Open Forum: September 22, 2018

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936 Responses to Open Forum: September 22, 2018

  1. No, not at all. The Senate GOP had a clear path to blocking Garland’s appointment. McConnell didn’t need to resort to dirty, underhanded tricks to do so.

    I can’t take you seriously any more OCO. You’re a clown.

  2. Oh come on

    I can’t take you seriously any more OCO. You’re a clown.

    That isn’t an argument, m0nty. You’ve been reduced to foaming at the mouth now. Sad.

  3. struth

    Now if only we could get rid of the UN Socialist filth in our parliament.
    Scomo is a nogo.
    He’s so chummy isn’t he?
    How many will that suck in?
    He won’t quit Paris and he won’t just humour it either.
    We have Malcom with less Narcissism, that is all.

  4. Oh come on

    I can’t take you seriously any more OCO. You’re a clown.

    That isn’t an argument, m0nty. You’ve been reduced to foaming at the mouth now. Sad.

  5. When you admit that you spent several hours arguing for points you don’t even believe in when they might hurt your tribe’s cause, you cease to be someone of interest for the purposes of argument.

  6. Death Giraffe

    Stop this pile on.
    Ask Monty something he has a chance of answering coherently.
    Monty: Bert and Earnie. Gay or not?

  7. Oh come on

    When you admit that you spent several hours arguing for points you don’t even believe in when they might hurt your tribe’s cause

    Perhaps, but that isn’t what I’ve done, so it it’s irrelevant.

    However, what you’ve written above neatly summarises your input on this blog.

  8. None

    They’re trying to talk that up as a recovery. When is election due? May?

    #Newspoll Federal Primary Votes: L/NP 36 (+2) ALP 39 (-3) GRN 10 (0) ON 6 (0) #auspol

    #Newspoll Federal 2 Party Preferred: L/NP 46 (+2) ALP 54 (-2) #auspol

  9. Armadillo

    I still have faith that mOnts will eventually end up on the Trump Train.

  10. Oh come on

    How’s menopause treating you, m0nts? Those hot flushes are clearly bothering you.

  11. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Lone sailor not line sailor. First TV I’ve watched in English for a while. Mostly we stick to online; TV becoming a legacy medium, says Hairy.

  12. Pedro the Ignorant

    Australian warship enroute to rescue the Indian lone sailor adrift and dismasted 3000 kms SW of the Australian coast.

    How many $millions to save some self indulgent “adventurer” from his own folly?

    These bozos should be made to take out travel insurance to cover the cost of any rescue .

    Not the first one we have had to rescue at huge cost.

  13. Armadillo

    Monty: Bert and Earnie. Gay or not?

    They interviewed a Giraffe for that show. After the casting session and picking “Bert and Ernies” stuffing off the floor, they decided “Big Bird” was a safer choice. Ever wondered why “Oscar” lived in a beat up trash can? Miserable grumpy prick. It’s based on Marlon Brando after the casting Giraffe got to him.

  14. Oh come on

    TV becoming a legacy medium, says Hairy.

    I think that’s true for FTA and cable TV, Lizzie. Streaming services and productions are quickly filling that niche and are fast becoming the new TV.

    You know what else is a legacy medium? Cinema. And a legacy format? The feature film.

  15. Armadillo

    How many $millions to save some self indulgent “adventurer” from his own folly?

    Meh. Spent more than that on Turnbull (and will continue to do so). It’s only taxpayers money. We should support the poor sod.

  16. Armadillo

    Fourth. Best place for the horse YOU backed in the race to run.

  17. Armadillo

    Sixth sense. Stop me now.

  18. OldOzzie

    Christine Blasey Ford could indeed be lying

    This whole confirmation process, in fact, has grown, in the words of Alice, curiouser and curiouser. The more we learn of Democratic funding to stop the Kavanaugh process, the more we learn of George Soros’ ties to groups like Demand Justice — a non-profit entity aimed at halting President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court picks that, coincidence-of-all-coincidences, just hired the same general counsel who worked for Sen. Dianne Feinstein — the more Wonderland this all becomes.

    What’s more, it’s gone around the bend of un-American.

    It’s just not constitutional to throw out unfounded, unsupported accusations against an individual and then sit back and watch the chaos that unfolds, all the while claiming some untouchable high ground of victimhood.

    If Ford has proof, it should’ve come at the same time as the accusation.

    If Ford has a compelling reason why that proof couldn’t come at the same time as the accusation, she should’ve made known that reason.

    If Ford has anything, anything at all that could show her claims against Kavanaugh are rooted in fact and truth, she needs to cough it up and cough it up quick. It’s not incumbent on Kavanaugh to prove his innocence.

    It is, however, incumbent on Ford to prove his guilt — to prove she’s not lying and using a shameful, despicable tactic to disrupt the Supreme Court proceedings and kill Kavanaugh’s nomination. After all, it may not happen often, but women can indeed lie about such matters. And when they do, they don’t just hurt the accused.

    And in the Meantime

    Radical Leftwing Groups Linked to Soros are Bussing in Protest Mobs for This Week’s Kavanaugh Hearings

    Christine Blasey Ford has made a Rod for her Back for the Future re not being able to Yly – As soon as she takes a Flight after this is all over she shows “Hmmmmmm.”

  19. Armadillo

    Nine. Upside down six. Start again.

  20. OldOzzie

    Rod Rosenstein, quit! – By Charles Hurt – The Washington Times

    For the good of your country, Rod Rosenstein, step down.

    If you have a shred of integrity left in you, if you still care about the law and justice as much as you claim, if you still hold to your oath, then quit your position as deputy attorney general of the United States.

    It is now clear that you are a fierce partisan working at the highest levels of the Department of Justice.

    The notion that someone in your powerful — yet unelected — position would scheme inside the highest levels of the federal government to take out a duly elected sitting United States president is stunning.

    Hatching plots to wiretap the Oval Office or invoke a constitutional revolt against a sitting president sounds like a marvelous thriller on Netflix. In real life, it is treasonous.

    Even if you were joking about wearing a wire into the Oval Office —still looking for the humor in that one — it reveals how wildly distorted your view of the Executive Branch has become and far you have fallen since first vowing to uphold the Constitution.

    These kinds of sick, twisted sentiments have no place anywhere inside the Department of Justice.

    It is a thousand times worse that these are the sentiments of the man who launched the current witch hunt into this fantasy “Russia collusion” canard based on little to zero actual evidence. Instead, it was entirely based on your zealous hatred of the man elected to the presidency by the American people.

    Even more stunning is that you remain in charge of that investigation.

    No wonder you have allowed Robert Mueller to roam all over the planet, delving back more than a decade to dig up all manner of irrelevant dirt on anybody who ever had any passing relationship with President Trump.

    This kind of unfettered assault on American democracy should terrify even the most partisan Democrat.

    If you displayed the same level of freakish devotion to the president as you do this freakish hatred of him, Democrats in Congress would leap to their feet demanding that you recuse yourself from the investigation.

    Of course you should recuse yourself. But you should also quit and exile yourself from further “public service.”

  21. Armadillo

    The entire thing is that Ford initially said she couldn’t stand to see Kavanaugh being a “Supreme Court Judge”. It’s why she came forward.

    Didn’t matter an iota to her when he was a Judge on various courts for how many years? Never said a word.

    Seriously, this is just utter bullshit. She has to be a Republican plant. Surely?

  22. OldOzzie

    Donald Trump’s Rosenstein dilemma
    By Mark Penn, opinion contributor

    This is the deep state unraveling.

    People bristle when I sometimes adopt and use that term: “deep state.” But as an outside observer, watching the unmasking of the actions of one official after another at the FBI, CIA and DOJ, I have come to accept that an unelected group of well-educated, experienced individuals running these departments became inebriated with their own power during the last election campaign and apparently came to believe they were on a mission to stop, defeat or remove President Trump and his associates for crimes they would find or, if necessary, manufacture.

    Damned if you do. Damned if you don’t.

    That is the dilemma President Donald Trump faces as he decides whether to fire Rod Rosenstein following revelations that the deputy attorney general allegedly talked about taping the president and rounding up Cabinet officials to invoke the 25th Amendment.

    There were several people present at this meeting in the aftermath of the firing of former FBI Director James Comey. Despite the fact that Rosenstein wrote the key memo trashing Comey for his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, he reportedly was angry and uncertain after the president actually did it, using his memo as a justification.

    The prime source for this information appears to be none other than fired FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, who faces investigation by a grand jury and whose memos are being declassified. McCabe appears to be even angrier at the Department of Justice (DOJ) brass who fired and humiliated him just for leaking and lying when he may have far worse on his comrades.

    Perhaps Rosenstein was joking when he referenced the 25th Amendment, as another meeting participant reports. But Rosenstein’s statement in response to the news accounts carefully avoids denying having discussed wiring himself or others in some effort to entrap Trump. This cabal is meeting and planning, post-Comey’s firing, despite the fact that Rosenstein himself in his memo to President Trump said Comey was “wrong” and the FBI could not regain lost public trust without a new director who understood his errors.

    It seems Rosenstein also may have believed we needed a new president. Just days into his expanded role and after these conversations, he appointed Robert Mueller as special counsel with a still-secret charter to investigate the Trump campaign and administration; the precipitating act was the very firing he recommended.

    Whether it involved sending missiles to Syria after chemical attacks on civilians, moving the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, or firing Comey, Trump actually has moved ahead and done some of the things that Washington elites complain about but go along with out of some extreme sense of caution and timidness. And those acts are then branded as some kind of lunacy.

