The most ignorant highly educated fools in history

This is from Campus Review: What Scott Morrison doesn’t get about most of the voting public. And what he doesn’t get is that they are ignorant fools. Here’s the text:

When now-Prime Minster Scott Morrison brought a lump of coal into parliament in 2017, pleading “don’t be afraid, don’t be scared, it won’t hurt you,” he made a critical error. That is, assuming he wants the Coalition to retain power at the next federal election.

That’s because to Generations X (b. 1961–81) and Y (b. 1981–96), which together comprise the largest segment of the voting public, combating climate change is their priority.

Australia’s generational spread, per 2016 Census data. Photo: ABC

This is a key finding of the University of Melbourne’s Life Patterns report, released this week.

The longitudinal study, which followed a cohort that left high school in 1991 and another that left in 2006, further revealed that although they both cared about minimising the use of coal, they did so for different reasons. Gen-Xers generally worried about their children’s health, whereas Gen-Yers tended to want to protect future generations.

Report co-author Dr Julia Cook, Research Fellow at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, explained how the researchers reached this conclusion.

“In 2017, we asked participants to nominate the three most important issues facing Australia.

“One major issue unites both generations: concerns about the environment and climate change …

“… Both groups consistently expressed grave concerns about the general lack of action towards climate change mitigation from the current government.”

Among Gen-Xers (now aged 43-44), women were almost twice as likely to think this than men, yet among Gen-Yers (now aged 28-29), men predominantly held this view, albeit by a slim margin: 40 per cent compared to 34 per cent.

“We’re not going to have air to breathe soon,” a mother living in a country town said.

A father living in a rural area was equally alarmed: “Climate change could ruin their [his children’s] lives and our governments are not acting.”

The other issues the groups aired tended to reflect their respective life stages. For instance, Gen-Yers were concerned about jobs and housing affordability, while Gen-Xers were anxious about the cost of living and education – a worry potentially exacerbated by Scott Morrison’s independent and Catholic schools funding announcement on Thursday.

I actually think this is reasonably accurate. These people will bring on a collapse of our civilisation – their civilisation – and never know what happened. And then by some coincidence, this was in The Oz today: Labor’s mining of millennials’ envy is a cynical ploy that may work. There you find:

Labor’s delusion that government is better able to order economic affairs than markets has cost Australian taxpayers tens of billion dollars over the decade. Its legacy includes unplanned and unwanted school buildings, the National Broadband Network, an unreliable and expensive electricity system and debt that will pass to the next generation, and possibly the one after that.

Yet Labor is doubling down. Bill Shorten is campaigning on the party’s least diluted socialist platform since Gough Whitlam. He promises intrusive government, and more steeply progressive tax. He will re-regulate the Labor market and hand back more power to the unions.

He will attack private health insurance and penalise self-funded retirees. He will throw more money at public schools and public health under the pretence of improving services.

He will resume subsidies to wind and solar farms, bringing more pain to consumers.

Economic freedom fighters like Uber and Airbnb will face a torrid time. Labor’s addiction to regulate, combined with the trade union movement’s determination to keep every worker within their grasp, will bring down the curtains on the sharing and gig economies.

Which sums up to this:

Labor’s politics of envy has a subliminal appeal to millennials. Winding back negative gearing or capital gains concessions for investors appeals to their grievances, even though its effect will be to tighten the rental property market on which most of them depend.

Higher education on demand has inflated career expectations for some. A significant proportion find themselves employed in jobs for which they are over-qualified, on paper at least.

The Opposition Leader is relying on these voters to get him home.

Mis-educated by design, perhaps, but with no actual knowledge – both among the teachers and the taught – the tragic result.

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36 Responses to The most ignorant highly educated fools in history

  1. DB

    I’m Generation X, having left school in 1991. Almost everyone that I know my age thinks climate change in either exaggerated, benign or outright BS.

  2. struth

    This is bullshit.
    Bullshit findings I wouldn’t believe for a second and bullshit conclusion.

    Don’t believe anything from a university study.
    Really, do you have to be told?

