember that monumental and monumentally entitled whine she claimed was her “state of the union”? She evidently realised what a terribly bad look it was because she’s taken down the official video, but the internet is forever.

  134. Pedro the Ignorant

    . A Faraday cage would keep out only the EM radiation. What threatens my electronics is high speed ions. Not that an em pulse would be good, but that isn’t what is coming off the sun.

    Oh well, I need a new phone anyway. The cool kids keep telling me my iPhone 5 is ancient tech. I still think it is white man’s magic.

  135. Roger

    The picture is much more complicated than reaching for preferred conclusions.

    Sure, but Buettner lists “life purpose” & “spirituality/religion” as characteristics of blue zone folk.

  136. calli

    Some of them overlap, Roger, and dovetail into Biblical teaching.

    Work, avoidance of gluttony and over-imbibing, importance of family and neighbours, meditation and prayer as stress reducers.

    Bias works both ways of course.

  137. mh

    CNN Ratings Down 41 Percent from Last Year

    Last week, CNN dropped a full 41 percent in the daytime TV ratings and fell 36 percent in primetime compared to the same week last year.
    AdWeek reports, “CNN ranked No. 6 across basic cable in total prime time viewers, and No. 5 in total day this past week. Despite the top 10 finishes, the network was -36 percent in prime time viewers, and -41 percent in total day viewers vs. the same week last year.”

    Not only did CNN see a devastating drop from last year’s ratings, the network was once again bested by its competitors. Fox News came in first place with during the day, while MSNBC came in second….

    https://www.breitbart.com/big-journalism/2018/09/14/cnn-ratings-down-41-percent-from-last-year/

  138. Tel

    What threatens my electronics is high speed ions.

    The average sheet steel chassis of a computer would easily block high speed ions.

    I’ve gone one step better and put the computers inside a sheet steel cabinet (a.k.a. an office supplies cupboard from Ikea). Then the ions need to travel through two layers of steel. I’m tucked in for the storm from here.

  139. Gab

    So Trump was right, yet again. “CNN is not a real news network”.

  140. Tel

    Oh well, I need a new phone anyway. The cool kids keep telling me my iPhone 5 is ancient tech. I still think it is white man’s magic.

    I must admit I leave the phone on the desk and it’s got a plastic case so perhaps the high speed ions have a chance on that one. Probably the concrete roof above the house will be sufficient, it’s got Kevin Rudd batts installed so that’s got to be worth something.

  141. cohenite

    Souths over the Dragons; corker of a game.

  142. DrBeauGan

    What threatens my electronics is high speed ions.

    The average sheet steel chassis of a computer would easily block high speed ions.

    I’ve gone one step better and put the computers inside a sheet steel cabinet (a.k.a. an office supplies cupboard from Ikea). Then the ions need to travel through two layers of steel. I’m tucked in for the storm from here.

    Depends on the energy of the ions, Tel. I had to use about two inches of lead to stop alpha and beta particles from a radioactive source in first year physics. A proton or electron travelling at close to light speed would take a lot of stopping.

  143. The Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, said Wednesday that “Europe belongs to the Europeans” and that refugees should return to their native countries to rebuild them.

    Speaking at a conference in Sweden’s third-largest city of Malmo, home to a large immigrant population, the Dalai Lama — who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 — said Europe was “morally responsible” for helping “a refugee really facing danger against their life”.

    “Receive them, help them, educate them… but ultimately they should develop their own country,” said the 83-year-old Tibetan who fled the capital Lhasa in fear of his life after China poured troops into the region to crush an uprising.

    “I think Europe belongs to the Europeans,” he said, adding they should make clear to refugees that “they ultimately should rebuild their own country.”

    CL, when did you start advising the Dali Lama?

  144. C.L.

    Rabbitohs!
    Woo-hoo,
    ———–
    Then caught the last play of the Loserbys – losing again.
    Israel owned. Brilliant flanker’s tackle.

    Pumas! Yay!

  145. DrBeauGan

    CL, when did you start advising the Dali Lama?

    When the pope stopped listening.

  146. Goanna

    It’s Remarkable
    #2817351, posted on September 15, 2018 at 8:04 pm
    Bloody welcome to country. Plus having run out with schoolchildren. Wrecks any focus by the players on the job at hand. But very PC and signalling.

    The GayFL wears a black armband.

  147. C.L.

    The Lama and I are tight.

    Look, it’s a question of morality. It is grossly immoral for entire nations to be abandoned like broken down kombi vans, the most vulnerable (and the most loyal) left behind to face a situation that will – because of the exodus – get infinitely worse. Go home and fight for your countries. Build something.

    These ‘refugees’ are not courageous. They’re gutless.

  148. None

    When the pope stopped listening.

    WHen the DL started his campaigning for Tibet for the Tibetans.

  149. Nick

    The Dalai Lama is a bunnies supporter.
    Tibet is a place well worth visiting in general

  150. DrBeauGan

    I quite like the dalai lama even though he giggles. He has a sense of humour and I am sure he is not corrupt. Can’t say the same for the pope.

