Open Forum: October 13, 2018

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1,630 Responses to Open Forum: October 13, 2018

  1. daggers

    Nick, you might be right, mate, but stories about Anthony Fisher sound OTT.

  2. Nick:

    This is where things become complicated. I was asked to look at an institutions’ rights and obligations’ recently. The place was naive in that was letting itself open to mischief makers who wanted to use the letter of the ‘law’ as stated in the rights for more political purposes.

    The lesson being taught to the churches by deviant priests doesn’t apply to them?

  3. Dr Fed Lenin

    I think I have invented a new phrase , Ruddising (v ) “ it occurred when I was writing about the morons in politics ,academia and the communist media I said the unersities are churning out morons by the thousand, I needed a name for the course.I thought of the dickhead rudd and up bobbed moronicity . There are I suppose many other wank courses at unis to which this phrase could be applied . Have fun comrades mocking the global communist fascist vocabulary . Two ways to defeat the left ,Defunding an Mockery ,they don’t like it up em .

  4. Roger

    The point with respect to religion based education and homosexuality is its constitutionality with respect to Section 116 of the Constitution: Commonwealth not to legislate in respect of religion

    Ah…but they’re not legislating in respect of religion but in regard to discrimination. And as the funding body they feel doubly emboldened to do so.

    Christian schools need to wake up and realise that they are the target in a war. Short of a successful High Court challenge to any legislation on the grounds that it impedes upon the free exercise of religion, their most powerful weapon is their numbers. The handsomely paid executives of their peak bodies should collectively make it clear to Morrison, Tehan, Porter, Cormann and Frydenberg that they will close their schools if their rights are not respected. The government would then face immediate and very politically damaging chaos which would require considerable expense to remedy.

  5. iain russell

    On a darkly humorous ate re ‘religious schools’: http://jewlicious.com/2017/11/iranian-engineers-propose-using-cranes-construction-well-hanging-gays/. The things they teach in trade schools?!

  6. Nick

    Daggers, I wasn’t talking about Fisher.
    Winston, it’s more about the reality of human frailty more than anything else.

  7. C.L.

    Let’s get this straight and on the record … The Liberal Party is changing the Sex Discrimination Act to protect imaginary gay students from imaginary expulsion. The same Liberal Party refused to alter the Race Discrimination Act to protect Bill Leak from the threat of jail.

  8. H B Bear

    Gotta give credit to the Lieborals – they are more useless than even I thought they were. Having been railroaded by the Gaystapo and the Liars, who sat on the issue for for six years, into legalizing homo marriage they install a former Lieboral into holding a review into religious freedoms. The review recommends maintaining the existing laws. The Lieborals then cave into the Fauxfacts press after 2 days, adopt a position to the left of the Liars and Plibblers and will legislate to restrict religious freedoms even further.

    The Lieborals must be destroyed.

  9. calli

    they will close their schools if their rights are not respected.

    The children are the pawns in all this. Only one side will seek to protect them and that will not be the government or activists.

  10. The Lieborals must be destroyed.

    You’re too late.
    Turdbull has already done it for you.

    Nonetheless,80% + of Cats will still vote for them in the next federal election.

  11. Nonetheless,80% + of Cats will still vote for them in the next federal election.

    Methinks not.

    The next fed election will be interesting. (In a Chinese proverb sort of way)

  12. calli

    Nonetheless,80% + of Cats will still vote for them in the next federal election.

    You keep saying this, MV.

    I feel like voting for them just to be annoying.

    😄

  13. struth

    A good start would be not expecting anyone to “do something for us” but to get off our far arses and do for ourselves.

    plus 100

    Trump isn’t going to help us one iota.
    Neither he should.

    The only thing Trump will do for us to some respects, is wake a few voters up to the UN and to Climate change and the cultural Marxist attack on the west.

    However, as mentioned up thread, they are introducing sex discussion with grade five children and there is crickets from their parents.
    Unlike the parents in the states.

    On that one comparison you can see exactly why the USA is a superpower and we are about to become Venestralia.
    It doesn’t matter what Trump and the USA teach us, no one here will do anything about anything.

  14. Methinks not.

    So, you reckon the majority of Cats will vote Labor next election.
    I can’t see it myself, but who knows?

  15. The diesel ferry had solar panels.

    Diesel engines are the winged keels of the 21st century.

  16. Confused Old Misfit

    Roger
    #2838025, posted on October 13, 2018 at 1:14 pm

    or for
    prohibiting the free exercise of any religion

    Is the relevant clause.

  17. Mark from Melbourne

    Nonetheless,80% + of Cats will still vote for them in the next federal election.

    MV, if you are going to keep repeating this, then please at least make your point more explicit, along the lines of :

    Nonetheless,80% + of Cats will still vote “validly” in the lower house in the next federal election.

    I am certainly not among that putative 80%. But your target isn’t – unless I have misunderstood you all these years – the Libs per se, it is voting system. Say it loud and proud!

  18. struth

    Memoryvault is right up to the point a third party gets to a certain size.

    We already know the Australian conservatives are the third largest party overall, and in membership, myself being a member, so they should “keep the bastards honest” in the senate and then it’s only a matter of time for the HOR.

    However, Cory is too much of a nice bloke for my liking so I don’t hold much hope, and they’ll be getting no more donations until he comes out swinging.

  19. Gotta give credit to the Lieborals – they are more useless than even I thought they were. Having been railroaded by the Gaystapo and the Liars, who sat on the issue for for six years, into legalizing homo marriage they install a former Lieboral into holding a review into religious freedoms. The review recommends maintaining the existing laws. The Lieborals then cave into the Fauxfacts press after 2 days, adopt a position to the left of the Liars and Plibblers and will legislate to restrict religious freedoms even further.

    As much as we criticise the Liberals, what the hell are their advisors doing? Wanking all day? Grovelling to the boss?

    95% of Cats could advise better than anybody “working” for the Liberals. I suspect most of them try to be too clever with grand schemes destined to fail. It’s like every Liberal advisor is Baldrick. Present company excepted.

  20. Confused Old Misfit

    Christian schools need to wake up and realise that they are the target in a war.

    The government will crumble.
    Not because of any media denigrated objections from the community of Christians Schools but from the back channel, unreported pressure from the Islamic community.

  21. You keep saying this, MV.

    Yes Calli, I do.
    Because it’s the truth, unfortunately.

  22. Top Ender

    Schools should teach children about colonialism, slavery and the legacy of the British empire

    Presumably it will include how the black kings sold their own people into slavery:

    King Tegbesu made £250,000 a year selling people into slavery in 1750. King Gezo said in the 1840’s he would do anything the British wanted him to do apart from giving up slave trade:

    “The slave trade is the ruling principle of my people. It is the source and the glory of their wealth…the mother lulls the child to sleep with notes of triumph over an enemy reduced to slavery…”

  23. John Constantine

    https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/rendezview/its-time-for-the-churches-to-start-paying-tax/news-story/2a96bc23043ffbbbb0327b64f8350802

    The majority of Australians wouldn’t vote for churches to become tax free at a poll, if they were already taxed now.

    Big Australia is changing the voteherd even now to a point where if it came to a vote in a ten year timeframe, churches would be taxed.

    The bad old days of sadists in church schools being able to select quiet bookish boys and savagely beat them for thrills and to thrash the pooftar out of them are gone, but the damage cause by covering up and making excuses for this is immense.

    Pick winnable fights, or the minority of Australians that support taxfree churches will continue to dwindle.

    Their angry hanson-young and their plibblefilth could probably get a church tax up in the second term of a green shorten government, once the property Ponzi has collapsed.

    Scomo might be the only protection for tax free religion going, think about that.

    Comrades.

  24. Roger

    Is the relevant clause.

    The High Court has historically interpreted that Section quite narrowly, so it doesn’t bode well for the churches in this instance.

  25. H B Bear

    King Tegbesu made £250,000 a year selling people into slavery in 1750.

    That is real money. Could he move it to Switzerland and buy up property in Mayfair and Chelsea like today’s African despots?

  26. Roger

    The High Court has historically interpreted that Section quite narrowly

    Clause, I should have written.

  27. John Constantine

    https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/rendezview/its-time-for-the-churches-to-start-paying-tax/news-story/2a96bc23043ffbbbb0327b64f8350802

    As church pews empty and the shorten looting cartel rules over the smoking ruins of an Australia bankrupted by the collapse of the property Ponzi, and the chicoms forcing a price war between Australian resources and agriculture and central Asian producers:

    “Tax the churches” will be here all too soon.

    Evangelical Scomo may be the only thing stopping a church tax getting a run right now.

    Think on that.

    Comrades

  28. struth

    Christian schools need to wake up and realise that they are the target in a war.

    Australians need to wake up and realise that they are the target in a war.

    Especially the white male ones.

  29. Ellen of Tasmania

    However, as mentioned up thread, they are introducing sex discussion with grade five children and there is crickets from their parents.
    Unlike the parents in the states.

    I used to ask parents, “What could the school introduce that would stop you sending your child along the next day?”

    Each ‘horror’, the parents grumble, complain and send their kids along next day. It’s astounding.

  30. Entropy

    As much as we criticise the Liberals, what the hell are their advisors doing? Wanking all day? Grovelling to the boss?

    Still using pimple cream.

  31. Entropy

    I actually agree with taxing churches. As long as unions, charities and NGOs get the same treatment. Far too many of them are businesses these days.

  32. Roger

    The High Court has historically interpreted that Section quite narrowly

    Clause, I should have written.

    I.e., if the purpose of legislation is not to prohibit the free exercise of religion it is not unconstitutional, even if the legislation has the effect of prohibiting the free exercise of religion.

    The purpose of Morrison’s proposed legislation will be to remove exemptions from anti-discrimination from religious schools, not directly prohibit the free exercise of religion, even though it will have that effect. Therefore, the HC is likely to dismiss any challenge on constitutional grounds unless the challenger’s lawyers come at it from a different angle.

  33. Christian schools need to wake up and realise that they are the target in a war.

    Australians need to wake up and realise that they are the target in a war.

    Struth, that battle was fought – and lost – over two years ago. It centred around a character named Ross Ward, and not that many Cats were interested at the time.

    Today, when it is way too late to accomplish anything, it is the main topic of conversation here.

  34. struth

    If a catholic priest talked to an alter boy about sexual matters like safe school Marxists are doing in schools , there would be hell to pay.
    Yet , they are not only ignored by government, but funded, celebrated, and supported.

    When are we going to do something, anything in this country?

    If we don’t make a noise about the sexual abused in our schools, funded by our taxes, then I swear I wish I never worried about doing the convoy protest.
    People should have never enlisted.

    That they gave their lives for this is a fucking disgrace.

    Australia, get fucked.

  35. Senile Old Guy

    Your only viable alternative now is to follow Dot’s advice, and put sitting members last.

    Yes. It won’t make any difference in my electorate. The uniparty is in control. I cannot see any way things will change. Turnbull, and sympathisers, swung the LNP to the left and it’s stuck there. There will be no change in my lifetime.

  36. None

    I actually agree with taxing churches. As long as unions, charities and NGOs get the same treatment. Far too many of them are businesses these days.

    Churches already pay tax for their church businesses and parachurch organisations. Unions don’t pay any tax whatsoever for anything.

  37. C.L.

    The historical turning point was Simon Birmingham’s war on Catholic schools. This was an unprecedented attack from the Liberal Party and a paradigm-shifting saga. The Liberals have now worked out that 1) the church school sector is in thrall to government monies and will therefore keep quiet during cultural brawls; 2) Christians will not vote for Labor anyway; and 3) from a marketing and campaign perspective, there is no longer a sizable, electorally rewarding cohort of die-hard Christians to bother about in Australian politics. Morrison believes throwing some Christians to the lions for the mob can’t hurt him.

  38. calli

    If churches are to pay tax, perhaps a tax deduction could be offered on what goes in the plate (or, more often these days, by electronic transfer).

    You know, like the Red Cross and Cancer Council do.

    Clever economics Cats might like to opine on the result.