    Perhaps the true headline item in Bob Woodward’s book, “Fear,” is that Trump was so incensed at the murdering of women and children by Syria’s Bashar Assad that he actually raised the idea of taking out the dictator responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of his own people. Sheer madness? Hardly. President Obama stood idly by as mass murder happened in Syria, and President Clinton’s biggest regret is that he did too little to stop the massacres in Rwanda; he believes 300,000 lives could have been saved had he sent in troops earlier. It’s presidential inaction in the face of madness that has proven most dangerous to the world. Ask the Crimeans.

    I say this not to defend all of the actions of President Trump, many of which I might disagree with, but to condemn the arrogance of those in the deep state who convinced themselves that they would rescue our country from ourselves. They were on a mission, it turns out, not to save our country but to undo our democracy, and Rosenstein finally has been unmasked as having the attitudes and conflicts we all suspected.

  23. OldOzzie

    First sign of electoral recovery as Scott Morrison claws back support

    The Coalition is seeing the first signs of political recovery since the August leadership coup, with a two-point lift in popular support as Scott Morrison cements his lead over Bill Shorten as preferred prime minister.

    An exclusive Newspoll conducted for The Australian has shown a five-point turnaround in the primary vote over the past two weeks, with Labor’s commanding eight-point lead over the ­Coalition narrowing to three points.

    The partial revival for the ­Coalition comes amid further bloodletting within the Liberal Party, with former foreign minister and deputy leader Julie ­Bishop, who contested the leadership but was knocked out in the first round, claiming Australia is now internationally known as “the coup capital of the world”.

    The latest poll, however, shows a significant fall in Mr Shorten’s approval ratings, with Mr Morrison emerging as a more trusted and authentic leader and with the best net satisfaction rating for a prime minister since February 2016. The improved numbers for the government still point to a significant election defeat but follow a critical victory for the Prime Minister, who last week brought to an end the Coalition’s war with the powerful Catholic schools sector over funding.

    The lift in the Coalition’s primary vote to 36 per cent marks a three-point jump from the 10-year low of 33 per cent recorded in the days following the August 24 spill that ended Malcolm Turnbull’s leadership. It is still six points down on the July 2016 election result, which returned the Coalition to government but with a single-seat majority.

    A corresponding three-point hit to Labor’s primary vote in this latest poll has seen popular support fall from a 10-year high of 42 per cent two weeks ago to 39 per cent.

    This has led to a two-point improvement in the two-party-preferred vote for the Coalition, which now trails Labor by 46 to 54.

    In the wake of the leadership spill, the Coalition was reduced to the lowest two-party-preferred vote since February 2015 — six months before Tony Abbott was rolled — raising concerns among Liberal powerbrokers that the leadership change may have led to an electoral collapse from which there might be no recovery.

    The two-party-preferred ­result still indicates a 4.4 per cent swing against the government on the 2016 election results, which would lead to the loss of up to 20 seats if the results were replicated at an election now and were uniform across all seats.

    There was no change to the Greens’ vote of 10 per cent, nor for One Nation, which recorded a primary vote of 6 per cent for the second consecutive poll.

    Support for other minor parties and independents lifted a point to 9 per cent.

    A separate question confirmed the damage caused by the leadership spill, with the change still playing out as a vote loser for the Coalition.

    A total of 31 per cent of voters claimed that a month after Mr Morrison became Prime Minister they were less likely to vote for the Coalition, compared with 24 per cent saying they would be more likely.

    The Newspoll is the 41st in a row in which the Coalition has trailed Labor and covers a fortnight in which Mr Morrison was praised for a quick response to the strawberry sabotage crisis and the announcement of a royal commission into the aged-care sector. However, he has also presided over continuing Liberal Party turmoil, including further allegations of bullying and a debate about quotas for women to address a gender imbalance in the Coalition.

    Labor’s attempts to capitalise on the Liberal Party’s troubles by announcing a new policy to close the superannuation gap for women if it won government had little impact.

    Despite the problems besetting the government, Mr Shorten’s approval ratings fell considerably, with a five-point drop to 32 per cent in the number of people claiming to be satisfied with his performance and a three-point rise to 54 per cent in those dissatisfied.

    This resulted in his net satisfaction rating falling to minus 22 from a two-year high in the previous Newspoll of minus 14.

    In more bad news for Mr Shorten, a separate question on the authenticity of the leaders revealed a more favourable result for Mr Morrison. When asked who they believed to be more authentic, 46 per cent chose Mr Morrison and 31 per cent chose Mr Shorten. Half of One Nation voters backed Mr Morrison, with just 20 per cent claiming Mr Shorten to be more authentic. Notably, 21 per cent of Labor voters also chose Mr Morrison, with 61 per cent backing the Labor leader, while just 5 per cent of Coalition voters backed Mr Shorten above the Liberal leader.

    Supporters of Mr Turnbull are likely to seize on the poll results showing whether the change to Mr Morrison will make voters more or less likely to vote for the Coalition. A total of 36 per cent of voters said it would make no difference to their vote, while 24 per cent said they would now be more likely. But 31 per cent said they would be less likely to vote Coalition with Mr Morrison as leader as opposed to Mr Turnbull.

  24. Armadillo

    This kind of unfettered assault on American democracy should terrify even the most partisan Democrat.

    This is the quote that deserves “bolding”, and deserves attention. Democracy itself is under attack. And from every angle. The Flag. The anthem. Work during the week. The sheep/cattle sales on Friday, the track on Saturday, the Church on Sunday.

    It was pretty “corney” back in the day with “Make Australia Beautiful” and all the rest of it. But those long lost days were in everyone’s bests interests. Time to work, time to play. Especially on a Saturday.

  25. Armadillo

    Steve trickler
    #2822730, posted on September 24, 2018 at 1:33 am
    Who is Anne?

    Anne is one of the many tax cheaters living off the Government teat.

    Blowing into a piece of wood, waving her arms about or attempting to flail about trying to get a tune out of some string and what appears to be a piece of wood?

    In her defence, she’s probably well dressed. In black. More appropriate for a funeral rather than whatever the hell those lot are up to.

  26. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Meanwhile, woman in Sydney accused Shorten and he immediately has no case to answer. I don’t like these sorts of accusations going way back to things that should have been taken to the police at the time. The worst ones are the Get Pell kind, where the case is very flimsy but gets a full hearing.

    I am enjoying an Ouzo and a little water sitting on our balcony, pre-dinner here in Rhodes. Just strolled with Hairy to the waterfront and the entrance to the constructed harbour, with Phoenecian oarsmen in my mind’s eye as in the last glow of the sun the wayfarers on the sea were turning to home. The aspect now is Mediaeval. There is a golden-toned stone building on the opposite arm of the entry and at each side of the entry are two high tapered stone pillars with a bronze deer standing atop each, one side a male with stunning antlers, the other side a female, a doe looking smaller and sweet. The harbor extends back a distance which is filled in each side with huge pleasure cruisers, with the big ferry port in the background and, towards the Old Town, great walls of some fortifications. Tonight we will walk back and eat in a restaurant we’ve spotted with an aspect down a few hundred yards to the pool or and its Italianate church where an expectant crowd await the arrival of a bride, heralded by sirens and cars honking in procession. Her day, so call out the city. Also to be in our view is a major but now deserted old stone mosque surrounded by some weird gravestones that first took my interest: like turbans on top of a rounded stone post, some also squared off, tombstones like Christian ones, but not quite, even though lacking turbans of distinction. It has been deserted since the Italians invaded and chased out the Ottomans. Just the sort of mosque that is pleasant to see, defanged and deserted by history. Turkey is only 12km across the sea, our driver points out to us as we settle into the back of his Mercedes taxi from the airport. That’s the Turkish mainland, he says pointing to the looming coastline opposite. You don’t ever speak of Turkish coffee or Turkish delight here though, Lizzie, Hairy warns me. As if, I say, indicating I need no reminders even though actually, I do. Very forgetful sometimes about things like that, so Hairy keeps me in line. We have mutual responsibilities to each other regarding that. I do get my turn, as you all know 🙂

  27. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Aspect to the port, not pool.

    To clarify, there were at least three different styles of Ottoman tombstones, and a few stone sarcophagi, one with a well fertilized old tree growing from within it.

  28. Armadillo

    Most of the blokes look gay and full on leftards.

    Didn’t see a single one pull out his mobile phone to put on a bet. Beards, goatees and immaculate finger nails are a dead set giveaway.

    At least one of the Sheliahs could have made an effort to wear something other than black. Yellow dress? Pink sash?

    Nope. Herd animals.

  29. OldOzzie

    Yet a reminder of previous post on CHRISTINE BLASEY FORD

    WHY CHRISTINE BLASEY FORD’S HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOKS WERE SCRUBBED: Faculty Approved Racism, Binge Drinking and Promiscuity

    Meanwhile

    “Lifelong Friend” Of Kavanaugh Accuser Denies Attending Party; Ford’s Lawyer Brushes Off

    The Times notes, however, that Leland Keyser’s statement “seemed to eliminate any chance of corroboration of Dr. Blasey’s account by anyone who attended the high school party where she says she was assaulted.”

    If no deal is reached for Blasey Ford’s testimony next week, Sen. Grassley will be left to decide on Sunday whether or not to move ahead with a scheduled vote to confirm Kavanaugh on Monday.

    Grassley has engaged in a back-and-forth with Ford’s legal team, allowing them to miss several deadlines to continue negotiations. While Grassley may be trying to avoid the appearance of the Judiciary Committee panel of 11 men bullying an female victim alleging sexual assault, many conservatives have expressed frustration at the Chairman’s acquiescence to virtually every demand Ford has made.

    Shut this down.

    Everyone at the party has said they have no idea what Christine Blasey Ford is talking about, even her longtime friend Leland Ingham Keyser!