  151. Snoopy

    What Bernadi is asking for doesn’t go far enough. If the Chicom bullies are identified they should have their visas cancelled.

    Lawyers look at Chinese threats
    SEPTEMBER 15, 2018
    A legal panel is considering a “snitching scandal” involving Chinese students at the University of Adelaide that saw some threatened with being reported to the Chinese embassy in ­Canberra for alleged anti-­communist activity.

    It comes amid calls by Conservatives Party leader Cory Bernardi for the university to conduct an investigation and for any international students ­“dobbing in fellow ­nationals” for participating in democracy to be suspended or expelled, and stripped of elected positions.

    Chinese students at the university were threatened with being reported for allegedly campaigning against communism during student elections last month. A key complaint was that a threatening message was circulated via the messaging platform WeChat.

    The message targeted students who were promoting a political banner that said “Jobs not Socialism”. The WeChat message claimed the banner was “openly against socialism and communism”, and warned that participators’ details had been reported to the embassy.

    Chinese students told The Weekend Australian “intimidating behaviour” during the election campaign had left many “freaking out” and concerned about the consequences for themselves and their families.

    A spokesman for International Student Association Inc said the issue had caused “genuine safety concerns for a variety of students, impression of foreign meddling and negative ­effects to the education industry among parents”.

  152. C.L.

    Adam Reynolds could kick a field goal from the car-park while being charged by a herd of hippopotamuses. So … St George run it on the fifth and take the tackle with a minute on the clock.

    Good call. 🙂

  153. Oh come on

    Tibetan Buddhism has been co-opted by a bunch of Californian hippies. Hey, it did bring in the big bucks after Mao took over, but the underlying philosophy lives on, in spite of Richard Gere (or maybe because of?? He hasn’t been heard of much recently). The Theravada Buddhist hierarchy positions on social issues is pretty much lineball with ‘conservative’ Christian perspectives.

  154. Oh come on

    The Dalai Lama says a lot – as in, a lot – of stuff that gets squelched by the SJW crowd who adores the Oriental aspect of him. He is a very politically incorrect individual.

  155. cohenite

    A proton or electron travelling at close to light speed would take a lot of stopping.

    Nah, according to notaries of the cult of alarmism like al gore and fuck-knuckle human CO2 in the atmosphere will stop the little buggars every time.

  156. C.L.

    The Dalai Lama has far better horological taste than the pope.
    He owns two Rolex Datejusts and an exceedingly rare solid gold Patek Philippe reference 658.
    (Price: about three quarters of a million dollars).

    Pope Francis wears a $10 Casio.

    You can guess which choice = pretentious in my book.

  157. Nick

    OCO, Tibetan Buddhist monks are organised along the lines of Hogwarts school. One group is into black magic, while the Dalai Lama from memory comes from the ‘yellow’ house.

  158. zyconoclast

    Tibetan Buddhism has been co-opted by a bunch of Californian hippies.

    Friendly Feudalism: The Tibet Myth

    But what of Tibetan Buddhism? Is it not an exception to this sort of strife? And what of the society it helped to create? Many Buddhists maintain that, before the Chinese crackdown in 1959, old Tibet was a spiritually oriented kingdom free from the egotistical lifestyles, empty materialism, and corrupting vices that beset modern industrialized society. Western news media, travel books, novels, and Hollywood films have portrayed the Tibetan theocracy as a veritable Shangri-La. The Dalai Lama himself stated that “the pervasive influence of Buddhism” in Tibet, “amid the wide open spaces of an unspoiled environment resulted in a society dedicated to peace and harmony. We enjoyed freedom and contentment.” 4

    A reading of Tibet’s history suggests a somewhat different picture. “Religious conflict was commonplace in old Tibet,” writes one western Buddhist practitioner. “History belies the Shangri-La image of Tibetan lamas and their followers living together in mutual tolerance and nonviolent goodwill. Indeed, the situation was quite different. Old Tibet was much more like Europe during the religious wars of the Counterreformation.” 5 In the thirteenth century, Emperor Kublai Khan created the first Grand Lama, who was to preside over all the other lamas as might a pope over his bishops. Several centuries later, the Emperor of China sent an army into Tibet to support the Grand Lama, an ambitious 25-year-old man, who then gave himself the title of Dalai (Ocean) Lama, ruler of all Tibet. Here is a historical irony: the first Dalai Lama was installed by a Chinese army.

