Wednesday Forum: October 31, 2018

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2,052 Responses to Wednesday Forum: October 31, 2018

  1. Baldrick

    Paging Stupid.Fucking.Liberal Marise Payne …

    Ambassador Danon ✔ @dannydanon (Israel’s UN representative)
    Today, We stood alongside the US and @nikkihaley when the UNGA convened to vote on Cuba’s resolution to condemn the US embargo. #Israel was the only country to stand with the US in voting against the Cuba’s attack on the Americans. Together, we fight for a safer and better world

    The motion was carried 189 votes to 2.

  2. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Plenty of people here draw attention to their own religious beliefs (or the lack of them) or their ethnicities and that of their significant others – Stimpy does both. I don’t see Cassie and Elle as any different in that regard. Let’s be fair about this, and take no notice of Rae going on above.

    Come back, Stimps. Little kerfuffles do not a whole blog make.

  3. Tintarella di Luna

    Alan Kohler ✔ @AlanKohler
    The best leader we’ve had in 12 years, by far, was Julia Gillard.

    Al probably got the look from the conniving femme fatale. Gillard could make all leftie men weak at the knees just be giving them the look.

    Yes Basilisks tend to do that

  4. she pongs of a hundred cats

    Probably the best comeback line against any feminist tirade. I’m going to use the following curse: May you pong of a thousand cats. If you were Confucian, it would read: May you live among feminists.

  5. RobK

    No one does interpretative dance like Stimpy.

  6. Are you still making appointments Dr. Stimpy?

    I’m in need of a consultation.

  7. OldOzzie

    Leninist logic says China must be checked, and soon – Henry Ergas Columnist


    As Bill Shorten noted in his address to the Lowy Institute on Monday, China is likely to remain Australia’s largest trading partner “for the foreseeable future”. However, that doesn’t mean our interests are necessarily aligned.

    Australia is best served by an open, rules-based, international order that provides opportunities not only for China but also for other emerging economies to prosper, including India and our neighbours in Southeast Asia.

    However, China’s economic policies, and the reaction from the US that they have predictably provoked, pose the greatest threat the open trading system has faced in decades.

    Those policies are inextricably linked to the recentralisation that has occurred under “paramount” or “core” leader Xi Jinping, whose goal is to entrench the Chinese Communist Party’s grip on power.

    Accompanying the CCP’s tightening grip is the reassertion of the party’s control over significant parts of the economy, and especially over its technologically most advanced sectors.

    As well as increasing the resources the party can command, the leadership’s aim is to strengthen China’s defence industry base, thereby ensuring the country has the capabilities needed to realise its regional ambitions, not least with respect to Taiwan, and to flex its muscles on the world stage.

    To achieve that objective, the Chinese government has ramped up its role in and influence on high-technology firms, provided those firms with preferential credit and facilitated their access to the latest technologies.

    While the Chinese government has used some conventional instruments to those ends, such as R&D subsidies, it has also resorted to industrial espionage and to coercion; for instance, by forcing foreign firms to disclose trade ­secrets if they are to avoid prosecution for alleged offences.

    Even putting aside the question of whether those measures are consistent with China’s international obligations, whatever China gains from the transfers is offset by losses to the investors whose assets are being expropriated, undermining the incentives for innovation and the prospects for global growth.

    With those losses falling largely on the US, it was never likely that China’s conduct would be tolerated indefinitely, all the more so once China had gone from being a fledgling participant in international trade to having a massive presence in world markets. The intensifying strategic rivalry between the US and China merely heightens those tensions, increasing the probability of a brutal confrontation.

    There is, however, little prospect of China backing down. The Chinese leadership’s choices are not driven by the capricious preferences of an autocrat; rather, they reflect the underlying logic of a Leninist state.

    Xi relentlessly emphasises the importance of Leninist doctrine and the need for cadres to follow what he refers to as the “correct line”, using the term Stalin adopted at the 16th Congress of the Soviet party in 1930 and which was then popularised by Mao Zedong. That he is closely familiar with Lenin’s writings and a committed Leninist is beyond doubt.

    Two points Lenin stressed are particularly important. The first is the “primacy of politics”, which means that protecting the party’s supremacy overrides all other objectives. The second is that while the “dictatorship of the proletariat” can accommodate different ways of structuring the economy, there are inherent tensions between “allowing capitalist relations to develop” and the party’s ability to perpetuate its rule.

    As the Chinese leadership well knows, those tensions came to the fore in the Soviet Union during the so-called New Economic Policy, which was launched by Lenin in 1921 and ended by Stalin in 1928.

    The NEP, which allowed market forces to operate in the countryside, in services and in light manufacturing, played a crucial role in resurrecting the Soviet economy, which had collapsed during the civil war of 1917-21.

    Recovery under the NEP was surprisingly rapid. Despite setbacks, the agrarian economy returned to pre-war levels of output by the middle of the 1920s, when peasant incomes attained levels only reached again in the 1960s. Industrial production also grew strongly, surpassing pre-war ­levels by 1926-27.

    But precisely because it encouraged entrepreneurial activity, the NEP facilitated the emergence of new social forces, undermining the party’s monopoly on power. Additionally, in a state unconstrained by the rule of law, corruption flourished, as entrepreneurs sought favours and bought off rapacious officials, further eroding the party’s control.

    Coming on top of a war scare in 1927 and the belief that the “imperialist powers” were preparing to attack the Soviet regime, that weakening in the party’s authority precipitated Stalin’s “swerve to the left” in 1927-28.

    The state’s dominance over the economy was re-established, while the social forces the state did not fully control were intimidated and ultimately crushed, as were the ethnic groups that resisted the return to extreme centralism.

    To say that is not to imply that Xi is another Stalin: if anything, the closer similarity is to Brezhnev. Nor would anyone suggest that Xi’s policies simply replicate, in a Chinese context, the sequence that played itself out in the Soviet Union.

    For example, with Maoism having destroyed the traditional property-owning classes, the CCP has been willing and able to accommodate the rise of a new, relatively pliant bourgeoisie to an extent the Bolsheviks, who always feared the restoration of the ancien regime, could never have ­imagined.

    But the CCP has not escaped the dynamics of Leninist regimes, which lead it to impede, distort and suppress market forces so as to ensure the party’s absolute primacy. Moreover, in China’s case, the pressures in that direction are reinforced by resurgent nationalism, which (in one of the world’s most unequal economies) has replaced the communist utopia of radical egalitarianism as the CCP’s motivating myth and historic mission.

    The result is a combination of mercantilism at home with belligerence abroad that is starkly at odds with an open, rules-based international order. Coexistence might have been feasible when China was an insignificant player; now that China is the world’s second or third largest economy, it is increasingly difficult to envisage.

    If an enormously harmful clash is to be avoided, China’s leaders need to understand that they cannot persist in their present course. Australia should therefore endorse the US administration’s demands for far-reaching economic reform and for China to desist from its bellicose international posture, including its encroachments on the freedom of navigation and its accelerated accumulation of nuclear weapons.

    Those demands will be credible only if they are backed by the threat of force; and we must prepare for the possibility that they will fail. To that extent, there can be no question that China is, and must be considered as, a potential strategic threat. To do otherwise would be an abdication of responsibility.

    Henry Ergas will be speaking at the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation in Sydney on Tuesday, November 27.

  8. Gab

    There was many a time on the Cat that Stimson was the sanest.

  9. Baldrick

    Little kerfuffles do not a whole blog make.

    Wrongfully branding someone an anti-Semite is hardly a ‘little kerfuffle’.

  10. OldOzzie

    Don’t let Andrews government get away with lowest of lows – Peta Credlin

    There’s something rotten in modern politics and Victoria is the ­canary in the coalmine. If left unchallen­ged, the contagion could spread far beyond the Murray into other parliaments and, god forbid, Canberra too, which hardly needs more challenges to its integrity, or its stability.

    Once the great manufacturing powerhouse of this country, the state replete with affordable and reliable power thanks to its resource­ blessings and the ingenuity of much-loved wartime son John Monash, Victoria has always punched well above its weight compared with its geographically larger neighbours.

