Wednesday Forum: October 10, 2018

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1,555 Responses to Wednesday Forum: October 10, 2018

  1. Armadillo

    I’m tired, drunk and bored.

    I hereby declare myself as having achieved 100 interupted posts at “The Cat” Open Thread.

    You bastards often claim “Poll Position” when arriving late. Goose/Gander.

  2. Armadillo

    Sinc, can you confirm the record for prosperity? Please.

    [Arma now holds the official record. I had to delete his other 96 posts because they contained banned words – SINC]

  3. DrBeauGan

    You just need someone intelligent to talk to, ‘Dillo. Unfortunately that lets me out. I lost ten grand on shares today and I’m really stupid about it.

  4. Harlequin Decline

    Arma,

    that’s a pretty piss poor effort by your standards didn’t get to 10. I was holding off posting to give you a chance to have a real crack at the record .

  5. Armadillo

    I lost ten grand on shares today and I’m really stupid about it.

    Visit the track and make it back. In the gates and past the post in minutes.

    You could probably quadruple your dosh on a lazy summers afternoon.

  6. Armadillo

    I was holding off posting to give you a chance to have a real crack at the record .

    Wish you had shown the same enthusiasm when Winston (spit) Smith was prancing about the place. No heart.

  7. JC

    Doc

    Are you going to sell them shortly? If not, don’t it’s not a concern.

  8. Harlequin Decline

    Arma,

    Why didn’t you protest Winston’s run? Maybe asked for a swab or something, after all he thought 27 was a prime number so maybe he was using performance enhancing substances.

  9. Armadillo

    JC, Doc’s lost 10k today. Show some sympathy. Say something nice. Ask him how his relationships with women are going.

  10. JC

    Doc,

    How’s the sheilas front doing?

  11. JC

    Camille Paglia is incredible. A true feminist.

  12. DrBeauGan

    I lost ten grand on shares today and I’m really stupid about it.

    Visit the track and make it back. In the gates and past the post in minutes.

    You could probably quadruple your dosh on a lazy summers afternoon.

    I know about horses, ‘Dillo. They’ve got a leg on each corner and big teeth. That’s all I want to know.

  13. Armadillo

    after all he thought 27 was a prime number so maybe he was using performance enhancing substances.

    Worthy of investigation. There is surely something in his drug fuelled rant which will disqualify him. Anyone got a Linky?

  14. DrBeauGan

    JC
    #2837067, posted on October 12, 2018 at 1:43 am
    Doc,

    How’s the sheilas front doing?

    Terrible, JC. I haven’t recovered from Spiky taking off for Sinny.

    There’s an Indian chick I know with a taste in short skirts and tight pants who is going back to India tomorrow.

    Everything is going bad.

  15. Armadillo

    How’s the sheilas front doing?

    Last I heard a chick called “spikey” let him go to the picture theatre with him. Tolerant lass that.

  16. DrBeauGan

    Last I heard a chick called “spikey” let him go to the picture theatre with him. Tolerant lass that.

    Yeah. The movie was shit, too.

  17. Armadillo

    Doc, what was the go with calling her “Spikey”? Personality? Hairdo?

  18. Harlequin Decline

    Arma,

    Here’s the link, , bound to be something protest worthy there.

  19. Armadillo

    It’s always a mistake not to go with an Algorithm theme night rather than movie night.

  20. Armadillo

    Thanks HD,

    Case is “shut and closed”.

    He missed 1,2,3.

  21. Armadillo

    Wow. I also owe a debt of gratitude to some weirdo leftard. The following is “smack bang” in the middle of Winstons record attempt.

    Colonel Crispin Berka, King’s Fusiliers Corps.
    #2832706, posted on October 6, 2018 at 3:36 am
    Hey capitalists, here’s a curly question for you.

    Is it immoral to use free market principals to run a market you can’t be free from?
    e.g. healthcare is not optional as it is required to live, so it should not be run as a free market.

    Does that make sense?

  22. Armadillo

    Winston, get in here and apologise for your fake attempt at glory.

  23. Mark A

    Winston is disqualified, only 21. What skiter claiming a record fradulently.

    Here is proof, note the post ID

  24. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Arrived at Heathrow and sitting in the Avis office while Hairy gets us a car for a week. We had a driver in Athens but now he wants to drive again. It’s a summery 18 degrees here. An old friend we were going to see has suddenly backed out with a lame excuse. I sent him some of my Quadrant stuff, and politics may have intercmvened. I believe once we leave Richmond in a day or so we are headed for Henley to relive some glory days of Haury’s rowing career, such as it was. Have to dress properly for it, so it seems.

  25. Armadillo

    Colonel Crispin Berka, King’s Fusiliers Corps.
    #2832706, posted on October 6, 2018 at 3:36 am
    Hey capitalists, here’s a curly question for you.

    Is it immoral to use free market principals to run a market you can’t be free from?
    e.g. healthcare is not optional as it is required to live, so it should not be run as a free market.

    Does that make sense?

    Probably deserves a response. Berks thinks he shouldn’t have to brush his own teeth, comb his own hair or wipe his own arse. The word “free” is bandied about as if he knows what it actually means.

    Pal, “immoral” is what you see in the mirror, you self loathing hate filled retard.

  26. Armadillo

    Winston is disqualified, only 21. What skiter claiming a record fradulently.

    Good Lordy. I’d never have expected such shenanigans at “The Cat”. Shameful.

  27. struth

    Seems Camille is going hysterical about female hysteria.

  28. Armadillo

    I suspect Doc tried to grope Spikey at the picture theatre.

    His denials will do nothing more than to prove his guilt. Arky was sitting up in the corner alone. He claims he wasn’t there. He recalls “Jaffers” being rolled down the aisles.

  29. calli

    Off on the hop on hop off bus around San Fran (another great Aussie invention). Will attempt to dodge the poo and vagrancy epidemic. I have packed extra Dettol wipes and hand sanitiser in case it has metastasised from the footpaths to higher objects.

    Report back later, but my impression of the place is that it has seen better days.

  30. Armadillo

    Report back later, but my impression of the place is that it has seen better days.

    Sounds like “The Cat”.

    First question. Who’s going to clean up this mess? You are going to need a long extension cord.

    First observation. You haven’t submitted a permission slip to be absent.

    First Revelation: Time for a “Cat Party”. Friday Night. 6 PM start. Cats only, No Kithens allowed.

  31. Armadillo

    I’ve organised a keg and mOnsters crucifixion. Best I could do. Stormy didn’t want to be in the same room as him.

  32. Armadillo

    I’ll also run “a book” on mOnsters tears (measured by the litre).

    Trigger words may include “Hillary”, “Mid term Election” and “Kavanaugh”. Closest to the mark sweeps the pool (minus a small margin).

  33. Armadillo

    Are Americans becoming awake, Tom?

    I get the sense that some Australians are, but the majority are oblivious to the freight train coming down the track. They laugh and snigger at the orange one, “We are rich”, we are the “Lucky Country”.

    Trump never mentions Australia. My gut feeling is that once all is revealed, we are going to be in deep shit. Really deep shit. There is no manufacturing left to target. That leaves mining and agriculture. He has his own resources in America and beyond. He’s hardly going to assist us, other than for strategic military purposes (to thwart China).

    Our final hope is our generals in high heels, and a socialist education system.

    Other than that, we have fuck all.

  34. Armadillo

    I’ve been put in moderation for no reason. Welcome to the nanny state.

  35. Armadillo

    What word got banned? What is so offencive that none can see?

  36. Armadillo

    Try again.

    Are Americans becoming awake, Tom?

    I get the sense that some Australians are, but the majority are oblivious to the freight train coming down the track. They laugh and snigger at the orange one, “We are rich”, we are the “Lucky Country”.

    Trump never mentions Australia. My gut feeling is that once all is revealed, we are going to be in deep shit. Really deep shit. There is no manufacturing left to target. That leaves mining and agriculture. He has his own resources in America and beyond. He’s hardly going to assist us, other than for strategic military purposes (to thwart China).

    Our final hope is our generals in high heels, and a socialist education system.

    Other than that, we have far all.

  37. Armadillo

    Catallaxy is DEAD, Might as well bury it.

  38. Tailgunner

    Arma – some Spring tips please.
    The track is now an investor safe haven.

  39. Armadillo

    Test.

    Arky (aka “Death [Shudder], can you volunteer for crucifixion please. Crosses to the left, innocents to the right.

  40. Armadillo

    Nope. That wasn’t it.

  41. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2837116, posted on October 12, 2018 at 6:24 am

    Nope. That wasn’t it.

    Did you type “balls”?

  42. Mark A

    Can’t be, it got through.
    Maybe torturing Monster again?

  43. Mark A

    Tailgunner
    #2837114, posted on October 12, 2018 at 6:16 am

    Arma – some Spring tips please.
    The track is now an investor safe haven.

    You must be desperate, asking a bookie for tips?
    Bet the favs my son, he’ll tell you!

  44. Armadillo

    The track is now an investor safe haven.

    Ignore the odds. Anything can happen. Pick them by name. Pick them by number.

    If you lose, be assured your money will find a good home. Probably go to the destitute and poor.

    Smile at Christmas lunch in the knowledge you have donated something to humanity.

  45. Armadillo

    Shut your trap, Mark. He asked for my advice, not yours.

  46. Armadillo

    Six is a good number. Stick with that.

  47. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2837120, posted on October 12, 2018 at 6:31 am

    The track is now an investor safe haven.

    Ignore the odds. Anything can happen. Pick them by name. Pick them by number.

    Some years back there was this craze on the propun forum betting on jockey colours, ran a query, and some actually turned a profit, albeit with a very small S/R and huge winners.

    Clearly a method only a desperate punter would apply.

  48. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2837121, posted on October 12, 2018 at 6:34 am

    Shut your trap, Mark.

    Shutting up Sir!

  49. Bruce of Newcastle

    Leak wins again. Simple, accurate and hilarious.

    Ramirez’s one on Hillary is really really good to. But not at all funny…

  50. Armadillo

    Clearly a method only a desperate punter would apply.

    Gunner backed Trump. All over him like horney sheep dog he was. His luck is over.

    My only “claim to fame” is that I never laid Trump.

  51. Mark A

    Mark A
    #2837131, posted on October 12, 2018 at 7:04 am

    Advice for vegans

    That should be people on salad/green diet.

  52. Bruce of Newcastle

    Judges used to burn witches in Brooklyn.
    Now witches in Brooklyn want to burn judges.

    Justice Kavanaugh ‘hex’ ritual planned by Brooklyn occultists: ‘Bring your rage’

    Occultists in Brooklyn, New York, are so incensed with the confirmation of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court that they are gathering to put a hex on him.

    The three witches from William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” famously offered the incantation “double, double toil and trouble. Fire burn and cauldron bubble,” but Oct. 20 is setting up for something along the lines of “fire burn and Kavanaugh bubble.”

    Catland, which bills itself as Brooklyn’s “premier metaphysical shop and event space,” will host the ritual and donate 25 percent of all proceeds to Planned Parenthood. Another 25 percent will go to the Ali Forney Center, a non-profit organization for homeless LGBT youths.

    A coven of witches giving 25% of the profits to baby killers is somewhat apt.

  53. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2837123, posted on October 12, 2018 at 6:37 am

    Six is a good number. Stick with that.

    With the greyhounds it is. You wouldn’t think so with 5 an 6 being the ‘worse’ trap.

  54. Cactus

    I had a theory about Greyhounds that in a 6 dog race you wanted to get the dog in either the 1 or 6 position as it only had 1 dog next to it to barrel it over or crimp its run. This theory has lost me lots of $2 and $3 bets.

  55. Mark A

    Cactus
    #2837142, posted on October 12, 2018 at 7:46 am

    I had a theory about Greyhounds that in a 6 dog race you wanted to get the dog in either the 1 or 6 position as it only had 1 dog next to it to barrel it over or crimp its run. This theory has lost me lots of $2 and $3 bets.

    Yes, that alone would.
    Still when you handicapping you have to give a fraction of a length advantage to the two outsiders, provided the 6 or 8 respectively have the early speed.
    I follow 6 dog races but it’s most frustrating with the two place div.

  56. Mark A

    Still early in the morn, so I post an other OT for Dr BG

  57. Bruce of Newcastle

    I am amused by this story.

    Switzerland Deported over 1,000 Migrant Criminals in 2017

    While other countries in Europe struggle with deportations, Switzerland’s statistics office has claimed that the country has deported over 1,000 criminal migrants in 2017.

    According to the Swiss Federal Statistical Office, 1,039 foreign criminals were ordered to be deported from the country last year, with the largest number, 348, coming from the Balkans, 20 Minutes reports.

    Africans made up 250 of those deported, 157 from North Africa and 93 from the Western African region.

    We have no success in deporting anyone to such places, so they rot on Nauru or in Villawood. How come Switzerland has been successfully booting these people out?

    Not mentioned in the article are all those anonymous numbered bank accounts in Zurich. It’d be really terrible for the politicians of certain nations if they were audited…

  58. John Constantine

    The selldown in small mining exploration stocks could indicate that the market expects capital availability and mineral prices to be less attractive medium term, that taking a mineral resource discovered now into an operating mine in 2020 will be at a harder time in the small cap stock cycle.

    That said, an arbitrage opened up this week between AIS and ARE, the two partners in the Lake Torrens joint venture. Not mentioning this as a gamble, but it is one of the last genuinely huge ‘ known unknown’ drill targets left in Australia. Undrilled for years because of green lawfare.

    Headology said that the 70% partner, AIS, was bad value, because it was crippled with poorly structured debt it had taken on when it was desperate [even though it has a working australian mine as well].
    ARE was technically fully priced in comparison for its 30% of the project, but it had a clean balance sheet and cash to meet costs for a while.

    AIS then ‘mined the market’ recently to raise a swag of cash before drilling started and clean itself up. 20 cents was the raising price, but the market has sold it down a few cents under this.

    It is accepted that sometimes stocks are sold down while the raisings are still open to scare small shareholders out of the offer and leave a big shortfall for the big funds, Sometimes the stocks are sold down because the new shares will weigh heavily on the market, sometimes sold down because the market is down.

    I had been selling down my ARE, with the intention of grabbing some AIS as the cap raising pushed it down and averaged 17 cents yesterday into AIS.

    The downside of all this comes if the pencilled in selling opportunity, which often occurs when the actual drilling program starts, is swamped by negative market sentiment. No ‘pop’ for gamblers is quite possible as an outcome now.