  3. tombell

    As a so called baby boomer I have paid tax at the marginal rate for most of my life. In semi-retirement I still do. I believe in equality of opportunity. And I believe I should pay tax. But what I see appalls me. Political system – a joke. Level of debate at sandstone institutions – a joke. Accountability – a joke. Level of analysis on almost any subject of real importance – a joke. The ability to make an issue out of a non-issue – a joke. In the “modern” progressive world you need a vagina and massive chip on your shoulder. And if not a person of colour – you certainly need to aspire to be one. So now I actively plan the day when I no longer live here. The great difficulty is finding somewhere demonstrably better. It may be Hobson’s choice. But Australia appears irredeemable.

  4. Nob

    Winding back negative gearing or capital gains concessions for investors appeals to their grievances, even though its effect will be to tighten the rental property market on which most of them depend.

    I said that to a teacher who is arse end of baby boom, therefore cognisant during Keating years.
    She simply said that abolishing negative gearing had no effect on rental market.

    Guess what – the ABC told her so.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-06/hockey-negative-gearing/6431100

  5. Born in 1952, what generation is that? Boomer?

  6. Mark A

    Winston Smith
    #2823611, posted on September 25, 2018 at 4:44 am

    Born in 1952, what generation is that? Boomer?

    Yup.

  7. tgs

    Declared vs revealed preferences.

  8. Senile Old Guy

    I’m Generation X, having left school in 1991. Almost everyone that I know my age thinks climate change in either exaggerated, benign or outright BS.

    Exactly. Do not believe opinion polls. In recent elections, most opinion polls have been wrong. I usually do not respond to polls, but when I do I usually lie. Opinion polls are now used to manipulate us and should not be believed or answered honestly.

  9. Guess what – the ABC told her so.

    Sadly, there are all too many people about (of all ages) that blindly believe everything that Their ABC says.

  10. mareeS

    Spouse and I have been considering this for some years, Steve. We have considerable wealth and a son and daughter who understand these things in their professions, and we as a family have protected ourselves because we understand history. We won’t be pillaged, but gee, lots will suffer when the entitled young frights get their hands on government. Save yourself now.

  11. EvilElvis

    you need a vagina

    Should have just rolled with that, tombell. There’s a few god uns around but in general women are the problem. Uni educated women more so.

  12. Farmer Gez

    A father living in a rural area was equally alarmed: “Climate change could ruin their [his children’s] lives and our governments are not acting.”

    Rural area. Nimbin?

  13. Mak Siccar

    What is really going on is plant churning. If a utility can replace existing but fully depreciated plants with new plants, it can increase its rate base, the portfolio of assets on which its allowed profit is based. If it can build double the number of plants by building wind and solar along with natural gas backup, so much the better. If the utilities were not restrained by public utility commissions they would be happy to frequently close depreciated plants to allow them to make investment in new plants. Wind and solar, requiring huge new investments, are wonderful for utility bottom lines. Xcel is concerned with its own financial health, not the huge waste of public and private money that takes place when efficient coal plants are replaced with subsidized, green energy schemes.

    Read more: https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2018/09/dumb_energy_advances_in_colorado.html

  14. Rural area.

    We live in a rural area, timber and potato farming, and there has been an influx of city Greenies moving in and adding to the existing Greenies spread about the place and they firmly believe in this crap. The sane people tend to keep quiet, as they know they can’t win with these loud mouthed idiots.

    And there’s a protest going on just about every week on some issue or another that offends their sensibilities. Their favourite activity is to try and run new businesses out of town, unless that business is into hair shirts and basket weaving. The same people then complain that jobs are disappearing.

  15. Muddy

    One suspects that education in the conventional sense is both overvalued and misunderstood. We churn out the ‘educated’ who cannot or will not, think for themselves. Then we assign the cognitive regurgitations of such people greater public oxygen.

  16. EvilElvis

    Their favourite activity is to try and run new businesses out of town, unless that business is into hair shirts and basket weaving. The same people then complain that jobs are disappearing.

    Same in my area. They’ll never be able to draw that line between businesses closing and lack of jobs, high wages and high costs, etc, etc.

    What a country.