    His two previous lama “incarnations” were then retroactively recognized as his predecessors, thereby transforming the 1st Dalai Lama into the 3rd Dalai Lama. This 1st (or 3rd) Dalai Lama seized monasteries that did not belong to his sect, and is believed to have destroyed Buddhist writings that conflicted with his claim to divinity. The Dalai Lama who succeeded him pursued a sybaritic life, enjoying many mistresses, partying with friends, and acting in other ways deemed unfitting for an incarnate deity. For these transgressions he was murdered by his priests. Within 170 years, despite their recognized divine status, five Dalai Lamas were killed by their high priests or other courtiers. 6

    For hundreds of years competing Tibetan Buddhist sects engaged in bitterly violent clashes and summary executions. In 1660, the 5th Dalai Lama was faced with a rebellion in Tsang province, the stronghold of the rival Kagyu sect with its high lama known as the Karmapa. The 5th Dalai Lama called for harsh retribution against the rebels, directing the Mongol army to obliterate the male and female lines, and the offspring too “like eggs smashed against rocks…. In short, annihilate any traces of them, even their names.” 7

    In 1792, many Kagyu monasteries were confiscated and their monks were forcibly converted to the Gelug sect (the Dalai Lama’s denomination). The Gelug school, known also as the “Yellow Hats,” showed little tolerance or willingness to mix their teachings with other Buddhist sects. In the words of one of their traditional prayers: “Praise to you, violent god of the Yellow Hat teachings/who reduces to particles of dust/ great beings, high officials and ordinary people/ who pollute and corrupt the Gelug doctrine.” 8 An eighteenth-century memoir of a Tibetan general depicts sectarian strife among Buddhists that is as brutal and bloody as any religious conflict might be. 9 This grim history remains largely unvisited by present-day followers of Tibetan Buddhism in the West.

    Religions have had a close relationship not only with violence but with economic exploitation. Indeed, it is often the economic exploitation that necessitates the violence. Such was the case with the Tibetan theocracy. Until 1959, when the Dalai Lama last presided over Tibet, most of the arable land was still organized into manorial estates worked by serfs. These estates were owned by two social groups: the rich secular landlords and the rich theocratic lamas. Even a writer sympathetic to the old order allows that “a great deal of real estate belonged to the monasteries, and most of them amassed great riches.” Much of the wealth was accumulated “through active participation in trade, commerce, and money lending.” 10

    Drepung monastery was one of the biggest landowners in the world, with its 185 manors, 25,000 serfs, 300 great pastures, and 16,000 herdsmen. The wealth of the monasteries rested in the hands of small numbers of high-ranking lamas. Most ordinary monks lived modestly and had no direct access to great wealth. The Dalai Lama himself “lived richly in the 1000-room, 14-story Potala Palace.” 11

    Secular leaders also did well. A notable example was the commander-in-chief of the Tibetan army, a member of the Dalai Lama’s lay Cabinet, who owned 4,000 square kilometers of land and 3,500 serfs. 12 Old Tibet has been misrepresented by some Western admirers as “a nation that required no police force because its people voluntarily observed the laws of karma.” 13 In fact. it had a professional army, albeit a small one, that served mainly as a gendarmerie for the landlords to keep order, protect their property, and hunt down runaway serfs.

    Young Tibetan boys were regularly taken from their peasant families and brought into the monasteries to be trained as monks. Once there, they were bonded for life. Tashì-Tsering, a monk, reports that it was common for peasant children to be s3xually mistreated in the monasteries. He himself was a victim of repeated [email protected], beginning at age nine. 14 The monastic estates also conscripted children for lifelong servitude as domestics, dance performers, and soldiers.

    In old Tibet there were small numbers of farmers who subsisted as a kind of free peasantry, and perhaps an additional 10,000 people who composed the “middle-class” families of merchants, shopkeepers, and small traders. Thousands of others were beggars. There also were slaves, usually domestic servants, who owned nothing. Their offspring were born into slavery. 15 The majority of the rural population were serfs. Treated little better than slaves, the serfs went without schooling or medical care, They were under a lifetime bond to work the lord’s land–or the monastery’s land–without pay, to repair the lord’s houses, transport his crops, and collect his firewood. They were also expected to provide carrying animals and transportation on demand.16 Their masters told them what crops to grow and what animals to raise. They could not get married without the consent of their lord or lama. And they might easily be separated from their families should their owners lease them out to work in a distant location. 17

    As in a free labor system and unlike slavery, the overlords had no responsibility for the serf’s maintenance and no direct interest in his or her survival as an expensive piece of property. The serfs had to support themselves. Yet as in a slave system, they were bound to their masters, guaranteeing a fixed and permanent workforce that could neither organize nor strike nor freely depart as might laborers in a market context. The overlords had the best of both worlds.