    AIS held up the drilling program for months while it got its finances in order, now shareholders have missed the ride. But the corporates have saved themselves.

    Still Lake Torrens remains something well worth a look when the helicopters do land the drill rigs out in the middle of nowhere.

    Nice photo of the workplace on yesterdays ARE report.

    https://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/20181011/pdf/43z5gl3k8g6kc6.pdf

  59. mh

    Kanye West in the Oval Office with President Trump (C-SPAN)

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HdC1jFr51GA

    Can’t watch right now, let me know if it’s interesting.

  60. OldOzzie

    Tom

    Thanks

    An Australian Winner Today – Johannes Leak.- sums up Green Square and Moore Park Surrounds every time I drive past to the Airport and the Rest of how Sydney is becoming the same

  61. OldOzzie

    Climate Change’s Ever-Shifting Goalposts

    Ever since Donald Trump wisely scuttled the meaningless Paris Climate Accord last year, climate alarmists have been desperate to revive the public’s interest in this once-dominant political issue. As concern about climate change has waned, the activists who are determined to use it as leverage to exert more state control over our lives have downgraded the planet’s prognosis once again.

    It is a pity Australia has TurdBull the Second in SCoMo Morrisson – another Liberal Watse of Space Paris Apologist

  62. mh

    So witches don’t believe in innocent until proven guilty, and also don’t believe that facts or evidence matter.

    Burn the witches! 🔥 🔥 🔥

  63. ScoMo gives Turnbull a kick on SKY.
    Discussion turned to the upcoming visit of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex,
    Asked if he was a republican or a constitutional monarchist, ScoMo said “I’m a constitutional monarchist, so the picture of the Queen is back up in the PM’s office. It’s one of the things that Malcolm and I disagree on”.

    ScMo will revel in the glitter of the royals whilst Mal stews with the dirty Dems in NYC.

  64. mh

    I wonder if CNN will double down on Kanye?

    I think we might here lot more N words!

  65. OldOzzie

    Another TurdBull Strikes

    Wentworth by-election: Alex Turnbull calls on voters not to vote Liberal – Andrew Clennell

    Malcolm Turnbull doesn’t agree with his son, who is urging Wentworth voters not to support the Liberal party in his father’s old seat, Prime Minister Scott Morrison says.

    Alex Turnbull issued an explosive social media message to voters in the Wentworth by-election urging them not to support the Liberal Party which he says has been taken over by extremists on the hard right and requires an “intervention’’.

    “I disagree with Alex. His father disagrees with him too,” Mr Morrison told the ABC on Friday.

    “His father Malcolm Turnbull is heavily supporting Dave Sharma, the only Liberal candidate running for Wentworth.” Mr Morrison says the former prime minister has recently been silent on the issue as he has bowed out of public life.

    Alex Turnbull, a professional investor based in Singapore, argued a general election was due next year anyway providing an opportunity for voters to “send a signal about which way the Liberal Party is going and your displeasure at where it is going’’.

    “Don’t vote for the Liberal Party in the Wentworth by-election … this time, don’t give the Liberals your vote,’’ Mr Turnbull said.

    Mr Turnbull’s message, posted on Facebook and Twitter yesterday, comes as senior Liberals are tipping a knife-edge result in Wentworth next Saturday. The Coalition must retain the seat to keep its one seat majority in the House of Representatives.

    The extraordinary message from the former PM’s son is a boost for independent candidate Kerryn Phelps.

    I recorded this message for the people of Wentworth. We need to send a message on climate change. This time, don’t give the Liberals your vote.
    Posted by Alex Turnbull on Wednesday, 10 October 2018

    Liberal candidate Dave Sharma is seen as marginally ahead of Dr Phelps but the question of whether Labor or Dr Phelps finishes second in the seat is seen as the key to Prime Minister Scott Morrison hanging onto his majority. Alex Turnbull said the Liberal Party had been taken over by extremists “on the hard right who aren’t particularly motivated to win an election and aren’t particularly motivated to serve the general public’’. They want to pursue a crazy agenda,’’ he said.

    In a direct rebuke of Liberal conservatives who are backing coal-fired power, Mr Turnbull declared that as an investor in energy “there is no way coal can compete anymore’’ because renewable energy was “too cheap’’.

    “There is no trade-off any more between lowering your power bills and reducing emissions and yet still some would like to prosecute a culture war over this issue for whatever the reasons may be,’’ Mr Turnbull said.

    Malcolm Turnbull’s national energy guarantee divided Coalition MPs and unsettled his leadership. On winning the Prime Ministership, Scott Morrison said the NEG “is dead’’ and Energy Minister Angus Taylor has made lowering power bills ahead of cutting emissions his policy priority.

    Mr Turnbull’s father also lost the Liberal leadership in 2009 after a revolt by conservative MPs over plans to back a deal on Kevin Rudd’s carbon pollution reduction scheme.

    But Alex Turnbull described the latest Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change report as “terrifying’’ and argued it was “insane that we could not be doing something about this and soon’’.

    Urging voters not to back the Liberals, Mr Turnbull said: “If you want to pull the Liberal Party back from the brink, this is the one clear signal you can send. Consider it an intervention for Australia, for the party, for Wentworth.’’

    Meantime, the Phelps camp believes missteps by NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian including the controversy over the Everest horse race and the Opera House are helping their campaign; as is the controversy over the religious freedom debate.

    The Phelps camp believes a 40 per cent primary vote for Mr Sharma will win it, but a 25 per cent primary vote for Dr Phelps will give her a red hot chance, pushing her ahead of Labor for second spot.

    “It’s not been a great week for them (the Liberals) that’s for sure,” a Phelps supporter said, alluding to the Everest Opera House controversy. “But they had three good weeks before that.”

    Yesterday, the NSW Liberal Party released an ad saying that: “The polls say 50-50 in Wentworth. That means voting independent could deliver a hung parliament. Phelps and Labor — Don’t risk it.”

    A senior Liberal said the Morrison government was decidedly nervous about the seat. “It’s still unclear whether Labor will beat Phelps,” another Liberal said.

    Focus group research on Premier Gladys Berejiklian in recent days of which The Australian is aware raises concerns from voters that she is looking after the “top end of town”, in terms of bending to pressure to allow Everest race advertising on the Opera House after agreeing to build two new stadiums.

    Ms Berejiklian said earlier this week she was an “outsider” and said she would lobby the federal government to halve immigration in NSW.

    Former Liberal premier and federal party president Nick Greiner has strongly endorsed Mr Sharma. Mr Greiner said he believed Dave Sharma was of the calibre of a “Bob Hawke” or “Malcolm Turnbull” and deserved to be elected to Wentworth.

    Mr Greiner said that “it’s obviously a tough fight” but “I think Sharma’s one of the highest potential people on either side of federal politics’’.

  66. OldOzzie

    South Africa’s Zulu Nation Joins White Farmers To Protest Government Land Seizures

    Now, this is what unity looks like. South Africa’s Zulu nation has joined forces with white farmers being subjected to racial land seizures in order to prevent the atrocity.

    The largest ethnic group in South Africa, Zulu, has spoken out against the racial expropriation of land without compensation in the country. Zulu is ready to cooperate with the country’s white farmers, known as “Afrikaners” or “Boers” to prevent the seizure of their land, reported RT. Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini has said the group will cooperate with South African minority rights group AfriForum because they desire to eat in the future.

    “The Zulu nation I’m talking about will not exist if we don’t have food. That’s why I say farmers must come closer so that we discuss what we can do when we talk about agriculture and the availability of enough food in the land. That’s why I’m asking AfriForum of the Boers to come and help us,” Zwelithini said, as quoted by eNews Channel Africa.

    “Because when government started talking about the appropriation of land, expropriation without compensation, Boers downed tools. There is no food in South Africa,” he added.

    Zulu people are the largest ethnic group in South Africa, with an estimated 10-12 million people living mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal. The group accounts for more than a fifth of the country’s population and its opinion is important in the context of the general elections next year.

  67. Bruce of Newcastle

    I wonder if CNN will double down on Kanye?

    What, like this?

    “Kanye West is what happens when negroes don’t read,” said CNN commentator Bakari Sellers Tuesday night.

    “Black folks are about to trade Kanye in the racial draft,” said CNN’s Tara Setmayer. “They’ve had it with him. He’s an attention whore like the president. He’s … the token negro of the Trump administration.”

    “No one should be taking Kanye West seriously,” she added. “He clearly has issues; he’s already been hospitalized.”

    During all of this, CNN’s Don Lemon laughed with venomous glee.

    The Tom Toms of war are being sounded.

  68. lotocoti

    How much money does the Equality Institute gets from the Victorian Government?

  69. Geriatric Mayfly

    We have no success in deporting anyone to such places, so they rot on Nauru or in Villawood.

    Most ratholes will not take them back anyway. We need the Aerodynamic Orange Capsule. Load it up with the detritus, fly over some Godforsaken corner of chosen rat hole. Open cargo hold, release, and bingo, the rejects float gently down to home sweet home.

  70. mh

    Why CNN Must Destroy Kanye West

    “Kanye West is what happens when negroes don’t read,” said CNN commentator Bakari Sellers Tuesday night. “Donald Trump is going to use it and pervert it, and he’s going to have somebody who can stand with him and take pictures.”
    “Black folks are about to trade Kanye in the racial draft,” said CNN’s Tara Setmayer. “They’ve had it with him. He’s an attention whore like the president. He’s … the token negro of the Trump administration.”

    “No one should be taking Kanye West seriously,” she added. “He clearly has issues; he’s already been hospitalized.”

    During all of this, CNN’s Don Lemon laughed with venomous glee.

    I should note that Lemon and both of these CNN commentators are black.

    Here are some other things worthy of note….

    All of a sudden CNN is smearing Kanye West as an “attention whore” … even though he has been a public figure and pop culture icon for nearly 20 years.

    All of a sudden CNN is smearing Kanye as “what happens when negroes don’t read” … even though he has been political, going back to 2005, when, during a nationally televised telethon, he said “George Bush doesn’t care about black people.”

    All of a sudden CNN is smearing Kanye as mentally ill … even though his behavior has become much less erratic since those days a full decade ago when he stole the stage from Taylor Swift at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards.

    All of a sudden CNN is smearing Kanye as a “token negro” … even though Kanye is still Kanye, the same eccentric genius he has been for two decades.

    Absolutely nothing about Kanye has changed.

    Nothing.

    Not even his political priorities (which I’ll explain below).

    So why is CNN suddenly wielding the worst kind of racism to smear him?

    To control him.

    Whether they know it or not, CNN is borrowing from the playbook of the worst racists in American history. During the tragic and ugly history of slavery in the pre-Civil War era, white slave owners ruthlessly and violently punished any black man or woman who sought to educate themselves or think for themselves. It was all about controlling them and maintaining power over them.

    During the post-Civil War era (after Republicans freed the slaves from Democrat plantations), white Democrats formed the Ku Klux Klan as a terrorist arm of the Democrat party in order to intimidate, suppress, and destroy the political activities of the newly freed black population who were active and elected Republicans. Using murder, torture, and terror, white-hooded Democrats punished and made a public example of any black man or woman who dared think for themselves, who threatened the Democrat power structure.

    During the era of Jim Crow, white Democrats codified these tactics into law, again, to suppress any black political activity that threatened the white Democrat power structure. Laws written and passed by Democrats legalized racism and segregation and made it nearly impossible for black Americans to vote.

    Other than the tactics, nothing has changed with the modern-day Democrat Party. To protect their power, to ensure some 95% of black people continue to vote for them, white Democrats, primarily through establishment media outlets like CNN, are still trying to control black Americans.

    Time and again — witness Clarence Thomas, Herman Cain, Condi Rice, Jackie Robinson, Candace Owens, Dr. Ben Carson, Allen West, etc. — we have watched free-thinking black men and women personally destroyed through political and media campaigns wielding ridicule and taunts. These apostates are mercilessly slandered as “dumb negroes,” “token negroes,” “house negroes,” as crazy, as sellouts, as “Uncle Toms,” Oreos,” and not really black anymore.

    The goal is to toxify these free thinkers before they awaken and inspire others, to make a public example of those who dare think for themselves outside the herd, and of course to terrorize other black people into “keeping their minds right.”

    Here is all the proof you need…

    Kanye is still Kanye.

    He is still mercurial, political, and primarily concerned with the fate black Americans.

    The only thing that has changed — the only thing — is that he now supports President Trump.

    And he supports Trump for good reason, for all the reasons in keeping with his personal and political values.

    For it is Trump who has dropped the black unemployment rate to record lows, Trump who is working on much-needed criminal justice reform, Trump who is fighting against the illegal immigration that undermines job opportunities and wages for young black men and women; it is Trump who wants to find a solution to the never-ending slaughter of black men by black men in Chicago, and it is Democrats who have controlled every one of these godawful urban areas of black despair for decades.

    CNN must destroy Kanye because Kanye is a direct threat to the Democrat Party’s power — a free-thinking black man who might persuade other black Americans to think differently, to open their eyes to what 50 years of voting Democrat has wrought on their friends, families, schools, and neighborhoods.

    You see, this is who the Democrats are, this is part of their DNA. For centuries, they have been destroying black people who threaten their political and cultural power.

    https://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2018/10/11/why-cnn-must-destroy-kanye-west/

  71. Mother Lode

    Thanks, Tom.

    Youh, Leak is coming along very nicely. The humour is very similar to his Dad’s. I expect he is still honing his drawing style, but the strong familial resemblance to his fathers is the first thing that jumps out at you.

    I like Ramirez – the one about Nikki Haley’s shoes is a nice salute to a woman who took on the UN and left it whimpering with nothing more than muttering nasty words under its breath.

    Unlike so many here I don’t really like Ben Garrison’s style, but I have gone over that before and I doubt anyone really cares.

  72. Boambee John

    Bloke has been arrested in the US, accused of planning to let a bomb off in the Washington Mall on election day.

    He said he wanted to draw attention to the concept of sortition.

    Dot, RUOK?

  73. Roger

    Much ado about nothing on the religious schools front.

    Morrison furiously adding to the confusion, like an actor without a script.

  74. Shy Ted

    SloMo could always cancel all subsidies to Infigen, Alex Turnbull’ heavily subsidised business. But he ain’t called SloMo for nothing so he won’t.

  75. Nick

    Morrison furiously adding to the confusion, like an actor without a script.

    This is what I don’t get, it should be very easy to deal with. He even needed coaching from Bolta.