    What are you waiting for Chuck!!! Vote on Monday!!! #ConfirmKavanaugh pic.twitter.com/ofwU7ULPht
    — The Columbia Bugle 🇺🇸 (@ColumbiaBugle) September 23, 2018

    The Senate should be negotiating with Ford for a written apology from her to Brett Kavanaugh and his wife and children.
    — The Columbia Bugle 🇺🇸 (@ColumbiaBugle) September 23, 2018

    Also potentially damaging to Blasey Ford’s claim is a theory presented Thursday by Ed Whelan, a former clerk to USSC Justice Antonin Scalia and currently president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center (EPPC), a conservative think tank. Using entirely circumstantial evidence which could certainly ruin the life of the man at the center of the new theory, Whelan suggested that Kavanaugh’s high school doppelgänger, Chris Garrett, may have in fact been responsible for Blasey Ford’s recollection of the alleged incident.

    Whelan apologized for publicly naming Kavanaugh’s look-alike hours later, perhaps to provide legal cover, however he did not retract his theory that Ford may be “misremembering” the incident.

    Professional help

    Also casting doubt on the timing and purpose of Ford’s 11th hour claim against Kavanaugh is the Friday revalation that Ford’s current political adviser – former Obama and Clinton White House official Ricky Seidman, had allegedly been working on Ford’s situation since July – outlining a plan on a newly released audio tape to use the allegation as political fodder to derail Kavanaugh’s confirmation, and if unsuccessful, at least politically harm Republicans during midterms.

  30. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2822735, posted on September 24, 2018 at 2:11 am

    I am enjoying an Ouzo and a little water sitting on our balcony

    Lizzie

    I hope you have been drinking Retsina as well!

  31. OldOzzie

    UK Begged Trump Not To Declassify Russia Docs; Cited “Grave Concerns” Over Steele Involvement

    That said, Steele hasn’t worked for the British government since 2009, so for their excuse focusing on the former MI6 agent while ignoring the multitude of events which occurred on UK soil, is curious.

  32. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Sudden fireworks display we can see close up from our balcony, coming from the port area. Probably da wedding, says Hairy. Went off well then, I smile, and add somthing about going off like a firecracker that I am not going to repeat here, except I think I just did. Oops!

  33. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I have also been drinking Retsina pre-dinner most notes and Cretan reds, which are very good, some quite light, a few of them strong like plums and tobacco.

    I used to smoke years ago but never now. Sometimes the fragrance of the light up and draw back still lives in my olfactory senses but mostly I am quite turned off by smokers and smoking, except hints of it in wine.

  34. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Most notes that robot still lurks, changing things that I don’t spot and correct.

  35. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    It’s done it again!!

    Nites, you fool robot, nites.

  36. OldOzzie

    Is This Ford an Edsel?

    One of their demands is that only senators question her. Doubtless this is not only because they know the chair wants Beth Wilkinson, an outstanding defamation lawyer, to do the questioning. What they want, in this age of group rights — and demons — is to be able to argue that this poor traumatized woman was further harmed by a group of old white male bullies.

    If any of this scenario sounds familiar it may be because Ricky Seidman, who advised Anita Hill to testify against Clarence Thomas in 1991, is advising Ford, and in July — about the same time Ford sent her letter to Feinstein — of this year said “Over the coming days and weeks there will be a strategy that will emerge, and I think it’s possible that that strategy might ultimately defeat the nominee.” Or that one of McCabe’s lawyers, Michael Bromwich, has joined her team.

    This is the crowd that really abuses women — arguing that they should always be believed (except when it’s Ted Kennedy, Chris Dodd, Bill Clinton, Keith Ellison, or any one of their many party cohorts accused of sexual misconduct.)

  37. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2822745, posted on September 24, 2018 at 2:44 am

    It’s done it again!!

    Nites, you fool robot, nites.

    Not a problem 0 knew it was Nites and not Notes

  38. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Cretan reds are with dinner, Retsina and Ouzo before it, and mostly a nearby potplant gets my post-prandial Raki to keep at least that much of the little flask’s firewater contents beyond Hairy’s grasp. If the Raki served is the sweet honey liqueur type, then the pot plant loses. I drink it 🙂

  39. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Just remembered we are now in Rhodes. We will drink Rhodes reds, not in Crete any longer

    I recommend Crete for a great holiday, Malta a bit too crowded although the Neolithic temples are a must of you’re there

  40. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    If not of.

    It wouldn’t allow me to change it. Froze solid

    We are off to eat now. Nice to chat here not bothering anyone wanting to do important stuff

  41. OldOzzie

    With the Kavanaugh Charade, Do Polls Now Replace the Constitution?

    When this sample of registered voters was asked if they support or oppose Kavanaugh’s nomination, he has 34 percent support. This is higher than Neil Gorsuch, Elena Kagan, and Sam Alito before their confirmations, but don’t expect MSNBC to be tweeting that factoid. Interestingly no recent Supreme Court nominee reached 50 percent support on the eve of their confirmation.

    For most nominees, a significant percent of those polled “did not know enough” about the nominee to have an opinion, nearly half for some nominees. Thanks to Senator Dianne Feinstein and the media, that’s not a problem for Judge Kavanaugh.

    Then there is the poll sample. As with most of these polls, they oversample Democrats. In this particular poll, Democrats represent 44 percent while Republicans only 36 percent, an 8-point difference and certainly enough to flip the 3-point differential in positive-negative feelings about Kavanaugh.

    This is just another example of many recent polls whose sole purpose is not to reflect opinion, but to shape it. Polls are another weapon in the Democrat playbook against Republicans and their agenda, whether winning the midterms or filling a Supreme Court vacancy.

  42. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2822750, posted on September 24, 2018 at 2:56 am

    If not of.

    It wouldn’t allow me to change it. Froze solid

    We are off to eat now. Nice to chat here not bothering anyone wanting to do important stuff

    Lizzie

    Enjoy the Meal – Time for me to try and go back to the Land of Nod

  43. Armadillo

    While Grassley may be trying to avoid the appearance of the Judiciary Committee panel of 11 men bullying an female victim alleging sexual assault, many conservatives have expressed frustration at the Chairman’s acquiescence to virtually every demand Ford has

    So, this is where we are at. I have five sisters. Perhaps some of these “11 men” have sisters as well. Pretty confident they would also all have a mother. In fact, I’m pretty sure of that. To suggest that men are somehow biased against women is ludicrous. In my experience, it’s the opposite in every regard.

    Men are generally raised to be the “protectors” of women. And women (mothers and older sisters) are the protectors of boys (and girls). The wife and husband (and grandparents and extended family) are the protector of all.

    Generally, there are some arsehats in this world. They are the exception, not the rule.

    As a man, a son, a husband, a father, a brother, an uncle, I object to being put in that slot. Think about what has been said here. It’s abhorrent and bloody insulting to the vast majority of men.

    While Grassley may be trying to avoid the appearance of the Judiciary Committee panel of 11 men bullying an female victim alleging sexual assault, many conservatives have expressed frustration at the Chairman’s acquiescence to virtually every demand Ford has

    If I were Ford, I’d be much more terrified of appearing before a Committee of 11 women. Especially if they are on the side of politics that “want to take you down”. It would be absolutely ruthless.

  44. Armadillo

    I’m going to assume we are rapidly reaching the point whereby you can’t criticise anyone? Or even comment on them. At all.

  45. Armadillo

    Test.

    mOnster you fat donught eating deviate.

  46. Armadillo

    I’m tired. And drunk.

    [Tom. Your shift – sort it – SINC]

  47. Armadillo

    Toms not coming to your rescue Sinc.

    It’s Monday morning. Early.

  48. Armadillo

    When faced with the prospect of beer or coffee, always choose beer.

  49. Armadillo

    Ok. I’m bored. Might actually watch Steve’s link above. Saw the chick and some bearded dude. It’s sure to disappoint.

    [If it’s no good, I’ll smote him – SINC]

  50. Damienski

    Thanks to Sydney Boy and Dr Faustus for information on Danish VAT. A day wandering around Copenhagen confirms – socialist paradise.

  51. Tom

    Monday’s Johannes Leak goes with the Paywallian’s Media Diary column.

  52. Tom

    Surprise, surprise! David Rowe not only has Trump Derangement, but, being a lefty, he’s also an identity politics zombie. Sad.

  53. Tom

    A.F. Branco posted this after Twitter started stepping up its censorship of non-left voices like actor James Wood ahead of the November 6 US mid-term elections.

  54. Mark A

    Damienski
    #2822764, posted on September 24, 2018 at 5:15 am

    Thanks to Sydney Boy and Dr Faustus for information on Danish VAT. A day wandering around Copenhagen confirms – socialist paradise.

    What is the rate and what is it applied to?
    Where I’m at present it’s 27% but very variable depending on different items/services and included in every quoted price but listed separately, so no surprises.

  55. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Chatting with Hairy over dinner .
    Me: I’m not surprised I had some PTS over that lift episode. I was really scared when I woke you up to open the balcony door at 5am.
    He: I know you were.
    Me: Were you surprised?
    He: I am never surprised, Lizzie
    Me: By me, or in general?
    He: Both.
    Me: I thought it was fairly rational to check we weren’t locked in.
    He: At 5am? By what definition of rationality?
    Me: By my definition.
    He: There’s your answer, Lizzie.

    I have a suspicion I didn’t do very well in that round. 🙂

  56. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Just to clarify about my 5am fears. This was an all suite hotel, super high tech and very trendy in its fittings. The doors were electronically controlled in various ways and you couldn’t get out without the blue magnetic card. What if it demagnetises? What if there is a power failure? What if the aircon fails and we suffocate because we are sealed in totally and no-one knows we are due at the airport at noon? I thought. Seemed fairly rational to me for this place had doors and apertures that hissed as they sealed you up, not like a normal hotel such as the one we are in here now, where a card opens the door but a normal handle will let you out.