  39. cuckoo

    U.S. christian pastor Andrew Brunson has been released from detention in Turkey. Can’t wait to see how this evening’s news bulletins spin this as a bad news story for Trump.

  40. Ellen of Tasmania

    However, Cory is too much of a nice bloke for my liking so I don’t hold much hope, and they’ll be getting no more donations until he comes out swinging.

    I thank God that Cory is a nice bloke – but he’s no wimp. I listen to his podcasts each week and I think he does come out swinging. The MSM works overtime to ignore him, and here in Australia we don’t have a large and noisy alternative media. But Cory doesn’t pull his punches.

    Now, honestly, he’s not as small government as I’d like him to be, but we’re supporting him all we can because he’s the best (political) hope we have in Australia at the moment. Anyway – let’s try his smallER government ideas and see how we go.

    We’ll support AC in the senate and leave the HoR’s (Tweedledum & Tweedledee) to themselves.

    NOTE: Any Cats see themselves as the next Breitbart/Shapiro/TomWoods/whoever? Struth could do the musical interludes. Great platform for his political songs! I’m sure there’s enough talent amongst you all.

  41. calli

    Yet Dr Ken Elliott still remains with Burkina Faso. If he’s still alive.

    We need our own Trump. Lucky America.

  42. I am certainly not among that putative 80%. But your target isn’t – unless I have misunderstood you all these years – the Libs per se, it is voting system. Say it loud and proud!

    No Mark, I’m not trying to change the system (of voting). That is now pretty-much impossible. I’m trying to get people out of the habit of thinking in terms of Liberal and Labor. It’s not a choice between Liberal and Labor anymore. These days it’s a choice between “them” and “us”, and has been for quite a while.

  43. Confused Old Misfit

    I.e., if the purpose of legislation is not to prohibit the free exercise of religion it is not unconstitutional, even if the legislation has the effect of prohibiting the free exercise of religion.

    By following that logic you can abrogate ANY clause in the Constitution.
    No it doesn’t wash.

  44. struth

    Ross Ward, and not that many Cats were interested at the time.

    I think many cats were interested at the time, but like most of us old farts here, even though I am only fifty one, our kids were grown by the time this all happened.

    I remember fighting when I was in school myself because a maths teacher let all the class make fun of me because I said I would vote Liberal, and I certainly went down to see the fucktards in my son’s school who were trying to say he had learning difficulties and could only take tests orally, which was bullshit.
    I tested him at home and knew he was very bright.
    He was too bright for the fucktard teachers who couldn’t and were too lazy to teach, preferring to make all the kids “problem kids ” that they needed more teachers and funding for.

    They had politics and green crap imbedded in every module and lesson which required many nights of re education on my part.

    You know what I’m talking about.
    Just the little things.

    I remember my son coming home from school and snearing about how dumb yanks were.

    Really I said, and after I said take your hat off before you go inside, and if you wear it backwards anywhere in front of me I’ll burn it.
    I then reminded him he talks, eats and dresses and lives life copying them, and then we had a half an hour talk at least, as it turned out a teacher had been rubbishing them on everything from gun laws to Red Neck style Christianity.

    That was another trip down to the school.

    I fought.
    And I did the convoy, and it cost me thousands in fuel to drive my Truck to Canberra and back etc.

    I fought radio jocks trying to rubbish and lie about the convoy, councils that didn’t want to let us use their camp grounds after they found out who we were etc…………………………..

    And I often say to Mrs Struth after writing another bloody letter, well, no one can say I haven’t done my bit.
    She has supported me 100 percent.

    But, well, I might have been a mug, but my conscience is clear, and my son is an upstanding right wing young man brimming with decency.

  45. stackja

    C.L. – Scomo, not getting my first vote.
    Need to see ballot, before I work on preference.

  46. struth

    There is no way I’ll vote Liberal.
    I am a right wing, conservative.
    Why would I do that?

  47. jupes

    Apropros nothing, my three favourite train stations from my recent trip to the US.

    Grand Central Station New York

    Union Station Washington DC

  48. stackja

    struth – schools today seem to be useless at proper education.

  49. But, well, I might have been a mug, but my conscience is clear, and my son is an upstanding right wing young man brimming with decency.

    Struth, I offer the following words as encouragement to continue the good fight:

    .
    “If you will not fight for right when you can easily win without blood shed;
    if you will not fight when your victory is sure and not too costly;
    you may come to the moment when you will have to fight with all the odds against you and only a precarious chance of survival.

    There may even be a worse case. You may have to fight when there is no hope of victory, because it is better to perish than to live as slaves.”

    .
    Winston Churchill.

    .
    Never stop fighting, Struth.
    It’s all we’ve got.

  50. iain russell

    calli, yes indeed, Dr Ken remains captured or dead in, rather than with, Burkina Fasso. Unfortunately for the good doctor and his family the SJWs will not demand help or sympathy because he is a pale, stale male and the captors are from the religion of peace. QED and RIP a good man.

  51. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    struth – schools today seem to be useless at proper education.

    One of the ouens had a son, who came home from school just after the September 11, 2001 incident – teacher had told the class it was all the Americans fault, and they deserved what had happened to them.

  52. C.L. – Scomo, not getting my first vote.
    Need to see ballot, before I work on preference.

    You’re not getting it, Stackja.
    You’re STILL going to end up voting Liberal or Labor.
    The system is designed to ensure it.

  53. Roger

    By following that logic you can abrogate ANY clause in the Constitution. No it doesn’t wash.

    Maybe so, but that is what the majority of the HC bench determined in Kruger v Commonwealth, 1997.

  54. struth

    There comes a time when Marxism’s terrible insanity affects minds to the point they are no longer clear thinkers.

    That is now.
    There is another old saying.

    Silence is consent.

    If people will not get angry at people sexually abusing their children, and indeed pay for it to happen, and pay for Marxist indoctrination generally……………………………………………………………….

    Fuck ’em.

    I’ve got oldies to look after or I’d be outa here.

  55. stackja

    mv – I will make my vote putting them at bottom.

  56. struth

    One of the ouens had a son, who came home from school just after the September 11, 2001 incident – teacher had told the class it was all the Americans fault, and they deserved what had happened to them.

    What happened?

  57. Bruce of Newcastle

    I don’t mind churches being taxed.
    After unions, NGOs and green groups all are.
    And mosques.

  58. mv – I will make my vote putting them at bottom.

    In that case you’re going to vote Labor, Stackja.
    And nothing will change.

  59. candy

    PM Morrison seems to have handled this badly. No-one wants students targeted because of being gay, and has that ever happened it sounds bit extreme, but he now has Christian schools being demonised. I wonder if he read Ruddock’s report or liaised with school principals or anything to get to the nitty gritty of the issue.

  60. calli

    Unions, NGOs, green groups and mosques won’t mind lying about their revenues for tax purposes.

    Churches risk the wrath of God. They’re under pretty clear instructions after all.

  61. Makka

    There comes a time when Marxism’s terrible insanity affects minds to the point they are no longer clear thinkers.

    That is now

    Marxism is the easy enemy. It’s out there in the open.

    The worst most sinister enemy we have is the one pretending to be our friend and ally. Quite successfully too. They go by the name of the Liberal Party. They are no more our friend than the Marxists and are far more damaging as a result.

  62. Confused Old Misfit

    Kruger v Commonwealth, 1997.

    Then they were in error then and would still be in error now.
    They are far from infallible and some are infected with the social justice syndrome.

  63. Roger

    I wonder if he read Ruddock’s report or liaised with school principals or anything to get to the nitty gritty of the issue.

    No, but he did have friendly chats with Andrew “conservative Christians are bigots” Bolt and Dave Sharma.

    I’ve said it before: when someone leans on Morrison he bears their imprint indelibly.

  64. struth

    Australia actually had a very proud , masculine reputation, and well deserved it was, for not taking to Kindly to authority.

    We, as a nation were going great guns up until the sixties and the flower power, free love culture insidiously and intentionally pushed by the Frankfurt school.
    The biggest bunch of sad as hell , embittered old failures who, like Hitler before, would not accept the defeat of socialism.

    To go to the paradise the USA was at the time and hate it and to conspire to bring it down requires a level of insane anti human sentiment, only academics seem to be able to achieve, as we have just seen again, with our baby killing academics.

    There is something seriously wrong with the academic mind.
    The real world is never really seen from the halls of academia.

  65. stackja

    mv – so you suggest informal?

  66. notafan

    Good to see Morrison going after Catholic schools-most of which are barely Catholic and have turned a blind eye to their out and proud gay teaching staff and students for decades.

    As long as staff don’t publicly flaunt their breach of Catholic teaching like the woman living in a defacto relationship at a regional Catholic school a long time ago who became pregnant it’s don’t ask, even if they tell.

  67. Confused Old Misfit

    Kruger v Commonwealth, 1997.

    What was the constitutional issue in this case?

  68. Bruce of Newcastle

    Unions, NGOs, green groups and mosques won’t mind lying about their revenues for tax purposes.

    That’ll give the ATO something to do, auditing them.
    I think the results would be most illuminating.

  69. stackja

    SMH schools story quickly fooled many. Gullibility rampant.

  70. No, but he did have friendly chats with Andrew “conservative Christians are bigots” Bolt and Dave Sharma.

    Bolt is the Trabant of Australian conservatism.

  71. stackja

    Bolt has faced court for his opinion.
    And George Pell upset the rainbow sash.

  72. Roger

    Kruger v Commonwealth, 1997.

    What was the constitutional issue in this case?

    Several indigenous folk claimed that their removal from their families as children contravened – among other things – their constitutional right to freedom of religion, in that they were deprived of learning their ancestral rites and religious customs. The majority of the HC found that as the purpose of the law which permitted the removal of indigenous children deemed to be at risk in their families was to preserve the welfare of the children and not to limit their freedom of religion – even though it could be argued it had that effect in practice – it was not unconstitutional and the plaintiffs were not entitled to compensation on that basis.

  73. jupes

    The ABC notices that females playing sport are 10 times more likely than men to get knee injuries.

    The solution: Don’t encourage females to play men’s sport.

    Only joking of course. The solution is for the taxpayers to pay for ‘ sports injury prevention programs’ or some such shit. Pay up suckers so women can pretend to be good at rugby.

  74. DrBeauGan

    stackja
    #2838101, posted on October 13, 2018 at 2:58 pm
    SMH schools story quickly fooled many. Gullibility rampant.

    Too many of us are like Candy, eager to think the best of our “leaders”, instead of recognising a bunch of corrupt, bum-licking, power-hungry arseholes.

  75. stackja

    BON – Has ATO ever gone after leftists?

  76. struth

    Marxism is the easy enemy. It’s out there in the open.

    The worst most sinister enemy we have is the one pretending to be our friend and ally. Quite successfully too. They go by the name of the Liberal Party. They are no more our friend than the Marxists and are far more damaging as a result.

    Not many Australians put the division via feminism, racism, sexism, politically (Marxist ) correct speech, and all the other ‘isms” together under the same Marxist umbrella.

    Indeed they are all fed by the Marxists and trots in education.

    It’s were it is nurtured.
    Where it is born.

    It is the march through the institutions.
    All planned and written about and enacted.

    The Liberal party are no longer the Liberals because of Marxism, not due to other reasons.

    Hence saying it is highly visible isn’t right, you haven’t put this one together, as it’s intention is not to be visible, and it hasn’t been correctly held accountable for this cultural division.

    Feminism or Femarxism is gullible women being used by Marxism.

    Same with ever victim group.
    That’s why the bad guys are always western whites and mussies can do what they like.

    If it wasn’t feminism fuelled by marx, they’d be rampaging against all men.

    Cultural Marxism.
    It’s the cause of all of this.
    I would ague that the Liberal party are left wing because of it.
    And the Frankfurt school pushed it onto us through schools.

  77. DrBeauGan

    Only joking of course. The solution is for the taxpayers to pay for ‘ sports injury prevention programs’ or some such shit. Pay up suckers so women can pretend to be good at rugby.

    I don’t mind women pretending to be rugger buggers. It’s when they pretend to be scientists that I get nervous.