    The Bolte years were legendary; the Kennett years dug, built and opened up; and the Bracks-Brumby era kept this infrastructure legacy rolling on; until they lost office and Spring Street started churning through its premiers with the same alacrity as our nation­al parliament.

    While the incumbent, Labor’s Daniel Andrews, has spent $1 billion not to build (that’s right, to cancel) the East West Link motorway, and taxed the Hazelwood coal-fired power station into closure (thus doubling wholesale power prices and putting at risk thousand­s of industrial jobs), it’s not his discontinuation of his predecesso­rs’ pro-infrastructure legacy that demonstrates how unfit he is to remain Premier.

    It is his lack of respect for probity that should condemn him to the political scrapheap.

    I don’t say this lightly; after all, I had a front-row seat to the Craig Thomson fiasco, and its encore saga with Peter Slipper, during the Gillard government years. But even at its grubby worst, backroom Canberra has nothing on what’s happening in Victoria today.

    At the previous election, $400,000 in taxpayer money was siphoned off and spent on “red shirts” campaign staff, rather than the electorate support staff it was supposed to fund. The scheme was dreamed up by a former state ministe­r and involved staff assigne­d to several serving cabinet ministers. There are claims that the Premier knew and approved, which he denies.

    When the rort was first uncovere­d, the government spent almost $1 million trying to block an Ombudsman’s report all the way to the High Court. With a full police investigation now under way, senior ministers, including Victoria’s chief law officer, the Attorne­y-General, are refusing to co-operate, demonstrating with brutal clarity that probity means nothing to Labor.

    I’ve been in and around politics for almost 20 years and I’ve never seen anything like government ministers refusing to co-operate with a police probe and — if the polls are to be believed — seemingly getting away with it.

    It’s about as crook as it gets when government ministers show the complete disregard for the law that would land an ordinary citizen in serious trouble. It begs the question, doesn’t it — if there’s nothing to see here, what’s their concern with co-operating?

    In recent memory, we’ve seen federal politicians lose their job over a $5000 helicopter ride that might’ve passed the opaque rules but failed the pub test.

    But if the Victorian government isn’t punished electorally, the rorters will win and a new, even lower, standard will be set: ministers who rip off the system might lose their jobs, but governments that rip off the system win election­s.

    Almost daily, in media conferences and interviews, Victoria’s Premier justifies ministers who are refusing to co-operate with an ­official police investigation into the “red shirts” rort. It’s unprecedented and — if he gets away with it — our democracy is in trouble because this lack of shame from the government, and the relative lack of outrage from the public, shows how far the standards in public life have slipped.

    Under this cloud, Labor should not even be competitive, let alone odds-on favourite to win. I appreci­ate that Opposition Leader Matthew Guy isn’t flashy; he’s not a big personality, and many voters still couldn’t pick him out in a line-up. But he’s honest, and decent, and would sack his ministers — not defend them — if they failed to co-operate with police.

    Elections are a choice, and more and more voters look for what’s in it for them. Isn’t it time to look for what’s in it for all us; for our system of government; and for decency in public life? Victorian voters now have a chance to stop the rot in politics. So Victorians should not waste their vote, or use it to exonerate this lowest of lows.

    Peta Credlin was chief to staff to Tony Abbott during his prime ministership

  11. hzhousewife

    THOUSANDS of Google employees from around the world have poured out of buildings to protest the tech giant’s poor handling of sexual harassment, claiming the company doesn’t value their safety.

    I don’t get this. Aren’t they, themselves, the company? Are they forced to sexually harrass each other by management, or, when they are promoted to management, are they expected to begin harrassing? People are very weird.

  12. THOUSANDS of Google employees from around the world have poured out of buildings to protest the tech giant’s poor handling of sexual harassment, claiming the company doesn’t value their safety.

    The pong of cats was strong that day, my friend.

  13. Nob

    I wonder what would happen to a Google employee who decided to stay at their desk instead of walking out to protest about … Google employees.

  14. feelthebern

    For NFL fans, today the 1-6 Raiders are up against the 1-7 49ers.
    Just terrible.

  15. Cassie of Sydney

    “Rae
    #2854849, posted on November 2, 2018 at 9:05 am
    As far back as May this year Stimp the Gimp was complaining, in his own inimitable fashion, about Elle constantly drawing attention to her Joo-ishness, the Holocaust and Anti-Semitism.

    I don’t know how much truth there is in the statements and claims of Elle, and Cassie with whom she tag-teams, but it seems that Stimp finally decided that it was not worth staying if he could not even discuss them without being harangued as an alleged Anti-Semite.”

    So Elle and I “tag-team”? Curious, in what way? Because we’re both J*wish? I’ve never met Elle. I know Lizzie personally. I do find a small sense of “camaraderie” with other women on this blog because we are a minority here. Oh and I never ever “harangued” Stimpy as an “anti-Semite”. I recall I did call him out about one or two things however I never sought to censor him…..that is up to the wise Sinclair Davidson and I certainly have never complained to Sinclair. I don’t believe in censorship .

    If Stimpy can’t stand the heat in the kitchen then that’s his problem.

  16. mh

    Google want employees to bring their “whole selves” to work.

    Maybe the men are just taking this very literally.

  17. DrBeauGan

    THOUSANDS of Google employees from around the world have poured out of buildings to protest the tech giant’s poor handling of sexual harassment, claiming the company doesn’t value their safety.

    The pong of cats was strong that day, my friend.

    Andy Rubin is charged with, inter alia asking for a blow job. Why couldn’t she have just said no? Or slapped his face?

  18. Rae

    So Elle and I “tag-team”?

    Sure you do, Hun.

    Because we’re both J*wish?

    You claim to be. But then, some people claim to be Cherokee. Whether or not either of you is Joo-ish and can rightly claim any associated victim status has not been tested here.

    I’ve never met Elle.

    So you say.

    I know Lizzie personally.

    Commisserations.

    I don’t believe in censorship .

    Sure, Hun. The other one has bells on it.

  19. H B Bear

    Graeoogs getting his creep on.

  20. OldOzzie

    And the 54 Wet Lettuce Labor-Lite Liberals out this Back Stabbing White Anting Cretin in Power as PM

    Legacy war: Turnbull threat to haunt Morrison

    Simon Benson National Affairs Editor – Primrose Riordan Political Reporter

    Malcolm Turnbull has ignited a new legacy war within the ­Coalition, putting Scott Morrison on notice that he will publicly defen­d his record, in a thinly veiled warning that has infuriated the new Prime Minister.

    Simmering tensions between the ousted prime minister and his successor escalated into a pitched public exchange yesterday, prompting Mr Turnbull to tell colleag­ues that he would not ­tolerate a rewriting of history.

    The Australian understands that when friends and former colleag­ues contacted Mr Turnbull this week to urge him to step into the shadows, the former prime minister was defiant, saying he would defend his legacy and ­“correct the record” when needed.

    The latest outbreak in hostilities came after Mr Morrison, in a radio interview, accused Mr Turnbull of going beyond his brief in discussing trade and Jerusalem with the Indonesians during his trip as an envoy to Bali this week.

    Mr Turnbull responded quickly with a tweet: “A few facts. Scott Morrison asked me to discuss trade and the embassy issue in Bali and we had a call before I left to confirm his messages which I duly relayed to (Indonesian President Joko Widodo),” he tweeted. “There was a detailed paper on the issue in my official brief as well.”

    In an attempt to de-escalate the conflict, Mr Morrison was forced to issue a statement, conceding that Mr Turnbull was correct and had been briefed on the two issues.

    The confrontation threatens to undermine attempts by Mr ­Morrison to present an image of a ­unified party and establish a fresh narrative for his government without inciting Mr Turnbull. Sources close to Mr Turnbull claim he is convinced that Mr Morrison, his former treasurer, had been working against him in the final week of his leadership.

    A senior minister warned last night that he doubted whether Mr Turnbull would heed the advice of colleagues.

    “Scott is trying to stay out of it; Malcolm can’t help himself, it’s as simple as that,” the minister said. “The former PM wants to keep talking about himself … it’s human nature. Kevin Rudd never stops talking about himself, Tony Abbot­t never stops talking about himself … I think Scott has ­handled it very well.”