    Hairy said the other place would over-ride into manual in such events as I spent good sleeping time envisaging. Anyway, I feel safer here tonight. Turning out now

  57. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Interesting, and educational day, touring the invasion beaches of D-Day – Omaha, Utah, Gold Juno and Sword. Tour guide said he had guided American tourists who refused to believe anyone, other then the American Army , were present on the day….The Somme, and the new Sir John Monash Centre, the day after tomorrow….

  58. Bruce of Newcastle

    Either David Rowe lives in a hermetically sealed lefty MSM world with no other input, no internet and wears horse blinkers, or he really doesn’t believe the stuff he draws.

  59. Mark A

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2822774, posted on September 24, 2018 at 5:48 am

    Hairy said the other place would over-ride into manual in such events as I spent good sleeping time envisaging. Anyway, I feel safer here tonight. Turning out now

    I wouldn’t get up at 5AM just to check the doors, but I have seen automatic doors frozen locked in a power out.

    It all depends, on a lot of things. I some locations I will not use the lifts.

  60. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The blue keypad that lit up with the card flashed an error message before the apartment door opened. I didn’t find that particularly reassuring either.

    Perhaps grappling with this smart phone is clouding my viewpoint, especially after that lift. I shall read myself to sleep now with my Kindle. The right hand side buttons still work on that although the left hand side ones gave up their ghost long ago. It is a tired old faithful now but we still get along alright. Hairy on the balcony now looking at car hire. He doesn’t want a driver after all.

  61. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Hah! Vindicated!!! Thank you, Mark.

  62. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Zulu, did you see the in-the-round series of actual colour footage of D-Day up on the big screen that they have in a big theatre right on one of the beaches? Really makes it live for you.

  63. Mark A

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2822778, posted on September 24, 2018 at 5:58 am
    Hairy on the balcony now looking at car hire. He doesn’t want a driver after all.

    After many years driving in the EU, I occasionally, still make a left hand turn the wrong way.

    Don’t have a Kindle reader but buy heaps of eBooks from Amazon and have to battle to convert them to proper epub, some of the DRM protected ones are hard to do. I complained as I’m not pirating but they responded “buy a Kindle”!

  64. John Constantine

    Straits of Gibraltar are a historic chokepoint.

    https://clbrief.com/chinese-groups-interested-in-portugals-port-of-sines-terminal/

    Chicoms get strategic.

    Comrades.

  65. John Constantine

    Straits of Gibraltar are a historic chokepoint.

    “He added that the choice of Tangiers to host this project is due to the central geographical position of the city at the crossroads of continents, only 15 km from Europe. Its well-developed infrastructure, namely the Tangiers Med port and associated facilities also make it the ideal choice.”

    https://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2017/03/211612/tangier-king-mohammed-vi-launch-largest-chinese-investment-project-north-africa/

    Chicoms get strategic.

    Comrades.

  66. John Constantine

    Trump beats chicom colonisation of Greenland.

    “”We continue to notice significant interest in Greenland by the Chinese,” a US defense official told Defense News when asked about the issue this summer.”

    “”A Chinese presence in Greenland would complicate the U.S. position on the island — ultimately it is not impossible to imagine that China could pressure the Greenlandic government to ask the Americans to leave or demand permission to get a Chinese military or dual-use presence there,” Jon Rahbek-Clemmensen, an associate professor at the Royal Danish Defence College’s Institute for Strategy, told Defense News”

    https://sputniknews.com/europe/201809111067915423-Greenland-Airport-Contract-Foregoes-China/

    Hussein Obama would have paid the chicoms to decommission Thule airbase for him.

    Comrades.

  67. Mark A

    John Constantine
    #2822783, posted on September 24, 2018 at 6:21 am

    Straits of Gibraltar are a historic chokepoint.
    Chicoms get strategic.

    Commercially and politically very significant, militarily, not so much.
    Distance in response to attacks these days is not an issue.

  68. OldOzzie

    Armadillo
    #2822753, posted on September 24, 2018 at 3:14 am

    I agree totally with what you said below – California college professor Christine Blasey Ford and the Denocrats are Sleezebags Extraordinaire

    Men are generally raised to be the “protectors” of women. And women (mothers and older sisters) are the protectors of boys (and girls). The wife and husband (and grandparents and extended family) are the protector of all.

    As a man, a son, a husband, a father, a brother, an uncle and in my case Grandfather, I object to being put in that slot. Think about what has been said here. It’s abhorrent and bloody insulting to the vast majority of men.

    While Grassley may be trying to avoid the appearance of the Judiciary Committee panel of 11 men bullying an female victim alleging sexual assault, many conservatives have expressed frustration at the Chairman’s acquiescence to virtually every demand Ford has

  69. Tel

    Also casting doubt on the timing and purpose of Ford’s 11th hour claim against Kavanaugh is the Friday revalation that Ford’s current political adviser – former Obama and Clinton White House official Ricky Seidman, had allegedly been working on Ford’s situation since July – outlining a plan on a newly released audio tape to use the allegation as political fodder to derail Kavanaugh’s confirmation, and if unsuccessful, at least politically harm Republicans during midterms.

    Her name is Ricki Seidman (with an “i”).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricki_Seidman

    She’s been a Democrat activist going right back to Walter Mondale, including campaigns against two other SCOTUS judges.

  70. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2822627, posted on September 23, 2018 at 10:30 pm
    Also: Bork was a traitor, and Thomas was a creep.

    You might like to post evidence that Bork was a traitor (other than that he was not a Demorat).

    As for creeps,rMary-Jo Kopechne was not available to comment on the creepiness or otherwise of Teddy Kennedy, while Robert Byrd responded, but his words were muffled by his white hood.

    Really scraping the bottom of the fascist left barrel there, lackey.

  71. struth

    good moaning

    About to start my four day vocational refresher at the cost of over a grand all up (plus travel and accom) to be taught by an ex copper who has been doing oversize work only as a pilot and a prime A1 bullshit artist who I’ve had to show many things to while on the road.
    Basically , compared to me he is a greenhorn, but one of those blokes that doesn’t mind being part of the accreditation rort for his own profit and perceived standing.
    So typical in cops.
    Eager to conform.
    Loves rules.
    Even if they’re not law.

  72. Bruce of Newcastle

    Now I know what DC means: dick comics.

    Batman’s penis revealed in new DC images: Fans NOT impressed

    Fans have been having a field day with the new images.

    He’s the only hero whose name is stuck before every gimmick and gadget so it was only natural that the phrase “Batmember” would soon start circulating. Other fans cheekily wondered why it wasn’t Dick Grayson who stripped off first.

    DC should probably have anticipated the furore, but they may have been surprised that so many of the comments centred on the rather disappointing proportions of what was revealed, with fans suggesting this now explains why he has always been obsessed with flashy cars.

    Even so, immediately censoring the images seem an overreaction, especially since over 100,000 issues have already been sold.

    We should ask the new Stormy Daniels superheroine whether Batman looks like a mushroom too.

    Stormy Daniels now the heroine of a comic book, deemed ‘unlikely feminist icon’ (19 Sep)

    I remember when, as a kid, comics were just comics. It seems a very long time ago. Sigh.

  73. Mother Lode

    I remember when, as a kid, comics were just comics. It seems a very long time ago. Sigh.

    Pretty sure that in the Soviet era, and under the Nazis, comic books were a means of programming children.

    Same principle.

    By much the same people.

  74. Boambee John

    Ah, I see Dillo bought a ticket on the Q Train. Shame, he sometimes used to make sense.

    Of all the posters here, m0nty is the one who seems most familiar with the “Q Train”.

    Something you want to tell us m0nty?

  75. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2822704, posted on September 24, 2018 at 12:23 am
    When you admit that you spent several hours arguing for points you don’t even believe in when they might hurt your tribe’s cause, you cease to be someone of interest for the purposes of argument.

    Do you own a mirror? Go look in it.

  76. min

    Perhaps Julie Bishop is suffering from the forgeteries when she tells that fellow foreign affairs politicians are making fun of Australian politics. I am 20 years older and I certainly remember her involvement in bringng down Abbott sending one of her people to the meeting at Hendy’s house. Now trying to make herself all sweetness and light, well a QueenBee Wanna Bee.

  77. struth

    If there is one thing women can’t stand and have never handled well, it’s rejection.
    They go all fatal attraction.
    Even if it’s just about work.

  78. calli

    OldOzzie
    #2822727, posted on September 24, 2018 at 1:18 am
    Hmm Yly try Fly

    Gotta zip! 🙂

  79. Elle

    New sentencing reforms kick in today in NSW. Let’s see if they are affective and reduce re-offending. I doubt it.

  80. C.L.

    This is real: Kennedy family denounces Brett Kavanaugh’s treatment of women.

    Ahahahahahahaha.

  81. Boambee John

    m0nty was manic last night.

    It must have been the ultimate sugar high. Can any Melbourne Cat check to see if there is a single Krispy Kreme available in the metropolitan area please? Perhaps he hoovered every last one up?

  82. calli

    Lizzie, go to a good je-eller and see if you can find a nice golden rose pendant. Apart from the little red deer, it’s a symbol of the isle of roses (even though the name doesn’t derive from the ancient Greek at all).

  83. Tel

    I remember when, as a kid, comics were just comics. It seems a very long time ago. Sigh.

    They have always been propaganda.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Age_of_Comic_Books

    Superman with American eagle on his wrist and starts and stripes shield in the background. Tell me there’s no hint happening. Most of the stories we are familiar with (e.g. Batman) came out during WWII.

  84. They have always been propaganda.

    Surely that doesn’t include the Ghost Who Walks?
    Tell me it isn’t so, Tel.