  76. zyconoclast

    Spain, Morocco in talks to repatriate 7,000 migrant children

    The Spanish government estimates that about 10,000 minor migrants are living in Spain without their families — 70 percent of them from Morocco.

    A total of 41,594 irregular migrants entered Spain between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30, according to the interior ministry.

  77. mh

    WATCH TRIGGERED LIBERALS FREAK OUT OVER KANYE-TRUMP MEETING

    ‘That was an assault on our White House’

    https://www.infowars.com/watch-triggered-liberals-freak-out-over-kanye-trump-meeting/

    🍿🍿🍿🍿🍿

  78. Atoms for Peace

    Any rocket crash that you walk away from is a good one.

  79. zyconoclast

    Isis supporters ‘frustrated’ at being stopped from travelling to Syria may attack UK instead, terror police chief warns

    Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner Neil Basu said that before last year’s attacks security services believed that fighters returning from abroad presented the biggest threat.

    “It wasn’t – the threat was already here – and there are still plenty of aspirant or frustrated travellers who now have nowhere to go,” he told the National Security Summit in London.

  80. zyconoclast

    AfriForum using Zulu king to fight its land battle

    The king warned of hunger if the government expropriated white owned farms.

  81. zyconoclast

    GINSBURG DELAYS FIGHT OVER CENSUS CITIZENSHIP

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg has delayed two depositions of Trump administration officials that had been scheduled by a judge hearing a case over whether the 2020 Census can ask respondents about their citizenship.

    WND reported last week the federal government had asked for a stay of orders from a lower court that would have compelled a wide-ranging interview with Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross.

    Critics of the citizenship question demanded to “probe the secretary’s mental state.”

  82. zyconoclast

    Germany has boosted the number of repatriations of rejected asylum seekers to Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia, the government said Monday, following years of diplomatic pressure on the Maghreb states.

    Between 2015 and last year, repatriations from the biggest EU economy to Algeria rose from 57 to 504, he said. To Morocco, they increased from 61 to 634, and to Tunisia from 17 to 251 over the same period.

  83. struth

    and

    Good Moaning.

    This attack on the west by the socialist shit in the UN, EU, and all levels of Australian and deep state western government is coming to a head.

    If we cannot, and it seems we can’t, get any journalist anywhere, not even on skynews, to mouth the words “It seems only western emissions cause climate change” and then report on what China , India and other corruptocracies are doing, we may as well just give up now.

    Our government is under the control of the socialist UN, in many ways.

    The Liberal party are now telling us that 80%, yes that’s right folks, 80% of us believe in man made climate catastrophe.

    I’d like to see that report, that survey.
    What utter bullshit.

    That’s a pure LIE to allow them to keep taking the path they are taking.

    However, it is true that the noisy minority and the yoof , brainwashed like never before, believe in this doomsday situation, you know, the one that keeps needing to be brought forward, as we’ve passed many “in fifteen years” milestones, and still miraculously survive.
    The polar bears are still with us.
    The ice is still there.
    Big ski season at Mt Buller.
    It’s Flannery-ed up and down the East coast, and indeed I wish it would stop Flannery-ing so hard here this week.

    This, of course, is irrelevant .

    Facts don’t count.

    But indeed they do, and need to be used.

    It’s just which facts.

    Facts that appeal to the underlying emotions of envy. Greed. Identity politics and being a victim.

    Alan Moran does excellent work, but will not change one brainwashed Australian’s view.
    If he is having success anywhere I wish him and the guys providing the valuable information to us, all the very best, and he is very much needed, as we, on our side, still need the facts.
    Lefties don’t need facts.
    Actually , they do their very best to avoid them, so how do you win this fight to the death?

    And it most certainly is to the death.

    You must show our brainwashed that they are victims.
    Victims of a con Job.

    Putting up graphs of temperatures and technical facts will have, and has had, zero impact.

    We need to redirect the Victimhood.

    The brainwashed will come around if they are shown that the UN does not believe in Climate Change.
    Christian, capitalist, western Carbon, is apparently a different element to Socialist, heathen, corruptocracy carbon.

    We need to constantly be talking about the UN’s behaviour in selectively targeting the west, while China and India and many other countries are going absolutely berserk building coal powered stations.
    This proves they don’t believe in Climate Change.
    The UN supports this.
    Yet just this week we are being told to give up meat!
    Seriously, if I know Australians, and their tall poppy mentality, they like nothing more than to bring the winners back down with them.
    They need to be shown China winning, and how it’s winning.
    Right now, because of Trump, the UN and socialists are over reacting and pushing too hard.

    Whether or not man made Climate catastrophe is happening, is obviously not the point.
    Australians being told to go without meat and electricity, while China alone is building hundreds of coal Power stations, with the UN’s blessing and support is something that will resonate with our politically zombie-fied population.

    I cannot seem to get anyone I write to, to publicly state this.

    They either can’t put two and two together, or refuse to.
    It doesn’t take much to Gogoduck the Secretary General of the UN.
    It doesn’t take much research to realise the UN has been taken over by Socialists and mussies.
    It doesn’t take much research to find that the UN are totally fine with the rapid expansion of non western countries and those countries massively increasing coal powered electricity production.

    And then it turns around and tells little old western styled Australia, to kill off it’s herd because of farts.

    You couldn’t make this shit up.
    We have always known the socialists were out to destroy the west, but really, I never expected them to actually be taking the piss as much as they are.

    Can people, who ever you are writing to, and I think Rowan Dean and a few others at sky are our best bet, please keep ramming home these points.
    Reporting that their so called science is just paid for, Socialist propaganda, is fine, but it’s not going to cut it.
    I am just amazed at how reluctant our so called right wingers like Chris Kenny, Alan Jones et al are in actually calling out the bleeding obvious.

    Socialists win by appealing to the darker side of humans.
    The envy, the tribal hatreds.
    We can win by doing the same.
    Unfortunately, It’s the only thing that works on many people.
    And in this case, they really do have a reason to feel like victims.
    Because they very much are.

  84. Roger

    This is what I don’t get, it should be very easy to deal with. He even needed coaching from Bolta.

    Consider his political career, Nick:

    He’s progressed by appearing to please both major factions of the Liberal Party, telling each what they wanted to hear.

    His high point was stopping the boats, which Abbott gave him the script for and Lt.-Gen Campbell actually carried out, dictating the secrecy policy to Morrison.

    As Treasurer Morrison was underwhelming. As PM his chief duty is to carry on the agenda of Maladroit – with whom he is still in communication – while being re-framed as a suburban dad to fool the voters.

  85. Consider his political career …

    FlexiScott.

    It can bend to any angle or shape from day to day.

    And like a memory alloy, it will always return to its original form, an amorphous blob.

  86. OldOzzie

    Minister has his fingers on the right switches – Judith Sloan


    Energy Minister Angus Taylor has mastered his brief quickly and has firm plans to force down electricity prices and shore up the reliability of the national electricity market. This much was clear from his presentation at the Economic and­ ­Social Outlook Conference.

    Because of the recent surge in investment in large- and small-scale renewable investment, the government’s Paris emissions reduction target of 26 per cent by 2030 will be met by the electricity sector early in the 2020s. It is now a non-binding constraint.

    In this context, the two priorities for the government are to ­ensure the electricity system is ­stable and reliable and that electricity prices for households and businesses are reduced in real terms.

    There is no doubt that parts of the eastern electricity market are currently under stress, particularly in Victoria. The Australian Energy Market Operator intervened in the market 25 times last year the seven years up to then, AEMO had intervened fewer than 25 times in total.

    The fact that the Energy Security Board, under Kerry Schott as chair, is now focused on defining the required level of reliability as well as imposing this obligation on retailers is completely appropriate. The states and territories that are party to the NEM have every incentive to co-operate.

    The real challenge for the NEM is how to manage the combination of the large new licks of intermittent energy, both wind and solar, which have been allowed to ­develop without any firming back-up.

    The chief executive of Powershop and Meridian Energy Australia — a small vertically integrated company that is half-owned by the New Zealand government — quoted in the same session figures for new firmed solar and wind projects in the range of $60 to $80 per megawatt hour. In his view, these figures are lower than for new coal-fired power stations. Moreover, new large-scale solar and wind projects can be completed within 18 months compared with five to six years for coal-fired plants.

    There are two points that should be made. First, these wholesale prices are still nearly double the historical figures that prevailed until the middle of last decade. Second, the prices that ­renewable project operators can quote are partly the result of the lower cost of capital they can ­secure because of the various government interventions such as the renewable energy target and state government reverse auctions.

    Were coal projects able to enjoy this same advantage, the prices they could offer would be lower than $60 to $80 per MW/h and would not require any external firming.

    The hope is that the government will act on the ACCC’s recommendation of underwriting some new large-scale dispatchable plants.

    Incidentally, the bizarre proposal of some businesses to do their own thing when it comes to emissions reductions can be easily dismissed. Like most cartels, this one is likely to quickly break down as businesses seek the cheapest ­reliable sources of power.

    If businesses want to impose some sort of shadow carbon price on their investment decisions, good luck to them, but their shareholders and customers will need to bear the consequences of doing so.

  87. Nick

    True Roger. It seems he has enough cunning to get to the top, though nothing beyond ‘not rocking the boat and being a good bloke’. It would work if he had those in the party who could roll a sensible agenda out. Hawke and Keating come to mind.

  88. Nick

    with whom he is still in communication

    I can understand the trap he’d fall into with the media if he dumped on Turnbull, however, the fact that he mentions that he’s in contact with the man shows he’s learnt nothing. Anything to do with Turnbull is a bad idea. His ongoing mischief is eveidence alone. Strangely, despite Morrison’s loyalty to Turnbull, it won’t be reciprocated. Morrison is too stupid to realise this.

  89. Roger

    The fact that the Energy Security Board, under Kerry Schott as chair, is now focused on defining the required level of reliability as well as imposing this obligation on retailers is completely appropriate.

    This would be the same Kerry Schott who on radio this morning opined that renewables had made new investment in coal untenable…without mentioning how government intervention has artificially skewed the market in favour of the former.

    Just how does she propose to ensure reliability and affordability “going forward”?

    By casting her magic wand over the NEM while incanting abracadabra?

  90. OldOzzie

    We’ve chained teachers to an unworkable system – By Andrew Laming

    As with a returning comet from deep space, federal Labor’s school funding promises appear each election like clockwork to the wonderment of constituents. The billions form a dust and plasma tail of hope that ultimately is dwarfed by how little changes when Labor runs the show.

    Fresh from last week’s sugar-hit into preschools, Bill Shorten is re-litigating Julia Gillard’s 2013 strategy with a $14 billion commitment to public schools. After two terms of opposing all attempts at budget repair, it’s curious to see the Opposition Leader’s sleeves rolled up and ready to spend a near-balanced budget straight back into debt through public sector injections.

    The Coalition had its chance to recast this debate into one of school quality. That resonates with its base and has the handy side effect of infuriating rent-seeking teacher unions. But that chance has not been taken in six years beyond a lonely second Gonski report. That leaves the government with a more complicated political sell, and state governments enjoying the stalemate.

    As and the OECD concede, money isn’t the issue. Our school funding and the poor’s access to school res­ources stacks up well. British academic Peter Dolton’s 2014 schools efficiency index (measuring value for money in public spending on schools) listed Australia at eighth of the 30 top nations, based on our 2012 maths ranking of ninth.

    Since that time, we have been slipping. In May, my comments in EducationHQ magazine blamed teacher workplace conditions and called for paid overtime. The reaction was fierce and swift. The comments were based on the political transformation achieved by nursing that left teaching behind during the past three decades.

    In the 1990s, contested healthcare politics forced nursing to professionalise to survive. They moved from hospital training to university, instigated postgraduate research, and remunerated merit and qualification rather than tenure.

    Teaching remains hunter-gatherer by comparison. Industrial representation is dissipated across almost 10,000 sites; leadership is paper-thin and research is done by psychologists. Finding empirical research at a teaching conference requires a search party of Thai cave proportions.

    Partly to blame is lack of agreement on what represents an educational outcome. Unlike objective health measures such as mortality, educators devote themselves to destroying the one facility they have: NAPLAN.

    Teachers are reasonably paid, but nine years of salary increments maxes wages for some by their late 20s. That is a decade earlier than the OECD average. This can drive the best out of the profession and has contributed to a collapse in teaching entry scores and with it prestige.

    Subjected to this sort of workplace penury, teachers must be resilient super-humans or sur­render to demoralisation. Every school has stories of incredible teacher devotion that goes unrewarded, like the Snickers bar in the pigeonholes for doing an evening of parent-teacher interviews. In the health sector, similar work earns a $400 call-in fee.

    Quality teacher time is eroded by every imaginable administrative task. The result is mountains of work done from home for free. In fact it is now so ingrained in the profession that it seems impossible to teach without doing it. Health professionals would face termination for privacy breaches if they did the same thing. If workplace conditions are so degraded that some teachers cling to their 11 weeks’ holidays to recover mentally, then it’s time to fix what happens in term time.

    Only paid overtime would force authorities to properly value teacher time and own the human resource chaos across the sector.

    Nursing, radiography and ­allied health are all careers based on love and they found a way to do it. Only by handing home time back to teachers can it be voluntarily reinvested in the development and qualifications that lead to higher performance and salaries.

    Gonski’s 2012 report legitimised Labor’s big spend. Re-commissioned by the Coalition, his second version dutifully delivered the quality and innovation piece. But neither approach will nudge the dial until the teacher workplace is overhauled. Tinkering with teacher training misses the fact that problems start when teachers hit the workforce and become isolated.

    Most vitally, teaching needs to sub-specialise the way health has, with attractive pay scales for formative evaluation, special needs teaching and working in challenging areas. Demoralised low-gain schools need invigorated leadership teams that are rewarded for turning things around. Ironically, as the defender of the bureaucracy, Labor has abdicated social policy reform to focus only on quantum. Australians know that isn’t the complete picture, but the ­Coalition is yet to provide a compelling alternative.

    Andrew Laming, the Liberal member for Bowman, chairs the standing committee on employment, education and training.

  91. Roger

    Morrison is too stupid to realise this.

    He’s not called SloMo for nothing around here.

  92. struth

    Energy Minister Angus Taylor has mastered his brief quickly and has firm plans to force down electricity prices and shore up the reliability of the national electricity market. This much was clear from his presentation at the Economic and­ ­Social Outlook Conference.

    Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah…………..cough……hahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  93. thefrolickingmole

    Looks like the prosecutors read the cat.

    Harvey has one charge dropped.