    One 22-year old woman, herself a runaway serf, reports: “Pretty serf girls were usually taken by the owner as house servants and used as he wished”; they “were just slaves without rights.”18 Serfs needed permission to go anywhere. Landowners had legal authority to capture those who tried to flee. One 24-year old runaway welcomed the Chinese intervention as a “liberation.” He testified that under serfdom he was subjected to incessant toil, hunger, and cold. After his third failed escape, he was merciless beaten by the landlord’s men until blood poured from his nose and mouth. They then poured alcohol and caustic soda on his wounds to increase the pain, he claimed.19

    The serfs were taxed upon getting married, taxed for the birth of each child and for every death in the family. They were taxed for planting a tree in their yard and for keeping animals. They were taxed for religious festivals and for public dancing and drumming, for being sent to prison and upon being released. Those who could not find work were taxed for being unemployed, and if they traveled to another village in search of work, they paid a passage tax. When people could not pay, the monasteries lent them money at 20 to 50 percent interest. Some debts were handed down from father to son to grandson. Debtors who could not meet their obligations risked being cast into slavery.20

    The theocracy’s religious teachings buttressed its class order. The poor and afflicted were taught that they had brought their troubles upon themselves because of their wicked ways in previous lives. Hence they had to accept the misery of their present existence as a karmic atonement and in anticipation that their lot would improve in their next lifetime. The rich and powerful treated their good fortune as a reward for, and tangible evidence of, virtue in past and present lives.

    The Tibetan serfs were something more than superstitious victims, blind to their own oppression. As we have seen, some ran away; others openly resisted, sometimes suffering dire consequences. In feudal Tibet, torture and mutilation–including eye gouging, the pulling out of tongues, hamstringing, and amputation–were favored punishments inflicted upon thieves, and runaway or resistant serfs. Journeying through Tibet in the 1960s, Stuart and Roma Gelder interviewed a former serf, Tsereh Wang Tuei, who had stolen two sheep belonging to a monastery. For this he had both his eyes gouged out and his hand mutilated beyond use. He explains that he no longer is a Buddhist: “When a holy lama told them to blind me I thought there was no good in religion.”21 Since it was against Buddhist teachings to take human life, some offenders were severely lashed and then “left to God” in the freezing night to die. “The parallels between Tibet and medieval Europe are striking,” concludes Tom Grunfeld in his book on Tibet. 22

    In 1959, Anna Louise Strong visited an exhibition of torture equipment that had been used by the Tibetan overlords. There were handcuffs of all sizes, including small ones for children, and instruments for cutting off noses and ears, gouging out eyes, breaking off hands, and hamstringing legs. There were hot brands, whips, and special implements for disemboweling. The exhibition presented photographs and testimonies of victims who had been blinded or crippled or suffered amputations for thievery. There was the shepherd whose master owed him a reimbursement in yuan and wheat but refused to pay. So he took one of the master’s cows; for this he had his hands severed. Another herdsman, who opposed having his wife taken from him by his lord, had his hands broken off. There were pictures of Communist activists with noses and upper lips cut off, and a woman who was raped and then had her nose sliced away.23

    Earlier visitors to Tibet commented on the theocratic despotism. In 1895, an Englishman, Dr. A. L. Waddell, wrote that the populace was under the “intolerable tyranny of monks” and the devil superstitions they had fashioned to terrorize the people. In 1904 Perceval Landon described the Dalai Lama’s rule as “an engine of oppression.” At about that time, another English traveler, Captain W.F.T. O’Connor, observed that “the great landowners and the priests… exercise each in their own dominion a despotic power from which there is no appeal,” while the people are “oppressed by the most monstrous growth of monasticism and priest-craft.” Tibetan rulers “invented degrading legends and stimulated a spirit of superstition” among the common people. In 1937, another visitor, Spencer Chapman, wrote, “The Lamaist monk does not spend his time in ministering to the people or educating them. . . . The beggar beside the road is nothing to the monk. Knowledge is the jealously guarded prerogative of the monasteries and is used to increase their influence and wealth.”24 As much as we might wish otherwise, feudal theocratic Tibet was a far cry from the romanticized Shangri La so enthusiastically nurtured by Buddhism’s western proselytes.

  159. Nick

    Fairfax:

    Tony Abbott survives shock challenge but may have secured just 55 per cent of vote

    I don’t remember the SSM plebiscite being talked about by Fairfax as ‘just’ winning.

  160. C.L.

    Channel-flipped on to The Day of the Jackal – the original one.
    Should be compulsory viewing for anybody under 35.
    Dozens of police searched big record books in an archive looking for a deceased baby’s name (illicitly appropriated to acquire a false passport). They kept in touch with their boss, Deputy Commissioner Claude Lebel (the great Michael Lonsdale), by heavy black, bakelite telephones. Everyone is constantly smoking. Commissioner Lebel’s desk blotter is covered in – yes, ink blots. In one scene, he takes a call while preparing a glass of powdery French Eno. he jots down a number plate and then accepts a Gauloises from his subordinate. A better world.

  161. None

    The cuddly Dalai Lama is quite an authoritarian. There is nothing cuddly about Tibetan Buddhism. It’s as oppressive (and sexist) as the next eastern religion. Buddhist countries are theocracies, autocracies and downright dictatorships (Tibet, Thailand etc)

  162. None

    Tony Abbott survives shock challenge but may have secured just 55 per cent of vote

    With 90 people present, you only need a handful for an effective branch stack.