  78. stackja

    jupes – and how much damage to female body parts?

  79. calli

    Those stations are the cream of the crop, jupes.

    Tomorrow morning the Beloved and I face the hideous Powell Street on the BART. After running the gauntlet with huddles of (hopefully) sleeping vagrants, we must descend the dodgy escalators with heavy luggage and then get our tickets from the vending machines – they were programmed by a semi moron high on weed.

    The trains themselves aren’t too bad. Except that you sit along the wall and have to wedge your feet under the suitcase wheels so it doesn’t roll into the next carriage when the train brakes. That’s if you get a seat.

    The joys of travel. 🙂

  80. Baldrick

    I don’t mind churches being taxed.
    After unions, NGOs and green groups all are.
    And mosques.

    I’m assuming the ABC comes under ‘unions, NGOs and green groups’.

  81. stackja

    Once LNP was small business. Now just business. ALP now just union bosses.

  82. mv – so you suggest informal?

    No Stackja, I urged an informal vote at the last election as a protest against Mark Textor’s “we don’t matter” comments. That is ancient history now. As others have stated, generally voting informal is a waste of time. Dot has explained three times the only viable voting alternative left to us now, but I will repeat it and flesh it out a little.

    1) – Forget all about parties. They are irrelevant.
    2) – Next election, identify your sitting member, and number them last.
    3) – Fill in the rest of the form however you like, as long as you number all the squares.

    The only variation to that is if the previous sitting member is not standing again. In that case, identify their replacement (the same party) and number them last.

  83. Tom

    Tuned in this afternoon to try out Melbourne sports radio SEN’s spring racing coverage (which used to be very good), now headed by ex-ABC sports caller Gerard Whateley, who was suspended from his weekday morning slot after the GayFL grand final last month after sports fans reacted with shocking ratings to his lecturing them about the moral superiority of green-left politics.

    However, I quickly tuned out when the first thing I heard was an interview with Moana Hope, a lesbian from the GayFL Lezzo League. And it turns out Whateley (a very good sports caller) hasn’t even turned up to call the races, one of the main reasons he was hired.

    I repeat: Craig Hutchison, who engineered the takeover of his sports content company Crocmedia by SEN and installed himself as SEN CEO, knows absolutely nothing about sports fans and, like Whateley, loathes them. Meanwhile he has pissed $4 million+ against the wall on the Crocmedia takeover and on hiring Whateley (look it up at asx.com.au and announcements under company code PNW). His clown show will be lucky if it still exists in two years time.

  84. jupes

    The joys of travel. 🙂

    We caught the train from New York (Penn Station) to Union Station in Washington. About four hours.

    It was a horses arse getting on, as it was first in best dressed for seats and there was limited room for bags. The conductor was hilarious. He was a huge black man who owned that carriage. I felt I was in boot camp as he briefed us on where bags can and can’t go. “Listen up y’all …”

    Couldn’t believe how beautiful Union Station was when we arrived.

  85. stackja

    mv – that’s what I wrote about putting last. Don’t know if ALP is running. My local member is Zim.

  86. egg_

    Leading independent Kerryn Phelps’s main strategy seems to be promoting an extreme-left climate position, knowing she could never be responsible for implementing it.

    If it Quacks like a duck…

  87. Makka

    The Liberal party are no longer the Liberals because of Marxism, not due to other reasons.

    Not buying that one bit. The Libs are overrun by greedy globalist UN elitist types with a cabal left leaning gay opportunists thrown in .Not Marxism. Their clear intent is to exploit the nation for money and their own greedy benefits.

    We have 2 distinct enemies. The Marxist left and our supposed CONservative friends in the Libs.

  88. Bolt has faced court for his opinion.

    True, but enough’s enough.

  89. Unless 40% of my electorate plan to vote exactly as I, my and their vote will change nothing.
    I must be in one of the safer ALP seats.

    The senate however is where I intend yo have some fun.

  90. stackja

    egg – KP has made a living by just doing such.

  91. None

    Add a third attempt to The Daily Telegraph finally gets the headline right: Tragic death of unborn twins prompts law review

  92. .

    I don’t normally comment on religious stuff, but Catholics need people to stick up for them.

    I’d like to debunk the smear about Catholics that their religion is not biblically based and that they worship Mary as an equal to Jesus.

    No. Just no and please shut up.

    https://dioceseofbrooklyn.org/where-is-the-hail-mary-in-the-bible/

  93. PS not saying you should do it, but voting informal does deprive the bastards of $2.65

  94. Any chance solar farms or wind turbines will be built in Wentworth?
    Phelps is happy to spoil country folk’s property prices and amenity to look pure.
    Another wind tower is being hoisted into place on the hills as I look out my window, never Kerryn’s.

  95. Baldrick

    Bolt has faced court for his opinion.

    … and he’s been trying to appease the Left, ever since.

  96. stackja

    db – we don’t really know how much Bolt was hurt.

  97. John Constantine

    From Michael Smith’s site.

    “Last night Victoria Police won the @PRIANational Victorian Awards for Excellence in the Thought Leadership category, for our innovative podcast ‘Unspeakable: Understanding Sexual Crime’. 🏆 (1/3) pic.twitter.com/ISkvSLId9E
    — Victoria Police (@VictoriaPolice) October 11, 2018”

    Thought Leadership.

    Who the fuck wants a secret police force, with a paramilitary death squad wing, to focus on social media thought crimes?.

    Remember, it is required that the majority of domestic terrorism related pre-dawn home invasions by their paramilitary death squads be the sheds and caravans and campsites where scrapheap pale stale males roll out their blueys.

    This proves the State isn’t racist.

    Nobody can say the State is racist.

    Seriously, give it a try and see what happens to you.

    Comrades.

  98. jupes

    Bolt has faced court for his opinion.

    Due to his large profile as much as his message, Bolta has been the most effective conservative journalist of the last couple of decades or so. He has been uncompromising on the CO2 hoax and the “stolen generation”.

    That being said, in recent times he gone further and further left. It would appear he is reverting to his old Labor instincts. The banking RC, the Ruddock report, advertising on the Opera House, on everyone of those issues he may as well have been working for the ABC.

    He needs to take time out and have a good look at himself.

  99. They’re a long way up IR.
    The blades are being fitted. I’ve seen them layed out before the lift and it’s a pretty darn interesting display of engineering, mechanic and aerodynamics.
    The walking hook cranes are a marvel as well. It’s a pity so much effort goes into something so useless.

  100. stackja

    None – last time law voted down by abortion lobby

  101. Roger

    PS not saying you should do it, but voting informal does deprive the bastards of $2.65

    $2.73…it’s indexed!

    Which is why neither major party will ever get rid of compulsory voting.

  102. Unless 40% of my electorate plan to vote exactly as I, my and their vote will change nothing.
    I must be in one of the safer ALP seats.

    Yes, there are seats like that, Rambler. But in about 40 seats less than 3,000 people simply putting their sitting member last will cost them the election. Most (but not all) of those are backbenchers and losing their place at the food trough means going back to selling used cars or whatever.

    It is only when those marginal backbenchers are faced with having to actually get a real job again, that any sort of change happens. Witness the presentation of a “NO” case in the SSM plebiscite, and the ousting of Turdbull as two recent examples.

  103. stackja

    jupes – Bolt is confusing.

  104. Tel

    $2.73…it’s indexed!

    Which is why neither major party will ever get rid of compulsory voting.

    Put a minor candidate in 1st position, send the money to someone who is doing the right thing. Also, the 1 preference counts are recorded so the major parties know whose policies to pinch.

  105. None

    BOLT was the target of a personal vendetta as one of the litigants in the race discrimination case openly stated afterwards. I nevertheless do believe that the ruling was not only wrong but corrupt. I also know that he was personally very hurt and upset when the lawyer accused him of being an artsy and the judge seem to agree. It was a disgusting tactic by 20 choose who would no doubt have been Nazi collaborators back in that day. But let’s also be clear here though that wbile the litigants were represented by pro bono lawyers of course , Bolt himself did not risk a single dollar of his own money to defend himself either: his defence was paid for by the Herald Sun and when the Sun decided it wasn’t going to appeal Bolt was not willing to stick his own neck out personally. This in contrast to people like Bernard Gaynor who has found himself on the receiving end of similar tactics and has paid a humongous price for it yet to his credit insists on fighting this not out of a personal vendetta but for the greater good.
    I’ve had quite a lot of comments over a Bolt’s not published in the last 2 or 3 days particularly those pointing to his personal hypocrisy in demanding he not pay for bigoted schools yet not kick up a fuss about paying for abortions and I notice today he’s trying to walk that fence by posting on abortion and then inferring that only transgender kids are worth saving. I personally like to cut people some slack and I certainly have defended people against unfair accusations I even have an email from vault thanking me for defending him on Twitter against the Lefty mob but I’m kind of over it. I actually think people like Bolt are part of the problem.

  106. .

    I think the stupid law that Scott “Speaks in Tongues” Morrison wants to pass now is unconstitutional.

    1. ICCPR – my favourite piece of legislation that is going to blow up spectacularly in the face of our proto-fascist ruling class over the next 20-30 years: anyone excluded can go to a public school which the States provide (and is, unfortunately, is recognised and enshrined as a positive right which the government has to guarantee, in theory anyway).

    2. (s 51, incidental power, nationhood power, ICCPR, s 96 and s 116). They can’t rely on the existence of Federal funding because the Federal government does not have a head of power over education. It is not necessary for this to be accomplished at the Federal level, worldwide, education is provided by State, Federal, unitary and local government. There is no incidental nationhood power to claim.

    3. (ICCPR) In the same way that Mrs Clubb’s claim was perhaps weakened by considerations of positive rights of third parties, the same limit on a claim by the Catholic schools cannot be claimed by the Commonwealth. In that sense, the physical space near those clinics was a definite, discrete area. You can send your kids to any private school you like but the nearest State school as well, with some limited options to switch.

    4. The claim of cultural rights (ICESR) – there is a stronger claim for the entire church than a child who as contemporary wisdom says, probably does not know their sexual preference until they are of age to consent, majority or even at 21 per se.

    They can make funding conditional perhaps (literal wording of s 96) – but then there will be a demand to be free of the state and federal control of the curriculum. If it goes to the statute book and gets voided, I don’t think Scotty will push it any further. Even if he was going to cut a deal like that, Birmingham et. al., won’t stand for it. They’re paid up uniparty ruling class members who like the size and power of the State, and benefit deeply from it.

  107. OldOzzie

    The Scourge of ‘Diversity’ – WSJ

    A onetime liberal, Heather Mac Donald now believes identity politics threatens higher education and civilization itself.

    Heather Mac Donald may be best known for braving angry collegiate mobs, determined to prevent her from speaking last year in defense of law enforcement. But she finds herself oddly in agreement with her would-be suppressors: “To be honest,” she tells me, “I would not even invite me to a college campus.”

    No, she doesn’t yearn for a safe space from her own triggering views. “My ideal of the university is a pure ivory tower,” she says. “I think that these are four precious years to encounter human creations that you’re otherwise—unless you’re very diligent and insightful—really never going to encounter again. There is time enough for things of the moment once you graduate.”

    In her new book, “The Diversity Delusion,” Ms. Mac Donald, 61, explores how identity politics has diverted higher education from more elevated subjects. She warns of this ideology’s spread to other cultural institutions and industries—Hollywood, Silicon Valley, Wall Street.

    Ms. Mac Donald’s Manhattan apartment proves that her own focus on current events hasn’t distracted her from classical scholarship. Her living room is dominated by a piano, but when asked about it, she gets shy and self-deprecating. So I ask to see her bookshelves, not realizing I’ll end up in nearly every room of the apartment. The books, neatly stacked and well-thumbed, span several languages.

    It’s no surprise that Ms. Mac Donald once aspired to teach. Working toward a master’s in English at Cambridge, she became skeptical of the “deconstructionist” approach to literature espoused by the Yale professors she had revered as an undergraduate. Her love of language and problems of interpretation led her to Stanford Law School. She clerked for the liberal Judge Stephen Reinhardt, volunteered for the Natural Resources Defense Council, and took a job at the Environmental Protection Agency. But she pined for the classroom. “I realized,” she says, “things in the humanities had gotten worse and worse, that identity politics had taken over. . . . I couldn’t go home again.” She set down roots at the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank, where she has worked since 1994.