    Harvey Weinstein: prosecutors in New York drop part of sexual assault case
    Dropped charge – announced in court with Weinstein looking on – involves claims made by Lucia Evans, one of case’s three accusers

    Assistant district attorney Joan Illuzzi-Orbon told the judge that prosecutors would not oppose dismissal of the count in the case involving Evans. She insisted the rest of the case, involving two other accusers, was strong.

    “In short, your honor, we are moving full steam ahead,” she said.

    Weinstein’s lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, told the judge he believed Evans had lied to the grand jury. He also said he believed a police detective had corruptly attempted to influence the case by keeping a witness from testifying about her misstatements.

    “The integrity of these proceedings has been compromised,” he said.

    But somehow the 4 years of “I wuv you harv” emails werent mentioned…

  94. H B Bear

    Are Lord Waffleworth, Lucy, Young Alex and Daddy worse than the Baird Family?

    Must be getting close.

  95. struth

    It’s still very much Death to the Liberal party.

    They are just dribbling shit constantly and not doing anything right wing at all.

    Tax cuts for business announced so far into the future that the entire Liberal Party will be retired on their full government pensions, swinging golf clubs, by the time it was supposed to come into law, (but never happened anyway)

    Scott Morrison is having a little Honeymoon period playing the Aussie back yard barbie dad.

    And don’t our so called right wing commentators just want to believe so much that Sco Mo is the man for Change.

    Oh, he’s just waiting until after the Wentworth bi election, they say.
    Then he apparently is going to come out swinging against the Climate Con, instantly lower immigration and taxes, Ring up Trump and tell him we’re with the USA all the way.

    Shall we take bets?

    The man who is still on the phone to Malcom?
    The man who hasn’t the integrity nor principles to publicly state that Paris is a socialist attack on the west, and he’ll have no part in the forced destruction of the country that he loves?
    He won’t even leave it.

    He is your blokey fast talking snake oil salesman, and unfortunately that sucks in a lot of Australians.

    He, like the Liberal party he leads, in my view, is a traitor.

  96. mh

    Middle of spring here in the sub tropics and the global warming is hitting with full force.

    Forecast for Brisbane:

    Friday – Showers Max 22
    Saturday – Rain Max 20
    Sunday – Showers Max 21

  97. Confused Old Misfit

    Just so you know that Australia is the only country mired in insanity:

    Any nation the preponderance of whose citizens regularly elects left-wing political parties; accepts single-payer healthcare; believes in the efficacy of the welfare state; endorses the hoax of global warming (as does even Sherrie Malisch, above); accommodates swarms of third-world immigrants and refugees who have no love for or understanding of a country becoming an open-to-all multicultural tombola with the highest proportionate rate of immigrants in the Western world; has allowed its educational industry, from pre-school to graduate school, to be corrupted possibly beyond retrieval by lockstep Leftism, “diversity and inclusion,” and “social justice” claptrap; has caved to the feminist and campus-rape fable; dutifully takes CBC Leftist propaganda as gospel; has fallen for the 16th Century meme of the “Noble Savage” in its dealings with the aboriginal peoples; extravagantly celebrates a second-rate rock band like The Tragically Hip and names a street after it; reads (when it does read) tedious scribblers like the acclaimed Joseph Boyden and Ann-Marie MacDonald; and gives a complete ignoramus like Justin Trudeau a majority government on the strength of name and coiffure, cannot be regarded as informed, well-educated or in any way distinguished. Unlike the U.S., there are no cracks, to quote Leonard Cohen, where the light gets in. The Canadian political, cultural and academic spectrum has gone dark from end to end.

    From an article:

    The Canadian Mind: A Culture So Open, Its ‘Brains Fall Out’

  98. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Another unsung Australian hero passes away

    By Elias Visontay
    11:00PM October 11, 2018
    5 Comments

    The Rats of Tobruk may have fought in the “most significant battle that defined Australia”, but the numbers of soldiers who survived the famous battle are dwindling rapidly, as two veterans died in the space of a week.

    John ‘‘JJ’’ Wade left the Port of Fremantle in 1941, at 23, and took part in the famous siege of Tobruk as well as El Alamein. He died on Sunday morning at the age of 100, in the same week fellow Rat of ­Tobruk Bill Corey passed away.

    Mr Wade’s family described him as being “always happy” and “a jovial man who loved people”.

    “John would always ask us ‘How the hell are you?’,” Leonie Wade, his daughter-in-law, told The Australian.

    “He absolutely adored his family. We marched with him in a wheelchair at the Anzac Day Parade this year. He hated the fact all these innocent people passed away in war, that affected him.

    “The war was one of the biggest factors in his life, it sort of made him who he was. There was a mateship from all the guys that survived Tobruk absolutely. And even with the sons of his mates that had passed away, they would always ask him about their fathers to find out about the men they never knew, and what had happened to them.”

    From the Oz. Lest we forget.

  99. Confused Old Misfit

    Just so you know that Australia is

    NOT

    the only country…

  100. The carbon game.

    I figure that each human being (whilst alive) is a carbon sink. It takes a lot of carbon to make a human being and the continuing absorption of carbon by human beings over periods of up to 100 years (or more) is significant.

    Hence I propose that parents are given carbon offsets for each child that they produce and the offsets are transferred to the young carbon sinks at the age of 18.

    This scheme, if applied, can effectively replace the, current, RETs.

    You know it makes more sense than what we have at the moment.

  101. Morrison furiously adding to the confusion, like an actor without a script.

    Yes, it really can’t be that hard to counter the hysteria. CL did it in a single sentence yesterday.

  102. RobK

    From OO’s J Sloan quote above:
    figures for new firmed solar and wind projects in the range of $60 to $80 per megawatt hour. 


    Firmed by what?….to what extent? Firmed is a weasle word. Is it fully dispatchable? Why are we cross subsidising then? Why are dispatchable and non-dispatchable in the same market? They are not the same value product. If it is firmed by gas to make it dispatchable (gas has a benefit from being exempt from paying the RET), then we are doubling up on capex whilst gifting RE it’s capex. What happens when the short-lived RE needs replacing?-the price no longer stumpped -up by coal. The price will go up. Idiots.

  103. Herodotus

    Struth, it’s a bit late for the Libs to make noises about how important the Wentworth by-election is.
    They had a good majority thanks to Tony, then they savaged their base, lost all those seats, and continued to delude themselves that the base didn’t matter.
    It seems to matter a bit more just now, when volunteers and funds are thin on the ground.

  104. There was a mateship from all the guys that survived Tobruk absolutely.

    A long passed great uncle was “rat”. I can vouch for their mateship.
    The rats that that I had the privilege of meeting had something else in common. They were all tough as nails.

  105. Armadillo:

    GPS went erratic for a few hours during the initial bombing for Gulf War 1. Used to line up between the peaks off the Gold Coast. GPS said we were 2 miles off course. Bullshit.

    GPS going wonky is said to be a reliable indicator of large scale military conflict as the US military screws up everyone elses targeting guidance.
    When the GPS goes to shit, head out of port.

  106. struth

    “The war was one of the biggest factors in his life, it sort of made him who he was. There was a mateship from all the guys that survived Tobruk absolutely. And even with the sons of his mates that had passed away, they would always ask him about their fathers to find out about the men they never knew, and what had happened to them.”

    Disgusting white men.

  107. RobK

    When 60% of RE profits is RET parasitic subsidies, of course it can afford some amount of firming. We are being fleeced blind.

  108. Nick

    They were all tough as nails.

    My tall Uncle Harry, a gentle man, a Rat of Tobruk, was the only man I’ve heard of laying out my Grandfather for laying a hand on his sister.

  109. woolfe

    What those who have never been in combat can never fully understand is that everything you do is for your mates. As is everything that is done for you. Its about survival and they are all you have.

  110. We are being fleeced blind.

    Correct, C₁₂ sink Rob.

  111. struth

    My Great uncle served on the Parramatta in the Convoys supplying Tobruk.
    When it was sunk, most were lost, except for him and a few others.
    As it was going down, the men who were too big to fit through the port hole pushed those that could fit , him being one of them, through it.
    This, they spent their last moments on earth doing, knowing they were doomed………………………..

    Disgusting white men.

  112. struth

    Disgusting white men.

    Apparently, we owe these people nothing.

  113. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    As it was going down, the men who were too big to fit through the port hole pushed those that could fit , him being one of them, through it.

    I’m remembering the story of the Petty Officer on the sinking HMAS Voyager – too big to fit through the porthole – who pushed all the ones who could fit, through, before leading the rest in prayer, knowing they were doomed.

    Disgusting white men.

  114. OldOzzie

    Crossbencher supports motion to strip discriminative schools of funding – Rachel Baxendale


    Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick says he supports his crossbench colleague Derryn Hinch’s proposed motion calling for religious schools which discriminate against teachers or students on the ground of their sexuality to be stripped of government funding and charity status.

    The Morrison government has flagged cabinet deliberations over a proposal for a religious discrimination act, as the Morrison government faces a damaging backlash ahead of the crucial Wentworth by-election following disputed claims schools could be handed new powers to turn away gay students.

    The proposed legislation, a key recommendation of the Ruddock review, is viewed within the Morrison government as a way to end Coalition infighting and allay fears among religious groups following the divisive same-sex marriage debate.

    Then prime minister Malcolm Turnbull appointed Liberal Party elder Mr Ruddock to chair a federal review into religious freedom following the same-sex marriage postal survey last year, amid concern from religious and conser­vative groups that the legalisation of same-sex marriage could infringe upon their ­religious freedoms.

    The government is yet to respond or publish the report, despite receiving it in May.

    Leaked sections of the report indicate it proposes changes that would restrict the ability of religious schools to use existing laws, introduced by the Gillard government, to discriminate against teachers and students based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

    Senator Patrick said he and his Centre Alliance colleague Stirling Griff supported Senator Hinch’s proposed motion “in principle”.

    “People must remember that a motion in the Senate is an expression of the Senate’s will, it’s not actually a law, but in principle yes,” Senator Patrick told ABC radio.

    “We’re of the view that teachers’ appointments should be based on merit. Of course you can have a teacher that is involved in misconduct, and that may be a determinant in a dismissal, but that has no bearing on sexuality.”

    Senator Patrick said he did not believe exemptions in current law granting schools the right to discriminate against students and teachers on the basis of sexuality should remain.

    “I don’t believe so,” he said.

    “The reality is it’s simply not proper to vet students on the basis of their sexuality.

    “I mean some of these students wouldn’t even understand what their sexuality was in certain circumstances, and if they do, it’s unlikely they may want to come out, they may want to keep that private, and they’re absolutely entitled to do that, so it’s doesn’t seem to be even something that is enforceable, but we’ve moved on from suffrage through to no fault divorce through to gay marriage, all of those sorts of things.

    “This is just one of these lingering old conservative principles and actually it’s time for that to go.”

    Senator Patrick said the government should “absolutely” release the Ruddock report immediately.

    “Indeed the last sitting of the Senate the Greens tried to move a motion to suspend standing orders in order to be able to get access to that document and the government refused,” he said.

    “They refused on the grounds of cabinet in confidence. I actually think that that claim is fundamentally flawed, because that particular document was not prepared for cabinet, and indeed whilst the deliberations of cabinet are indeed confidential, a document that is referred to is not, and it should have been released to the Senate and it should have been made available to the public.”

  115. I have another rat story.

    A group who, at night ventured out and returned with food and truck parts stolen from the germans.
    Their reward was kitchen duties and “AWL” inserted on their service records.

  116. OldOzzie

    WSJ Editorial – Democrats Sing, the ABA Dances
    Will the lawyers’ guild try to delegitimize the new Court Justice?

    Brett Kavanaugh has already heard his first Supreme Court oral arguments, but Democrats are signaling they’ll continue a campaign to undermine his standing. Let’s hope the American Bar Association doesn’t become their partisan handmaiden.

    Paul Moxley, head of the ABA’s Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary, wrote to Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley in an Oct. 5 letter that the ABA committee is “reopening” its “evaluation” of Justice Kavanaugh. This is the same ABA committee that on August 30 gave the judge its highest rating in a report replete with praise. Now Mr. Moxley writes that this could change, given “new information of a material nature regarding temperament during the September 27th hearing” in which Judge Kavanaugh defended himself against claims by Christine Blasey Ford.

    Mr. Moxley’s letter landed more than a week after the Kavanaugh-Ford hearing, though on the eve of the crucial full Senate vote on Judge Kavanaugh. It followed a public demand by ABA President Robert Carlson—a Hillary Clinton donor—to further delay the Senate vote with an FBI probe. The vote proceeded after that probe, and now the only purpose of an ABA re-evaluation would be to join the Democratic political campaign to delegitimize the new Justice and the current Supreme Court.

    Mr. Moxley seems like a straight-shooter, but if he’s being bullied by Mr. Carlson or Democrats on his committee, he ought to resign and say so publicly. Otherwise he should shut down this revisionist exercise. This last-minute maneuvering shows again why this guild of liberal lawyers should have no role in nominations. Let’s hope South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, who may chair the Judiciary Committee next year, is watching.

  117. H B Bear

    Hunch is a bigger grandstanding hypocrite than the Xylophone ever was.

  118. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Hunch is a bigger grandstanding hypocrite than the Xylophone ever was.

    Harsh, but fair.

  119. I am bespoke

    As it was going down, the men who were too big to fit through the port hole pushed those that could fit , him being one of them, through it.

    Just WOW! and these are the masculinity that they want to destroy.

  120. JC

    I’m remembering the story of the Petty Officer on the sinking HMAS Voyager – too big to fit through the porthole – who pushed all the ones who could fit, through, before leading the rest in prayer, knowing they were doomed.

    Disgusting white men.

    Leaving aside the disgusting white men part, I have a question about your story. If they were all doomed and ended up that way, who exactly reported what actually happened at the end?

  121. JC

    Yep, it’s the FBI again.

    Several FBI employees, stationed in cities across Asia, have been recalled to Washington in recent months while the agency investigates allegations related to parties and interactions with prostitutes, according to people familiar with the matter.

    The Justice Department’s inspector general is examining the allegations, which involve Federal Bureau of Investigation personnel in some half a dozen cities, including in East and Southeast Asia, said the people.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/fbi-personnel-recalled-from-asia-amid-probe-into-prostitution-partying-1539298488

    I think the Rabz doctrine is needed here. Shut it down and fire them all.

  122. “The war was one of the biggest factors in his life, it sort of made him who he was. There was a mateship from all the guys that survived Tobruk absolutely. And even with the sons of his mates that had passed away, they would always ask him about their fathers to find out about the men they never knew, and what had happened to them.”