  85. struth

    We’re still fighting WW2.
    The socialists were allowed to survive.
    Big mistake.
    Marx is still causing more misery than can be comprehended.
    He appealed to the lowest human emotions.
    A dead lazy c…nt.

  86. Surely that doesn’t include the Ghost Who Walks?

    “Phantom ring” has a different meaning this days.

  87. Boambee John

    Via Instapundit. These are the people m0nty puts on a pedestal, their behaviour an example to all of the world.

    HOWIE CARR: Joe Kennedy’s tweet on sexual assault insensitivity is a bit much.

    Maybe I missed it, but has JoJoJo tweeted out any denunciations of his House colleague, Rep. Keith Ellison of Minnesota, who is also vice chairman of the DNC? Ellison, a Muslim who used to hang out with rabid anti-Semite Louis Farrakhan, has been accused by two of his ex-girlfriends of physical abuse, and there are 911 calls from the terrified, bruised women on the record.

    Has JoJoJo ever commented on Sen. Tom Carper of Delaware, who has admitted using his ex-wife as a punching bag, giving her a black eye — “it caused some discoloration of her left eye and some puffiness.”

    Better put some ice on it, Mrs. Carper. Oh sorry, wrong Democrat pol — that was President Clinton’s medical tip to Juanita Broaddrick after he allegedly raped her. JoJoJo has never tweeted about that Democrat sex crime either.

    How about Sen. Sherrod Brown, extinguished Democrat of Ohio. His ex-wife once filed court documents saying that “he struck and bullied me on several occasions.” Lucky for Brown the cops didn’t also charge him with impersonating a Kennedy!

    How about New Jersey, where Sen. Cory “Spartacus” Booker has admitted to groping a woman at age 15? And how old were those working girls Sen. Bob Menendez was accused of partying with down in the Dominican Republic? How about the Democrat sheriff of Bergen County who was recently recorded on tape speculating about the sexual preferences of the state’s new unmarried female lieutenant governor?

    More crickets from JoJoJo about all the above stalwarts of the Garden State Democrat party.

    But it’s even more disingenuous for JoJoJo to be pitting the blast on anyone else, given his own family’s sordid record of abusing women.

    Starting with his own father, a hot-tempered moron named Joseph P. Kennedy II. He put Pam Kelley in a wheelchair for life in 1973 on Nantucket in a Jeep accident. Then he hooked up with JoJoJo’s mother, Sheila Rauch. JoJoJo’s mom later detailed in a book how his father had “bullied” her and how frightened she had been by his misogynistic thuggery and volcanic temper.

    Then there’s your cousin William Kennedy Smith. I once saw cousin Willie strolling into St. Edward’s in Palm Beach one Sunday morning with your dad. Willie needed divine intervention, because at the time he was on trial in West Palm for raping a young mother in Palm Beach.

    Willie beat that rap after the judge refused to allow the jury to see sworn depositions from four other young women who claimed Cousin Willie had attacked them.

    JoJoJo, did I miss your tweets on Cousin Willie?

  88. Even Donald Duck was a Nazi.

    Calli, Donald Duck is just a cartoon character.
    He’s not real – unlike the Phantom who is and walks amongst us.

  89. “Phantom ring” has a different meaning this days.

    Rambler, you need a good scrubbing with brain bleach.

  90. Top Ender

    Navy chief’s submarine cost bombshell

    ROBERT GOTTLIEBSEN
    BUSINESS COLUMNIST

    Five dramatic words from Rear Admiral Gregory Sammut have put in jeopardy Australia’s long term ability to fund the spending in the 2019 election splurge on education, aged care and other areas.

    Rear Admiral Sammut is the head of the future submarine program and his five words — “on a constant price basis”— sound innocuous.

    But when the Australian government announced in 2016 that it was accepting a $50 billion contract from the French to build 12 submarines instead of the $20 billion firm price offered by the Germans, some of our best defence commentators said they believed the difference was narrowed because the $50 billion covered maintenance and had been adjusted for inflation. They were wrong.

    The Rear Admiral was recently asked by a parliamentary committee to clarify the $50 million calculation. With crystal clarity he dropped a bombshell which shocked the defence community.

    The Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s Marcus Hellyer says the five words translate the original $50 million into an outlay of $79 billion. But, as I understand it, the base $50 billion actually excluded the combat system (always a handy addition to a sub) so the inflated cost will be about $90 billion.

    But in the parliamentary committee it got much worse—-the $90 billion is just the construction cost. Then there is the maintenance figure – another $50 million. And again, according to the Rear Admiral, it is “in constant dollars” which, according to the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) translates into another $124 billion.

    Rear Admiral Sammut emphasises that these estimates are preliminary because the submarines have not yet been designed.

    I think we can say that the nation of Australia faces a $225 billion plus bill for 12 submarines.

    And the first submarines will not be available for at least 14 years, but the Rear Admiral believes they will still be useful up until around 2080. Of course, the way technology is moving in the defence space, conceivably they could be outmoded before construction is finished in the late 2030s.

    According to ASPI we were looking to spend about 30 per cent of our estimated defence capital on these 12 submarines.

    But there is more. We have contracted to spend $35 billion on nine frigates which I guess will be in constant dollars, so call it $70 billion. And then there is goodness knows what for the Joint Strike Fighter.

    According to the Americans the JSF does not deliver air superiority in the region, which is what we wanted. On that basis it’s a lemon.

    The frigates should be worth having but everyone else buys their frigates for a fraction of what we are paying. We claim our frigates will be better than our rivals so they are worth the outlay. They had better be.

    And of course because the government wants to win South Australian seats the submarines, frigates and also the first two patrol boats will be built in Adelaide.

    The cost of trying to establish a huge industrial complex where skills must be brought in will be very high. And so is the defence risk of having so much defence manufacturing capacity in one place.

    I fear Australia will look back at the Abbott-Turnbull-Morrison government as one that took huge gambles on our long term defence future and on our ability to fund our defence given other priorities.

    But to be fair we do need to understand what we are trying to do in submarines.

    At the risk of oversimplifying we plan to take a nuclear-shaped submarine and drive it with non-nuclear engines using the pump-jet propulsion systems that have not previously been used outside nuclear power. There are some physicists in Australia who say what we are attempting is scientifically impossible. I can’t argue that but let me share with you the way the Rear Admiral justifies what the navy has done (I quote extracts from an edition of Strategist magazine)

    “After years of research, we couldn’t find a military-off-the-shelf submarine to meet Australia’s requirements. We need a submarine with the range and endurance of Collins (existing submarines) to operate where we believe submarines need to operate. We have to improve stealth and sensor performance in a submarine that will operate into the 2070s.

    “A key driver of the choice of Naval Group (the French) was capability and the assessment that it offered us the best opportunity to design and deliver a regionally superior submarine and, importantly, one over which we have the sovereign capacity to operate and sustain over its life. This could not be simply a commercial relationship. It always had to be backed by a treaty-level government arrangement between our country and the home nation of our partner. We’re developing plans for technology transfer…..

    “We are using pump-jet propulsion that was offered by France. Some claims about the pump jet are misleading. It’s not purely for use in nuclear submarines. It can be efficient across the entire speed range, taking account of the submarine’s size, the speed required and stealth. It needs to be tuned to the hull of the submarine. The hull needs to be tuned to the pump jet. We did not specify that the boat should have or not have air-independent propulsion or lithium-ion batteries, rather that it met our requirements. We’ll continue to look at all applicable technologies as we go through the design process.”

    Oz link

  91. Boambee John

    The Collins Class had problems, but at least seemed operable.

    By the end of the submarine and frigate programs, we will he lucky if we can recover some of the losses on the scrap metal market, without ever seeing an operational capability.

  92. OldOzzie

    All to keep the Prancing Poodle Backstabbing Black Hand Pyne in SA – and the Liberals wonder why they are not Worth Voting For?????

    Rear Admiral Sammut emphasises that these estimates are preliminary because the submarines have not yet been designed.

    I think we can say that the nation of Australia faces a $225 billion plus bill for 12 submarines.

    And the first submarines will not be available for at least 14 years, but the Rear Admiral believes they will still be useful up until around 2080. Of course, the way technology is moving in the defence space, conceivably they could be outmoded before construction is finished in the late 2030s.

  93. mh

    Teddy Kennedy was haunted by the fact that he was the only Kennedy to not shag Marilyn Monroe.

  94. Leigh Lowe

    Teddy Kennedy was haunted by the fact that he was the only Kennedy to not shag Marilyn Monroe.

    What?
    Even Rose had a go at Marilyn?

  95. Let’s say RBG lasts until February 2020 but then carks it, with Trump somehow still President and McConnell still holding onto the Senate. Does anyone here seriously believe

    Does anyone believe that monty will be arguing, if the Senate was Democratic, that the Senate rubberstamp Trump’s nominee out of consideration for the fact that this was exactly what the Senate did in 1993 and 1994 when RBG (96-3) and Breyer (87-9) were appointed in Bubba’s first term? No, he wouldn’t. And that’s because the Dems completely politicized the nomination process in the 1980s by setting aside the oversight role of the Senate and by now vetting nominees for political reasons.

    BTW, there is still a difference between Trump in 2020 annd Obama in 2016 and that is that Obama wasn’t running in 2016, while Trump will be in 2020. Which is why Hillary offered no support for Garland in 2016, a fact you’ve been entirely silent about.

  96. mh

    Come Thursday, George Schwarz will have found another reason for delay.

    Republicans – Just Do It.

  97. mh

    What?
    Even Rose had a go at Marilyn?

    That’s exactly what Teddy was thinking while driving along Chappaquiddick Road.

  98. .

    The Rear Admiral was recently asked by a parliamentary committee to clarify the $50 million calculation. With crystal clarity he dropped a bombshell which shocked the defence community.