    Mr Morrison is said to be “filthy” with his predecessor, claiming he believed he had tried to treat him with respect.

    Defence Minister Christopher Pyne today dismissed the brawl as “not an issue” and insisted Mr Turnbull had represented the government “very well” in Bali.

    Mr Pyne said Mr Morrison would not be distracted by the row.

    “Malcolm went to Bali for the oceans conference. I’m sure he represented us there very well,” Mr Pyne told the Nine Network’s Today program.

    The latest Liberal Party hostilities ignited over the decision by Mr Morrison to send Mr Turnbull to the oceans conference in Bali to represent Australia. The trip included a meeting with Mr Joko.

    At a news conference in Bali, Mr Turnbull warned Mr Morrison that moving Australia’s Israel embass­y to Jerusalem would hurt relations with Indonesia. “There is no question, were that move to occur, it would be met with a very negative reaction in Indonesia,” Mr Turnbull said at the time. “This is, after all, the largest Muslim-­majority country in the world.”

    The comments were seen as overtly political and a slap in the face for Mr Morrison, who had sent Mr Turnbull on the mission against the advice of senior Liberals that he could not be trusted to toe the government line.

    Mr Morrison reacted by hitting back at Indonesia, declaring Aust­ralia would not be dictated to on foreign policy by another country.

    Asked yesterday whether Mr Turnbull would be sent on more diplomatic missions, the Prime Minister said: “No … He was there to actually attend an oceans conferenc­e. The issues of trade and other things were not really part of the brief.”

    But he issued a statement after Mr Turnbull’s tweet, saying: “As head of delegation, he was briefed on appropriate responses on other issues that could be raised in any direct discussions with the President, in his role as head of dele­gation. Accordingly, there were briefings dealing with the issues he has referred to.”

    Mr Pyne said today: “I was in Singapore just a week before. I met with 17 different defence ministers from our region. Not one of them raised the issue about the Jerusalem embassy.”

    Mr Pyne also said the idea of moving the Israeli embassy in west Jerusalem was “perfectly even-handed” and that it would not be an issue once a Palestinian state is created.

    “But quite frankly, we’re considering whether we should put our embassy in west Jerusalem, in Israel, the only country in the world where our embassy is not in the capital and it’s perfectly even handed.

    “If there is a Palestinian state, and we support a two state solution, we will have an embassy in east Jerusalem for the Palestinian state. So it is not an issue here.”

    Victorian Liberal Party president Michael Kroger, whose state branch is fighting a state election amid the federal distractions, urged Mr Morrison and Mr Turnbull to present a unified front for the sake of the party.

    “They have had a minor disagreement over something but long term they have had a very close relationship and I am sure that will continue,” he said.

    Mr Morrison declined to discuss the row with Mr Turnbull when he faced reporters in Sydney today.

    “I dealt with all those issues yesterday,” he said.

    Senior Liberal MPs said Mr Morrison had made a serious mistak­e in sending Mr Turnbull to the conference.

    “Scott is just as much at fault as Malcolm, he is not an innocent guy taking it on the chin. He has tried to be clever,” one senior Libera­l figure said.

    Another MP was less forgiving. “He (Turnbull) has decided to bite the hand of the last man standing, who was trying to protected a now discredited legacy,” the MP said.

    Senior Liberals said a public showdown between the two was inevitable following the leadership spill and Mr Morrison’s continued insistence that he had wanted Mr Turnbull to remain in the job and had not sought it himself until he realised that Mr Turnbull’s leadership was terminal.

    The former prime minister is believed to have told close colleague­s that he would not tolerate “lies” and had put up with what he believed were deliberate and negative background briefings against him to the media.

    Mr Morrison’s camp, however, claim that it had been Mr Turnbull who was agitating behind the scenes to undermine Mr Morrison’s leadership.

    Mr Morrison said last week that Mr Turnbull should follow the example of other former prime ministers, by refraining from offering political commentary.

    “I’m always going to act with respect to former prime ministers, regardless of who they are. I do think the exemplar of former prime ministers about how they go about things outside of politics is John Howard. And on the Labor side, it is Julia Gillard.”

    Tensions between Mr Turnbull and Mr Morrison first arose when Mr Turnbull tweeted from New York in the days following the Augus­t 24 spill that Mr Morrison should refer Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton to the High Court over his eligibility to sit in parliament under section 44 of the Constitution. The advice was ignored.

    Tensions were further inflamed during the Wentworth by-election, when Mr Turnbull refused to publicly urge a vote for Liberal candidate Dave Sharma, who was soundly beaten in the election by Kerryn Phelps.

    Mr Turnbull will make his first media appearance since he was ousted by Liberal MPs on the ABC’s Q&A next Thursday.

  21. calli

    You guys worry too much. Stimpy’s doing fine.

    He’ll be back as soon as he’s done the chicken dance.

    My view – free speech has to be free. Even if it offends, hurts, humiliates, challenges or injures.

    Of course, no one here would deliberately hurt another commenter. It isn’t that type of blog. ⚔️

  22. Tel

    Your word for today (if you choose to accept it) is Problematization

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Problematization

    It is a method of defamiliarization of common sense.

    The thing we need right now!

  23. Cassie of Sydney

    “Rae
    #2854882, posted on November 2, 2018 at 9:58 am
    So Elle and I “tag-team”?

    Sure you do, Hun.

    Because we’re both J*wish?

    You claim to be. But then, some people claim to be Cherokee. Whether or not either of you is Joo-ish and can rightly claim any associated victim status has not been tested here.

    I’ve never met Elle.

    So you say.

    I know Lizzie personally.

    Commisserations.

    I don’t believe in censorship .

    Sure, Hun. The other one has bells on it.”

    What an adolescent. You can fuck off and whilst you’re at it…learn to spell.

  24. OldOzzie

    Sorry meant

    And the 54 Wet Lettuce Labor-Lite Liberals put this Back Stabbing White Anting Cretin in Power as PM

    PS could refer to SloMo as well as the Remnants of the 54 Wet Lettuce Leaf Labor-Lite Liberals put him in power too and what a Crock he is turning out to be

  25. Cassie of Sydney

    ““Rae
    #2854882, posted on November 2, 2018 at 9:58 am
    So Elle and I “tag-team”?

    Sure you do, Hun.

    Because we’re both J*wish?

    You claim to be. But then, some people claim to be Cherokee. Whether or not either of you is Joo-ish and can rightly claim any associated victim status has not been tested here.

    I’ve never met Elle.

    So you say.

    I know Lizzie personally.

    Commisserations.

    I don’t believe in censorship .

    Sure, Hun. The other one has bells on it.”

    Resident creep. You can f*ck off and whilst you’re at it…learn to spell.

  26. OldOzzie

    For Cat Petrol Heads – Ouch Expensive

    WSJ – Subaru and Toyota to Recall More Than 400,000 Vehicles Globally

    Toyota said its vehicles account for around 80,000 of the total, including some 25,000 Scion FR-S sports cars sold in the U.S.

    TOKYO— Subaru Corp. FUJHY -0.19% is picking up a hefty tab to recall over 400,000 vehicles globally to repair a faulty engine part that could cause stalling.

    The recall affects its popular Forester sport-utility vehicle and Impreza compact, as well as the BRZ sports car. It also affects the Subaru-made Toyota 86 sports car, which was sold in the U.S. as the Scion FR-S during the period covered by the recall. All the cars were made in 2012 and 2013.

    Last week, Subaru cut expectations for April-September, the first half of the Japanese financial year. The company now expects an operating profit of ¥61 billion ($540 million), a reduction of ¥49 billion from its prior projection, mostly to cover recall-related costs. The company said it would outline the impact of the recall for the full year when it announces second-quarter earnings Monday.

    Subaru said valve springs in the recalled cars could fracture and cause the engine to stall, risking an accident. These springs keep engine valves closed when the fuel is being combusted. Failure can cause severe engine damage.

    The repairs are likely to be costly. Subaru believes the work will take more than 12 hours.

    Toyota said its vehicles account for around 80,000 of the total. In the U.S., Toyota is recalling around 25,000 Scion FR-S models manufactured between March 2012 and July 2013. The company said it would contact affected U.S. owners by mail starting in December.