    Disgusting white men.

    Ahem!
    Privileged white men.

  123. .

    Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick says he supports his crossbench colleague Derryn Hinch’s proposed motion calling for religious schools which discriminate against teachers or students on the ground of their sexuality to be stripped of government funding and charity status.

    Great, now can they also stop regulating and mandating what Catholic schools must do?

    But they’re already discriminated against. They get a lot less net funding, and despite the facade of Federalism, we all know the Feds pull the purse strings because of s 90 and s 109 of the Commonwealth Constitution.

  124. .

    Weinstein’s lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, told the judge he believed Evans had lied to the grand jury.

    Yes, she did.

    Lock her up!

  125. C.L.

    The FBI is America’s gestapo. A monstrous behemoth, it was founded by a cross-dressing nazi asshole and it has been standing over governments to protect its ‘law and order’ racket for three quarters of a century. Affirmative action has made it even worse.

  126. Leigh Lowe

    Yep, it’s the FBI again.

    Several FBI employees, stationed in cities across Asia, have been recalled to Washington in recent months while the agency investigates allegations related to parties and interactions with lady-boy prostitutes, according to people familiar with the matter.

  127. Rae

    Chief Petty Officer Coxswain Jonathan Rogers

    In January 1963 ‘Buck’ Rogers joined the destroyer Voyager which was commanded by Captain DH Stevens. As her coxswain, Rogers was the senior sailor on board and responsible for the ‘good order and discipline’ of the ship’s company. On 10 February 1964 Voyager took part in exercises with the aircraft-carrier Melbourne off the south coast of New South Wales. That evening Rogers presided over a game of tombola being played by about sixty men in the ship’s forward cafeteria. At 20:56, 20 nautical miles (37km) south-east of Jervis Bay, Voyager collided with Melbourne and was cut in two. Voyager’s severed forward section immediately heeled sharply to starboard and about five minutes later turned upside down. Water began pouring into the cafeteria. Within another five minutes the forward section sank. Rogers was one of the 82 men who died. His wife, son and three daughters survived him.

    http://www.navy.gov.au/hmas-voyager-ii

    Sailors who escaped from the cafeteria later told how Rogers had taken charge of the situation. He had calmed terrified shipmates, attempted to control the flooding, tried to free a jammed escape hatch with a length of pipe and a spanner, and organised men to move into other compartments with functioning emergency exits. Meanwhile, he knew that he was probably too large to fit through an escape hatch himself. When it was obvious that some of his comrades would not get out in time, he led them in prayer and a hymn, ‘encouraging them to meet death’ beside him ‘with dignity and honour’. His wife remarked: ‘It was typical of him – he never thought of himself’. He was posthumously awarded the George Cross.

  128. I’m remembering the story of the Petty Officer on the sinking HMAS Voyager

    Chief Petty Officer Buck Rogers, George Cross.
    One of the sailors he pushed out was my uncle.

  129. OldOzzie

    Surprisingly AFR from UK Telegraph

    Donald Trump is right to blame the Fed for market rout

    by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard

    London | Global liquidity is vanishing faster than water on the beaches of Mont-St-Michel as the tide goes out.

    The two great central banks of the Western world – the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank – are both dialling down stimulus rapidly even though the world economy is slowing.

    The $US2 trillion ($A2.8 trillion) flow of stimulus each year from “peak QE” has plummeted to zero. By early next year the net effect will be negative. “We are moving into an -entirely different world,” said Brian Coulton, chief economist at Fitch.

    Quantitative easing by the Fed is now in full-throttle -reverse. The pace of bond sales rises to $US50 billion a month this quarter.

    Since the Fed has always argued that QE “works” by driving up -equity prices and holding down credit spreads, one might -infer that the opposite also holds: that falling asset prices usefully helps the Fed do its dirty work.

    Investors have been complacent about this accumulating shock, although the credit crunch is already plain to behold in emerging markets.

    Borrowers in Asia, Latin America, the -Middle East and Africa have -together wracked up $US7.2 trillion of dollar loans and equivalent derivatives – double the pre-Lehman -levels – and are having to roll over debt in an ever less friendly climate.

    Markets have also been complacent about the future path of US rate rises, betting that the Fed would lift rates just twice more before calling a halt next year. This fond illusion has just been blown to pieces.

    “What has changed everything is the sudden realisation that the Fed is not going to stop. There has been a seismic shift,” said Andrew Roberts, credit strategist at RBS.

    The cold douche came last week when Fed chairman Jay Powell said the US economy was firing on all cylinders – ie overheating – and that the interest rates were a “long way” from neutral levels. “We may even go past neutral,” he said.

    Lael Brainard, doyenne of Fed doves, has metamorphosed into a fire-breathing hawk. Rates will have to punch higher to counter the inflationary -impulses of Donald Trump’s fiscal blitz.


    The key number to watch

    The key number to watch is the Fed’s estimate of the “long-run equilibrium rate”. After holding deceptively steady for much of the last year, it is now shooting up.

    President Trump is right to identify the Fed as the cause of Wednesday’s Wall Street rout. He told a group of rich fundraisers in August that he had -appointed Mr Powell on the mistaken assumption that he was a “cheap money” man.

    Now he has discovered – like others before, Carter, Bush senior – that the institution is his nemesis. “The Fed has gone crazy. They’re so tight,” he said -after the Dow dropped 800 points on Wednesday night.

    The Fed has been forced to hit the brakes to offset the inflationary fiscal blitz by the White House and Congress, a package of tax cuts and pork-barrel spending at the top of cycle when there is no slack in the economy.

    Capital investment is surging at a 10 per cent rate. The US Conference Board’s indicator of consumer confidence is a whisker away from a peak last seen in 1968. The unemployment rate is the lowest in half a century.

    Mr Trump is pouring petrol on the fire. Federal infrastructure -spending is flowing through when it is least needed. Fiscal loosening will push the budget deficit to 5 per cent of GDP next year (IMF data), four percentage points too high for this stage of economic cycle.

    British economist Tim Congdon calls it a policy of “fiscal vandalism”. The output gap closed long ago. The stimulus feeds overheating. This risks a sudden catapult effect akin to the mid-Sixties when the coiled springs of the Great Inflation abruptly broke loose. On that occasion the Fed was caught napping.

    “The US is in the middle of an -enormous economic boom, but it is -basically a closed economy. It is not lifting the rest of the world with it,” said Mr Roberts.

    By contrast, the world financial -system is “dollarised” and is highly geared to US borrowing costs. It collectively holds a $US26 trillion “short” position on the US dollar through loans on the -offshore dollar markets and through equivalent derivatives. “This is dangerous. Economic risks in the world are escalating,” he said.

    Ultimately an equity slide on Wall Street and a jump in high-yield credit spreads will cause the Fed to retreat, or at least talk down its future tightening path. In trader parlance, the “Fed Put” will kick in.

    Marc Ostwald from ADM says the Fed hates to rescue stock -markets but it does track the Goldman Sachs financial conditions index, currently well–behaved at 99.22. Any jump in this -index has macro–economic consequences and does some of the Fed’s tightening for them. “If it gets to a 100 the Fed will start to think quite hard about a pause,” he said

    “We are a long way from the activation of a Fed ‘put'”, said Krishna Guha from Evercore ISI. “In our view it would take something in the region of a 10pc correction to get the Fed’s -attention, and even this would probably not deflect the Fed from ongoing quarterly hikes.”

    “It would likely take a much larger 15-20 per cent correction to force a more -far-reaching revision to the Fed’s policy plans,” he said.

    So far the S&P 500 index on Wall Street has dropped just 6 per cent. This will be considered mere noise. So brace for more trouble before the cavalry arrive.

    Fed tightening is what ended every cycle since the First World War. Often the Fed is caught out at the inflection point and over-tightens. This may happen again. The growth rate of the real M1 money supply in the US has dropped to 1pc despite the economic boom. This leading indicator points to an economic slowdown next year.

    What makes this so unpredictable is that the ECB is also cutting back on stimulus despite an industrial mini-slump over recent months. There has been a sharp slowdown in M3 money growth, which could test recessionary levels of zero (three-month annualised) on the current course.

    It has cut bond purchases to $US15 billion a month – down from a peak of $US80 billion – and is pre-committed to halting QE altogether by December. This is something they probably regret. “They’re frankly terrified right now. They are facing a downturn. It is real and it has begun,” said one banker.

    The end of QE in Europe is exacerbating the global liquidity squeeze. For almost three years the ECB’s largesse has been leaking out into UK Gilts, US Treasuries, bond funds everywhere, and emerging markets. We took it for granted.

    We will soon find out whether it is even possible for the world to keep -going without constant doses of monetary caffeine. Perhaps the financial systems need permanent QE just to stay afloat.

  130. I am bespoke

    I have a question about your story. If they were all doomed and ended up that way, who exactly reported what actually happened at the end?–JC

    too big to fit through the porthole – who pushed all the ones who could fit, through, before leading the rest in prayer, knowing they were doomed.

  131. Senator Patrick said he did not believe exemptions in current law granting schools the right to discriminate against students and teachers on the basis of sexuality should remain.

    “I don’t believe so,” he said.

    This is why Morrison’s fumbling is so toxic. The law does not, as it stands, provide that they can be discriminated on their sexuality alone. It involves the right to remove a student or teacher that is acting publicly in a manner that expressly flouts the express teaching of that school.

    “The reality is it’s simply not proper to vet students on the basis of their sexuality.

    “I mean some of these students wouldn’t even understand what their sexuality was in certain circumstances, and if they do, it’s unlikely they may want to come out, they may want to keep that private, and they’re absolutely entitled to do that, so it’s doesn’t seem to be even something that is enforceable, go.”

    If it is not something that even the student understands and is acting upon, how would it ever come to the attention of the school and thereby become an issue for the school, you monstrous imbecile?

    but we’ve moved on from suffrage through to no fault divorce through to gay marriage, all of those sorts of things.

    “This is just one of these lingering old conservative principles and actually it’s time for that to go.”

    Bingo. So this is really all about extending the liberal project through society at any cost.

  132. C.L.

    Just heard Sooky Alex’s Wentworth rant. Conclusion: Malcolm Turnbull raised the equivalent of an old-fashioned bum wearing a “The End Is Nigh” sandwich board. Good job.

  133. OldOzzie

    King & Wood Mallesons investigated for overworking employees

    Top-tier legal firm King & Wood Mallesons is the subject of an unprecedented WorkSafe investigation for overworking lawyers and staff to meet punishing royal commission deadlines.

    The investigation was triggered by a complaint about employee fatigue during high-pressure situations at the firm’s Melbourne office, and is thought to relate to the work the law firm did in the first months of the Hayne royal commission. KWM represented AMP, Suncorp, Youi and IOOF during the commission.

    A source said KWM graduates were subjected to gruelling conditions, with some employees choosing to sleep at the firm’s Melbourne office rather than return home. Day and night shifts were allocated, so work could continue around the clock.

    KWM chief executive partner Berkeley Cox said the firm had taken “deliberate steps to manage” the royal commission …

    KWM chief executive partner Berkeley Cox said the firm had taken “deliberate steps to manage” the royal commission demands, including allocating resources from other parts of the firm, appointing additional permanent legal staff, work rosters, and using a casual workforce. Janie Barrett

    ​”The grads are traumatised from it all,” the source said.

    The investigation, formally classified as an “inquiry” by Worksafe, is understood to be the first safety investigation into a law firm and has sent ripples across the industry, which has developed a reputation for overwork and stress, as well as a hyper-competitive environment for graduate positions. WorkSafe is Victoria’s safety regulator, which makes sure employers comply with occupational health and safety.

    KWM’s Melbourne offices have inspector notices posted on every floor, which say the firm may be in breach of the Occupational Health & Safety Act in relation to fatigue and overworking staff.

    If the law firm is found to be in breach of the act, WorkSafe can seek a maximum $285,426 fine for individuals, including partners, or issue enforceable undertakings.

    It’s understood KWM first became aware of the WorkSafe complaint on August 9. Later that month, WorkSafe representatives met with KWM at their office to further discuss the complaint. KWM must formally respond to the complaint by mid-November.
    Staff wellbeing ‘paramount’

    KWM chief executive partner Berkeley Cox, who has previously admitted it was “quite challenging” to ensure staff wellbeing amid the royal commission’s fierce deadlines, said no formal complaints had been made internally. However, he said the firm had taken “deliberate steps to manage” the royal commission demands. These included allocating resources from other parts of the firm, appointing additional permanent legal staff, work rosters, and using a casual workforce.

    “We are taking this incredibly seriously. The wellbeing of our staff is absolutely paramount,” he said. “It’s sad that someone has gotten to the point that they felt they needed to make the complaint. We respect that.”

    Mr Cox said the firm wasn’t treating the issues as being specific to graduates but as it applied to all employees, including partners and senior lawyers.

    He reiterated that the royal commission “did throw up unusual demands in the context of the enormous number of documents that needed to be produced in a short space of time”.

    “The commission itself was under significant pressure, that led to significant pressure on our clients, which led to significant pressure on our people.”

    The Hayne royal commission finished its sixth round of hearings in September, with the focus on general and life insurance. During 2018, AMP has estimated it will spend about $26 million for the royal commission and related costs, which includes legal fees.

    The KWM complaint comes as there is an increasing discussion around the mental health of lawyers in high-pressure environments.

    In 2014, the Tristan Jepson Memorial Foundation released guidelines aimed at better working environments, after lawyer Matthew Stutsel took his own life in 2015.
    ‘Warning sign for all law firms’

    KWM signed up to the guidelines in 2015 along with more than 100 law firms and other businesses. However, when The Australian Financial Review contacted the foundation, it was told it was closed.

    Mr Cox said “now it’s a good time to take a fresh look at where we are more broadly”.

    “The 24-7 nature of technology and the pressure generally on people makes us focus more deliberately on the desire for us as a firm to focus on individual personal growth and wellbeing,” he said.

    A WorkSafe spokesman said in response to questions from The Australian Financial Review that ​”WorkSafe has been made aware of an alleged health and safety issue and is making inquiries”.

    Health and safety expert, Clyde & Co partner Michael Tooma, said the WorkSafe action into KWM was a first for the legal industry.

    “This is a very significant development and should be a warning sign for all law firms,” he said. “What it will bring into focus is the drive for billable hours and the health impact on lawyers, particularly younger lawyers who have to put in the hours.