  17. Muddy

    My point is that schooling is not the same as education, and if the inability and unwillingness to analyse and reason is now seen as the hallmark of the latter as well as the former now, I will happily out myself as having been schooled, but remaining uneducated. A consensitard.

  18. Bushkid

    “We’re not going to have air to breathe soon,” a mother living in a country town said.

    What a dreadful indictment on the education system that’s pushing the CAGW hoax! Truly abysmal that anyone can be so ignorant as to believe this, and particularly that they can believe it’s because of a trace gas that makes up 0.04% of the entire atmosphere!

  19. duncanm

    What did they do – poll all the people they know at Uni?

    No representation without taxation, now.

  20. mareeS

    Further, we live and travel, the spouse surfs, I swim in our ocean baths, winter/summer, we fish the ocean, we couldn’t give a flying f about climate lies. Our youngsters are on the good side, working in mining jobs,all of the cousins think they are going to die because Mick and Nyrie are killing the planet bymcoal.

  21. duncanm

    Oh, and

    Generations X (b. 1961–81) and Y (b. 1981–96)

    Gen-Xers (now aged 43-44), Gen-Yers (now aged 28-29)

    does not compute.

    Try 37-57 and 22-37 respectively,.

    That is, unless of course, they chose a very narrow band of X’s and Y’s to prove their conclusions. They wouldn’t do that, would they?

  22. duncanm

    Here’s the report

    A couple of points
    – these are people who signed up for a ’10-up’ style review of their opinions over an extended period. They are not a representative cross-section of the community. It also explains the narrow X and Y bands I noted above
    – 40% have a bachelor’s degree, 35/25% a PhD..
    – the ‘environmental concern’ level correlates very well with education level attained (pp5 graph). 45% of the PhD’s think the environment is most imporatant, while only 15/25% of school leavers think it is.
    – Very few seem to be in full time jobs. Only 30% of cohort1 are full-time or contract employed (pp8)
    – There’s a whole lot more concern about cost of living in that study than the above summary hints at.

    An example of the environmental angle.. pretty much what you’d expect:

    Government inaction on climate change
    in this country is a crying shame….
    [Male, librarian, married, parent, living in a
    capital city, cohort 1]

  23. manalive

    One mother living in a country town, told researchers “we’re not going to have air to breathe soon” …

    Invincible ignorance, tragicomedy.

  24. Mother Lode

    I do think teachers are a problem.

    Apart from the fact that so many of them really aren’t that bright, and are rather to inclined to think the advantage in knowledge they have over their youthful charge translates to an intellectual advantage over their charges’ parents.

    Some of those parents will be employed in far higher achieving positions, but even a parent employed as a cleaner will recognise that they do not know everything and not impose error upon others – if less educated they are still smarter.

    Of the teachers I used to know at uni most are miserable sods I now have only very occasional interaction with. They were rapt when they got their first job – getting pay and conditions that were the envy of the rest of us.

    The as time went on and we advanced in our jobs, and they were still teaching the same stuff to an endless procession of the same urchins, as our pay overtook theirs, and the extra days off became emptier and only shared with other teachers, they became angrier and more strident in their collectivist opinions.

    The children in school aren’t their goal. They are an outlet. An outlet for pent up anger, frustration, and sense of pointlessness.

    It is not the case for all teachers – but quite a lot.

  25. Roger

    Steve, I’d take any survey appearing in Campus Review with a grain of salt.

  26. We live in a rural area, timber and potato farming, and there has been an influx of city Greenies moving in and adding to the existing Greenies spread about the place and they firmly believe in this crap. The sane people tend to keep quiet, as they know they can’t win with these loud mouthed idiots.

    Then the “sane people” are part of the problem.
    If they “know they can’t win” then they’ve already lost and might as well shoot themselves in the head.

    “We’re not going to have air to breathe soon,” a mother living in a country town said.

    Seriously…anyone who can’t speak up let alone win against this stratospheric level of utter imbecility deserves Veneztralia and the accompanying diet of witchetty grubs and ‘roo piss.

    Stand up, organise and fight them you fucking pansies.
    Your ancestors who fought and died in World Wars will be dying of shame all over again.

  27. min

    Posted in open forum was an English weather channel warning of another Maunder Minimum because of a lack of sun spots. Bring it on, let them go through a really cold weather for decades and worry about climate change.