    Her views are heterodox. She would seem a natural ally of Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff, authors of “The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure.” They argue that college “snowflakes” are the products of overprotective childrearing, which creates oversensitive young adults.

    Ms. Mac Donald doesn’t buy it. Minority students disproportionately come from single-parent homes, so “it’s not clear to me that those students are being helicopter-parented.” To the contrary, “they are not getting, arguably, as much parenting as they need.” If anyone is coddled, it’s upper-middle-class whites, but “I don’t know yet of a movement to create safe spaces for white males.”

    The snowflake argument, Ms. Mac Donald says, “misses the ideological component of this.” The dominant victim narrative teaches students that “to be female, black, Hispanic, trans, gay on a college campus is to be the target of unrelenting bigotry.” Students increasingly believe that studying the Western canon puts “their health, mental safety, and security at risk” and can be “a source of—literally—life threat.”

    She similarly thinks conservatives miss the point when they focus on the due-process infirmities of campus sexual-misconduct tribunals. She doesn’t believe there’s a campus “rape epidemic,” only a lot of messy, regrettable and mutually degrading hookups. “To say the solution to all of this is simply more lawyering up is ridiculous because this is really, fundamentally, about sexual norms.”

    Society once assumed “no” was women’s default response to sexual propositions. “That put power in the hands of females,” Ms. Mac Donald says. “You didn’t have to bargain every time you didn’t want to have sex. The male had to bargain you into yes. But you could say no, and you didn’t have to exhaust yourself.” Sexual liberationists claimed men and women were alike, and chivalry and feminine modesty were oppressive. “Now, the default for premarital sex is yes,” Ms. Mac Donald says. “That gives enormous power to the male libido” at the expense of women.

    The #MeToo movement is one reflection of this reality, but so is the growing realization that consensual sex isn’t always healthy sex. To get back to the “no” default, students are “inviting adults back into the bedroom to write rules that read like a mortgage contract,” Ms. Mac Donald says. Young women, meanwhile, are learning “to redefine their experience as a result of the patriarchy, whereas, in fact, it’s a result of sexual liberation.”

    In her book, Ms. Mac Donald writes that “the only upside to the whole sordid situation” is “taking the fun out of college sex.” So does she oppose all premarital sex? “Huh,” she says. She pauses to think it over before acknowledging it would be unrealistic. Yet she says there is a societal benefit to sexually frustrating young men: “Channeling the male libido into other pursuits, like writing poetry to girls, is a good thing. Channeling it into studying is also a good thing. To becoming an alpha male when you graduate afterwards so that you can then become an even more attractive marital mate—that’s a good thing.”

    When it comes to race, Ms. Mac Donald’s views are more conventionally conservative. She argues that minorities could overcome economic and educational disparities by embracing “bourgeois values.” She opposes all forms of affirmative action, and believes admissions and hiring should be based solely on aptitude tests and objective measures of performance. She even opposes the University of California’s guaranteed-admissions plan, which admits the top 9% of students from every California high school, regardless of the school’s overall performance. The mechanism is a covert way to reintroduce race into admissions, she says, in violation of Proposition 209, which prohibits race and sex preferences in California’s public institutions.

    But don’t students who rise to the top of mediocre or failing schools exhibit exactly the bourgeois values Ms. Mac Donald lauds? “Some of these schools—it doesn’t take a whole lot to be an honors student; you basically show up,” she replies. Even when disadvantaged students truly have shown exceptional work ethic, unless their test scores pass muster, “I think the mismatch is far too powerful a problem.”

    That refers to the theory that preferences set up their intended beneficiaries for failure. They’re suddenly expected to perform beyond their proven capabilities and to compete with peers who earned admission through merit. This helps explain why universities may feel racially hostile despite the best efforts of admissions officers, faculty and administrators. Minority students may be excluded from study groups or chosen last for class projects because of aptitude, not race. “That’s heartbreaking,” Ms. Mac Donald says, “but if you come to a university with one or two standard deviations below your peers of academic qualifications, the gap doesn’t close.”

    So without affirmative action, how can kids born into poverty and dysfunction ever escape their circumstances? Ms. Mac Donald questions the premise: “What I also find striking about the defenses of racial preferences is the extraordinary snobbery and elitism on the part of the most selective schools—the assumption is that unless you go to Harvard or UC Berkeley, life is over for you,” Ms. Mac Donald says. “To escape poverty, you just need to graduate from high school, hold a job—any job, minimum-wage job, full-time—and wait until you get married to have children. Nearly three-fourths of all people who follow those simple rules are not poor.”

    To accommodate affirmative-action beneficiaries, Ms. Mac Donald says, universities have lowered standards and established majors focused on identity and oppression: “There’s even talk of being able to major in social justice, so there’s a blurring, in some cases, of the line between disinterested academic scholarship and activism.”

    Ms. Mac Donald admits she doesn’t know how to reverse this trajectory. She entertains the idea that students themselves should know better: “I don’t want to engage in my own victimology and absolve people of responsibility.” Then again, she says, independent thinking is “hard to do when you have a critical mass of faculty who are promoting the narrative of ubiquitous discrimination.”

    What about the idea of actively enforcing viewpoint diversity? “I’m reluctant to have affirmative action for conservatives, just because it always ends up stigmatizing its beneficiaries,” Ms. Mac Donald says. Still, she’s concerned that as campuses grow increasingly hostile to conservatives, some of the best candidates may decide, as she did, that there’s no space left for them.

    Some conservatives attempt to match the hyperbole and theatrics of campus progressives. That isn’t Ms. Mac Donald’s approach. She understands “the thrill of bringing a Milo”—Yiannopoulos, a notorious provocateur—“who is absolutely fearless in using every rhetorical tool of contempt and derision at his fingertips to try and puncture politically correct nostrums. But it does allow the left to say, ‘Oh, this is just a problem of these extremists.’ ” She declines to offer an opinion as to the wisdom of inviting Mr. Yiannopoulos to campus. But “to see me as a ‘provocateur’ is kind of ridiculous,” she adds.

    Leftist mobs don’t make that distinction. As Ms. Mac Donald recalls the night in April 2017 when she needed a police escort and spoke to an empty hall at Claremont McKenna College, she stiffens, crosses her arms, and speaks softly.

    The shades were pulled down at a guest suite-turned-safe house, she recalls, and the crowd outside grew louder and louder, chanting and wailing and drumming. “I don’t want to sound melodramatic about this, because I was obviously not at huge risk of any physical danger,” Ms. Mac Donald says. “But I did feel somewhat of an understanding of what the victims of the French Revolution felt, in waiting for the guillotine. Because you hear a mob that is, in fact, hysterical. And you don’t know what’s going to happen next.”

    What worries Ms. Mac Donald more than the mob is the destructive power of its animating ideas. If the university continues its decline, how will knowledge be passed on to the next generation, or new knowledge created? Ms. Mac Donald also warns of a rising white identity politics—“an absolutely logical next step in the metastasizing of identity politics.”

    “One of the great achievements of Western European civilization was to move beyond tribalism, to nation-states, to concepts of citizenship that transcend tribal identity,” Ms. Mac Donald says. “And we’ve been playing with fire for the last 40 years in thinking we can keep this ethnic warfare thing at a low simmer rather than a hot boil.”

    Then there’s the tragedy of individual students—those who wallow in victimhood yet enjoy an extraordinary privilege. As Ms. Mac Donald says wistfully: “They have at their fingertips what Faust sold his soul for, which is knowledge.”

  108. None

    Exactly right Tel. That is the most responsible strategy. Voting informal is just for petulant two year olds. Politicians don’t care if you don’t vote there’s still going to get voted in on the basis of people who do vote and they will get exactly the same money and exactly the same power without you. The best thing you can do is to vote somebody else make your voice heard that way.

  109. I wonder if the boy from Berriwillock, Darren Weir, will take out the Everest with Brave Smash?
    He keeps on winning the big races and upstaging the dynasty trainers.
    Starts soon.

  110. .

    No. Informal voting is principled. We’re not petulant children for not wanting to vote for a group that over a third of the entire public does not support.

    Putting sitting members last is simply has more strategic value.

  111. Roger

    Put a minor candidate in 1st position, send the money to someone who is doing the right thing.

    Yes.

  112. OldOzzie

    Is ‘First, Kill All the Lawyers’ the Democrats’ New Credo? – WSJ

    Their cries that the Supreme Court has been ‘corrupted’ evoke the rhetoric of totalitarians.


    In Shakespeare’s “Henry VI,” Jack Cade promises a coup that will make him king, after which “all the realm shall be in common” with bounties for all. To which the murderous Dick the Butcher replies, “The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.”

    This oft-quoted line has become a lawyer’s joke, but Shakespeare no doubt also wanted to convey revolutionary zeal. If you destroy lawyers, you also do in the law. That would have suited Dick fine.

    Fast forward to last Saturday, after Brett Kavanaugh concluded his own dramatic turn on the world stage by ascending to the Supreme Court. His Democratic tormentors, including California’s 85-year-old Sen. Dianne Feinstein, don’t want the drama to end. Up went the hue and cry that Justice Kavanaugh would “taint” future Supreme Court decisions. The Atlantic’s Adam Serwer didn’t leave it at that, screaming that all three branches of government had been befouled by “Trumpist corruption.”

    Maybe it’s time for the Democrats to calm down. They probably aren’t aware of it, since reading history has gone out of style, but their hatred of Donald Trump has now boiled over into what sounds like an attack on America’s institutions. As the party of the left, they should be more careful about any such suggestion. Modern history records that it is the left, not the right, that has been more culpable in destroying institutions that protected citizens from authoritarian rule.

    Mrs. Feinstein should know better. For someone in her position to suggest that Justice Kavanaugh’s appointment “undermines the legitimacy of the Supreme Court,” as she tweeted Saturday, is not quite equivalent to suggesting that we kill all the lawyers. But it does strike a blow against the sanctity of the judiciary. That is an offense more serious than the senator likely intended. It constitutes an attack on the rule of law—an institution at the heart of the much admired and widely emulated success of the American experiment in self-government.

    Other large nations have tried similar experiments, which too often have led to disastrous failures. It is often forgotten that the Russians attempted to make representative government work, electing their first State Duma, or parliament, in 1906 and making some progress over 11 years until the effort was shattered by revolution. Lenin said the Bolsheviks “found power lying in the streets and simply picked it up.” We know how that turned out; the Russian people are still living with its legacy.

    China also made a feeble attempt at representative government after the overthrow of the Qing dynasty in 1911 but could not build the civil institutions to sustain it. As a result they eventually ended up with Mao, who like Stalin became responsible for the deaths of millions. Both dictators set about to abolish property ownership, and in the process murdered the owners themselves. In both cases, the vital missing institution was the rule of law, which those countries never had and couldn’t achieve.

    The tragedy of Venezuela in modern times is that the people elected a populist president, Hugo Chávez, who immediately began dismantling civil institutions. We see the results today as millions of Venezuelans flee their homeland.

    America got lucky. Americans in 1776 did not revolt against the developing parliamentary government in London. They revolted against being excluded by a bumbling King George III from participating in the parliamentary process. So they broke away and set up their own representative government with a constitution that has held the nation together even at times of great strain, as in 1861. Brett Kavanaugh has shown from his appeals-court decisions that he is a constitutionalist.

    It is not a good omen when leaders of a major party and its adherents in the press seem to justify lawlessness simply because they don’t like the president the country elected. In National Review Online last weekend, Andrew C. McCarthy, a former federal prosecutor, reviews recent warning signs of this turn to lawlessness. One example was the FBI’s use in 2016 of a fake dossier manufactured by the Democrats as a reason to spy on the Trump campaign. Under the title “The Left Criminalizes Politics By Weaponizing Investigations,” Mr. McCarthy writes of the Kavanaugh hearings:

    “The world has changed. People who care nothing about norms can no longer be dismissed as a fringe. For generations, left-wing activists have instructed students and other groups that norms are the building blocks of a rigged system that deprives them of power and denies their ‘selfless’ desires.