    “It’s a challenge that the industry has been trying to deal with for some years and it’s about time we tackle it head on.”

    He said the inquiry may even lead to the death of billable hours, given that the practice offered a “meticulous” record of work times.

  134. .

    US inflation is still running at 2.7%.

    I’m sure there are deep stating arseholes at the Fed that would want to crash the economy to ruin Trump, but the optimal inflation rate is zero, with some flexibility in the short run.

    Fed tightening is what ended every cycle since the First World War.

    …but why did the cycle start in the first instance?

    It is as though the business press just choose to ignore the last 63 years of empirical macroeconomic research, von Mises, Hayek…even other nobel winners like Kydland and Prescott, in favour of cranks like JM Keynes and Major Douglass. First principles don’t even rate a mention. As for NGDP, they will agree with it in the short term as long as it supports a short-term accommodation.

    If you want to ramble about shills, these are the people you should be having at.

  135. Old Ozzie:

    Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick says he supports his crossbench colleague Derryn Hinch’s proposed motion calling for religious schools which discriminate against teachers or students on the ground of their sexuality to be stripped of government funding and charity status.

    That’s a nasty little hole Rex and Derryn are digging there.
    I won’t mention Islam.

  136. Nick

    Great, now can they also stop regulating and mandating what Catholic schools must do?

    This is where the Left are very stupid. At present there’s a lot of ‘don’t ask don’t tell’ in Catholic institutions. They aren’t looking for reds under the bed because they know it will backfire in a variety of ways. However, if you push them to the extent that Catholic officials are told they cannot enforce their beliefs, that’s exactly what they will end up doing.

  137. .

    Another thing to remember is that a change in the inflationary environment can wreak havoc on banking balance sheets. Also too, the rate of change of inflation can also be destructive if not signalled correctly – expectations cannot form rationally.

    So the Fed could even cause moderate inflation and create a liquidity crisis in two ways.

    It also helps if you cut spending and coordinate fiscal and monetary policy.

  138. feelthebern

    Alex Turnbull is all in on renewables.
    It is purely a financial decision.

  139. .

    Disgusting white men.

    Victims of their own patriarchy, I tells ya!

  140. feelthebern

    I am seeing the future.
    Trump won’t have to sack anyone from the FBI.
    They’ll all resign.
    WSJ alert.

    FBI Personnel Recalled From Asia Amid Probe Into Prostitution, Partying

    Several FBI employees, stationed in cities across Asia, have been recalled to Washington in recent months while the agency investigates allegations related to parties and interactions with prostitutes, according to people familiar with the matter.
    The Justice Department’s inspector general is examining the allegations, which involve Federal Bureau of Investigation personnel in some half a dozen cities, including in East and Southeast Asia, said the people.

  141. OldOzzie

    How can gas imports be the answer in Australia?

    Resources Minister Matt Canavan says bluntly subsidies are no answer to the high gas prices now undermining the viability of many commercial and industrial customers.

    Nor does he believe in domestic price controls on the basis this would only deter the investment necessary to build more supply – creating a greater problem long term.

    This still won’t be a popular message for many commercial and industrial customers used to relying on relatively cheap Australian gas prices to sustain their competitiveness.

    The government’s determination last year to force companies to put more gas into the domestic market ahead of the LNG export market – under threat of export controls – has certainly helped improve supply.

    But the era of cheap gas – even in a country with abundant natural resources – is over.

    Explaining that equation is politically tricky.

    Linking exports to domestic prices

    The government has to defend the massive economic benefits that come from Australia becoming the world’s second largest exporter of LNG – worth almost $50 billion next year – but with domestic gas prices now linked to international prices for LNG.

    “The reality right now is it’s making the bulk of Australian manufacturing not competitive,” Calderon told The Australian Financial Review Energy Summit. He finds it absurd, for example, it would be cheaper for Orica to import ammonia for its explosives business than it is to make it here, even with a fully depreciated plant.

    Australia’s position on this is also unique, he argues. Other gas exporters like Canada and the US, as well as Russia and Middle East countries, have restrictions in place permitting exports only after their domestic markets has sufficient supply at reasonable prices. The result, he says, is that gas for their manufacturers is available much more cheaply than in Australia.

    In Australia, in contrast, prices on the east coast are now set according to the “netback” price – the international LNG price minus the cost of freezing and shipping it overseas. How did we get here?

    In Western Australia, rules governing development of major gas projects off the coast were always clearer, including insistence by successive state governments on a domestic reservation policy to ensure plentiful supply for local users, translating into lower prices.

    Horrific implications

    But states like NSW and Victoria have effectively locked up their own states from further gas development while traditional supplies from Bass Strait and the Gippsland wind down and production costs rise. That means the east coast market has become more reliant on Queensland’s coal seam gas projects for supply and pricing – plus transport costs.

    The result is that gas in Sydney is now running at close to $12 a gigajoule, compared to historic average costs more like $3-to-$4.

    Government ministers like to point out this figure is down from last year when producers were actually charging above the netback price until they were pulled into line.

    But the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission expects LNG prices to be sharply higher in 2019, pushed by surging demand particularly from China and the increasing cost of oil, which affects the price of gas.

    Many Australian industrial consumers are horrified at the implications.

    Not that Calderon favours government subsidies or price controls. Instead, he has a more optimistic – although unrequited – ambition.

    He wants gas producers to realise it is in their best interests, both politically and commercially, to negotiate better terms with their major industrial customers in Australia.

    “It is in nobody’s interest to strangle manufacturing because then everybody loses,” he said.

    “I do not think it’s in the best interests of this country to solidify netback gas prices long term … we will never be competitive. And for a country that has 100 years of gas, that is not the right solution.”

    So far, however, there’s little enthusiasm for shared financial sacrifice from producers given the risks and cost of big projects. Had it not been for the LNG export market, the Queensland coal seam gas industry would never have happened, they say.

    And coal seam gas here comes with no oil to mitigate development costs. Warwick King, chief executive of the Australian Pacific LNG project in Gladstone, told the summit the projects have been tougher and more challenging than anyone expected.
    Short-term solution

    So what is the right short-term solution? One possibility attracting attention is the notion of importing gas to the east coast. Admittedly, this sounds like a contradiction in terms given Australia’s supplies of gas and its status as a major exporter.

    “This is like Saudi Arabia importing oil,” Calderon said. “Is this the kind of country we want to be?”.

    It may well be, given the absence of alternatives any time soon. Both AGL and a new player, Australian Industrial Energy, are planning import terminals – AGL in Victoria and AIE at Port Kembla in NSW.

    AIE is backed by Andrew Forrest, most famous for successfully challenging the established order in iron ore. Another partner is Japan’s Jera, the world’s largest purchaser of LNG.

    According to chief executive, James Baulderstone, a new terminal could be built within 18 months at a cost of $200 million plus $50 million in floating costs, with the aim of delivering gas for around $10-$12 a gigajoule over five-year contract terms.

    But to get started, AIE needs customers. Although 15 have signed memoranda of understanding, those commitments aren’t yet firm.

    State and federal government are similarly interested in the proposal but not guaranteeing any support.

    It all sounds like waiting indefinitely for take-off.

    Will the gas market – and the country – still be suffering from failure to launch this time next year?

  142. Peter Castieau

    I still get market updates despite being out of the car business for 4 years now. I note that its double the difference between 1st and 2nd place.

    Official figures released by VFACTS reported a total market decline of 5.5 per cent for the month of September to 94,711 – 5489 fewer sales than the September 2017 result. For the year to date, the total market of 881,005 sales is down by 8163 units, a 0.9% decline from 2017.

    SUVs up, passenger cars down

    Significantly, overall passenger car sales at 30,487 in September 2018 now account for just under one-third of the total market, at 32.2 per cent.

    Top 10 brands that watched monthly sales slip back, year on year, included Mazda (-3258, -31.5%), Hyundai (-20, – 0.2%), Ford (-1761, -25.7%), Holden (-2231, -25.7%) and Volkswagen (-207, -4.2%).

    Tasmania growth hot spot

    Tasmania again performed outstandingly, realising an amazing 21.9 per cent increase. The Tasmanian result was an outlier with falls recorded in New South Wales (-9.4%), Victoria (-4.9%), Queensland (-4.6%), Western Australia (-1.1%), South Australia (-5.1%), the ACT (-0.6%) and the NT (-6.5%).

    In terms of particular models, sales of Toyota’s evergreen HiLux were up and continued to lead the market with almost 4340 registrations, ahead of Ford’s Ranger, which was down significantly at less than 3230 sales.

    Next was the Toyota Corolla at just over 2900 (down 4.5%), followed by the Hyundai i30 at more than 2500 (up 9%) and the ageing Mazda3 with just 1840 sales – down more than a third compared to September 2017, in line with most other Mazda models after a bumper August.

    While strong Navara sales drove Nissan’s solid monthly result, Mitsubishi’s sales lift came courtesy of the ASX and Triton 4×4, and Holden Commodore sales numbered 670.

    Top 10 brands, year to date:

    1. Toyota – 164,988
    2. Mazda – 86,074
    3. Hyundai – 73,120
    4. Mitsubishi – 64,468
    5. Ford – 52,970
    6. Holden – 45,548
    7. Kia – 45,374
    8. Nissan – 43,594
    9. Volkswagen – 42,781
    10. Honda – 40,537

    Top 10 models for September:

    1. Toyota HiLux – 4338
    2. Ford Ranger – 3228
    3. Toyota Corolla – 2917
    4. Hyundai i30 – 2508
    5. Mitsubishi ASX – 2138
    6. Nissan X-TRAIL – 1908
    7. Mitsubishi Triton – 1857
    8. Mazda3 – 1842
    9. Toyota LandCruiser – 1741
    10. Nissan Navara – 1713

  143. Diogenes

    A source said KWM graduates were subjected to gruelling conditions, with some employees choosing to sleep at the firm’s Melbourne office rather than return home. Day and night shifts were allocated, so work could continue around the clock.

    Poor diddumses. This was common when I was a Software Developer, and when working for a large multinational , ‘flexible hours?, sure, you ca work any 80 hours a week you like’.

  144. JC

    Dot

    Optimum is theoretically zero, but it’s largely unachievable nor desirable. For the Fed to manage monetary without resorting to QE the appropriate inflation rate is 2% annually. Once you target zero, QE has to be a readily available policy tool to prevent it falling through, because the only tool below 0 is QE.

  145. .

    I’m gonna laugh my arse off when a big lefty law firm gets sued for a breach of OH&S with those long hours.

    I do remember a law firm in Adelaide was going to charge 20k for a graduate position.

  146. struth

    Alex Turnbull is all in on renewables.
    It is purely a financial decision.

    On Sky last night, that little hornbag ,Sharri Markson………..(coorrrr) openly said that Malcom Jnr had interests in renewables to which one of the others, and I think it was Kenny said, but to be fair he did say he has interests in the energy sector!

    Yes he spudnik, but he didn’t say he had interests in the renewable energy sector.

    Our right wing journalists have been even more of a disappointment now I get to see them on free to air here.

    Their so over zealous about being seen as fair, they lose the plot.
    Typically.

  147. Entropy

    .L.
    #2837234, posted on October 12, 2018 at 11:04 am
    Just heard Sooky Alex’s Wentworth rant. Conclusion: Malcolm Turnbull raised the equivalent of an old-fashioned bum wearing a “The End Is Nigh” sandwich board. Good job.

    Actually, he is a parasite on the Australian community facilitated by the policies his father used to rig the energy market that just happens to enrich him and fellow travellers. A parasite who doesn’t even live in the country he feeds off.

  148. struth

    Would I be so bold as to say young Malcom Junior’s wealth is gained through corporatism and corruption?

    Why , yes I would.

  149. .

    Once you target zero, QE has to be a readily available policy tool to prevent it falling through, because the only tool below 0 is QE.

    I don’t see why any inflation at all below zero predicates QE; surely normal monetary accommodation suffices? A lot of the movement the CB wants really occurs in the banking system anyway.

    I can’t see what you’re saying though a (very rough!) IS-LM and aggregate demand/supply model. Nothing in that necessarily means that zero inflation represents a liquidity trap.

    If the inflation rate is low and predictable, GDP should be able to expand and the rate and prices should be stable.

  150. struth

    Apparently Sharri is getting her own show.
    I’ll just watch with the sound turned down.

    Like you always do with porn…………………………………..er………………….so I’m told.

  151. Entropy

    When is the best time to buy an SUV Peter? I’m thinking December-January will be time for me to trade in my current horse. Mainly because I can get some time off to shop around.

  152. Peter Castieau

    Any time is the right time to buy an SUV Entropy.

    Between APRA (I think) and the car manufacturers almost every potential profit centre in car dealerships have been regulated with manufacturers dictating service costs and retail prices and government deciding the maximum interest rates and regulated warranties etc have made the whole business of Auto retailing a one percent business for many.

    Car dealers will do almost anything to keep the stock moving.

  153. Interesting thought while driving to Longreach yesterday.
    Assume a networked world computing system, where all the worlds financial information could be collated.
    In other words, make all transactions visible.
    What are the implications?
    1. Cash will always be necessary for bribes etc.
    2. The Proles would see just how deep the corruption is.
    Add more as you wish…

  154. Leigh Lowe

    On Sky last night, that little hornbag ,Sharri Markson………..(coorrrr) openly said that Malcom Jnr had interests in renewables to which one of the others, and I think it was Kenny said, but to be fair he did say he has interests in the energy sector!

    Yes he spudnik, but he didn’t say he had interests in the renewable energy sector.

    So, are we to believe Minor Malcolm is a silent partner in Adani?
    Gouging income out of merchant bank engineered government policy.
    The apple don’t fall far from the tree.

  155. mh

    Alex Turnbull

    Silver spoon ✔️
    Entitled ✔️
    Making money from a scam ✔️
    Dickhead ✔️

  156. C.L.

    Sooky Alex said that he’d read the latest IPCC report (which only weirdos do) and said it was “terrifying.” I’ll never forgive his idiot father for what he did to the light-bulb market. You used to be able to buy a bulb for buck each (or less) and buying was easy. 4oW, 60W, 100W etc. Everybody knew what to buy, how bright they’d be, which ones suited lamps and rooms etc. Now a bulb costs several dollars, the boxes are covered in hundreds of words of advisory crap and it’s virtually impossible to judge the brightness. I’ve discarded a dozen bulbs which were as bright as the sun when installed.

  157. John Constantine

    Their turnbulls hated private car ownership, and it seems that one side effect of their turnbulls shyster loophole of going for mass population growth by temporary visas is shown in dropping new car sales even though the population is growing faster than ever.