    The recalled Subaru vehicles were made between January 2012 and September 2013. Subaru said 101,000 of the recalled vehicles were sold in Japan. A company spokesman declined to say how many were being recalled in the U.S. Subaru sold nearly 270,000 of the three affected models in the U.S. during the period covered by the recall.

    Last week’s earnings disclosure, made after markets had closed in Japan, caught investors by surprise. The next day Subaru’s share price dropped nearly 7%.

    On the day of the announcement, Tokyo-based auto analyst Takaki Nakanishi criticized Subaru for the lack of detail, saying in a client note that it “raises questions about the quality of its investor relations.” At the time he wrote that he anticipated a recall of between 1 million and 2 million vehicles, a number echoed in some Japanese press reports.

    A Subaru spokesman said it had been unable to provide more detail in its initial disclosure because it hadn’t yet made the required filings with regulators.

  27. DrBeauGan

    One of the benefits of free speech is that it tends to produce morally tough people. Conversely, rules protecting feelings produce creepy people who obsess about their feelings and never grow up.

  28. Stimpson J. Cat

    Elle
    #2854433, posted on November 1, 2018 at 8:13 pm
    Oh Stimpy. I really liked you until you started ranting. Areff called you on it. I know you don’t hate Cassie and I, and others, because we’re J*wish. You challenge the fact the Holocaust happened. You have a right to do that. Obviously, this is not the forum to do it though. As a suggestion, you could start up an anti-Semitic blog so you can chat with like-minded peeps.

    Elle
    #2854495, posted on November 1, 2018 at 9:20 pm
    Snoopy, the ever loyal “fan” of Stimpy.
    I posted about my family members who perished in the Holocaust. He said “prove it”.
    There have been many “prove it” comments by him … and similar type comments by Helen.
    Selective pursuing by some.

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2854877, posted on November 2, 2018 at 9:47 am
    “Rae
    #2854849, posted on November 2, 2018 at 9:05 am
    As far back as May this year Stimp the Gimp was complaining, in his own inimitable fashion, about Elle constantly drawing attention to her Joo-ishness, the Holocaust and Anti-Semitism.
    I don’t know how much truth there is in the statements and claims of Elle, and Cassie with whom she tag-teams, but it seems that Stimp finally decided that it was not worth staying if he could not even discuss them without being harangued as an alleged Anti-Semite.”

    So Elle and I “tag-team”? Curious, in what way? Because we’re both J*wish? I’ve never met Elle. I know Lizzie personally. I do find a small sense of “camaraderie” with other women on this blog because we are a minority here. Oh and I never ever “harangued” Stimpy as an “anti-Semite”. I recall I did call him out about one or two things however I never sought to censor him…..that is up to the wise Sinclair Davidson and I certainly have never complained to Sinclair. I don’t believe in censorship .

    If Stimpy can’t stand the heat in the kitchen then that’s his problem.

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781421, posted on August 5, 2018 at 5:03 pm
    Most of my maternal grandparent’s family perished in Auschwitz. What are you saying, Stimpson?

    What do think I should say Elle?
    Should disputing historical events be a crime,
    yes or no?

    Elle
    #2781430, posted on August 5, 2018 at 5:18 pm
    Stimpson, the denial of the systematic genocidal killing of millions of J$ws is illegal in many European countries and including Isr$el. Free speech when it’s free, but not where there are laws in place. You’re a staunch Libertarian. I respect that. I don’t respect your support of a Holocaust denier.

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781450, posted on August 5, 2018 at 5:39 pm
    I don’t respect your support of a Holocaust denier.

    So I’m a Holocaust Denier Supporter but not a Nazi?
    Thank f$ck.
    I was worried for a second there.

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781485, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:06 pm
    Cassie
    Hmmm, so you’re selectively sensitive. However you’re insensitive about historical facts and the deaths of millions to post a link about an unapologetic Nazi grandmother who sprouts Holocaust denial. Is that your idea of humour Stimpy? If so, it’s adolescent.
    And now you’re crying victim. Pathetic.

    I knew I should have left a smiley face at the end.
    I had nothing to do with the Holocaust in any way, shape, or form, and have nothing to apologize for.
    I’m sorry that millions of people died.

    I am sorry you don’t find my humor funny.
    I’m sorry I believe you should be able to question historical events.
    Was there anything else you would like me to apologize for while I am here?

    Elle
    #2781491, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:14 pm
    Stimpy, loves ya. Just gotta say, that having lost most of my family on my mum’s side in the Holocaust, and having heard my grandmother’s nightmares when I was a child, I have a view based on reality. The emotional stuff aside, my family have paperwork as evidence of what occurred.

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781498, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:22 pm
    Stimpy, loves ya. Just gotta say, that having lost most of my family on my mum’s side in the Holocaust, and having heard my grandmother’s nightmares when I was a child, I have a view based on reality. The emotional stuff aside, my family have paperwork as evidence of what occurred.

    I have no reason whatsoever to doubt you in any way Elle, nor would I.

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2781495, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:21 pm
    “Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781485, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:06 pm
    Hmmm, so you’re selectively sensitive. However you’re insensitive about historical facts and the deaths of millions to post a link about an unapologetic Nazi grandmother who sprouts Holocaust denial. Is that your idea of humour Stimpy? If so, it’s adolescent.

    And now you’re crying victim. Pathetic.

    I knew I should have left a smiley face at the end.
    I had nothing to do with the Holocaust in any way, shape, or form, and have nothing to apologize for.
    I’m sorry that millions of people died.
    I am sorry you don’t find my humor funny.
    I’m sorry I believe you should be able to question historical events.
    Was there anything else you would like me to apologize for while I am here?”

    No, I don’t find anything funny about linking to a Nazi grandmother who is an unapologetic Holocaust denier. What’s was the point of that….trying to make her out to be some kind of martyr? Pathetic.

    Oh and by the way, being J*wish, I know a lot about humour. Humour, along with chicken soup, is our penicillin. Even in the extermination camps, people consoled themselves with humour….it’s all they had. I’m sure Elle can vouch for me on that.

    Shalom to you too Elle.

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2781510, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:31 pm
    “Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781509, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:29 pm
    I don’t think it’s a good idea to have a law banning some loonies from expressing their opinions but not others.

    Agreed.
    Some of us Loonies could get caught up with the other Loonies and people would think we were exactly the same as those Loonies even though we were just normal Loonies.”

    Stimpy, you’ve made me laugh.

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2781518, posted on August 5, 2018 at 6:35 pm
    Stimpy, you’ve made me laugh.

    Of course.
    You are J$wish and know a lot about humour Cassie.

    😁

    Elle
    #2781706, posted on August 5, 2018 at 9:41 pm
    Dr BeauGan
    Elle, when I was a child I saw film of the liberation of Belsen by the Americans. I can still see the shuffling human skeletons greeting their liberators, and the death pits full of bodies. I don’t need to be told that the holocaust was real and utterly vile. I saw it for myself, courtesy of the seppos. I can understand the emotions you feel at the horrors, I share them. But I don’t permit that to determine my views on the importance of freedom.

    You saw a film? Wow!

    You aren’t a J$w. Don’t pretend to understand what my family suffered.
    You are not a friend of Isr$el.
    Free speech? If you were an advocate, you would not encourage anti-Semitism.


    (And there it is.
    In black and white.
    Women Can Be…….
    Unreliable In Their Recollection Of Events.
    It’s Why The Men Are In Charge.
    Especially on Catallaxy.
    Be excellent to each other and good luck you sane kids.
    You sane people are f$cking exhausting.
    Bye. )

  29. Armadillo:
    You don’t have to stalk me, I’m in Barcaldine.
    Yew Street.
    Number 14 to be precise.
    Do you want the grid co ordinates?
    Don’t worry about the “Achtung Minen” sign at the gates – it’s just to keep the roos away.
    Bring beer. Or alcohol of any kind – even the rubbing liniment that ZK2A rubs into his tongue.
    MarkA:

    Also, WS (no spit) sorry about the quip “paint watcher” it was meant to be a compliment.

    That’s fine, the paint watching was a very interesting puzzle to sort out. The bonus made it worthwhile.