  163. None

    I can’t believe I used to smoke Gauloises. *pinches self*

  164. C.L.

    Monty discusses the Manafort story as Donald Trump and Mike Pence walk past:

  165. Mitch M.

    I quite like the dalai lama even though he giggles. He has a sense of humour and I am sure he is not corrupt. Can’t say the same for the pope.

    There is a famous case of a neuroscientist who became a Tibetan Buddhist. When they placed him in a scanner to perform a standardised test on happiness his was through the roof. I don’t like Tibetan Buddhism, too much nonsense. Buddhism generally brings a “lighter” touch to life, not as intense as the Judaeo-Christian tradition. One aspect of Buddhism that is interesting is how it stresses that our senses are rather deceptive.

  166. hzhousewife

    The cuddly Dalai Lama is quite an authoritarian. There is nothing cuddly about Tibetan Buddhism. It’s as oppressive (and sexist) as the next eastern religion. Buddhist countries are theocracies, autocracies and downright dictatorships (Tibet, Thailand etc)

    Primitive societies and cultures tend to be, well, primitive.
    Except aboriginal australian society, which was all sweetness and light and glorious harmony before white man turned up.

  167. None

    It’s tragic that Trioli lost her baby but it would not have been the first. IVF is basically a game of throwing babies over a chasm and hoping one of them will eventually make it to the other side (this is precisely how a doctor explained it once). IVF clinics are quite coy about giving details of their FAILURE rate. They are even more coy about how they falsely assess fertility problems (how many people do we all know who had #1 by IVF and then concieved naturally?). They also don’t inform women then IVF actually reduces their fertility. Remember IVF is a very big business.
    The number of kids Trioli would have killed in her pursuit of artificial insemination would have exceeded the average number of abortions per woman in Australia. Regardless, millions of women go to work pregnant without behaving like a galah. I am sick of this namby women who make up excuses or lie to cover up for their bad behaviour. Own it, ladies.

  168. What in God’s name is happening?

    Malthusianism in action.

  169. None

    Except aboriginal australian society, which was all sweetness and light and glorious harmony before white man turned up.

    Yes. How I long for us to return to the Australia of the 1600s where I could have my skull smashed … etc., etc.

  170. DrBeauGan

    One aspect of Buddhism that is interesting is how it stresses that our senses are rather deceptive.

    Also, in zen Buddhism in particular, how language can fail us in describing the world.

  171. None

    Speaking of Zen Buddhists, the Japanese Zen Buddhist priests were just as bastard as the rest of them during the war, even secretly training in their monasteries.

  172. Mindfree

    lhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgTKyG86cL0&list=RDKgTKyG86cL0&start_radio=1
    sensational

  173. Mitch M.

    Sure, but Buettner lists “life purpose” & “spirituality/religion” as characteristics of blue zone folk.

    In relation to Okinawa the religion is probably Shintoism which doesn’t strike me as being about social life. For most of our evolution we lived in clans, tribes were about specific family lines so there may even be a selection issue that favours being around people of like mind. Hence my interest in the idea of stranger danger, wondering if living in a highly mixed community is more stressful.

    A study a few years ago found that having purpose in life was important for longevity and studies on centenarians tend to bear that out. A follow up study found that such people, naturally, took better care of their health(though in the text I read on centenarians they weren’t particularly health conscious). Chicken and egg there because longevity appears to very much about genetics. Tonight I sent to some friends a new study I saw on various nutrients associated with longevity, it does appear that controlling inflammation is very important which is why I raised the issue of stress responses because sustained stress tends to increase inflammation. Smoking is terrible for inflammation and DNA damage so it is not surprising it is just about the worst thing for health. Another study found that loneliness is just as bad as smoking.

  174. jupes

    Hey hey! Instead of flying into a typhoon, I’m about to board a business class flight to Dubai on the way to NY. My travel agent is a genius. That’s why I married her.

  175. None

    Emma Bonino, a radical feminist and extreme leftist, proudly claims to have personally aborted some 10,000 “unwanted” children with a modified bicycle pump.

    She now argues that 3rd world immigration is the answer to Europe’s demographic crisis.

    She now also wears a hijab.

  176. Mark A

    None
    #2817404, posted on September 15, 2018 at 10:59 pm

    I can’t believe I used to smoke Gauloises. *pinches self*

    So did I when I still smoked got onto it when studying in Germany, now there is a cigarette that gives you a real kick.
    No filter, no nothing .

  177. Nick

    You’re lucky Jupes. Qantas cancelled their 1130 flight out.

  178. jupes

    Nick I’m in Perth. I was originally heading North to HK then East to Ny but now I
    I’m heading West. Always a smart move.

  179. Mitch M.

    Speaking of Zen Buddhists, the Japanese Zen Buddhist priests were just as bastard as the rest of them during the war, even secretly training in their monasteries.