    “We don’t want to acknowledge what this has wrought. We have norms because they safeguard foundational principles, such as due process, the presumption of innocence, and freedom from unreasonable and unwarranted police prying. But the Left is no longer attached to those principles.”

    That’s a pretty damning indictment with serious implications for the nation’s future. Instead of looking for Republican “taint,” maybe the Democratic fire-breathers should try a bit of self examination.

  113. None

    Heather McDonald speaks lots of common sense. Thanks for posting that Ozzie.

    Society once assumed “no” was women’s default response to sexual propositions. “That put power in the hands of females,” Ms. Mac Donald says. “You didn’t have to bargain every time you didn’t want to have sex. The male had to bargain you into yes. But you could say no, and you didn’t have to exhaust yourself.” Sexual liberationists claimed men and women were alike, and chivalry and feminine modesty were oppressive. “Now, the default for premarital sex is yes,” Ms. Mac Donald says. “That gives enormous power to the male libido” at the expense of women.

    Indeed.

  114. Eddystone

    Inspired by the Cats exhortation to fight on, I have just sent a polite email to our CEO protesting about our organisations (ambos) official participation in the gay “pride” parade.

    I really liked being an ambo. I hope one of you bastards has a job for me! 🙂

  115. Boambee John

    mv at 1417

    No Mark, I’m not trying to change the system (of voting). That is now pretty-much impossible. I’m trying to get people out of the habit of thinking in terms of Liberal and Labor. It’s not a choice between Liberal and Labor anymore. These days it’s a choice between “them” and “us”, and has been for quite a while.

    And yet you continue your refrain that “no matter who we vote for, we vote for Labor or Liberal”.

    We have got that message, but apart from focusing on the Senate, where the UNiParty will still be able to combine to defeat the cross-bench when their fundamental principles are threatened, we are yet to see you offer a practical electoral alternative.

    Rather than repeating your well known position ad nauseam, how about you let us in on your proposals for effective action?

  116. zyconoclast

    From michaelsmithnews.com

    Pooncey-Pyne bullshits about attack on Aussie base in Afghanistan

    Defence Minister Christopher Pyne’s claims that insurgents had attacked an Australian base and a protected area in the Afghanistan capital of Kabul days before his ­official visit to the city last month have been rejected by military officials in both countries.

    In a radio interview last week, Mr Pyne described his trip to the “very dangerous war zone” of Kabul and detailed attacks on the Camp Qargha base and in the protected zone in the capital in the lead-up to his arrival.

    “It’s a war zone and it’s a very dangerous one. There were eight terrorist attacks in the area around the protected part of Kabul in the 72 hours before I got there,” Mr Pyne told Fiveaa radio in Adelaide on October 3.

    “Missiles fired at our camp at Camp Qargha on the 19th of September, which thankfully didn’t cause any casualties but did a bit of damage.”

    Military officials contradicted Mr Pyne’s claims. Both the NATO-led Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan and the Australian Defence Force said yesterday there were no attacks on the dates cited by Mr Pyne.

  117. jupes

    I nevertheless do believe that the ruling was not only wrong but corrupt.

    Indeed it was.

    Just another example of what the Australian deep state excels at. Legal corruption.

  118. .

    Maybe Pyne is transitioning into a Hillarysexual.

  119. None

    Yes Stackja. The abortion lobby would rather deny a person justice for the murder of their own child then acknowledge the humanity of that child.
    It is in this way that Hitler really did win the war.

  120. Makka

    Spygate: The True Story of Collusion [Infographic]
    How America’s most powerful agencies were weaponized against President Donald Trump

    It’s a bit of a read but all encompassing. The sheer magnitude of the collusion is breathtaking. The resources dedicated the Get Trump are unbelievable.

  121. jupes

    Military officials contradicted Mr Pyne’s claims. Both the NATO-led Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan and the Australian Defence Force said yesterday there were no attacks on the dates cited by Mr Pyne.

    Have any military officials contradicted Chrissy’s claim that the Indian and Pacific Oceans are different temperatures therefore requiring us to buy bespoke submarines from the Frogs?

  122. Exactly right Tel. That is the most responsible strategy.

    In 97% of seats, it’s a vote for Liberal or Labor, and will make fvck-all difference to boot.

  123. Tintarella di Luna

    Maybe Pyne is transitioning into a Hillarysexual.

    Dot read that as Payne, much alike in their thinking the hair colour is starkly different butt.

  124. None

    Oh Eddystone I salute you. I sincerely hope that your opinion is respected even if your organisation decides to ignore you. God bless you for your courage. I wish I had a job for ambos to offer you should it come to that. I hope it doesn’t.

  125. Boambee John

    stackja
    #2838107, posted on October 13, 2018 at 3:06 pm
    BON – Has ATO ever gone after leftists?

    Back when Bronnie Bishop was in the Senate, one meeting of Senate Estimates she got stuck into the Tax Commissioner (Boucher??) about political selectivity.

    He wascl Outraged, Outraged, at the implication, but did not seem to have a very convincing argument against it.

  126. None

    In 97% of seats, it’s a vote for Liberal or Labor

    meaning your informal vote will still result anything Liberal or Labor. But the difference is if you vote for somebody else first they get the money and they start building up their ranks to make more serious challenges in the future and secondly it sends a very strong signal to liberal and labour that people are voting elsewhere and they’re voting for different policies. It may as tell said force them to adopt some of those policies just as Howard adopted some One Nation policies when one nation started making inroads into the Liberal vote. You’re not going to change this bunch of charlatans overnight you have to be in it for the long haul.

  127. And yet you continue your refrain that “no matter who we vote for, we vote for Labor or Liberal”.

    Because that is the reality of our situation, John, and that’s not going to change any time soon.
    The best we can hope for is to put the fear of God into some of the backbenchers, and hopefully get them nervous on a more regular basis.

    Yes, anything else is a waste of time, and won’t change anything one whit.

  128. Boambee John

    mv

    Now seen your 1521 post.

    Apart from a elwarm inner glow and depriving the majors of some money, what does that achieve?

  129. Tel

    In 97% of seats, it’s a vote for Liberal or Labor, and will make fvck-all difference to boot.

    Cobblers. Most seats have 4 or more candidates, go find one with 2 candidates from a recent election.

  130. Tintarella di Luna

    Inspired by the Cats exhortation to fight on, I have just sent a polite email to our CEO protesting about our organisations (ambos) official participation in the gay “pride” parade.

    I really liked being an ambo. I hope one of you bastards has a job for me! 🙂

    People who take a stand on principle will always get jobs. There’s an old Italian saying: Non puoi scoprire nuovi oceani se non hai il coraggio di perdere di vista la riva.: You can’t discover new oceans unless you have the courage to lose sight of the shore. – Good luck and bon voyage

  131. Redzel being led into the the winners circle by an Asian owner.
    The ABC told us it was a race for rich white men.

  132. bundyrum

    The change to slomo has made no difference to my vote, the LNP ain’t getting my vote again.
    Slomo is no different to the last few tosspots.

  133. Rae

    Churches already pay tax for their church businesses and parachurch organisations.

    They do? Of which church businesses and para-church organisations do you speak?

  134. Mitch M.

    This is the only aging expert I have encountered who incorporates a genetic and evolutionary perspective. Without those perspectives it is almost ridiculous to think about aging. For many years his views were disregarded but now people are realising how important his perspective is.

  135. meaning your informal vote will still result anything Liberal or Labor.

    Sorry None, I missed where I urged people to vote informal next election. Please remind me.

  136. Tintarella di Luna

    The change to slomo has made no difference to my vote, the LNP ain’t getting my vote again.
    Slomo is no different to the last few tosspots.

    Give your first vote to any candidate but Labor or Liberal or Greens (Graberals) or Clive Palmer’s lot – look for One Nation candidate, or Shooters Farmers and Fishers or Australian Conservatives – if there’s a candidate for the lower house – you know what to do in the Senate.

  137. Eddystone

    Thanks None and Tinta.

    I was tongue in cheek with the bit about my job, I’m sure I will be ok.

    There’ll be a hell of a shit storm (H/T Krudd) if there’s any come back.

  138. Senile Old Guy

    Rather than repeating your well known position ad nauseam, how about you let us in on your proposals for effective action?

    Since we lack a true conservative party in the lower house, there is little that can be done, except deny them funds and hope that we get a sensible senate.

  139. Boambee John

    mv at 1545

    Yes, there are seats like that, Rambler. But in about 40 seats less than 3,000 people simply putting their sitting member last will cost them the election.

    How will that stop one of Labor or Liberal forming government? As you regularly point out, one of those parties will eventually get the seat. It might be a bit random, but tge result is the same.

    The only real benefit is the warm inner glow from throwing current troughers out, but there will still be the same number of troughers, and one wing of the UNiParty will still form government.

  140. stackja

    Mrs Fred Nile often stood for HoR.

  141. None

    Journalists always describe Christians as “proud” when they undermine Christianity.
    It’s a way of rewarding them for legitimising apostasy.

    This is why I know Sharri Markson is a Lefty and Morrison is a flake: because she said she liked Morrison because he didn’t wear his religion on his sleeve.

  142. None

    Dearest MV: putting your sitting member last is a voting strategy; it is not the same as voting informal. I have consistently stated that voting informal is stupidity and only for petulant 2 year olds.

  143. Tel

    https://www.aec.gov.au/media/media-releases/2018/09-28.htm

    The good burgers of Wentworth have sixteen candidates to choose from. Freaking SIXTEEN!!!

    For people like MV that’s not enough, God knows how many it would take to satisfy.

  144. stackja

    Mary Whitehouse predicted problems. MSM didn’t agree.

  145. Cobblers. Most seats have 4 or more candidates, go find one with 2 candidates from a recent election.

    Tel, the number of candidates is utterly irrelevant. Last election only about 60% of the voting public voted Liberal, Labor or National, as first preference. Nonetheless, between them they won 97% of the seats (145 out of 150). Even after all the by-elections since then, the count is Liberal, Labor and Nationals 143 seats out 150, or 95%.

    The system is rigged to ensure that outcome EVERY time.

  146. None

    Christian schools should just expel all politicians kids.

  147. None

    All politicians kids – local state and Federal – should be sent to Muslim schools.

  148. How will that stop one of Labor or Liberal forming government?

    It won’t. And nothing we can do will change that. The very best we can do now is come up with strategies that just might slow the bastards down a bit.

  149. None

    My federal electorate is staunchly Labor but we always have tons and tons of candidates all loopy lefties mind: population party animal Justice party sex parties blah blah blah I still manage to find a sane non uni party person to vote first and then yo yo the preferences.

  150. Boambee John

    lah I still manage to find a sane non uni party person to vote first and then yo yo the preferences

    At least you force the scum of the AEC to earn their money by having to follow your random walk of preferences to the end.

    Unless they decide to “lose” your ballot paper.

  151. Boambee John

    mv at 1650

    So, after all your criticism of others, you acknowledge that your proposal makes no practical difference to the outcome?

  152. Senile Old Guy

    So, after all your criticism of others, you acknowledge that your proposal makes no practical difference to the outcome?

    Without a true, large, conservative party in the lower house, there’s little to nothing that can be done. If anyone has better ideas, let’s have it.

  153. your proposal makes no practical difference to the outcome?

    Nervous backbenchers caused the current mob to at least allow a NO argument in the SSM plebiscite, and saw Turdbull dispensed with. Two very small victories I’ll grant you. But that’s all we have to work with now – making backbenchers in marginal seats nervous.

    If you have a more productive strategy**, let me know, and I’ll support you to the hilt.

    .
    ** – NOTE: Just doing the same thing over and over again, like people have done since 1972, is not a “more productive strategy”. In fact,it’s even not a “strategy” at all.

  154. DrBeauGan

    Conservativism is deeply unfashionable. If you want a large conservative party to vote for, you’ll have to make conservatism fashionable. That is, you’ll have to make it appealing to air-heads and bubble-brains. There aren’t enough thoughtful folk around.