  30. mh

    Stimpy, you were there all the time!

    We missed you.

  31. OldOzzie

    Liberal MP Chris Crewther faces High Court referral over Section 44

    Richard Ferguson
    Reporter

    Scott Morrison says he has “no concerns” over losing one of his MPs over constitutional eligibility and facing a by-election in one of Australia’s most marginal seats.

    Chris Crewther, the Victorian federal MP for Dunkley -the Liberals’ second most marignal seat – spoke to the Prime Minister this morning. He is at risk of falling foul of Section 44 of the Constitution because he reportedly invested in a company which received a government grant.

    The government would face an uphill battle to keep Mr Crewther’s seat. It shifted from a 1.3 Liberal margin to a notional 1.3 per margin for Labor after the 2017-16 federal seat redistribution.

    “No I’m not concerned by that. Look, these stories come and they go and I think the Australian people are completely all over it,” Mr Morrison told reporters in Sydney today.

    “I have no concerns on the matter.”

    Mr Crewther’s investment puts him at risk of contravening the ban on MPs having a direct or indirect pecuniary interest in any agreement with the public service of the Commonwealth.

    The MP said he was did not know it could possibly come into conflict with the Constitution.

    “I thought I would support the local economy,” Mr Crewther told The Herald Sun.

    Mr Crewther is reportedly one of 14 shareholders of Gretals Australia. MPs can only have direct or indirect pecuniary interests if they have them through “an incorporated company consisting of more than 25 persons”.

    He told the Herald Sun he was also unaware of how many shareholders the company had.

    After losing the Wentworth by-election to independent Kerryn Phelps, the Prime Minister does not have a majority in the House of Representatives and does not have the numbers to block any referral of Mr Crewther to the High Court if the crossbench sided with Labor.

    Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton is also at threat of being referred to the High Court by Labor and the crossbench because of an investment in childcare centres.

    Mr Crewther did know Gretals Australia had received a $50,000 government grant. He congratulated the company in the House of Representatives on October 23 last year.

    “I met with the CEO of Gretals, Alistair Cumming, to discuss how they will benefit from the $50,000 grant they recently received under the government’s Global Connections Fund,” he told the House.

    “I congratulate Gretals Australia on their work and on the receipt of their grant. I look forward to their continued success and advances.”

    The Australian has contacted Mr Crewther for comment.

  32. calli

    Thanks, Stacks. I owe my very enjoyable motoring experience to Ike.

    Why, oh why didn’t I have my photo taken with him at Rapid City? I recognised his bronze statue from almost a block away.

    The roads here really are a wonder. And being Aussies, driving long distances is a doddle.

  33. Senile Old Guy

    Simmering tensions between the ousted prime minister and his successor escalated into a pitched public exchange yesterday, prompting Mr Turnbull to tell colleag­ues that he would not ­tolerate a rewriting of history.

    Hahahahaha! Since I would prefer to vote conservative now, I should be saddened by this stupidity…but I find it hilarious! Turnbull’s only “history” is destroying the Liberal Party and enacting ALP policies. The man has never won anything. He was a dud as opposition leader and lost almost all of the seats won by Abbott. He fumbled about as PM, accomplishing nothing except a few ALP policies, lost too many polls to count, then was finally, mercifully dumped.

    The Australian understands that when friends and former colleag­ues contacted Mr Turnbull this week to urge him to step into the shadows, the former prime minister was defiant, saying he would defend his legacy and ­“correct the record” when needed.

    …in other words, he will continue to do what he did in the past and white ant the Liberal Party and continue to be the cancerous left wing growth that killed it and will lead to two terms for the useless and hopeless Shorten.

  34. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Wrongfully branding someone an anti-Semite is hardly a ‘little kerfuffle’.

    If it’s such a big deal he can come in and tell us he’s not. Just that. We’d believe him.
    Miscommunications on it so far have flown past each other. State your case, Stimps.
    Or he can just come in and be himself. Up to Stimpy. This thing has got out of control.
    Like some fucking leftie conference about what is and what isn’t sexual harassment.

    I support Elle and Cassie because I’ve recently been to two Joosh H museums and they are not pretty. If I was Joosh I might get a bit upset about it on a blog where I thought I was amongst friends. Cut them some slack as we do with others over their valid but slightly obsessive feelings about evil deeds.

  35. Mindfree

    Alan Kohler ✔ @AlanKohler
    The best leader we’ve had in 12 years, by far, was Julia Gillard.

    Alberscreechy learnt all her economics skills from Alan Kohler

  36. DrBeauGan

    (And there it is.
    In black and white.
    Women Can Be…….
    Unreliable In Their Recollection Of Events.
    It’s Why The Men Are In Charge.
    Especially on Catallaxy.
    Be excellent to each other and good luck you sane kids.
    You sane people are f$cking exhausting.
    Bye. )

    You’ve made your point, stimpmeister. Rather well. Now get your energy back and then return so those of us, most, who enjoy your sanity can continue to enjoy your posts.

  37. calli

    Lol. News from Abilene:

    Twenty new trash cans have been placed downtown! They even had a ribbon and scissors ceremony.

    I love this place.

  38. Don’t pretend to understand what my family suffered.

    Fsck orf.

    Bataan, Changi, Burma and countless mass (planned) brutal atrocities throughout Asia compete well in the inhumanity stakes.

    Elle may well try to comprehend the suffering of other than her family.

  39. Stimpy’s grasp of the blockquote, bold and italics buttons is insane.

  40. Muddy

    Pre-order yours before it’s too late!

    Kerry O’Brien’s life has spanned the post-war era through the maelstrom of the nuclear and digital age. Whether strolling the corridors of the White House while waiting to interview Barack Obama, or talking with Nelson Mandela, or exploring ideas with some of the great artists, philosophers and scientists of our time, Kerry O’Brien has sought to unearth the truth behind the news.

    In this intimate account told with wit and insight, O’Brien reflects on the big events, the lessons learned and lessons ignored, along with the foibles and strengths of public figures who construct our world. The end result is a memoir like no other.

  41. OldOzzie

    Highway Traffic BACKED UP FOR MILES to See TRUMP in Columbia, Missouri (VIDEO)

    This video was taken three hours before the 6:30 rally tonight.
    The traffic on Highway 63 is backed up for miles!

    Traffic on SB 63 three hours ahead of President Trump’s rally at the Columbia Airport @Missourinet pic.twitter.com/SD5DLHKdot

    — Bill Pollock (@missourisports) November 1, 2018

  42. calli

    Women Can Be…….
    Unreliable In Their Recollection Of Events.

    I’m not. Memory like a steel trap. Doesn’t mean I have to comment but.

    Whoops… 😀

  43. Cassie of Sydney

    PM backs Aboriginal culture in science
    AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS
    8 MINUTES AGO NOVEMBER 2, 2018
    Science teachers should use every tool available to get children excited about the field, including Aboriginal culture, the prime minister says.

    Scott Morrison’s comments comes after Australia’s curriculum authority published 95 ways indigenous culture could be incorporated into lessons.

    “I am for whatever tool they need to help kids better understand science,” Mr Morrison told reporters in Sydney on Friday.

    SloMo really is an inept dunce.

  44. John Constantine

    Ten years, an entire lost decade for farming and mining coming up under shorten in Australia.

    Never recover, once the Tyrant of all the chicoms is pushed to source his raw materials from once remote central Asia.

    Thanks to ruddgillardruddturnbull and the one party State.

    The arrogance of the pale stale quisling elites to feel the chicoms have no options.

    Comrades.

  45. Woolfe

    But Cali did they have a welcome to country and a smoking ceremony (cash payment required).

  46. DrBeauGan

    Oh, and Stimpy, I don’t think you should accuse Elle and Cassie of being sane. They are women, after all, and we all know that for women, sanity is at best a part-time thing.

  47. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Ah. Caught on the page turn, me. I see Stimps has put the whole case out in black and white. A sensible decision. Better that ’twere done now, and then forgotten. This sort of track is how flaming got its name.