    Zen Buddhism as practiced today does not reflect Bodhidharma. Buddhism like most religions has been bastardised hence all the different schools of interpretation and internecine differences. Shintoism became the dominant religion and what was left of Zen was co-opted for militaristic purposes. Religions are often co-opted for nationalistic purposes. Again that bastardisation. I would prefer that religionists choose not to become aligned with the State but that hasn’t been going on ever since the first chief sought the support of the first shaman.

    https://www.quora.com/How-was-Zen-Buddhism-viewed-in-Japan-during-WWII

  180. No filter, no nothing .

    Camel and Chesterfield plains (unfiltered) in the 1960 – 70’s.
    A pure, unadulterated mix of nicotine and tar.
    Heaven.

  181. Nick

    Smart move indeed. If you’re on an A380 the bar is worth a visit. I’m about to nut two loud mainlanders who are disturbing my business class fun.

  182. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    In transit at Athens airport on the way to Crete. Your lispth re my thong gave me a laugh, Calli. I used to thing my babieth to thleep but that is the extent of my vocal talents when it comes to thinging to an audience.

    My phone is having complete conniptions about the above, btw.

  183. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Mention of lisps on the Cat tends to bring forth My Fwend Biggus Dickus.

    I’m off before anyone blames me for it. Calli did it, honest.

  184. None

    So did I when I still smoked got onto it when studying in Germany, now there is a cigarette that gives you a real kick.
    No filter, no nothing .

    I was about the only non-smoker in my class when I was a student in Germany (you could smoke at school, in the last two years of gymnasium; only at the mid-morning though). I picked up the habit later 🙁

  185. None

    Ah Camels were my go to if no Gauloise available and third option was Dunhill Reds. But I’d switch to clove cigarettes in Asia because they were dirt cheap.

  186. None

    Thanks Mitch. Yes I think Westerners are very starry-eyed and misinformed about Buddhism.

  187. Talleyrand

    None
    #2817404, posted on September 15, 2018 at 10:59 pm
    I can’t believe I used to smoke Gauloises. *pinches self*

    Loved Gitanes sans filtre myself. Too many in an hour however, did give you the shakes.
    That cigarette vice, and pernod; the taste of my youth.

  188. None

    Talley – pernod? I developed a taste for ouzo! I think because it was cheaper. I don’t drink now except for the odd special occasion but I’m pretty sure I was an alcoholic in my 20s.

  189. Talleyrand

    None- Well I was in my 20s, reading Lawrence Durrell at the time, and the characters always seemed to be drinking Pernod, smoking, fcking ,and talking of art.

  190. Mark A

    Motorbike experts, can any of you ID this one, from the end of WWII, possibly German commandeered by a couple of Russians.

  191. Mark A

    Talleyrand
    #2817444, posted on September 16, 2018 at 3:37 am

    None- Well I was in my 20s, reading Lawrence Durrell at the time, and the characters always seemed to be drinking Pernod, smoking, fcking ,and talking of art.

    Did you take up the lot or just the fags and the booze?

  192. Mitch M.

    Thanks Mitch. Yes I think Westerners are very starry-eyed and misinformed about Buddhism.

    Definitely. Look at the hype psychologists carried on with about insight meditation, even making ridiculous claims that it would enhance compassion(it doesn’t) and creativity(idiots). Meditation is just a way of training the mind to shut the F. up and it can be very good for some people but as the old Buddhists knew it can also be very dangerous for some with mental illness. Moreover the real physiological benefit of meditation was known by Herbert Benson in the 50’s. He developed the idea of the relaxation response. He was a Christian who wanted to strip meditation of its religious affiliations and came up with a very good idea that is too much neglected today. Nonetheless his ideas are more about inducing relaxation rather than training the mind to shut the F. up, which in itself can have considerable benefits. Not for me though, I enjoy the busyness upstairs.

    The big cultural problem with Buddhism is it is cowardly in the sense that it is too accepting of reality. That’s the counterpoint to the Judaeo-Christian tradition which is much more likely to compel people to challenge the world rather than just sit back and let it be. I sometimes wonder if that is why Asians nations didn’t progress as much until Westernisation came along and made them get off their asses.

  193. Mitch M.

    Anti-inflammatory diet linked to reduced risk of early death

    Not that important when we are young but very important post age 60. There is even a term that relates to age related inflammation: inflammaging.

    An Update on Inflamm-Aging: Mechanisms, Prevention, and Treatment

  194. Mark A

    Mitch M.
    #2817451, posted on September 16, 2018 at 5:14 am

    Anti-inflammatory diet linked to reduced risk of early death

    I’m nearing the dreaded 60 in a few years time, can you recommend some more detailed reading on this?

    I know I can Google, but if you already sorted the wheat from the chaff then it would help.
    Thanks

  195. rickw

    She now also wears a hijab.

    The Lunatic Left and Islam’s not so secret love affair.

  196. Jumpnmcar

    Mark A.
    I’m thinking a Zündapp just by the front suspension and headlight.

  197. Mark A

    Jumpnmcar
    #2817455, posted on September 16, 2018 at 6:31 am

    Mark A.
    I’m thinking a Zündapp just by the front suspension and headlight.