    Mass importing visa holders to live in chicom dogbox apartments without a parking space doesn’t boost carsales. Maybe their turnbulls found that pleasing, as they flew out to their deposed dictators exile, looking down on the congested and doomed streets of Sydney from a great height.

    Comrades.

  158. Today I’m in an area where Sky News is on FTA.
    Switched it on to see interviews & vox pops so mind-numbingly stupid you’d think they were done by “The Project”.

    Then all became clear. Sky does not run 24 hrs on FTA.
    Part of the day the FTA feed comes direct from WIN.
    The news interviews of a standard you’d expect from a high school media studies class were of course, WIN interviews.

  159. H B Bear

    The Lieborals deserve to die for the light bulb thing alone.

  160. .

    It is worthwhile going to an electrical wholesaler C.L.

    They actually can get you decent lights. The cost is marginally higher than buying overpriced LEDs at the BunningsBorg.

  161. The Lieborals deserve to die for the light bulb thing alone.

    Factcheck status: True

  162. OldOzzie

    Entropy
    #2837254, posted on October 12, 2018 at 11:29 am

    When is the best time to buy an SUV Peter? I’m thinking December-January will be time for me to trade in my current horse. Mainly because I can get some time off to shop around.

    Am in same mode – having sold 2004 Jazz (90oooKm) for youngsters to buy Kia Rondo 7 Seater to handle Wife, Daughter and 3 Grandkids ,have been looking to get Wife to upgrade from 2006 Honda Jazz to new Small Car with Best Safety Features.

    Nothing wrong with Both Honda Jazz’s – have applied the same philosophy as applied to Dress Up Barbie Doll 1994 Series 80 Toyota Landcruiser – 4.5L petril EFI

    Mobil One Synthetic Oil every 10k Km Oil Change – All Fluids replace every 2 years – in the case of the Honda Jazz’s as low mileage running around suburbs, replace CVT Fluid every 10k Km and use BP 98 Premium Unleaded fuel – stopped pinging on 80 EFI which gets up and rocks, and the Honda Jazz runs as if new even though 12 years old

    My wife being small, loves her Jazz and it’s ability in Carparks plus the Famed Magic Seats which are superb – so New 2019 Jazz, new Toyota Corolla, Madza 3, Subaru Impreza in sights

  163. The luvvie line up on the ABC are breathtakingly ignorant of anything outside the bubble.
    Jon Faine’s Conversation Hour has US country singer Kevin Welch as a guest.
    Kevin plays a song he wrote recorded by Chris Stapleton (Tennessee Whisky).
    Kevin says “You may have heard of him, he pretty big”.
    No bells ring for the luvvies, including Stephen Curry who’s flogging the Pine Gap TV crap.
    The ABC reflect Australian society were told.
    There’s not many of us who’ve missed Chris Stapleton’s magnificent Tennnesee Whisky.

  164. Peter

    Impreza? I got a WRX just for manual trans.

    Excellent town car. Good pickup.

  165. Nick

    Lol the chutzpah of athe Left deriding Trump for meeting with a rap musician and their mysoginistic lyrics. Yet when Obama did it, it was cool.

  166. OldOzzie

    .
    #2837263, posted on October 12, 2018 at 11:45 am

    It is worthwhile going to an electrical wholesaler C.L.

    They actually can get you decent lights. The cost is marginally higher than buying overpriced LEDs at the BunningsBorg.

    I am about to buy another lot of Phillips LED Outdoor Lights from Reduction Revolution (5 x 70W and 1 x 50W)- have been happy with previous Phillips Essential Smartbright LED Flood Lights from them, and I noticed that the same Phillips LED Flood Lights were used outside at the Shangri-La Fijiian at the outside Breakfast Area last month.

    I am also going to order 20 Phillips LED Globes from them as well – expensive but should last

  167. struth

    I’m in the service Industry (transport) and also entertainment (gigs)

    I don’t want people and especially6 competitors knowing how much I charge.

    Anyway, it’s quite a stretch to think that all transactions would be visible to all people.
    I’m sure the government won’t be doing that.

    Which proves

    It’s a long drive to Longreach.

  168. Oh and while I’m at it, did anyone catch the f$$$ck up last night with Vic ABC’s last telecast of long time newsreader Hendo?
    Broke down a few minutes in and Jaunita Phillips from Sydney read the news on relay.
    So very very professional.

  169. struth

    I play “What are you listening to” and “was it 26” .
    One written by Chris and one an old Allman Bros (I think number) after being asked if I knew any Chris Stapleton by a number of Punters.
    He’s very popular up this way.

  170. jupes

    Disgusting white men.

    My Grandad was a Rat of Tobruk. Survived Tobruk but didn’t survive the war.

  171. John Constantine

    The biggest live cattle exporter from the Kimberly has been hit with a show cause notice as to why the State shouldn’t shut them down.

    Over links to a banned live sheep exporter, not because of cattle handling issues.

    Their left want the cattle industry shut down, and will use any loophole to do it.

    Aboriginal interests have thirty percent of Kimberly cattle. The left want them back in welfare herds, not owners of cattle herds.

    Comrades.

  172. struth

    Any excuse to drop d tune.

  173. jupes

    The best moment of the Kanye / Trump Oval Office presser was when Trump thanked Jim Brown for coming. Brown replied that he wasn’t there to ask for anything, he was there to serve.

    You can bet that won’t be reported in the MSM.

  174. duncanm

    SloMo could always cancel all subsidies to Infigen, Alex Turnbull’ heavily subsidised business. But he ain’t called SloMo for nothing so he won’t.

    Why doesn’t someone in the media just shut Alex up with a ‘how much do you personally, and your company have invested in renewballs’ question?

  175. jo

    Peter
    #2837268, posted on October 12, 2018 at 12:01 pm

    Impreza? I got a WRX just for manual trans.

    Excellent town car. Good pickup.

    Shopping trolley! Years ago pulled up in woolies carpark. Little old lady showing her friend a car she had just bought. WRX Sti. Salesman saw her coming.” It goes really well” she said.

  176. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Labor to back PM’s tax cuts, Chris Bowen says

    Rachel Baxendale
    Reporter
    @rachelbaxendale
    26 minutes ago October 12, 2018
    8 Comments

    Labor will back a federal government move to bring forward tax cuts for companies with annual turnovers less than $50 million.

    Those companies will have their tax rate cut to 26 per cent in 2020/21, then 25 per cent the following year, under legislation that will be introduced to parliament next week.

    “Labor has always been the friend of small business,” Labor leader Bill Shorten and shadow treasurer Chris Bowen said in a statement on Friday. The federal opposition says it will pay for it by delaying the introduction of its proposed Australian Investment Guarantee by 12 months.

    The guarantee would give all businesses in Australia the ability to immediately deduct 20 per cent of any new eligible asset worth more than $20,000, with the balance depreciated in line with normal depreciation schedules from the first year. – AAP

    From the Oz. “Friends of small business” my hairy aunt.

  177. .

    Millennial Millie doing good interviews now, not relying solely on her looks.

    This is really quite revealing.

  178. OldOzzie

    Labor plans to keep anti-gay exemptions for religious schools

    Rachel Baxendale


    Labor deputy leader Tanya Plibersek says the opposition has no plans to abolish exemptions the Gillard government put in place, which allow religious schools to reject gay students and teachers.

    However, Ms Plibersek said it would be “wrong”, “irresponsible” and “abhorrent” for a school to turn a child away because of their sexuality.

    Leaked sections of Liberal Party elder Phillip Ruddock’s report on religious freedom indicate it proposes changes that would restrict the ability of religious schools to use existing laws, introduced by the Gillard government in 2013, to discriminate against teachers and students based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

    Then prime minister Malcolm Turnbull appointed Liberal Party elder Mr Ruddock to chair a federal review into religious freedom following the same-sex marriage postal survey last year, amid concern from religious and conser­vative groups that the legalisation of same-sex marriage could infringe upon their ­religious freedoms.

    The government is yet to respond or publish the report, despite receiving it in May.

    “It’s not Labor’s plan to reduce any of the existing exemptions, but any expansion of the right to discriminate is certainly something we’re not contemplating,” Ms Plibersek said when asked whether Labor would seek to abolish the exemptions it introduced.

    “I think there’s a very easy way for Scott Morrison to deal with this debate, and that’s to release the report that’s been sitting on his desk for five months into religious freedoms.

    “Now Labor absolutely believes that no one should be discriminated against on the basis of their religion.

    “People absolutely have a right to practice their religion as long as it doesn’t in any way contravene Australian law, but the right to be free from discrimination on the basis of your religion is not the right to discriminate because of your religious views, and this debate is getting very messy very quickly because Scott Morrison refuses to release the report that he has, that’s been given to him by an expert panel of eminent Australians.

    “Why doesn’t he want to release the report before the Wentworth by-election? What’s so bad in it? What’s the government contemplating that could be so controversial that they’re not prepared to talk about it before the Wentworth by-election?”

    Ms Plibersek said it would be “wrong and irresponsible’ to turn a child away because of their sexuality.

    “I think it’s absolutely, frankly abhorrent to send that message to a child that there’s something wrong with them,” she said.

    “There have been exemptions in the past for the staff of schools, if schools are religious-based.

    “I would really urge schools to reconsider whether they make use of provisions like that, and I’ve got to be honest with you: I think the vast majority of schools simply don’t.

    “I think the vast majority of schools are grateful to their skilled teachers and really aren’t sending the bedroom police around to their place on the weekend to see who they’re living with.”

    ‘Strip anti-gay schools of funds’

    Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick earlier said he supported his crossbench colleague Derryn Hinch’s proposed motion calling for religious schools which discriminate against teachers or students on the ground of their sexuality to be stripped of government funding and charity status.

    Senator Patrick said he and his Centre Alliance colleague Stirling Griff supported Senator Hinch’s proposed motion “in principle”.

    “People must remember that a motion in the Senate is an expression of the Senate’s will, it’s not actually a law, but in principle yes,” Senator Patrick told ABC radio.

    “We’re of the view that teachers’ appointments should be based on merit. Of course you can have a teacher that is involved in misconduct, and that may be a determinant in a dismissal, but that has no bearing on sexuality.”

  179. areff

    As we’re all (some of us) talking cars, let me report that I popped into the Great Wall dealership, drawn by the ads proclaiming incredibly cheap prices. The commodification of cars, like computers a decade ago, is inevitable and the Great Wall Steed 4×4 looks good enough and, at $24k with lots of standard extras, seemed at least worth a look. A second look, actually, as I checked out the first models when initially released and wasn’t impressed. Poor finish, cheapish plastic interiors etc.

    Well the new model is much better finished, and the extras you get for that dough really are impressive.

    So I want for a test drive … and all favourable impressions were negated. You’d end up with an arm like Popeye from working the gear stick to make up for the weak as a kitten diesel donk. The steering was helium-light at highway speed, the ride choppy and the road noise unacceptably loud, due to the big mirrors (I suspect; monster door handles too, probably). Also, no slush box available for old farts like me who are long past the thrill of double-clutching.

    Verdict: almost there but not quite. If the next models offer an automatic box, petrol and more grunt, the Great Wall would be great value for money. My trusty Mitsubishi V6 4×4 will do until then 0r, more likely, I chance upon a good secondhand deal on a better established marque at similar price.

  180. Eyrie

    Those who think that denying or degrading civilian GPS screws up anyone else’s targeting or location ability have not heard of GNSS. There are several satellite based systems.
    The US has GPS, the Russians Glonass, the Chinese Beidou, the Euroweenies Galileo, the Indians have IRNSS (Indian Region Nav Sat System). The way to deny these is to jam an area with Rf on the same frequencies as the systems (roughly 1.2 to 1.7 GHz). To be really effective this has to be done from space or high altitude as otherwise you just shield the antenna from signals below.
    The only good thing that miserable disgusting prick Bill Clinton did in his time in office was getting Selective Availability (degraded accuracy by dithering the clocks) turned off permanently in 2002. The US military had developed the ability to deny civilian GPS in any area of a few hundred kilometers in extent to replace it. They test this in Nevada now and again during war games and screw up civilian airliner navigation using GPS.
    Search for a little Android app called GNSS View and see the 40 + nav sats visible at any time from the 4 main constellations.

  181. Nick

    I’m not sure whether to laugh or not:

    An aspiring journalist who took a Melbourne university to court for failing an assignment about dogs has had the case dismissed.

    Monash University student Chinmay Naik, 23, was failed in 2017 for a video assignment about the negative stereotypes surrounding certain dog breeds and then failed again when it was remarked.

    Ok…

    For the project, students had to produce a current affairs-style video that dealt with an issue in Victoria.

    Mr Naik chose to explore the perceptions around different dog breeds.

    “It dealt with negative stereotypes around certain kinds of dogs, such as greyhounds, how people perceive them and how they should be accepted,” he said outside court last month.

    But of course….

    She said it was “not the end of the world” to fail an assignment and told Mr Naik he would have to pass only one more subject.

    “I understand you will be disappointed by this outcome,” the judge said.

    She advised Mr Naik to consider his legal options because she would award costs to the university.

    “I am on financial hardship and will not be able to pay costs,” Mr Naik said in court.

    Yep.

  182. H B Bear

    Oh and while I’m at it, did anyone catch the f$$$ck up last night with Vic ABC’s last telecast of long time newsreader Hendo?
    Broke down a few minutes in and Jaunita Phillips from Sydney read the news on relay.
    So very very professional.

    Chief Maxist Jon Paine was having a whinge about that this morning apparently. How very ALPBC – old white guy gets the Quentin Dumpster long goodbye after decades on Aunty’s ample bosom, much love from the staff co-op comrades and a technical stuff-up.

    I guess a billion dollars only goes so far.

  183. H B Bear

    Liars bat the Lieboral’s small business tax wedge into the long grass.

    Advantage Peanut Head and Turtlehead.

  184. John Constantine

    https://www.skynews.com.au/details/_5847364525001


    Former Speaker of the House Bronwyn Bishop says a video released by Alex Turnbull in which he pleads with voters to veto the Liberal party does nothing but expose his father’s ‘treachery’. Malcolm Turnbull’s son posted a video urging Wentworth constituents to vote against the Liberal candidate to stop the party drifting too far to the right on contentious issues like climate change. Ms Bishop described Mr Turnbull as a socialist who infiltrated the Liberal party and ‘like all socialists, when he crashes and burns, wants everything else to crash and burn as well’.
    Read more…”

  185. Entropy

    Unlike Bronnie of course. Never a bad word to say about anyone. Always had the taxpayer in mind.