    The Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s Marcus Hellyer says the five words translate the original $50 million into an outlay of $79 billion. But, as I understand it, the base $50 billion actually excluded the combat system (always a handy addition to a sub) so the inflated cost will be about $90 billion.

    But in the parliamentary committee it got much worse—-the $90 billion is just the construction cost. Then there is the maintenance figure – another $50 million. And again, according to the Rear Admiral, it is “in constant dollars” which, according to the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) translates into another $124 billion.

    Rear Admiral Sammut emphasises that these estimates are preliminary because the submarines have not yet been designed.

    I think we can say that the nation of Australia faces a $225 billion plus bill for 12 submarines.

    I don’t get angry anymore. I just laugh at stupid Australia.

    I think for 225 bn we could buy 730 JSFs. Or 1640 F-22s. OR FIFTY VIRGINIA CLASS SUBS.

    At the risk of oversimplifying we plan to take a nuclear-shaped submarine and drive it with non-nuclear engines using the pump-jet propulsion systems that have not previously been used outside nuclear power. There are some physicists in Australia who say what we are attempting is scientifically impossible.

    LOL

    This place is a joke compared to most of South America.

  99. Nick

    Donald Duck is a memaphrodite, the duck being the female of the species.
    Why does Donald put a towel around himself when he gets out of the bath, but doesn’t wear pants?

  100. .

    I sometimes can’t stand Alex Jones and I can’t believe that I’m getting better news from Infowars.

    Paul Joeseph Watson on James Woods and Twitter Censorship on “Influencing Elections”.

  101. This place is a joke compared to most of South America.

    Nonetheless, you and Struth will still be voting for the same crowd in a few month’s time.

  102. Tel

    Navy chief’s submarine cost bombshell

    ROBERT GOTTLIEBSEN
    BUSINESS COLUMNIST

    Am I weird or does that article appear to use the words “million” and “billion” as if they were interchangeable?

    Gottliebsen has been doing financial and economics reporting since I was a kid, so either he has stopped even caring or that problem with fluorine in the water might be more serious than we first thought.

  103. .

    Nonetheless, you and Struth will still be voting for the same crowd in a few month’s time.

    Incorrect, please delete.

  104. Oh come on

    Holy crap Drudge is blowing up! Red alert!

  105. Oh come on

    Insiders claim Ronan Farrow and Jane Mayer are set to report a late twist in Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation… MORE…
    NEW YORKER to publish account of a new woman and a ‘dildo’…
    She is ‘Never Trump’, says a source. But best friend will say ‘She never told me!’… Developing…

  106. Bruce of Newcastle

    Apparently the demorats have dug up another sheila to accuse Kavanaugh

    The old one looking kind of dilapidated?

    4th purported witness claims no knowledge of alleged Kavanaugh assault against Ford

    I’m wondering when Thursday arrives if there’ll be a sudden onset of an unexpected illness.

  107. mh

    Wow, shows the desperation of the globalists. Dildo stories.

  108. Oh come on

    She is ‘Never Trump’, says a source. But best friend will say ‘She never told me!’…

    Well that’s weird.

  109. thefrollickingmole

    This is being trumpeted as “proof” that all normal standards of evidence must be dropped because “muh vagina”.

    Revealed: less than a third of young men prosecuted for rape are convicted
    Exclusive: figures show men aged 18-24 less likely to be found guilty of rape than older men in England and Wales

    A large part of the story should be “why are so many men dragged through the courts for false/unprovable allegations”?

    The crisis engulfing the criminal justice system over its approach to rape cases is revealed by startling figures that show less than a third of prosecutions brought against young men result in a conviction.

    According to statistics, men aged 18 to 24 in England and Wales are consistently less likely to be found guilty than older men on trial. Young men accounted for more than a quarter of defendants in rape-only cases in the five years to 2017-18.
    ..
    Senior CPS staff believe the failure to secure convictions reflects a desperate need to educate jurors, who appear particularly reluctant to punish young men at the start of their adult life for serious sexual assaults.

    “Educate”, mmmmmyeeess nothing like a bit of “education” to ensure the correct outcomes, Comrade.

    An intense media focus on the small number of false allegations of rape “perpetuates the public perception that lying about rape is common when in fact the opposite is true”, she added.

    Well, that and a 35% conviction rate….

  110. .

    So I was right Bruce – all the witnesses Ford named, contradict her – the male friends of the Kav and her four friends she turned up to the party with.

    Now we have an 11th-hour story about a dildo, right after Christine Ford has been demolished as an utter fantasist.

    Feinstein, Eshoo, Katz, Seidl and Ford’s emails, social media, IM, SMS and phone records MUST be subpoenaed.

  111. OldOzzie

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2822833, posted on September 24, 2018 at 9:28 am

    Apparently the demorats have dug up another sheila to accuse Kavanaugh

    The old one looking kind of dilapidated?

    4th purported witness claims no knowledge of alleged Kavanaugh assault against Ford

    I’m wondering when Thursday arrives if there’ll be a sudden onset of an unexpected illness.

    Nope the car will break down on the way from California but in the meantime the Senate Judiciary Committee will have a Dildo to interview

  112. OK, time for Republicans to call the vote and confirm Kavanaugh. Delay is simply an invitation for the fabrication of more and more calumnies.

  113. Oh come on

    I’m starting to think that a GOP prez will never again be able to appoint a male SCOTUS justice. The Dems will just find one or two randos to accuse him of sundry sex crimes and that’ll be it.

  114. Bruce of Newcastle

    NEW YORKER to publish account of a new woman and a ‘dildo’…

    A mushroom shaped dildo?

  115. Oh come on

    Ronan Farrow’s strike rate is pretty good…

  116. H B Bear

    Why does Donald put a towel around himself when he gets out of the bath, but doesn’t wear pants?

    I’d like to help but don’t want to appear speciesist.

  117. Oh come on

    Yeah this is starting to look like another fit up. The red alert has gone and Drudge now has a link up…to a Mediaite article that covers the Drudge reaction. Oh and it mentions some NYT guy claiming ‘rumours have been brewing all day’.

  118. H B Bear

    rumours = hearsay = not evidence

  119. .

    Ronan Farrow’s strike rate is pretty good…

    This is a joke, right?

  120. Oh come on

    I’m sure something will come out. But it’s looking like weak sauce so far. I’m sure m0nty will be in shortly, having kittens.

  121. OldOzzie

    Labor’s mining of millennials’ envy is a cynical ploy that may work</strong> – Nick Cate Columnist

    A decade after Kevin Rudd’s declaration of a new economic epoch, global capitalism is yet to get the comeuppance the Left so keenly anticipated.

    The 2008 global financial crisis appears as a blip on the chart of global growth. World gross domestic product has risen from $60 trillion to more than $85 trillion. It has grown steadily at about 3 to 4 per cent for eight years.

    The contribution made to this by the Rudd government’s stimulatory frenzy is probably a fraction less than zero per cent.

    The damage it caused to Australia’s fiscal reserves has left Australia dangerously exposed to external economic shock.

    Rudd’s manifesto for the post-GFC world, expounded in his notorious essay in The Monthly, was an “activist state”, global regulation and a call to arms for governments to fight for social justice.

    A decade later, economic growth in western Europe, where Rudd’s social democratic path was followed, is barely half the global average. In Trump’s rawhide America, growth is at 4.2 per cent.

    The truth, barely acknowledged by chin-stroking commentators, is that the financial crisis was caused not by capitalism but by non-market failure.

    The global free market survived despite, not because of, governments. It survived Wayne Swan’s Keystone Keynesian antics and survived the European Central Bank’s quantitative easing. Capitalism survived despite the US Federal Reserve’s best efforts to castrate it by severing its vital organ, risk, and dumping it in the taxpayer’s lap.

    Labor’s delusion that government is better able to order economic affairs than markets has cost Australian taxpayers tens of billion dollars over the decade. Its legacy includes unplanned and unwanted school buildings, the National Broadband Network, an unreliable and expensive electricity system and debt that will pass to the next generation, and possibly the one after that.

    Yet Labor is doubling down. Bill Shorten is campaigning on the party’s least diluted socialist platform since Gough Whitlam. He promises intrusive government, and more steeply progressive tax. He will re-regulate the Labor market and hand back more power to the unions.

    He will attack private health insurance and penalise self-funded retirees. He will throw more money at public schools and public health under the pretence of improving services.

    He will resume subsidies to wind and solar farms, bringing more pain to consumers.

    Economic freedom fighters like Uber and Airbnb will face a torrid time. Labor’s addiction to regulate, combined with the trade union movement’s determination to keep every worker within their grasp, will bring down the curtains on the sharing and gig economies.

    It amounts to a repudiation of the reformist thinking that began under Whitlam’s successor, Bill Hayden, and drove Labor thinking for a quarter of a century. In the 1980s Labor responded to global challenges; today it runs from them.

    It is an old socialist agenda that would have been familiar to Labor leaders in the 1940s and 50s, one heavy on ideology and light on realism. Labor’s only innovation is to head to an election promising to increase taxes. The taxes may be targeted in theory at the rich, but they will touch middle-income earners and retirement savers.

    A pro-tax manifesto would have been unthinkable 10 years ago. There are two reasons, however, why the strategy might work.

    The first is that the majority of voters pays less in taxes than it receives in benefits, the consequences of which were explored in this column last week.

    They include public servants, doctors, university lecturers and shareholders in wind farms whose dividends are largely determined by subsidies rather than the sale of electricity.

    The second is that redistributive policies are likely to appeal to millennials who feel caught on the wrong side of an intergenerational wealth divide. They are principally young voters with post-school education. They have spent much of their adult life at university accumulating debt, and little or no time earning income.