    Good guess, I was thinking along that line, someone suggested, the DKW NZ250

    it’s a kraut bike for sure.

  198. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Ouzo, Pernod, Rickard, love them in small amounts but can’t drink Arrack or Raki. Raki came as a freebie with a delicious smooth chocolate in a small glass with our dinner in Crete tonight after the plane landed, so Hairy scoffed down my share. We went to a full-on Greek Saturday night in the suburbs with families out in full force and children running around between the tables at 10pm. A very pleasant introduction to a balmy warm night as a start to a week’s immersion into Greek culture. Hope to go to Knossos tomorrow to start at the earliest period, also to go to the archaeological museum. And now Hairy lets me know something I never knew: he spent his honeymoon with his first wife in Crete. Not surprising really as he spent every university holiday in the Greek Isles when he wasn’t in Ireland chasing the Irish folksinger love of his early years. That one is long gone but we still see the ex-wife socially every so often. I might not mention too much about Crete to her now though.

  199. Rafe Champion

    Tanks Lizzie, great travel tales!

  200. Drink-up Socrates

    Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!
    Bloody hire car company gave me a disgusting hybrid.
    I’m having to drive with my hat pulled down in case someone recognises me.
    Bet there is a copy of The Age in the boot.

  201. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2817461, posted on September 16, 2018 at 7:08 am

    Not surprising really as he spent every university holiday in the Greek Isles when he wasn’t in Ireland chasing the Irish folksinger love of his early years.

    I assume it was not – Andrea RiceFrom 1991 to 2004 Andrea spent most of her time in SEOUL KOREA at O’KIM’S BAR in the WESTIN CHOSUN HOTEL, singing to people from all over the world, from Business people to Politicians to Ambassadors.


    O’Kims became the most popular BAR in ASIA.

    I spent many evenings in O’Kims Bar whilst in Westin Chosun Seoul listening to Andrea Ric e and I have her CDs that I purchased from her in the Bar

  202. Twostix

    The Lunatic Left and Islam’s not so secret love affair.

    Last century brave feminists were bravely sending love letters to Adolph.

  203. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    There were pictures of Communist activists with noses and upper lips cut off,

    Not that there’s anything wrong with that

  204. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2817461, posted on September 16, 2018 at 7:08 am

    I spent many evenings in O’Kims Bar whilst in Westin Chosun Seoul listening to Andrea Rice and I have her CDs that I purchased from her in the Bar

    I meant to add she had a Hairy Bearded Manager who sat in the ausience

  205. OldOzzie

    Anyone who has had a drink with a Leftie will appreciate this one

    Who pays for the Drinks”

  206. Geriatric Mayfly

    All this talk of the sun firing super charged rays and particles in our direction tomorrow, where can one buy a lead jockstrap on a Sunday?

  207. calli

    DrBeau would appreciate this.

    I know the feeling.

    Thanks Tom.

    The cyclone categories were helpful.

  208. I am bespoke

    What do you think monty?

    (CNN)Federal prosecutors in New York are weighing criminal charges against former Obama White House counsel Greg Craig as part of an investigation into whether he failed to register as a foreign agent in a probe that is linked to former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, according to sources familiar with the matter.

  209. Elle

    Tanks Lizzie, great travel tales!

    Second that, Rafe.

    Tom’s toons and Lizzie’s tales are why I come to the open fred.

    Am nursing a mild hangover. I blame sport.

  210. calli

    Mitch M.
    #2817451, posted on September 16, 2018 at 5:14 am

    Interesting articles, Mitch. Thanks for posting.

    On autophagy, I’ve been doing IF for about eight months now and have never felt better. Complexion looks so good some pals collared me the other night and asked what cosmetics I’d changed to. (Aldi, of course 🙃)

    The keto diet has left me with normal BP (now off medication) plus energy, weight loss, no hunger. Also early symptoms of arthritis have disappeared. I’d recommend it to anyone who wants to reduce inflammation and drop some kilos. Blood tests this week so I’ll see how the LCHF aspect has affected cholesterol.

  211. OldOzzie

    Perfect Description of Liberals/Nationals/Labor/Greens and the The Isolated Canberra Echo Chamber from Jo Nova/Viv Forbes

    A British observer [in 1975 or so] noted “Any fool can bugger up Britain but it takes real genius to bugger up Australia.”

    Australian politicians are again showing real genius.

    Now, we have incredible tri-partisan plans to cover the continent with a spider-web of transmission lines connecting wind/solar “farms” sending piddling amounts of intermittent power to distant consumers and to expensive battery and hydro backups – all funded by electricity consumers, tax-assisted speculators and foreign debt.

    We are the world’s biggest coal exporter but have not built a big coal-fired power station for 11 years. We have massive deposits of uranium but 100% of this energy is either exported, or sterilised by the Giant Rainbow Serpent, or blocked by the Green-anti’s.