    Not impossible, but not easy either.

  155. None

    Boambee I even vote below the line in the Senate with suitable annotations for any scrutineers.

  156. stackja

    1945 UAP disappeared. 1946 ALP won. ALP went after banks. 1949 LCP won. Will voters accept BS going after their savings?

  157. John Constantine

    The only reason chrissy pyne scares backbenchers more than deplorable australians do, is that not enough obsolete and deplorable australians have made the personal effort to introduce themselves face to face and in a charming way, explain that they never voted to be sold out to the lowest bidder.

    In an elevator.

    That worked for their American left.

    Comrades.

  158. hzhousewife

    Redzel again!
    What a payday.

    Yup !

    🙂

  159. JC

    Tel
    Faultline has gone back to writing his old newsletter- this time at the Cat. This time, he knows that if he tries on nonsense like what he used to write – aboriginal revolt and AK47s hidden in Alan Bond’s basement- he’d be laughed off the site.

  160. Not impossible, but not easy either.

    Abbott campaigned on the basis that we had a financial crisis, and the answer was to reduce both taxes, government spending. (“We have an expenditure problem, not a revenue problem”). Doesn’t anybody else remember him pushing that line?

    He won the election with the second biggest majority vote in the history of modern Australian federal politics. Australians aren’t stupid, and they’re naturally somewhat conservative.

  161. H B Bear

    Maybe Pyne is transitioning into a Hillarysexual.

    Chrissy has been denying reality for years.

  162. Rae

    Inspired by the Cats exhortation to fight on, I have just sent a polite email to our CEO protesting about our organisations (ambos) official participation in the gay “pride” parade.

    I really liked being an ambo. I hope one of you bastards has a job for me!

    You might be surprised at just how many ambos are gay. But then, you might not be. Surprised, that is.

  163. Steve trickler

    Iconic imagery and sounds. (10 mins )

    The AN-225, is being prepared for flight, whilst a fighter jet display performs in the background. The bloke holding the camera would be stoked. Great work.



  164. Will voters accept BS going after their savings?

    The bulk of Australians’ savings are now in compulsory super. Governments of both political persuasions have been stealing more and more of it via taxation, almost since it was introduced.
    Who are you going to vote for to stop the theft – Liberal or Labor?

    The inevitability of gradualism. Enthusiastically endorsed by all major parties.

  165. JC

    Conservativism is deeply unfashionable.

    Is it though? I appreciate the fact there are more people outing themselves as “socialist” these days doing away with the old and dishonest vernaculars..progressive or social democrat. However support for capitalism is still in the mid 40s.

    The problem isn’t so much that people oppose capitalism ( I presume that’s what you meant by “conservatism”), it’s that people are afraid of removing the welfare net. I think most people are confusing the social welfare net with conservatism. At least, I believe, ordinary punters are.

    The right, not the libertarians haven’t been smart about this. They seem reluctant to openly speak up about placing a limit on the amount of money that can be distributed. There used to be talk about this Costello was excellent in speaking about this very thing. However, the person who derailed all this, at least in Australia, was Abbott. Abbott signed onto every single big spending program left unfunded by the liars party as well as adding his own, while peddling concerns about a budget emergency.

  166. JC

    There is also another very big problem essentially created by the central banks after the GFC, or at least to avoid a depression. Quantitative easing had to be introduced in order avert depression. There was no choice- QE or down the drain. I’m making this point not to debate the merits of QE but to explain the massive government failure that resulted from very tight money resulted in a material increase in asset prices across a lot the western world (with QE). The end result is that those with assets increased their wealth materially. Those that didn’t are sitting on stagnant incomes and becoming more morose, envious and pissed off by the day. Whichever way you cut this melon da inequality argument is important because masses of people are pissed off.

  167. DrBeauGan

    The right, not the libertarians haven’t been smart about this. They seem reluctant to openly speak up about placing a limit on the amount of money that can be distributed. There used to be talk about this Costello was excellent in speaking about this very thing. However, the person who derailed all this, at least in Australia, was Abbott. Abbott signed onto every single big spending program left unfunded by the liars party as well as adding his own, while peddling concerns about a budget emergency.

    Cf:

    Abbott campaigned on the basis that we had a financial crisis, and the answer was to reduce both taxes, government spending. (“We have an expenditure problem, not a revenue problem”). Doesn’t anybody else remember him pushing that line?

    He won the election with the second biggest majority vote in the history of modern Australian federal politics. Australians aren’t stupid, and they’re naturally somewhat conservative.

  168. DrBeauGan

    MV, conservativism may be popular with 40% of the Australian population. Hard to say. But it sure isn’t popular with the political class.

  169. RobK

     Those that didn’t are sitting on stagnant incomes and becoming more morose, envious and pissed off by the day. 
    I think you are right.

  170. vlad

    Tony shot himself (and Australia) in the foot twice: in backing the NDIS and the NBN.

    But what I can’t forgive him was that when the ghastly Quentin Bryce – Shortstop’s mother in law – offered him her resignation as GG at the start of his term as PM on the grounds of conflict of interest he declined it.

    Nice guy. Too nice for the top job.

  171. struth

    Not buying that one bit. The Libs are overrun by greedy globalist UN elitist types with a cabal left leaning gay opportunists thrown in .Not Marxism. Their clear intent is to exploit the nation for money and their own greedy benefits.

    I think of it like this.

    Those UN globalists are self declared socialists.

    Their weapon or tool is Cultural Marxism.

    The left (socialists) use Alinsky (and other Marxists from the Frankfurt school) as a guide to destruction.
    So does the UN.
    We agree but you see cultural Marxism something Marxists follow and I’m saying it’s a weapon used by all socialists against the west.
    They follow it as well.

  172. DrBeauGan
    #2838220, posted on October 13, 2018 at 5:48 pm

    Yes, Dr BeauGan.
    Abbott campaigned on one thing, and once elected, went and did pretty-much the exact opposite of what he promised to do. Just like just about every other party leader elected since 1972.

    Your point is . . . ?

  173. .

    Kim Beazley is also a “nice guy” but did not put opponents in prison.

  174. rickw

    As the Australian Defence “Force” drops combat standards to accommodate fat lesbians …

    Fat Lesbians V Russians would be short and brutal.

  175. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Pathetic, Nick, doing the ‘Hyacinth’ thing again.
    Try laying off the stupid. It is unbecoming on you.

    —-

    Now, in the latest lunatic leftie designation for a normal woman, speaking myself as ‘a person with a uterine system’…. when we passed by Windsor Castle and its St. George’s Royal Chapel yesterday it seemed there was a wedding going on there. One of the Ugly Sisters, I quipped, and then felt ashamed of myself forthwith, for those girls have come a long way since they turned up at Prince William’s wedding wearing those ludicrous hats.

  176. vlad

    Menzies won government from opposition primarily on one policy: abolition of petrol rationing.

    ScoMo could retain government if he campaigned on one policy: lowering electricity bills.

    That would take guts, of course. So much for that idea, then.

  177. vlad

    Point taken, dot. That was Tony’s bastard moment. A pity he wasn’t more of a bastard in better causes.

  178. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    How can we vote from here in the Wentworth by-election? Hairy saying we’d never forgive ourselves if the conservative (yes, I know, I know) side fell short by two votes.

  179. JC

    Fuckhead, you were telling Ronery last evening to ignore my comments just as you do. Scroll past, you instructed him.. Your dishonesty is not something I take lightly. I also don’t take lightly very specific things said about you in the Journal of Social Studies. Now fuck off and follow what you preach. Don’t ever question me again, you degenerate.

  180. vlad

    Looks like I’ve got this place to myself. 6.00 pm everyone else is eating dinner. Maybe I’ll go for Armadillo’s record.

  181. .

    I am sure JC is right.

    I know a guy who bought houses worth of NAB perpetual bonds shortly after the GFC and monetary accommodation.

    He was already loaded, but it set him up for retirement and then some.

    He even got to the point where he started some risky greedy crap like using his (primary) house as equity to buy more and more of them. He started taking a 4% spread at one stage.

    As he remarked, “I have invented a money-making machine”.

  182. vlad

    Well, I thought I had the place to myself. Like all those people at the start of an open thread typing “am I first” or whatever while someone else is posting “1”.

  183. DrBeauGan

    memoryvault
    #2838227, posted on October 13, 2018 at 5:57 pm
    DrBeauGan
    #2838220, posted on October 13, 2018 at 5:48 pm

    Yes, Dr BeauGan.
    Abbott campaigned on one thing, and once elected, went and did pretty-much the exact opposite of what he promised to do. Just like just about every other party leader elected since 1972.

    Your point is . . . ?

    My point is that conservativism is deeply unfashionable where it counts. With the air-heads. And yes, I include Abbott in that description.

  184. we’d never forgive ourselves if the conservative (yes, I know, I know) side fell short by two votes.

    The who?

  185. JC

    Tony shot himself (and Australia) in the foot twice: in backing the NDIS and the NBN.

    But what I can’t forgive him was that when the ghastly Quentin Bryce – Shortstop’s mother in law – offered him her resignation as GG at the start of his term as PM on the grounds of conflict of interest he declined it.

    Nice guy. Too nice for the top job.

    And Gonsky along with his social policy of assisting potential high income earning mothers with subsidies.

    Government borrowing showed exactly the same ascent as under the liars.

    https://tradingeconomics.com/australia/government-debt-to-gdp

    Same climb rate for spending too.

    https://tradingeconomics.com/australia/government-spending

  186. Makka

    My point is that conservativism is deeply unfashionable where it counts. With the air-heads. And yes, I include Abbott in that description.

    The only reason why it’s become fashionable is because conservatives have allowed the left to control the narrative. Pollies like Costello never allowed the filth to get away with that. Abbott however , one he had Govt’ ran dead on confronting the left. On top of that he caved to grubs like Turdball, raised taxes, signed us up for leftist debt bubbles and the like. Abbott had plenty of opportunities to fight back but didn’t. He caved.

  187. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Agree with JC above on the effects of QE.

    Inequality has no real purchase on voters unless a large number see themselves as stuck while others are doing well. Their kitchen is hot and they can’t see where the heat is coming from.

    Enter socialism. Here we go again. An awful cycle of rinse and repeat.

  188. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    MV, the who? As I said, I know, I know. Not a conservative in sight in the lot on offer. Simply referring to a holding operation. AC’s should have run.

  189. .

    Ferkin crepes, the garbage you see on the tubes.

    Anyone seen this “polished man” crapola?

    Stupid idea, pointless virtue signalling and based on a misinterpretation of totally phoney, mind-blowingly misandrist data.

    TL;DR did a video on it and basically, it is total garbage.

  190. JC

    Dot

    I bought some ANZ perpetual bonds. This stuff was trading on a 25% yield, but there just wasn’t much liquidity, so it couldn’t get any in size. A funny dude I know went to the ANZ with a borrowing proposition. He wanted to take out a mortgage on his house and other assets and use the funds to buy ANZ perps. The bank told him to fuck off.

    GFC was a once in a lifetime opp to make life-changing amounts of money.

    However the problem we have now is that there are masses of unhappy people for who even buying a home etc is impossible.

  191. DrBeauGan

    The only reason why it’s become fashionable is because conservatives have allowed the left to control the narrative. Pollies like Costello never allowed the filth to get away with that. Abbott however , one he had Govt’ ran dead on confronting the left. On top of that he caved to grubs like Turdball, raised taxes, signed us up for leftist debt bubbles and the like. Abbott had plenty of opportunities to fight back but didn’t. He caved.

    I think this is right, Makka. But Abbott was always gutless. He’s what you get in a system where you advance by kissing arses. The more arses kissed, the higher you rise.

  192. Makka

    Their kitchen is hot and they can’t see where the heat is coming from.

    Yes they can. They see it in zero wage growth, immigrants flooding in, higher energy prices and the rising tax grab. While we see politicians gifting themselves generously, making us pay for their helicopter jaunts and overseas junkets etc, letting lobbyists fk the punters over on all major policy issues. People have a right to be pissed off. But there is no Trump in Australia to turn to who will bust open the UNiparty’s cosy grip on our nuts so we scavenge around with the 2 main parties for our crumbs.