    Stimps is back to normal now though. As a representative of the Vag, it’s all my fault. I can see that now. 😀

    but slightly obsessive feelings about evil deeds

    Here I am referring to others on this blog, not Cassie and Elle. We get a lot of people with strong feelz about abortion, for instance. Very legitimate feelz, just as Cassie and Elle have very legitimate feelz, with an extra edge for them because in some countries and places they’d still be killed for just existing, just as some little babies are under current ‘civilised’ laws.

  48. Senile Old Guy

    The SMH has comments on the Rush case:

    Whatever happens in the Geoffrey Rush defamation case, there are two clear outcomes. The women I know are sad, sad and broken and angry, as they read Eryn Jean Norvill’s testimony. Why? Because they know and understand how she felt, feels.

    …in other words, it doesn’t matter what actually happened, women will be “sad, sad broken and angry”. These people seem very fragile and rather uninterested in actual events.

    And two, whatever happened, whatever the court decides, men across Australia – and some women – are now on notice. What was acceptable in 1970 is no longer acceptable.

    Notice the qualification: “men across Australia – and some women”. All men are “now on notice” but only “some women”. This is sexism at its worst.

    (Please do not trouble me with your #notallmen baloney.

    Please don’t bother me with facts or actual events: it is all about “feelz”.

    When you don’t intervene, you are as bad as the person offending.

    Notice my moniker: if I “intervened” against a 20 year old, I would, at the least, end up in hospital, if not a coffin. Circumstances matter…but not when it is about “feelz”. And, note, that events are rarely clear cut. And confusion is usual.

    Which may or may not be Geoffrey Rush

    I’ll bet the lawyers made her put that in…but who cares what actually happened? Rush is guilty…of something.

    but it is certainly other men in occupations and organisations everywhere).

    Again, most men are evil. And the SMH, and similar publications, wonder why no-one buys them.

    Last year, the Daily Telegraph published two stories and a poster alleging Rush behaved inappropriately towards Eryn Jean Norvill during the season of King Lear at the Sydney Theatre Company. Norvill, the actor who played Cordelia, allegedly made a complaint to the Sydney Theatre Company but did not wish for it to be brought to the attention of Rush and did not speak to the Telegraph for its story.

    Still no actual facts, only allegations. It is also notable that, among the people that Norvill did not contact, are the police.

    But to Eryn Jean Norvill, whatever happens after this case and even during, know that women are with you. We are sad with you. We are angry. Whatever the court says, whatever the evidence, we understand how you experienced those creepy feelings and we know it’s hard to measure what is real and what is not because, in most institutions, we have no-one to discuss it with.

    Yes, a newspaper actually published a piece saying “whatever the evidence” and “what is real and what is not”. In the real world, we make decisions based on what is real and not on what is imagined.

    And why are women’s stories always stolen from them, before they are ready to talk. That is one of the elements of this story which devastates me. Norvill didn’t want to go public, she just wanted to confide in someone.

    This is very much having it both ways: either Norvill is going to accuse Rush of doing something, or she is not. If she is not, then the case is over (and Rush gets paid the costs).

    That men are never held to the same standards of behaviour as women, especially in Australia where our defamation laws are designed to protect the powerful and rich, not the poor or vulnerable.

    No, the laws are designed to prevent people making frivolous accusations for the purposes of extortion.

    Now, there is some evidence in this case on which both sides more or less agree, for instance, Rush admitted he may have called Norvill “scrumptious” and “yummy” during rehearsals for King Lear. Under no circumstances is this appropriate behaviour from one worker to another.

    And this is why many men now refuse to have anything to do with women in professional situations. Any male can be accused of something and have their career ruined instantly.

    Jenna Price is an academic at the University of Technology Sydney and a Fairfax columnist.

    Because times have changed. I fear men haven’t.

    I have. I regard unknown women as hand grenades likely to detonate at any time. I feel sorry for men, and for the good women. But the left have ruined the world.

    Of course she is.

  49. mh

    I support Elle and Cassie because I’ve recently been to two Joosh H museums and they are not pretty.

    Wise words from Lizzie.

  50. vr

    Highway Traffic BACKED UP FOR MILES to See TRUMP in Columbia, Missouri (VIDEO)

    A caravan?

  51. Tel

    Ten years, an entire lost decade for farming and mining coming up under shorten in Australia.

    Never recover, once the Tyrant of all the chicoms is pushed to source his raw materials from once remote central Asia.

    The ALP don’t want to destroy farming and mining, they simply want to take over and own the means of production, wherever that might be. Farming and mining are profitable, so they see it as their job to seize control.

    This process might also destroy the goose being argued over, but these people honestly believe themselves to be better managers, better farmers than any farmer, better miners than any miner… after all, they have been to a coffee shop, in Melbourne, and you can’t get smarter than that.

  52. mh

    Thanks, old Ozzie. I hadn’t noticed that addition from Kates!

  53. Boambee John

    prompting Mr Turnbull to tell colleag­ues that he would not ­tolerate a rewriting of history.

    Except, of course, his own rewriting of the history of his deposing of Abbott?

  54. DrBeauGan

    Senile Old Guy
    #2854918, posted on November 2, 2018 at 10:35 am
    The SMH has comments on the Rush case:

    You’re late, SoG. It’s worth scrolling up to see what CL said on the topic.

  55. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    sanity is at best a part-time thing

    Pass me my oestrogen and I’ll be fine, Dr. BG. 🙂

    Oxytocin too is a fine hormone, released with female orgasm although not in the amounts produced by childbirth. It makes women recall they are double x, love cuddly little kittens and be kind to toddlers with snotty noses, and this, upon birthing a baby (written by a lady called Maureen Hawkins):

    Before you were conceived
    I wanted you.
    Before you were born
    I loved you.
    Before you were here an hour
    I would die for you.
    This is the miracle of life

    Oh, and it allows us to put up with hairy sweaty men snoring in bed next to us, and other males going off about us on blogs. Mentioning no names. 🙂

  56. JC

    Stimson
    I told you , you’d be back. Michael Corleone said so in the Godfather.

  57. Senile Old Guy

    Science teachers should use every tool available to get children excited about the field, including Aboriginal culture, the prime minister says. Scott Morrison’s comments comes after Australia’s curriculum authority published 95 ways indigenous culture could be incorporated into lessons.

    OMG! Can we have an election soon to get rid of this utterly useless government? Yes, two terms of Shorten will bankrupt the country and probably do appalling damage but after Turnbull and Morrison it will be worth it. How utterly vacuous! Western culture put men on the moon, sequenced the human genome and cured most diseases. Aboriginal culture gave us…a bent stick that sometimes come back, dot paintings and some very brutal practices.

  58. I am bespoke

    Stimp’s back

    Where’s Struth?

  59. calli

    Do I win because I have Jooish grandchildren, in whom my future is utterly invested?

    Seriously, the victim totem pole is being given a real workout here. Cut it out kids.

    If we can’t say what’s on our minds, the blog is dead. The censors win. If you don’t like it, scroll it. Or challenge it. Silencing it won’t change a thing.

  60. Senile Old Guy

    You’re late, SoG. It’s worth scrolling up to see what CL said on the topic.

    I’m always late! But, after the Stimpy affair, I’m scared to scroll up.

  61. Rae

    Don’t pretend to understand what my family suffered.

    I wonder if Grigory M has a view about the 40 million of his ancestral compatriots killed in WWI. Or the further 27 million killed in WWII.

  62. P

    The Wall Street Journal is reporting, and several media confirming, the likely nominee to replace U.N. Secretary Nikki Haley will be current State Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert.

  63. Old School Conservative

    Mr Turnbull will make his first media appearance since he was ousted by Liberal MPs on the ABC’s Q&A next Thursday

    Carpe! Carpe! Can I get in early and take zero for the interruptions?

  64. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Memory like a steel trap.

    Me too, Calli. Makes Hairy nervous sometimes. 🙂

  65. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    If you don’t like it, scroll it

    Spot on. As a scrollee, I am used to this. Scrollers rule. 🙂

  66. Boambee John

    And two, whatever happened, whatever the court decides, men across Australia – and some women – are now on notice. What was acceptable in 1970 is no longer acceptable.

    She is quite right, of course.