    Those who have clawed their way into the property market are on the first rung with large mortgages and little or no capital gain. Their superannuation savings are meagre, and in any case the justification for compulsory superannuation savings seems remote.

    Meanwhile the reforms of the 90s, delivered by both Labor and Liberal governments, have made today’s retirees the wealthiest in history. The baby boomers are far more likely than their parents to be shareholders. Most own the property they live in, and a significant number own investment property.

    Labor’s politics of envy has a subliminal appeal to millennials. Winding back negative gearing or capital gains concessions for investors appeals to their grievances, even though its effect will be to tighten the rental property market on which most of them depend.

    Higher education on demand has inflated career expectations for some. A significant proportion find themselves employed in jobs for which they are over-qualified, on paper at least.

    The Opposition Leader is relying on these voters to get him home. Labor already holds three-quarters of the seats that the 18-35 cohort predominates. The Coalition holds two-thirds of electorates dominated by the over-55s.

    There is evidence that the financial crisis was a decisive event for those who experienced it in their late teens and early 20s, particularly in the US and Europe.

    Shorten will know that intergenerational envy was one of Jeremy Corbyn’s most successful strategies in the last British election. If the voting age had been capped at 35, Corbyn would have won by a landslide.

    Shorten will need broader appeal, since the millennials make up less than 30 per cent of the electorate. The pendulum is shifting in favour of the oldies, thanks to modern medicine.

    In the meantime Labor is prepared to pit children against their parents and grandparents in a cynical game of demographic class warfare. It will weaken the social fabric as surely as appeasing the public sector workforce weakens the economy. It will do nothing whatsoever to open the career pathways and earning opportunities the millennials seek.

    Nick Cater is executive director of the Menzies Research Centre.

  122. Oh come on

    Weinstein and Moonves are pretty impressive scalps, dot.

  123. Cassie of Sydney

    Breaking news from the Oz website….Michelle Guthrie sacked.

  124. .

    Economic freedom fighters like Uber and Airbnb will face a torrid time. Labor’s addiction to regulate, combined with the trade union movement’s determination to keep every worker within their grasp, will bring down the curtains on the sharing and gig economies.

    That dog won’t hunt.

    Millennials might be envious and woke but they love capitalism. The ALP needs something like the lauded (and still crap) “Nordic model”, with sensible tax brackets.

    Dinosaur ALP stuff just won’t work.

  125. OldOzzie

    ABC managing director Michelle Guthrie sacked by the board</strong> – Stephen Brook Media Diary
    Darren Davidson Media Editor

    The managing director of the ABC, Michelle Guthrie, has been sacked almost halfway through her five-year term.

    The Australian understands the chairman of the ABC, Justin Milne, and the board made the decision to dismiss Ms Guthrie.

    “In resolving to seek fresh leadership, the board’s foremost consideration was the long term interests of our own people and the millions of Australians who engage in ABC content every week,” Mr Milne said in a statement.

    “This is driven by our commitment to deliver best possible outcomes for our loyal audience.

    The ABC’s management team was being informed of the decision at 10am.

    More to come

  126. Roger

    He will throw more money at public schools…under the pretence of improving services.

    Nobody seriously believes that, Nick; it’s about “fairness”.

  127. .

    Scalps maybe, but not necessarily correct.

  128. Boambee John

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2822842, posted on September 24, 2018 at 9:36 am
    NEW YORKER to publish account of a new woman and a ‘dildo’…

    A mushroom shaped dildo?

    Wasn’t it a toadstool?

  129. OldOzzie

    Yale law professor Amy Chua rejects charge she coached female students on how to dress for Kavanaugh

    Yale Law School professor Amy Chua denied allegations that she coached female students to dress in an “outgoing” fashion when interviewing for clerkship positions with Judge Brett Kavanaugh, now a nominee for the Supreme Court.

    “Everything that is being said about the advice I give to students applying to Brett Kavanaugh – or any judge – is outrageous, 100 per cent false, and the exact opposite of everything I have stood for and said for the last fifteen years,” said Ms Chua, who gained fame beyond the legal world for her 2011 parenting memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother. Reports were published earlier this week in Huffington Post and the Guardian alleging that Ms Chua had told female students to dress “outgoing,” and had offered to review their sartorial selections before interviews. She also allegedly commented that it wasn’t an accident Mr Kavanaugh’s female clerks looked like models. Press contacts for the Huffington Post and Guardian didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment Saturday night.

    Ms Chua’s response was sent in an email to the Yale community Saturday by her husband, fellow Yale Law professor Jed Rubenfeld.

    Ms Chua was hospitalised late last month for unknown medical issues. In a note last weekend to the school, he said she suffered a “massive, freakish internal infection” and underwent major surgery, and the cause of her illness was still unknown. He said in Saturday’s message that she “remains extremely ill.” Ms Chua is on medical leave from Yale Law for the remainder of the semester. According to the note, Ms Chua said she tries to be “frank and transparent” in preparing students for their clerkship interviews, telling students to read every opinion the judge has written and be well-versed on recent court cases and to dress professionally, meaning not too casually and avoiding inappropriate clothing.

    “My record as a clerkship mentor, especially for women and minorities, is among the things I’m most proud of in my life,” she said, noting that she is called on annually to provide guidance on the clerkship process to a variety of student affinity groups.

    She called Mr Kavanaugh a “mentor to women” in a Wall Street Journal op-ed this summer. Her daughter, a recent Yale Law graduate, had accepted an appellate clerkship with Mr Kavanaugh before he was nominated to the high court.

    Mr Rubenfeld is also not teaching this semester.

    He said in a statement that he was notified in June that the school would conduct an “informal review” of certain allegations, but he didn’t know the specifics. He said he was advised the allegations “were not of the kind that would jeopardise my position as a long-tenured member of the faculty.” An investigator has conducted multiple interviews about alleged misconduct, according to students who were contacted by the investigator. They and other students say the allegations are related at least in part to comments made to one or more female students in a fall 2017 constitutional-law class.

    A Yale Law spokeswoman said the school cannot confirm or deny the existence of any investigation.

    “While we cannot comment on individual complaints or investigations, the Law School and the University thoroughly investigate all complaints regarding violations of University rules and take no options off the table,” Dean Heather Gerken wrote in a letter to the school community on Thursday.

    Dow Jones Newswires

  130. Cassie of Sydney

    “OldOzzie
    #2822858, posted on September 24, 2018 at 9:53 am
    ABC managing director Michelle Guthrie sacked by the board – Stephen Brook Media Diary
    Darren Davidson Media Editor

    The managing director of the ABC, Michelle Guthrie, has been sacked almost halfway through her five-year term.”

    So when is the board going to sack the whole ABC news and current affairs’ division beginning with Probyn? The incompetent Guthrie is the easy scalp.

  131. Incorrect, please delete.

    Ha ha, so I was right last night when I speculated you had chucked in law in favour of comedy.
    You and Struth ought to team up – you know, like the Two Ronnies, or Morecombe and Wise.

  132. Snoopy

    Oh and it mentions some NYT guy claiming ‘rumours have been brewing workshopped all day’.

  133. Boambee John

    Or was that a toad’s tool?

  134. Des Deskperson

    ‘The managing director of the ABC, Michelle Guthrie, has been sacked almost halfway through her five-year term.”

    Nothing yet on the ABC news website.

    Mark Day was saying, in today’s Oz, that she had made significant administrative reforms but taken a ‘hands off’ approach to the ABC’s news journalism. Maybe she has had to wear the recent Murdoch/Stokes reporting stuff-ups as well as other failures of professionalism.

  135. Shy Ted

    Frank Elly getting all excited about the drop in new, NSW only, gay-male HIV cases and the “100% increase” in straight-male cases. Well, it is fAkeBC news so thought I’d check. Gay males now only responsible for 98.9% of cases. Well done gays. But of the straight-male cohort (22 cases in 5 years), only 54% were born overseas and likely brought it with them, only 27% of Aussies caught it overseas and a mere 19% were born here and caught it here. Lots more fun facts, of nearly 10,000 people in treatment, 98.8% male, 0.2% female, 0.8 trannie M-F, 0.1% trannie F-M and “other sex” 0.1%. So that’s only 98.9% of gay or bisexual men carrying the infection, “other sex” 0.6% and a lowly 0.5% heterosexual men, some of whom are indigenous. And that’s why straight, white men are evil. We’re being beaten by “other sex”ers!!!

  136. Des Deskperson

    Its now up:

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-24/michelle-guthrie-leaves-as-md-of-the-abc/10297608

    “The ABC Chairman has confirmed that the national broadcaster’s Managing Director Michelle Guthrie has left her position.

    David Anderson will serve as Acting Managing Director until a formal search process finds Ms Guthrie’s successor.

    According to a statement released by the ABC, the decision was made when the directors resolved that it was not in the best interests of the ABC for Ms Guthrie to continue to lead the organisation.

    More to come”

  137. Boambee John

    Put these complainants and all akkeged witnesses on oath before tge FBI. Let them then have tge choice to tell the truth or face the General Flynn treatment, to be bankrupted for lying to the FBI.

    m0nty has already told us he supports the use of this tactic, so he will be on board.

  138. Confused Old Misfit

    Breaking News: Michelle Guthrie sacked
    by Sinclair Davidson

    ABC managing director Michelle Guthrie has been sacked by the ABC board.
    Sinclair Davidson | September 24, 2018 at 10:06 am | URL: https://wp.me/pScng-lS7

  139. Delta A

    More on the Guthrie sacking:

    ABC managing director Michelle Guthrie has been sacked by the ABC board.

    The sacking comes after months of tension between the managing director and ABC chairman Justin Milne.

    Ms Guthrie, who is only two years into her five year term, will be replaced by David Anderson, ABC head of specialist and factual, as interim managing director.