  193. vlad

    Babies will pay for themselves in the long run. They’re cheap at $50k a pop.

  194. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Hah. Brekkie time here. And what do you do when the next place you have booked in to and paid for emails this morning to inform you that, due to a function being held there tonight, there may be noise disturbance till 1am?

  195. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Point taken there, Makka. Many can see the results without making the macro economic analysis. One issue though is that much of it is generational and the millenials have all been brainwashed and kept quiescent on celebrity bread and circuses.

  196. AC’s should have run.

    Lizzie, the AC got 4.6% of the vote the first time they ran in a HoR election, and 3.2% the next time.
    It would appear that they have already had their peak moment of glory (such as it was), and are now in their “fade into oblivion” phase.

  197. rickw

    The only reason why it’s become fashionable is because conservatives have allowed the left to control the narrative.

    How is this not fashionable?

    https://m.ebay.com.au/itm/Trump-2020-Vote-Keep-America-Great-Again-Republican-Political-Mens-White-T-Shirt/163180829639?hash=item25fe55dbc7:m:mJqQoCC9Y1WLSYnLYJMtZ8w

  198. Makka

    One issue though is that much of it is generational and the millenials have all been brainwashed and kept quiescent on celebrity bread and circuses.

    True and scary too. The most concerning trend I see is the way younger generations embrace Socialism. It’s telling me the left’s disappearing of History has been effective. Nothing or little learned from the past. Very scary indeed.

  199. Herodotus

    Had a few dollars on Redzel, so my TAB account lives to fight another day.

  200. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Small swings can affect outcomes in a tight call though, MV.

    My hope for the AC’s still lies in the Senate, and in a slow growth of awareness by sold-out Millenials (who like Gen X will grow up) of a more conservative alternative – provided the AC’s can lose the fuddy-duddy image. You gotta hope. 🙂

  201. Nick

    Suck shit Lefties, 41000 at Randwick to watch the Everest, with betting up 20%. Lol

  202. .

    Anyone see how Trump appointed three conservative Federalist society members as new justices of the US appeals court’s “nutty 9th” circuit.

    This is winning.

  203. .

    Millennials love capitalism. They really love money. They are too stupid to see through the SJW nonsense they’ve been inculcated with at school, but the reason why they’re Bernie Bros is that…well the world was burnt down before they could get a job like their parents or grandparents.

    When Trump gets results, they’re gonna vote conservative for a long time.

  204. egg_

    Any chance solar farms or wind turbines will be built in Wentworth?

    How about a dirty great hulking, rusty tidal power generator?

  205. Makka

    Anyone see how Trump appointed three conservative Federalist society members as new justices of the US appeals court’s “nutty 9th” circuit.

    Leftist media labelled them ARCH conservatives. I hope they take flame throwers in to weed out the filth infestations.

  206. My hope for the AC’s still lies in the Senate

    My thoughts too, Lizzie. One can only hope that Bernardi’s Quixotic tilts at the HoR have not done them too much damage. And that he has learned his lesson.

  207. None

    The problem isn’t so much that people oppose capitalism ( I presume that’s what you meant by “conservatism”), it’s that people are afraid of removing the welfare net. I think most people are confusing the social welfare net with conservatism.

    Atbsolutely correct and they’re afraid of removing the net because they’ve totally f***** up their families. They other don’t want to support their family is all know that their families couldn’t give a s*** about them whatever other ridiculous reason – yes of course you can thank the sexual revolution and leftism for that as well – and so they look to the government to save them as if the government has some sort of magic bucket of money. Used to be law here in South Australia that your family was responsible for your welfare and that the state only needed to intervene for the genuinely destitute.

  208. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Hairy says AC’s are sensible to conserve resources for the Senate. I think, and have argued here before, that a good candidate in Wentworth would have given them the high profile that is presently far too costly for them to purchase. The media largy ignore them, but it would have been impossible to do so in Wentworth, especially given the lacklustre non-resident and unknown Liberal candidate.

  209. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Largely. Wretched phone.

  210. None

    I snapped at a millennial the other day trying to sell us solar panels. I ended up telling him to go up the road and sell his own future to somebody else.

  211. DrBeauGan

    rickw
    #2838255, posted on October 13, 2018 at 6:32 pm
    The only reason why it’s become fashionable is because conservatives have allowed the left to control the narrative.

    How is this not fashionable?

    https://m.ebay.com.au/itm/Trump-2020-Vote-Keep-America-Great-Again-Republican-Political-Mens-White-T-Shirt/163180829639?hash=item25fe55dbc7:m:mJqQoCC9Y1WLSYnLYJMtZ8w

    Unfortunately, it’s in the wrong country, Rick.

  212. .

    memoryvault
    #2838264, posted on October 13, 2018 at 6:45 pm

    My hope for the AC’s still lies in the Senate

    My thoughts too, Lizzie. One can only hope that Bernardi’s Quixotic tilts at the HoR have not done them too much damage. And that he has learned his lesson.

    FFS you are totally wrong, totally and utterly wrong.

    THE PROBLEM IS MONEY. $$$$. NOTHING ELSE.

    1. Ideas are easy.
    2. People are harder.
    3. Money is all that matters and everything else is effectively bullshit.

    If you have enough money, you run as many candidates as you can without sacrificing more important seats or candidates.

    If you have a limited budget, you do your best with a small pool of the best candidates you’ve got.

    There is no “damage” in increasing brand awareness. There is such thing as a poor ROI.

  213. .

    Despite the financial constraints, the ACs probably should have had a crack at Wentworth.

    Stuff like that can be a catalyst for greater things.

  214. None

    That 4.6% ACC vote was enough to guarantee election funding so that would have gone to their coffers. They just need to get 5 to 10% in a few places to build up some funds that way as well. Anyway Bernardi conceded that they probably should not have tried to run lower house as well as Senate candidates in the SA state election. I will be sticking to senators for the federal election I think.

  215. min

    According to the boys on outsiders, December 12 is Paris Day, as the agreement says signees can withdraw 3 years after signing. And that is the day

  216. cohenite

    Trump Does The Unthinkable
    by Liz Crokin

    As an entertainment journalist, I’ve had the opportunity to cover Trump for over a decade, and in all my years covering him I’ve never heard anything negative about the man until he announced he was running for president. Keep in mind, I got paid a lot of money to dig up dirt on celebrities like Trump for a living so a scandalous story on the famous billionaire could’ve potentially sold a lot of magazines and would’ve been a Huge feather in my cap.
    Instead, I found that he doesn’t drink alcohol or do drugs, he’s a hardworking businessman. On top of that, he’s one of the most generous celebrities in the world with a heart filled with more gold than his $100 million New York penthouse.

    Since the media has failed so miserably at reporting the truth about Trump, I decided to put together some of the acts of kindness he’s committed over three decades which has gone virtually unnoticed or fallen on deaf ears.
    In 1986, Trump prevented the foreclosure of Annabell Hill’s family farm after her husband committed suicide. Trump personally phoned down to the auction to stop the sale of her home and offered the widow money. Trump decided to take action after he saw Hill’s pleas for help in news reports.

    In 1988, a commercial airline refused to fly Andrew Ten, a sick Orthodox Jewish child with a rare illness, across the country to get medical care because he had to travel with an elaborate life-support system. His grief stricken parents contacted Trump for help and he didn’t hesitate to send his own plane to take the child from Los Angeles to New York so he could get his treatment.

    In 1991, 200 Marines who served in Operation Desert Storm spent time at Camp Lejune in North Carolina before they were scheduled to return home to their families. However, the Marines were told that a mistake had been made and an aircraft would not be able to take them home on their scheduled departure date. When Trump got wind of this, he sent his plane to make two trips from North Carolina to Miami to safely return the Gulf War Marines to their loved ones.

    In 1995, a motorist stopped to help Trump after the limo he was traveling in got a flat tire. Trump asked the Good Samaritan how he could repay him for his help. All the man asked for was a bouquet of flowers for his wife. A few weeks later Trump sent the flowers with a note that read: We’ve paid off your mortgage.

    In 1996, Trump filed a lawsuit against the city of Palm Beach, Florida, accusing the town of discriminating against his Mar-a-Lago resort club because it allowed Jews and blacks. Abraham Foxman, who was the Anti-Defamation League Director at the time, said Trump put the light on Palm Beach not on the beauty and the glitter, but on its seamier side of discrimination. Foxman also noted that Trump’s charge had a trickle-down effect because other clubs followed his lead and began admitting Jews and blacks.

    In 2000, Maury Povich featured a little girl named Megan who struggled with Brittle Bone Disease on his show and Trump happened to be watching. Trump said the little girl’s story and positive attitude touched his heart. So he contacted Maury and gifted the little girl and her family with a very generous check.

    In 2008, after Jennifer Hudson’s family members were tragically murdered in Chicago, Trump put the Oscar-winning actress and her family up at his Windy City hotel for free. In addition to that, Trump’s security took extra measures to ensure Hudson and her family members were safe during such a difficult time.

    In 2013, New York bus driver Darnell Barton spotted a woman close to the edge of a bridge staring at traffic below as he drove by. He stopped the bus, got out and put his arm around the woman and saved her life by convincing her to not jump. When Trump heard about this story, he sent the hero bus driver a check simply because he believed his good deed deserved to be rewarded.

    In 2014, Trump gave $25,000 to Sgt. Andrew Tamoressi after he spent seven months in a Mexican jail for accidentally crossing the US-Mexico border. President Barack Obama couldn’t even be bothered to make one phone call to assist with the United States Marine’s release; however, Trump opened his pocketbook to help this serviceman get back on his feet.

    In 2016, Melissa Consin Young attended a Trump rally and tearfully thanked Trump for changing her life. She said she proudly stood on stage with Trump as Miss Wisconsin USA in 2005. However, years later she found herself struggling with an incurable illness and during her darkest days she explained that she received a handwritten letter from Trump telling her she’s the bravest woman, I know. She said the opportunities that she got from Trump and his organizations ultimately provided her Mexican-American son with a full-ride to college.

    Lynne Patton, a black female executive for the Trump Organization, released a statement in 2016 defending her boss against accusations that he’s a racist and a bigot. She tearfully revealed how she’s struggled with substance abuse and addiction for years. Instead of kicking her to the curb, she said the Trump Organization and his entire family loyally stood by her through immensely difficult times.

    Donald Trump’s kindness knows no bounds and his generosity has and continues to touch the lives of people from every sex, race and religion. When Trump sees someone in need, he wants to help.

    Two decades ago, Oprah asked Trump in a TV interview if he’d ever run for president. He said: “If it got so bad, I would never want to rule it out totally because I really am tired of seeing what’s happening with this country.'”

    That day has come. Trump sees that America is in need and he wants to help. How unthinkable! On the other hand. have you ever heard of Hillary or Obama ever doing such things with their own resources?

    Now that’s really unthinkable! Might be worth passing on!!!

    Just shows we hired the right guy. If Hollywood, the liberals and the media ever STOP harassing him, Trump will have time to do many more positive things for our country….the good ole United States of America!!

  217. DrBeauGan

    Why does Bernardi make it so hard for me to send him money? Why do I have to tell him who I am and where I live? Is it a statutory thing, or does he just want to make it easy to nag me for more?

  218. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Dot, meet Hairy, who argues it’s only money that matters. 🙂

    I’veargued to him that running in Wentworth could have been done with a mere whiff of the oily rag.
    High National profile (not just any old by-election) and plenty of willing helpers with home printers for making and delivering leaflets and manning the booths. Hairy himself, I point out in making my case to him, is an experienced and ruthless scrutineer, and the disillusioned electorate would certainly pass around the hat financially once the decision was made I am sure. Cassie, Elle and I are not the only women with genuinely conservative views in Wentworth. Too late now, of course

  219. .

    A treaty with no laws incorporating it into domestic law is effectively useless.