    Australia suffers recurrent droughts but has not built a major water supply dam for about 40 years. And when the floods do come, desperate farmers watch as years of rain water rush past to irrigate distant oceans.

    Once, Australia was a world leader in exploration and drilling – it is now a world leader in legalism, red tape and environmental obstructionism.

    Once, Canberra and the states encouraged oil and gas exploration with geological mapping and research – now they restrict land access and limit exports.

    Once, Australia was a world leader in refining metals and petroleum – now our expensive unreliable electricity and green tape are driving these industries and their jobs overseas.

    Once, Australia’s CSIRO was respected for research that supported industry and for doing useful things like controlling rabbits and prickly pear and developing better crops and pastures. Now CSIRO panders to global warming hysteria and promotes the fairy story that carbon taxes and emissions targets can change the world’s climate.

    Once, young Australians excelled in maths, science and engineering. Now, they are brain-washed in gender studies, green energy non-science and environmental activism.

    Once, the opening of a railway or the discovery of oil, coal, nickel or uranium made headlines. Today’s Aussies harass explorers and developers, and queue at the release of the latest IPad.

    As Australia’s first people discovered, if today’s Australians lack the will or the knowledge to use our great natural resources, more energetic people will take them off us.

    Viv Forbes

    The Carbon Sense Coalition

  212. Elle

    Tom’s toons and Lizzie’s tales are why I come to the open fred.

    And Steve’s plane shenanigans. ✈ 🛩

  213. Monty discusses the Manafort story as Donald Trump and Mike Pence walk past

    So true. Believe me.

  214. C.L.

    Perfect Description of Liberals/Nationals/Labor/Greens and the The Isolated Canberra Echo Chamber from Jo Nova/Viv Forbes

    Sad reading and every word true.

  215. will

    Drink-up Socrates
    #2817463, posted on September 16, 2018 at 7:27 am

    Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!
    Bloody hire car company gave me a disgusting hybrid

    .

    Don’t knock them. I have the frequent opportunity of driving a hybrid Camry at work. Superb car, and the latest model is even better. Very economical on fuel.

  216. cohenite

    Tom

    #2817449, posted on September 16, 2018 at 4:22 am

    Week In Pictures: Hurricane Trump Edition.

    Thanks, best laugh of the week. Although that idiot reporter bending into the wind as 2 guys stroll past behind him still makes me laugh.

  217. Boambee John

    IT’S AS IF THE WHOLE THING WAS MADE UP TO EXCUSE HILLARY’S HUMILIATING DEFEAT: Woodward: No Evidence Of Trump-Russia Collusion, I Searched For Two Years.

    From Instapundit.

    Note well, m0nty, you lackey of the fascist left Deep State, that even Nixon’s nemesis thinks this Wussia, Wussia, Wussia collusion thing is a nothingburger.

  218. Gab

    @CatholicSat
    At the end of his meeting with the Youth of Sicily today, Pope Francis refused to give the Pontifical Blessing, as not to offend the “many non-Catholic christians, those of other religions, and the agnostics” present

    3:02 AM – Sep 16, 2018

    Words fail me.

  219. egg_

    that idiot reporter bending into the wind as 2 guys stroll past behind him still makes me laugh.

    MSM theatrics in a nutshell.

  220. Tel

    IT’S AS IF THE WHOLE THING WAS MADE UP TO EXCUSE HILLARY’S HUMILIATING DEFEAT:

    And it also turned into a convenient excuse for the establishment parties (i.e. the anti-Trumpers) to both get together and put pressure on every social media platform to bias their “community standards” to the left in a severe way. I’m sure those Silicon Valley type people would have been willing to support the Dems anyhow, but the excuse gives them all a good cover story.

  221. egg_

    Steve’s plane shenanigans. ✈ 🛩

    In plane sight.

  222. mh

    Thanks, best laugh of the week. Although that idiot reporter bending into the wind as 2 guys stroll past behind him still makes me laugh.

    “What you’re seeing and what you’re reading is not what’s happening,”
    – Donald Trump

  223. Top Ender

    Tennant Creek still the same…

    Not much has seems to have changed since Mr Turnbull flew out; kids still roam the main drag after dark, unemployment is still rife and too many people crowd into rundown houses.

    It took a heinous crime to galvanize media and political attention on Tennant Creek: the alleged rape of a two-year-old child in February.

    And yet, when a three-year-old was allegedly sexually assaulted just a week after the leadership change, it was barely reported.

    Link

  224. Peter Castieau

    Shorten coming up on their Insiders

  225. Peter Castieau

    Don’t worry I watch it so you don’t have to…..

  226. Elle

    Shorten coming up on their Insiders

    Am watching. Will see how the robotic union thug presents.

  227. mh

    Peter, if you don’t watch I still don’t watch.

    Insiders is shit.

  228. Peter Castieau

    David Crowe says liberal supporters deserted AbbottSatan because climate change and SSM

    The weekend false narrative.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.