    The practice of allowing women out of their homes without a chaperone present at all times (preferably an aged aunt) must end. The 1970s liberation movement went too far!

  67. Tel

    Sometimes the memory comes out looking a bit mangled, hardly recognizable compared to what went in.

    Steel traps will do that.

  68. OldOzzie

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2854913, posted on November 2, 2018 at 10:28 am

    PM backs Aboriginal culture in science

    Science teachers should use every tool available to get children excited about the field, including Aboriginal culture, the prime minister says.

    Scott Morrison’s comments comes after Australia’s curriculum authority published 95 ways indigenous culture could be incorporated into lessons.

    “I am for whatever tool they need to help kids better understand science,” Mr Morrison told reporters in Sydney on Friday.

    SloMo really is an inept dunce.

    Kevin Donnelly: Adding Indigenous understanding to STEM a curriculum fail

    The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has announced schools are being asked to incorporate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scientific understanding in science, technology and mathematics subjects.

    In the same way indigenous history, culture and spirituality are now embedded in history, English and civics and citizenship classes, teachers will now be asked to include cross-curriculum indigenous priorities in STEM subjects across all year levels.

    Teachers will now be asked to include cross-curriculum indigenous priorities in STEM subjects.

    The justification for putting indigenous science on the same footing as Western science is that teachers need to “provide a more culturally responsive curriculum”.

    Schools are also told that “it is crucial that our curriculum ­effectively includes respect and understanding of 65,000-plus years of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history”.

    Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, provides further justification when arguing that Australia’s indigenous peoples “have explored the many wonders of our continent for millennia” and “through their rich enduring legacy, we can inspire the same instinct to explore in our students today”.

    Not surprisingly the Commonwealth Minister for Indigenous ­Affairs, Nigel Scullion, is a strong supporter of this latest example of cultural sensitivity.

    He extols ACARA’s work as “groundbreaking” and suggests that “incorporating traditional knowledge developed over a millennia into modern scientific teaching is not only a huge privilege for Australian students, but will also enhance our own scientific thinking”.

    To assist teachers ACARA has published 95 elaborations to illustrate how they can “combine the best of ­Indigenous and Western scientific understanding” in a way that respects “cultural appropriateness”.

    ACARA also argues that the elaborations will illustrate how “Indigenous history, culture, knowledge and understanding can be incorporated into teaching core scientific concepts”.

    Examples of the elaborations include students recognising Indigenous “knowledge and understanding of solids, liquids and gases (for example, application of steam for cooking)”.

    Students could also look at “changes of state in materials used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander peoples, such as beeswax or resins.”

    Teachers are also told that students “can investigate some of the chemical reactions and methods employed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to convert plants into edible food products”.

    At a time when Australian students are going backwards in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests one would expect, instead of this latest example of PC cultural sensitivity, that ACARA would focus on ensuring the existing curriculum is academically rigorous and based on the established disciplines.

    Namely, disciplines that incorporate the best of Western scientific research and thinking and that can be traced back through the Industrial Revolution, the Enlightenment to the early Roman and Greek scientists, mathematicians and philosophers.

    Contrary to what those responsible for the national curriculum think, Western scientific thought, based as it is on rationality, reason and empiricism, is not culturally determined.

    As argued by Professor Igor Bray in his submission to the 2014 national curriculum review, “science knows nothing about the nationality or ethnicity of its participants, and this is its great unifying strength”.

    Bray goes on to argue “scientific statements are those that are able to be falsified by empirical evidence, and that scientific facts are not logical truths but those statements that have not yet been falsified despite repeated experiments. There is no room for cultural sensitivity”.

    It should also be recognised that ACARA’s decision to equate Indigenous science with Western science is not new. This relativistic approach was adopted by the 1993 South Australian curriculum where it states, “every culture has its own way of thinking and its world views to inform its science. Western science is the most dominant form of science but it is only one form among the sciences of the world’’.

    As argued by James Anthony Gibbons in On Reflection equating all sciences as equally deserving respect ignores the fact that Western science is pre-eminent in its ability to help us better understand and deal with our physical environment. This is primarily because Western science is not based on superstition or witchcraft as it involves a unique scientific process, one that Gibbons suggests involves “testing explanations against the physical world and, depending on their success in accounting for that physical world, may be accepted as a step in the search for truth”.

    Treating science as culturally ­determined ignores that some ­approaches better approximate the truth compared to others.

    As argued by Warren Mundine, “what is Indigenous physics? Physics is physics” and “the idea that you have to have an indigenous or Asian perspective, to be frank, is silly”.

    This latest egregious example of how political correctness is dumbing down the school curriculum beggars belief but given the cultural-left’s control over what is taught in the nation’s classrooms nothing should surprise.

    Kevin Donnelly is a Senior Research Fellow at the Australian Catholic University and author of How Political Correctness Is Destroying Education (Wilkinson Publishing).

  69. C.L.

    The #MeToo movement is well named.
    What it’s really about is boasting. It’s certain women (almost all of a certain age) saying ‘I too was sexually pursued and propositioned by a beastly, libidinous man!’
    Me too!
    In other words, if you can’t say “Me Too,” well, you weren’t very desirable.

  70. Dr Faustus

    prompting Mr Turnbull to tell colleag­ues that he would not ­tolerate a rewriting of history.

    There is nothing as elegant and engaging as a political yesterday’s man defending his legacy.
    Particularly when his principal accomplishment is wafting SSM through a process set up by his predecessor.

  71. calli

    Watch it, Tel.

    Trust But Verify.

  72. Boambee John

    1960s liberation movement!

  73. Arky

    Stimpson.
    Stop persecuting the cohenites.
    You anti- cementite.

  74. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #2854936, posted on November 2, 2018 at 10:52 am

    Memory like a steel trap.

    Me too, Calli. Makes Hairy nervous sometimes. 🙂

    Ladies,

    You outperform Men in Memory easily

    My wife remembers everything I have ever done wrong in our going out together and Marriage over 53 Years – Scary – but definitely Mind like a Steel Trap

  75. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has announced schools are being asked to incorporate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scientific understanding in science, technology and mathematics subjects.

    Careful where you point that bone, son!

  76. Old School Conservative

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #2854936, posted on November 2, 2018 at 10:52 am
    Memory like a steel trap.

    Me too, Calli.

    Only for mens’ transgressions.
    (I’d insert a laughing emoji here but I’ve forgotten how to)

  77. Atoms for Peace.

    The unstated aim of education in Australia is to keep the punters stupid , make them dependant and make them vote.

  78. C.L.

    Remember Sarah Palin’s reference to political foes in the “crosshairs”?
    It caused the Western left to melt down (as usual) for weeks.

    Michelle Grattan at ABC Online:

    Malcolm Turnbull is now the sniper at the window.

    The ABC inciting gun violence and assassination.

  79. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Twenty new trash cans have been placed downtown! They even had a ribbon and scissors ceremony.

    That’s all very well, Calli, but the morning clean up around here is lacking in a mirror cleaner for two overnight pixel thieves who fill the place with Arabic numerals. I suppose we should be grateful they are not Roman ones, which are much more cumbersome and thus harder to remove, and it’s better than the industrial clean usually needed. Still, hurry on home.

  80. C.L.

    Daily Mail:

    Seventy ‘desperate’ asylum seekers on Nauru REJECT chance to move to the US when they’re told they’ll have to work and won’t get free welfare.

    A total of 71 asylum seekers on Nauru have turned down the chance to move to the US after discovering they would need to work and wouldn’t get free welfare.

  81. Arky

    Bit of metallurgy humour there.
    None of you got it.
    No worrries, I’ll just go drown myself quietly now.

  82. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    We have to go out now. Daughter of old friends wants us for a university psychological experiment first; her parents repay us with a nice lunch. The questionnaire sent as an initial taster didn’t meet our exacting standards, but friendship is friendship.

  83. C.L.

    You ripped that off from “ant-dentite” (Seinfeld), Ark.
    I’m on to you.

  84. OldOzzie

    Fire starting and spear throwing make national science curriculum

    Bruce McDougall, The Daily Telegraph

    RACIAL politics have been injected into the national science curriculum in a move slammed by critics as “dumbing down” lessons in the classroom.