  220. it would have been impossible to do so in Wentworth,

    The Wentworth by-election has already been won.
    The security agency of a certain foreign entity came first.

    And second.

  221. .

    The Wentworth by-election has already been won.
    The security agency of a certain foreign entity came first.

    And second.

    WTF?

    Someone explain this nonsense in my absence. Sounds like ALP conspiracy stuff about Gough.

  222. rickw

    Unfortunately, it’s in the wrong country, Rick.

    Yes and no. Seeing as we don’t have any conservative kick ass in Australia. I borrow the USA’s. I wear my Trump T’s (Kavanaugh in the Mail) all the time, it gets such a visceral reaction from the beta’s. Fuck them.

  223. .

    One last one.

    A pig vigil!

    “Pathetic Millennial” – Barbecuing Hot Dogs at an Animal Rights Protest

    I tried to have a nice barbecue and a bunch of people showed up to protest it…-.-

    Damn. Now I want a cigar, I’m all out.

  224. OldOzzie

    Climate inaction ‘stuns’ voters: Shorten


    Climate change is the biggest issue for Wentworth voters according to federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten who believes the by-election is an opportunity to send a message to the government.

    The Labor leader says voters are “stunned” with the Morrison government’s inaction on climate change following the release of a major United Nations climate report earlier in the week.

    “There’s a chance to send a message in Wentworth … If you are not happy with the way this government has been running things for the last two-and-a-half and indeed five years send them a message – not this time,” Mr Shorten told reporters in Sydney on Saturday.

  225. Dot, meet Hairy, who argues it’s only money that matters.

    And yet, a certain Senator just got himself more publicity than the major parties can only dream of, simply by suggesting a certain other Senator go back to fvcking herself stupid. Not a penny was spent.

  226. Boambee John

    None
    #2838205, posted on October 13, 2018 at 5:14 pm
    Boambee I even vote below the line in the Senate with suitable annotations for any scrutineers.

    I always do that.

    On one occasion, when we still had to fill in all the numbers, I took care to put the Commos and the Sex Party ahead of the Liars and the Slime, on the grounds that they were at least honest about their intentions.

  227. jo

    Duck, Shirley you mean ‘ ducks like a quack’.

  228. OldOzzie

    After Hewson in Wentworth, will Turnbull turn against Liberals?

    Gerard Henderson

    Since Sir Robert Menzies stepped down as prime minister in January 1966, the Liberal Party of Australia has had 13 leaders. This leaves 11 — if Harold Holt (who died in office in December 1967) and Scott Morrison are excluded.

    Of the 11, a quarter campaigned against the Liberal Party in their years after politics, while another has chosen to effectively run dead as the Liberals face perhaps their most important by-election since the party was founded in late 1944.

    Last Saturday evening, television carried footage of former Liberal leader John Hewson campaigning in Wentworth, assisted by a group of green-left anti-mining activists. He called for the Liberal Party to get “a drubbing” in next Saturday’s by-election.

    Hewson described the Liberal Party’s Dave Sharma as “a good candidate”. Yet he wants the electors of Wentworth to “register” a substantial protest vote against the government “or any other candidates that don’t understand the magnitude and urgency of the climate change challenge”.

    He is urging electors to vote for Labor, the Greens and independents (such as Kerryn Phelps and Licia Heath) ahead of Sharma. He wants traditional Liberals to vote against Sharma on October 20 “before returning to vote Liberal at a general election in six months’ time”. This is disingenuous.

    Hewson knows that once an independent wins a seat such as Wentworth, they are difficult to dislodge — since the likes of Phelps, if successful on October 20, would face the general election next year with all the benefits of incumbency. If Phelps prevails over Sharma, she is likely to be the member for Wentworth for some time.

    In his regular Sydney Morning Herald column on Wednesday, Hewson put his activism into words. He urged traditional Liberal voters in Wentworth to lodge a protest vote, declaring that he saw himself “as an Australian first and a member of the Liberal Party second”. Yet Hewson did not sign off his column as “an Australian” but rather as “a former Liberal opposition leader”.

    Fairfax Media and the conservative-free zone that is the ABC readily give space and time to former Liberal Party identities who delight in bagging the party that once delivered them parliamentary seats. The thoughts of Hewson can frequently be found in the Herald and on ABC TV programs such as The Drum.

    Hewson stands in the tradition of John Gorton (who led the Liberals from 1968 to 1971) and Malcolm Fraser (who led the party from 1975 to 1983). It’s possible that Malcolm Turnbull will join this group. Certainly he has made life difficult for the Liberals by resigning as the member for Wentworth and causing an unnecessary by-election about six months before the likely date of next year’s federal election. Moreover, so far at least, he has not made an unequivocal statement in support of Morrison or Sharma.

    In March 1971, Gorton lost support in the partyroom and was replaced as prime minister by William McMahon. Gorton blamed Fraser for undermining him; their enmity lasted until the former’s death in 2002. Gorton ran unsuccessfully as an independent for a Senate seat in the ACT in 1975. He was a constant public critic of the Fraser government.

    In turn, Fraser became a leading public critic of John Howard and his government from not long after the Coalition’s election victory in March 1996 until its defeat in November 2007. Once a hated figure among the Left, in his final years Fraser was wont to receive standing ovations by leftists at taxpayer-funded literary festivals.

    In 1992 (during the Keating government) Fraser co-­operated with anti-communist ­activist BA Santamaria and academics John Carroll and Robert Manne with a view to establishing a new political grouping that would advocate protectionism and economic intervention. Fraser was the designated leader. This was first revealed by Patrick Morgan and confirmed in Malcolm Fraser: The Political Memoirs, which Fraser co-wrote with Margaret ­Simons. The project got nowhere.

    In 2015 (during the Abbott government), Crikey’s Sally Whyte revealed that in the months leading up to his death, Fraser was at it again. He attempted to set up a new party, Renew Australia, that would oppose both the major parties since they allegedly advocated “policies ever more corrosive of our national spirit of fairness and justice”. Fraser died in March 2015. He formally had resigned his Liberal Party membership in 2010.

    Like Hewson, Fraser was much sought after to comment on the Liberal Party in his capacity as a former leader. This gave a sense of credibility to his criticisms that they otherwise would have lacked. At least Fraser in due course resigned his membership. At his green-left-supported rally this week, Hewson indicated he retains his Liberal membership.

    With the occasional exception, a person who becomes a political leader in a democracy is talented to some extent. Yet the likes of Gorton, Fraser, Hewson and Turnbull would never have obtained the positions they did without the support of the Liberal Party. In other words, the party creates the leaders. In return, it is reasonable to expect that former leaders will respect the party that made their success possible.

    Liberal leaders such as Billy Snedden, Andrew Peacock, John Howard, Alexander Downer and Brendan Nelson, after their retirement from politics, did not attack the party that made them. McMahon made some criticisms of the Fraser government but they were of little moment. Abbott was not a disrupter in the lead-up to the 2016 elections, where Turnbull led the party to a near defeat. He did criticise Turnbull during the past two years but now is clearly supporting Morrison.

    It remains to be seen whether Turnbull will follow Howard’s tradition or that of Hewson. What is known is that Hewson is calling for a majority Coalition government to become a minority administration. If this occurs, Labor will be even closer to government. It’s not an outcome that Menzies ever favoured.

  229. H B Bear

    The fact that Fat Clive managed to get a handful of otherwise unelectable bozos into the Senate and his buffoonish self into the Reps (albeit in Queensland) shows that money talks.

  230. None

    Makka

    #2838121, posted on October 13, 2018 at 3:28 pm

    Yep.

  231. woolfe

    Trump makes his own “Withdrawal Day” #winning

  232. DrBeauGan

    Yes and no. Seeing as we don’t have any conservative kick ass in Australia. I borrow the USA’s. I wear my Trump T’s (Kavanaugh in the Mail) all the time, it gets such a visceral reaction from the beta’s. Fuck them.

    😁
    Good thinking, Rick.

  233. OldOzzie

    Three Abortion Arguments Eviscerated by the Heartbreaking New Movie ‘Gosnell’

    The new movie “Gosnell: The Trial of America’s Greatest Serial Killer” isn’t a pro-life activist project, but rather a compelling, heartbreaking movie about horrific crimes perpetrated in the name of furthering a woman’s “right to choose.” The convicted murderer Kermit Gosnell (Earl Billings) matter-of-factly voices a pro-abortion mantra to justify his crimes, a mantra that rings utterly hollow as the horrors of his abortion clinic become exposed. [Warning: Spoilers.]

    “I provide the standard of care for them that I would want for my own daughter,” Gosnell repeats on television and in court testimony. The abortionist seems sincere in this statement, and that is all the more horrifying.

    The movie is based on the story masterfully told by Ann McElhinney and Phelim McAleer in their bestselling book, “Gosnell: The Untold Story of America’s Most Prolific Serial Killer.” The crime drama tells the true story of Gosnell, who was sentenced to life in prison in 2013 for the murder of three babies born alive. His abortion practice also led to the death of Karnamaya Mongar, a recent immigrant who was turned away from other clinics because an abortion would be too dangerous.

    In a panel at the Values Voter Summit, actor Dean Cain explained that he is personally pro-choice, and many characters in the film — notably Assistant District Attorney (ADA) Alexis McGuire (Sarah Jane Morris) — are also pro-choice. Even so, the movie powerfully exposes the falsehood of many popular abortion defenses.

  234. Percy Popinjay

    Bluddee hell – I was labouring under the delusion that poor ol’ Paul Mcgeog had finally been liquidated in ‘stan many moons ago.

    Unfortunately, it seems not. Apparently, he’s as hardy a target as Shrillary under Bosnian artillery shelling during the Vogon siege of Macchu Pikachu in the 1570s.

    Protracted redundancy negosheeashuns with Fauxfacts will result in these bizarre outcomes, it seems.

    Here’s hoping they end sometime soon, like late next century.

  235. None

    Whoever thought you could put liberals and conservatives in the same party is at f****** idiot.

  236. Bosco Baracas

    Hello All

    Looking for a good read on the economy behind Hitler’s war machine. Was recommended the “Wages of destruction” by Adam Tooze. Figured that since is an economics blog I would get some good advice here. Any suggestions?

  237. The movie is based on the story masterfully told by Ann McElhinney and Phelim McAleer in their bestselling book, “Gosnell: The Untold Story of America’s Most Prolific Serial Killer.” The crime drama tells the true story of Gosnell, who was sentenced to life in prison in 2013 for the murder of three babies born alive.

    Their mothers should also be in prison, as should those that aided and abetted theIr murder.

  238. Bosco Baracas

    Oh c#$p

    I will try again.

    Hello All

    Looking for a good read on the economy behind Hi#@&tler&’s war machine. Was recommended the “Wages of destruction” by Adam Tooze. Figured that since is an economics blog I would get some good advice here. Any suggestions?

  239. Bushkid

    No Mark, I’m not trying to change the system (of voting). That is now pretty-much impossible. I’m trying to get people out of the habit of thinking in terms of Liberal and Labor. It’s not a choice between Liberal and Labor anymore. These days it’s a choice between “them” and “us”, and has been for quite a while.

    I’m only just catching up on the thread, having been out for the arvo.

    Actually MV, I think most Cats here are well aware of the need and have the intention to ensure their votes cannot flow, as much as is possible within the limits of candidates offered to them in their own electorates, to either of the uni-party options. It’s easier int he Senate than the Reps, as there are many more to choose from, and it’s easier to exhaust your 12 (or whatever it’s going to be this time) choices without having to go anywhere near Lab/Lib/NP/greens at all.

    We are, by and large, smart enough to work out how to avoid endorsing the uni-party nongs.

  240. Death Giraffe

    The usual libertarian muppets suggesting you waste your vote.
    Ignore them.
    Vote for whoever you think is the candidate mostsome represents your views.
    Might not achieve what you want immediately this cycle.
    But at least you aren’t helping some libertarian unicoorn fucking fruit case get the bslance of power.
    Euthanasia.
    Compulsory sodomy.
    Don’t give these pipe- smoking weirdos and unearned leg up. Make them work for those open borders and rectums.

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