  28. Ellen of Tasmania

    These people will bring on a collapse of our civilisation – their civilisation – and never know what happened.

    That seems the greatest tragedy to me. Even when everything falls apart, they won’t understand why. You see it in failed socialist states now. The people are still looking to the government to save them, when it is the government that has failed them.

    When the whole debt-based fiat currency lie comes crashing down, will people recognise why? When we’re back to candles and fires, will they understand why? When our culture is lying in the gutter, will they understand what worldview brought us there?

  29. Nob

    Can’t wait for the media take on Iceland’s accelerating CO2 emissions due to current volcanic activity.

    Surely this will put them ahead of Australia in the mythical but coveted “carbon emissions per head numbawan” spot.

  30. Confused Old Misfit

    So now I actively plan the day when I no longer live here. The great difficulty is finding somewhere demonstrably better. It may be Hobson’s choice. But Australia appears irredeemable.

    You will not find any where that is demonstrably better unless you go to a Greek Island and stick your head in the sand.
    Politicians the world over have discovered that they can bribe the electorate using that electorate’s own money.
    Your job will be to find a place where the level of corruption does not exceed your level of tolerance.

  31. Speedbox

    So now I actively plan the day when I no longer live here. The great difficulty is finding somewhere demonstrably better. It may be Hobson’s choice. But Australia appears irredeemable.

    Don’t despair – there are a surprising number of places to live. It all depends on what “you want”.

    There are numerous ‘areas’ but all will require some compromise. For example, the South Pacific (Vanuatu; Fiji, Cook Islands). If you want a casual ‘beach-comber’ style these are perfect. English spoken but services are generally much less advanced than here. Very near to Aust so friends/family can visit easily and you can return in just a few hours. Long term residency visas are fairly easy to obtain. The uber casual attitude may/may not suit. BTW, cost in the Cook Islands seems (relatively) high.

    SE Asia (Thailand, Indonesia, Cambodia, Vietnam). Obvious issue with language although english is very widely spoken as a second language. Consider your diet and the common national dishes. Long term residency visas are generally easy. You can live very well in SE Asia for a fraction of the cost of Australia. Great scenery, beaches, people. Services can be 1st class or patchy. Some areas may carry an element of security risk. Do your homework.

    Europe (Hungary, Czech Republic, Croatia, parts of Spain, Ireland). There are a large number of places beyond those mentioned. Unless you have lots of money, forget the capitals or major cities of any country but the countryside, and small to medium villages in particular, are something else. English language is not an issue. Be aware of climate (particularly winter temps). Services are generally very good. Long term visas can be problematic in some locations (assuming you are not EU person) but as a self-funded retiree you should have few problems. If you have an interest in history, Europe is ‘ground zero’.

    My wife and I have been quietly planning our escape from this rat hole for the past 2-3 years. Another 3-4 years and we hope we will be gone. Have already purchased an appt and block of land overseas. Another appt will be added around Feb/March 2019. You need to decide the ‘style’ of your retirement. Walking sandy beaches picking up coconuts and just chillin’? The more frenetic pace in an Asian town? Quieter country life in a smallish village, eating at the local taverna, growing a few veggies and taking day trips to a larger town when necessary. Whatever you do, good luck.

  32. .

    A review of Morocco, Japan, Oman, the Caribbean, Namibia (!) South America, Cape Verde, etc please.

  33. Confused Old Misfit

    The grass is always greener….

  34. duncanm

    Can’t wait for the media take on Iceland’s accelerating CO2 emissions due to current volcanic activity.

    12-24kt/day is about 0.75-1.5M Icelander’s worth (assuming 6t/annum/person). ie: 2-4 times the CO2 output of their entire population.

    Thats one volcano.. which hasn’t even erupted.

  35. tombell

    Can’t wait for the media take on Iceland’s accelerating CO2 emissions due to current volcanic activity.

    There should be a law against volcanoes.

  36. Bob in Castlemaine

    These over “educated” gen X and Y types need to understand that environmental utopia has its price.
    The Peoples Republic of California is hurtling in that direction.

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