  186. areff

    Funny that Bronny would say that, given she backed Turnbull in the coup that ousted Abbott. Apparently girl-on-girl bitchiness re Credlin inspired her to do so — and Turnbull still got her vote even after taking the train to Geelong in the middle of the chopper-ride flap specifically to embarrass her and Abott, who was at that stage standing by her.

  187. stackja

    SMH story on schools has leftists upset over freedom of religion. The real agenda is religion seen as barrier to socialist republic.

  188. Senile Old Guy

    I actually feel sorry for the younger generation:

    ‘People of all genders can fall pregnant, because people of all genders can have the reproductive organs to do so,’ the tweet stated.

    Breitbart:

    The Equality Institute’s advice was not well-received, with thousands of now erased posts accusing the group of undermining what it means to be a mother, among other things.

    This is the age of stupid, where (as others have written) feelz overides thinks. And the Equality Institute?

    The Equality Institute (EQI) is a global research and creative agency working to advance gender equality and prevent violence against women and girls. We work with clients and collaborators to develop research, guide policies and programmes, and design creative campaigns to incite social change across the world.

    It’s another leftist organisation. A post:

    theequalityinstituteGender isn’t binary: it’s a spectrum and can be fluid. It’s not that hard to understand – be respectful of people of all genders!⠀

    No. It’s male/female. Personality can be “a spectrum and can be fluid” but biology isn’t.

  189. Steve trickler

    Not a good look for US Naval Security. 2016.

    Brilliant vision of a car chase that ends up at a Naval Base.

    I was expecting tracer fire to light up the screen after a few minutes. But no, the threat was allowed to continue.



    It didn’t end well for the occupants of the vehicle.

  190. None

    Andrew Bolt got a gay man to be godfather to one of his children. Therefore he always goes wobbly on the gay. what is funny though that Bolt in his rush to virtue signal simply infantilizes gays. His gay godfather I believe is actually quite conservative and supports religious schools being able to discriminate.

  191. Eyrie:

    Those who think that denying or degrading civilian GPS screws up anyone else’s targeting or location ability have not heard of GNSS. There are several satellite based systems.

    Yes, quite well aware of the other systems. I should have but didn’t mention the GPS system in terms of the ’91 Gulf war.
    My bad.
    That’ll learn me for getting my present and past mixed.

  192. Myrddin Seren

    SMH story on schools has leftists upset over freedom of religion. The real agenda is religion seen as barrier to socialist republic.

    I sense a ‘Ministry of Religious Affairs’ won’t be far off from the installation of the Shorten 1000-Year Reich.

    The only question being – will they appoint a Faux Christian, an LGBTI+++ atheist or a Muslim as the Minister for Dismantling Two-out-of-Three Abrahamic Faiths ?

  193. None

    No one seems to last why Gillard passed that law on being able to turn away gay kids from schools not just gays teachers but gay kids which is revolting because it basically locks kids into a label at an age when they are still growing up comma dealing with hormones and all sorts of issues. My guess it was Labor’s pandee for the Muslim boat in Western Sydney. My guess is Tony Burke was mixed up in it.

  194. None

    All gay kids should be forced to attend Muslim schools.

  195. Senile Old Guy

    In the UK:

    The NHS will be among the employers required to set out plans to increase high-level recruitment from ethnic minority backgrounds

    …because when I’m in hospital, I really care about “ethnic minority backgrounds”! What about, you know, employing people who are good at what they do?

  196. .

    ‘People of all genders can fall pregnant, because people of all genders can have the reproductive organs to do so,’ the tweet stated.

    Human ova have been synthesised from blood in the lab recently.

  197. Geriatric Mayfly

    Chemicals go under microscope
    A Senate investigation of agricultural chemicals agency will put the world’s biggest-selling weed killer, glyphosate, under scrutiny.
    The Oz

    Stacked with Greens and cross bench riff-raff I should imagine.

  198. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Stacked with Greens and cross bench riff-raff I should imagine.

    Who would be outraged if Australian farmers abandoned “minimum till” and reverted to cultivation to kill weeds?

  199. mh

    .
    #2837283, posted on October 12, 2018 at 12:20 pm

    Great video, dot. Liked the gay black guy who gets chased by BLM. 😂

  200. DrBeauGan

    Armadillo
    #2837075, posted on October 12, 2018 at 2:01 am
    Doc, what was the go with calling her “Spikey”? Personality? Hairdo?

    Sorry for the long delay, ‘Dillo. I was asleep.

    Spiky describes her personality.

    Her friends at work call her “The smiling assassin.” Or so she claims.

    She was a student of mine ten years ago. She was cheeky, impertinent, showed no respect for mah authoritah, and was consequently irresistible.

  201. stackja

    If leftists insist on no money to religious schools. Then parents can take their children to non-religious schools. The parents will insist on teachers teach proper.

  202. Eyrie

    Winston, GPS was not actually declared operational when the Gulf War 1 was on. There was limited satellite availability because the full constellation had been been launched then and it was only giving you a location at certain times of day.

  203. Senile Old Guy

    Zero Hedge:

    Senator Tom Cotton (R-AK) claims that a sexual assault allegation levied against Justice Brett Kavanaugh at the 11th hour of his confirmation hearings was orchestrated by Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and his “political operation” as far back as July. Cotton told nationally-syndicated radio host Hugh Hewitt that Schumer was behind the leak of Christine Blasey Ford’s allegation “from the very beginning.” Cotton noted that Ford’s good friend, former FBI agent Monica McClean worked for former US Attorney Preet Bharara.

    McLean came under fire last week after a report emerged in the Wall Street Journal that she pressured her to change her story to “clarify” her story to claim that she “didn’t remember” a party at which Ford claims Kavanaugh groped her, as opposed to claiming that the party never happened. Bolstering Cotton’s assertion that Ford’s claim was professionally curated for political ammunition is a leaked recording from July in which Democratic operative and PR guru Ricki Seidman – an adviser to Ford – can be heard discussing how Ford’s accusation can be used to harm conservatives whether or not it’s successful at dislodging Kavanaugh from his nomination.

    What a surprise! It was nothing to do with Kavanaugh and entirely a Democrat attempt to slime Republicans.

  204. GM:

    Stacked with Greens and cross bench riff-raff I should imagine.

    The really cynical among us would believe that Monsanto has a replacement in the pipeline.
    Can anyone tell me the patent duration for agricultural products?

  205. Tel

    Can anyone tell me the patent duration for agricultural products?

    There’s plenty of generic glyphosate on the market, so it’s certainly expired on that one.

    Very likely you are right, Monsanto are getting into the professional wrestling game, playing the bad guy so they can come good again with a new product. Politicians can pretend to be heros, generic brands go away, dumb consumer pays more but it’s all for the better because environment, so don’t feel bad because we have taught you to love religious self flagellation.

  206. Senile Old Guy

    The US press is vile, when it comes to conservatives:

    In the end, Christine Blasey Ford’s privilege and access, her lawyers and her girlish voice and her desire to be of help, were not enough to grant her due process. Due process would have meant being interviewed by the FBI and having the man she accused be subject to a more searching inquiry than five-minute bursts from Democrats and aggrieved monologues from Republicans.

    No, due process would be Ford going to the police, instead of the press and left wing politicians. And I mean the police, not the FBI. But a short investigation would very quickly reveal numerous problems with her story, including that supposed witnesses denied it, and she could not remember where or when it happened or how she got to or from the party.

    It would have meant the FBI following up with the leads those lawyers offered. It wouldn’t have included Senate Judiciary Republicans using the press to pass on smears of Ford instead of having the FBI adjudicate them.

    However, it is entirely fine to let Ford smear Kavanaugh with allegations of attempted sexual assault 35 years after the supposed event, with no evidence, no witnesses and no details.

    The link.

  207. Myrddin Seren

    …instead of having the FBI adjudicate them.

    The FBI adjudicates nothing – as Gropey Joe Biden made clear during the Clarence Thomas hearings.

    I think we can safely say: #FakeNews

  208. John Constantine

    Their abc reveal that only seven percent of farmers audited for fertiliser compliance in great barrier reef catchments were obedient.

    Calls for harsher penalties for non compliant fertiliser use.

    The next big thing in waiting is noncompliant fertiliser use, I instinctively object to the State going big control, but the cowboy operators ruin it for everybody.

    Yes, blue green algae in inland lakes comes from excess nutrients in runoff from paddocks and yes, some blokes don’t know, or don’t care about when and how much they fertilise.

    Just one more weapon to use in their glorious five year plan for Dekulakisation.

    Sugar farmers killing the great barrier reef as they grow sugar poison to kill children and make wymynsys fat, this will become a meme impossible to resist soon.

    No more social license to fertilise.

    Comrades.

  209. thefrolickingmole

    Anyone got Hinchs’ livers address, I have a pallet of metho to send it.

  210. John Constantine

    The replacement farming systems for the off patent glyphosate based farming systems are closed loop.

    The company sells the seed, the company sells the training and accreditation courses, the company sells the onfarm compliance inspections, the company collects the end point of sale royalties the company sells the upfront fee per acre sown, the company sells the chemical.

    All profit locked in regardless of the crop actually growing to harvest.

    Activists banning glyphosate are working for the massive profit of Crony Big Closed Loop agriculture, and their paid for political tools.

    Comrades.

  211. Myrddin Seren

    Sugar farmers killing the great barrier reef as they grow sugar poison to kill children and make wymynsys fat, this will become a meme impossible to resist soon.

    Damn – you are right ! Intersectional social justice looms.

    Stop the sugar. Save the Reef. Will no one think of the children ?!

  212. People of all genders can fall pregnant, because people of all genders can have the reproductive organs to do so,’ the tweet stated.

    Human ova have been synthesised from blood in the lab recently.

    So what.

  213. My local (algae* dominated) council is a huge user of glyphosate. Parks etc.

    The winning algae argument is that they need it for weed control to plant their trees.

    *algae == greenslime

  214. .

    Patents are 20 years and I think that is agreed to by treaty (PCT?). Pharma can go for 25 and genetic IP rights for microorganisms and plant breeders rights are different again.

    IIRC, Roundup was from the 1980s to mid-2000s, but I checked and it was 1974 to 1994, but was extended to 2000.

  215. Senile Old Guy

    Their ABC now continuing to use the Turnbulls to bash the Liberals:

    Malcolm Turnbull’s son Alex has denounced “extremists on the hard right” who, he says, have taken over the Liberal Party. “If you want to pull the Liberal party back from the brink, there is one clear signal you can send,” he said, urging people not to vote Liberal. Apart from the leadership coup, Mr Turnbull — a Singapore-based investment manager — highlighted energy policy to make his point about the hard right’s “crazy agenda”. “As an investor in energy, I’ve seen that in particular there’s no way coal can compete anymore. Renewables have gotten too cheap, firming costs are reasonable, and really there’s no trade-off any more between lowering your power bills and reducing emissions. And yet still some would like to prosecute a culture war over this issue”.

    And the ABC fails to mention that it is only through subsidies that “renewable” energy becomes competitive. (It is not renewable because the windmills wear out and have to be replaced.)

  216. .

    …DB.

    I am sure that is not what they meant by “all genders can be pregnant”.

  217. You can never have enough sugar.

    One of the 5 main food groups.

  218. Pedro the Ignorant

    GPS in 1990 was pretty primitive, and the handheld units by Magellan had a clunky start up procedure, a dim matrix dot screen and could only be used at certain times of the day (or night) when the US satellites were visible above the horizon. They also cost something like $2000 from memory.

    Nevertheless, they infinitely better than traditional survey methods in remote areas.

    A proper survey needed a trained surveyor with his offsider and all his equipment, all at $$$ cost to the explorer, whereas GPS could be operated by anyone with some training in map reading and land navigation.

    Nowadays, the generically named “GPS” uses several different satellite systems and can plot a position to within a metre or less and anybody can pick one up and almost immediately know where they are, and of course most new cars are fitted with SatNav systems as standard equipment.

    The technology gets better and better almost annually.

    My huge stack of paper topographical maps is gathering dust in storage.

  219. …DB.

    I am sure that is not what they meant by “all genders can be pregnant”.

    I’m sure of that but the fact that human ova may be able to be synthesized in a lab from human blood proves nothing beyond that fact.

  220. .

    Other than frost, why is sugar cane not grown inland – or even further north?

    Rain?
    Soil quality?

  221. Mother Lode

    A source said KWM graduates were subjected to gruelling conditions, with some employees choosing to sleep at the firm’s Melbourne office rather than return home.

    Ha!

    Karoshi! Death from overwork!

    At last, something multicultural that is not cuisine or the will of Allah.

  222. Roger

    And the ABC fails to mention that it is only through subsidies that “renewable” energy becomes competitive.

    Last night on 7:30 they prosecuted a case against the poles and wires companies, accusing them of using the technical difficulties of integrating solar into the grid as a ruse to prevent the loss of customers and profits.

    Witnesses for the prosecution: Two solar panel installers!

  223. .

    I was a Saraiman once.

    Nothing is worse.

    Unless you’re going to work for yourself one day, do a trade.

  224. Labor deputy leader Tanya Plibersek says the opposition has no plans to abolish exemptions the Gillard government put in place, which allow religious schools to reject gay students and teachers.

    However, Ms Plibersek said it would be “wrong”, “irresponsible” and “abhorrent” for a school to turn a child away because of their sexuality.

    Leaked sections of Liberal Party elder Phillip Ruddock’s report on religious freedom indicate it proposes changes that would restrict the ability of religious schools to use existing laws, introduced by the Gillard government in 2013, to discriminate against teachers and students based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

    So the past week of belly-aching was nothing more than virtue-signaling. What a shit-show.

  225. Rae

    Peter #2837268, posted on October 12, 2018 at 12:01 pm

    Impreza? I got a WRX just for manual trans.

    Excellent town car. Good pickup.

    Shopping trolley! Years ago pulled up in woolies carpark. Little old lady showing her friend a car she had just bought. WRX Sti. Salesman saw her coming.” It goes really well” she said.

    A WRX is no shopping trolley. Maybe you could use a Honda Jazz for that.

  226. Mother Lode

    “I am on financial hardship and will not be able to pay costs,” Mr Naik said in court.

    Okay, when someone is engaged in litigation and, when they lose and the court decrees that they must pay costs, and if they are unable, is there any action undertaken in lieu? Or do they get off essentially scot free?

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