    Any info about him, Tom?

  140. Snoopy

    Ramirez said that, when both she and Kavanaugh were freshmen at Yale, she was invited by a friend on the women’s soccer team to a dorm-room party.

    >
    >

    At one point, she said, a male student pointed a gag plastic penis in her direction.

    This accusation at least has some plausible consistency.

  141. Snoopy

    Any info about him, Tom?

    He could be a man. If so he should refuse the appointment so another talented woman can be appointed.

  142. Roger

    Mark Day was saying, in today’s Oz, that she had made significant administrative reforms but taken a ‘hands off’ approach to the ABC’s news journalism.

    Her refusal to engage as editor in chief was never a tenable position.

  143. Oh come on

    Here’s the strongest corroboration of Ramirez’s story:

    A classmate of Ramirez’s, who declined to be identified because of the partisan battle over Kavanaugh’s nomination, said that another student told him about the incident either on the night of the party or in the next day or two. The classmate said that he is “one hundred per cent sure” that he was told at the time that Kavanaugh was the student who exposed himself to Ramirez. He independently recalled many of the same details offered by Ramirez, including that a male student had encouraged Kavanaugh as he exposed himself. The classmate, like Ramirez, recalled that the party took place in a common room on the first floor in Entryway B of Lawrance Hall, during their freshman year. “I’ve known this all along,” he said. “It’s been on my mind all these years when his name came up. It was a big deal.” The story stayed with him, he said, because it was disturbing and seemed outside the bounds of typically acceptable behavior, even during heavy drinking at parties on campus. The classmate said that he had been shocked, but not necessarily surprised, because the social group to which Kavanaugh belonged often drank to excess. He recalled Kavanaugh as “relatively shy” until he drank, at which point he said that Kavanagh could become “aggressive and even belligerent.”

    He’s the only one willing to go into detail to back Ramirez’s story but doesn’t want to be named? How convenient.

    And he was able to independently recall the same details as Ramirez? Well they have had several days to get their stories straight. Foul play is afoot.

  144. Snoopy

    Did Googles Guthrie refuse to discipline the imaginative Andwew Pwobyn?

  145. Oh come on

    Breaking News: Michelle Guthrie sacked
    by Sinclair Davidson

    Wow, go DL! Can you please sack the rest of them while you’re at it?

  146. Bruce of Newcastle

    Here it is, folks. The New Yorker’s “other woman”.

    Hmm.

    The woman at the center of the story, Deborah Ramirez, who is fifty-three, attended Yale with Kavanaugh, where she studied sociology and psychology.

    Hmmm.

    Later, she spent years working for an organization that supports victims of domestic violence.

    Hmmmm.

    The New Yorker contacted Ramirez after learning of her possible involvement in an incident involving Kavanaugh. The allegation was conveyed to Democratic senators by a civil-rights lawyer.

    Hmmmmm.

    For Ramirez, the sudden attention has been unwelcome, and prompted difficult choices. She was at first hesitant to speak publicly, partly because her memories contained gaps because she had been drinking at the time of the alleged incident.

    Hmmmmmm.

    In her initial conversations with The New Yorker, she was reluctant to characterize Kavanaugh’s role in the alleged incident with certainty. After six days of carefully assessing her memories and consulting with her attorney, Ramirez said that she felt confident enough of her recollections to say that she remembers Kavanaugh had exposed himself at a drunken dormitory party, thrust his penis in her face, and caused her to touch it without her consent as she pushed him away.

    Hmmmmmmm.

    Ramirez is now calling for the F.B.I. to investigate Kavanaugh’s role in the incident. “I would think an F.B.I. investigation would be warranted,” she said.

    Hmm + x(m+1).

    Ramirez acknowledged that there are significant gaps in her memories of the evening

    Do they all use the same script?
    I have this strange feeling of Deja Vu. But I swear I wasn’t drunk when Mr Vu felt me up.

  147. C.L.

    So the Democrats have hired a new prostitute now that all four witnesses have sword statements that Ford is a lying loonball.

  148. C.L.

    Revealed: less than a third of young men prosecuted for rape are convicted
    Exclusive: figures show men aged 18-24 less likely to be found guilty of rape than older men in England and Wales

    That’s because most of the accusers were drunk at the time and pressed charges only to save face when they sobered up.

  149. C.L.

    As I was saying …

    For Ramirez, the sudden attention has been unwelcome, and prompted difficult choices. She was at first hesitant to speak publicly, partly because her memories contained gaps because she had been drinking at the time of the alleged incident.

  150. Roger

    After six days of carefully assessing her memories and consulting with her attorney…

    Let me guess…he’s a registered Democrat too.

  151. Chris

    Googles G down, 3000 to go.

  152. Snoopy

    I’m guessing the Ramirez recollections confirm that Ford has no intention of fronting the senate judiciary committee?

  153. Oh come on

    So the Democrats have hired a new prostitute now that all four witnesses have sword statements that Ford is a lying loonball.

    They’ve worked harder on this one, though – they obviously realised there was a problem with Ford not telling anyone about it for thirty years. So this time they’ve made sure that some anonymous person is “100% certain” that another anonymous person told him on the same night Dildogate occurred or maybe the next day or the day after that it was definitely Kavanaugh. 100% sure, 100% anonymous.

  154. Bruce of Newcastle

    I know prediction is hard, but by Thursday it is definitely possible a dossier will turn up saying that Kavanaugh had hookers urinate on a hotel bed once slept in by Ruth Bader Ginsberg.

  155. Nick

    At one point, she said, a male student pointed a gag plastic penis in her direction.

    Lol. Seriously, the Right should play the Left at their own ridiculous game, swooning whenever someone wears a pussy hat, claiming it’s heteronormative and offensive.

  156. This allegation is a nothingburger. So the allegation amounts to nothing more than Kavanaugh waving his penis in front of Ramirez’s face when both and everyone else is intoxicated at a college party.

  157. W Hogg

    The Grand Final will most likely be minus Slater and Cronk.

    The law firm cancelled its corporate box due to cost-cutting?

  158. Kavanaugh is so boned, LOL.

    Attorney Michael Avenatti tweeted Sunday that he is now representing a woman who has “credible” information about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his high school pal Mark Judge.

    “I represent a woman with credible information regarding Judge Kavanaugh and Mark Judge,” Avenatti tweeted. “We will be demanding the opportunity to present testimony to the committee and will likewise be demanding that Judge and others be subpoenaed to testify. The nomination must be withdrawn.”

  159. From the New Yorker piece:

    After seeing Judge’s denial, Elizabeth Rasor, who met Judge at Catholic University and was in a relationship with him for about three years, said that she felt morally obligated to challenge his account that “ ‘no horseplay’ took place at Georgetown Prep with women.” Rasor stressed that “under normal circumstances, I wouldn’t reveal information that was told in confidence,” but, she said, “I can’t stand by and watch him lie.” In an interview with The New Yorker, she said, “Mark told me a very different story.” Rasor recalled that Judge had told her ashamedly of an incident that involved him and other boys taking turns having sex with a drunk woman. Rasor said that Judge seemed to regard it as fully consensual. She said that Judge did not name others involved in the incident, and she has no knowledge that Kavanaugh participated. But Rasor was disturbed by the story and noted that it undercut Judge’s protestations about the sexual innocence of Georgetown Prep. (Barbara Van Gelder, an attorney for Judge, said that he “categorically denies” the account related by Rasor. Van Gelder said that Judge had no further comment.)

    Another woman who attended high school in the nineteen-eighties in Montgomery County, Maryland, where Georgetown Prep is located, also refuted Judge’s account of the social scene at the time, sending a letter to Ford’s lawyers saying that she had witnessed boys at parties that included Georgetown Prep students engaging in sexual misconduct. In an interview, the woman, who asked to have her name withheld for fear of political retribution, recalled that male students “would get a female student blind drunk” on what they called “jungle juice”—grain alcohol mixed with Hawaiian Punch—then try to take advantage of her. “It was disgusting,” she said. “They treated women like meat.”

    Republicans are the party of rape.

  160. Delta A

    Bill Clinton was a Republican?

  161. Bruce of Newcastle

    Kavanaugh is so boned, LOL.

    Attorney Michael Avenatti tweeted Sunday that he is now representing a woman who has “credible” information about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his high school pal Mark Judge.

    M0nty, you are now satirizing yourself!
    To choose Avenatti of all possible lawyers in DC?
    That is pure double-D toadstool-shaped irony.
    It’s like saying to the whole world “this is a stick-up, gimmee money!”

  162. .

    Another woman who attended high school in the nineteen-eighties in Montgomery County, Maryland, where Georgetown Prep is located, also refuted Judge’s account of the social scene at the time, sending a letter to Ford’s lawyers saying that she had witnessed boys at parties that included Georgetown Prep students engaging in sexual misconduct.

    Wowee. The new allegation is “proved” by a poison pen letter of unverifiable provenance, (a supposed recollection perhaps dating from the early, mid or late 1980s) supporting the totally debunked fantasy of Ford whose own witnesses and friends she says came to “the party” with her, whom all deny the accusation happened.

    What’s funny about this is it was written by misandrists with no sense of self-awareness: all of the misconduct reported was the actions of the males. No female impropriety whatsoever.

    Which smacks of incredibility.

  163. struth

    Australia deserves what it gets, due to letting the left run riot.

    If the yanks let the loony socialist left get away with their bullshit, well, they deserve all they get.

    I’m not listening to another psycho bitch dribble unsubstantiated bullshit playing dirty politics.

    If the men let this happen, they, like us, deserve to go down.

    Fight or bend over Americans.

    Hey look down under.
    Do you want to end up like this?

  164. rickw

    Republicans are the party of rape.

    Munty isn’t getting any smarter.

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