    Curriculum chiefs have come under fire for including indigenous “histories and cultures” in science classes while the academic performance of Australian children falls behind the rest of the world.

    The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has published 95 ways science teachers are being told to incorporate Aboriginal culture into their lessons.

    ACARA chief executive Rob Randall said the examples were “scientifically rigorous­ demonstrating how indigenous history, culture, knowledge and understanding can be incorporated into teaching core scientific concepts­”.

    But author and senior research fellow at the Australian Catholic University Kevin Donnelly yesterday slammed the move as “the latest egregious example of how political correctness is dumbing down the school curriculum”.

    Shifting the science syllabus.

    Despite this, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said teachers using examples “involving spears and boomerangs” would help children learn in the classroom.

    “I think they should be using every resource available to them to get our kids passionate and interested about science.

    “And if that involves using the stories from indigenous culture to help them engage kids with science and help them understand science – I’m for whatever tool they need to help kids better understand science.”

    The changes include Year 10 students researching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ knowledge of celestial bodies and explanations of the origin of the universe. Another lesson will investigate how indigenous people achieved an increase in velocity and impact force through the use of spear throwers and bows.

    Students also will be taught to “acknowledge the need to critically analyse scientific literature for potential cultural bias towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples”.

    The last Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study shows Australia is being outperformed by a large number of countries — including Kazakhstan.

    “At a time when Australian students are going backwards … one would expect, instead of this latest example of PC cultural sensitivity, that ACARA would focus on ensuring the existing curriculum is academically rigorous and based on the established disciplines,” Dr Donnelly said.

    But Mr Randall said it was crucial to include “respect and understanding of 65,000-plus years of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history” and combine the best of indigenous and Western scientific understandings.

    He was backed by Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel, who said ACARA was “immersing students in the scientific basis of traditional knowledges and practices”.

    From The Comments

    – I think Europeans, and pretty much everyone else, had worked out the ideas of leverage (bows and arrows and so forth) quite a while before arriving in Australia. We also had the wheel, metals, etc. It is not clear what the Aboriginals contributed to knowledge beyond that of native flora and fauna.

    – OK, Its many many decades ago, but when I was at school, “science” was comprised of 3 parts, physics, chemistry and biology.

    – What’s happened to the pride we once had in our educational outcomes being in the top 10.
    With rubbish introduced as science it’s not surprising we are now at the bottom of the performance table and behind Kazakhstan (in science we have dropped to 17th in the rankings) !

    It’s a Stone Age culture. Seriously?

  85. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Trust But Verify.

    So true. I realise I am easy prey. I totally accepted that Trump train was headed for Mexico.
    Mea culpa. I really have no idea where it was going, what it was for, and what the equipment on it really was. But it was on the internet, so there.

  86. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    combine the best of indigenous and Western scientific understandings.

    Complete crapola.

  87. Tintarella di Luna

    In other words, if you can’t say “Me Too,” well, you weren’t very desirable.

    Well the jig is up for me, but I have been married for almost 40 years on the strength of a one and only proposal.

  88. Mark A

    zyconoclast
    #2854785, posted on November 2, 2018 at 7:46 am

    -Stimpy has never denied the Holocaust
    -Stimpy is not an anti-Semite

    Yawn.
    Needs it’s own thread.

    Fancy coming from you.
    You need your own forum judging by the voluminous cut and paste you do.

  89. Mindfree

    I posted this last night and it may have been a bit late – with an extra comment

    Mike Brookes-Cannon and Simon Farquhar both co-founders of Australian software company Atlassian software. The software is OK but not great as I have used it in my profession

    Both worth 5billion + and both 38 years old

    Both own prime real estate in Sydney’s inner harbour side eastern suburbs (google it). 100million house for Brookes Cannon and 71m for Farquhar on the old Fairfax estate (BTW next door to each other – how did they achieve that – very, very lucky – when does prime real estate like that go on the market at the same time?) I think the residences are both ex-Fairfax estates so it looks possible

    Their company is listed on the Nasdaq (not ASX) and the worth has doubled in the last 12 months

    Both these two are world citizens (think World Economic Forum). Their wealth is above and beyond anything in the tech sector here (Disclaimer: my wife use to work for DWS – Danny Wallis MD who is estimated about 80 million but has been going for about 30 years)

    Now Brookes-Cannon is open about renewable energy and mates with Musk (Incidentally Farquhar spoke out against 457 visas being cancelled)

    These guys are billionaires whilst the most Oz software entrepreneurs can be only measured in millions

    Am I missing something here or can someone fill in the blanks?

    Question – who is pumping up their tyres (ie buying up the stock on the Nasdaq) and why now are they coming out in favour of all things ‘progressive’

    Maybe its all a coincidence and nothing at all except simply a couple of rich billionaire techos like Brin, Zuckerberg and Dorsey just announcing their positions

  90. Notafan

    Most of those left in Nauru sound like Iranians. Iran won’t take them back

    Isn’t the issue is that Iran won’t allow forcible repatriations and these people are refusing to leave voluntarily?

  91. Infidel Tiger

    $AUD with a bullet.

    What’s happening?

  92. Senile Old Guy

    Seventy ‘desperate’ asylum seekers on Nauru REJECT chance to move to the US when they’re told they’ll have to work and won’t get free welfare.

    So they are not desperate enough to actually work? They are economic refugees who want to sponge off Australians.

  93. Senile Old Guy

    Teachers are also told that students “can investigate some of the chemical reactions and methods employed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to convert plants into edible food products”.

    This, in science, is elsewhere known as “cooking”. What utter stupidity.

  94. Tintarella di Luna

    This, in science, is elsewhere known as “cooking”. What utter stupidity.

    Indeed ask those renowned scientists Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsay.

  95. Senile Old Guy

    As of Monday, 40 children of asylum seekers remain on Nauru and an unofficial timeline has been set to have them brought to Australia.

    And so SloMo undoes all his good work of years ago. The boats will be coming back.

  96. Mindfree

    Trump appointing a pretty decent looking former Fox reporter to the UN Job.

    Heather Nauert

    Wow – only a couple of years ago before Trump got elected, she was the news update girl on the morning Fox and Friends show, she was not even considered a Fox commentator except as part time presenter on the very early pre-show

    Big career rise

  97. John Constantine

    What’s the big deal with boats?

    Their turnbullites lawyers loopholes flew ten times as many voters into australia as ever boated in.

    The airlifts will fundementally transform australia, not the boats

  98. OldOzzie

    Mindfree
    #2854969, posted on November 2, 2018 at 11:17 am

    I posted this last night and it may have been a bit late – with an extra comment

    Mike Brookes-Cannon and Simon Farquhar both co-founders of Australian software company Atlassian software. The software is OK but not great as I have used it in my profession

    A bit more on this Topic

    Energy warrior Mike Cannon-Brookes not so fair dinkum after all – David Swan Reporter


    It’s unclear how fair dinkum tech billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes is about his new renewable energy initiative, with the entrepreneur yet to register a trademark and the “Fair Dinkum Power” domain name ­already taken by someone else.

    Mr Cannon-Brookes launched a mysterious plot on Tuesday with a tweet-storm at Scott Morrison, calling the Prime Minister’s energy policy “bullshit” and declaring that “we need a movement”.

    “I’m not sure you know what fair dinkum means,’’ Mr Cannon-Brookes tweeted at Mr Morrison. “It means fair to ­Aussies, to our wallets AND to the planet. We need a brand for Australia’s energy future.”

    I’m not sure you know what fair dinkum means. It means fair to Aussies, to our wallets AND to the planet. ⚡ can be reliable, renewable & cheap. @fairdinkumpower registered. Let me get back to you with some logo concepts. Give me an hour. #gameon #fairdinkumpower #auspol 2/2
    — Mike Cannon-Brookes 👨🏼‍💻🧢 (@mcannonbrookes) October 31, 2018

    But that new brand seems stuck on the drawing board, with the Young Rich Lister failing to register the http://www.fairdinkumpower.com.au domain name that is already registered to someone named Stephen James.

    Mr James has set the address to redirect automatically to Renew Economy, a renewable energy news website.

    Mr Cannon-Brookes would need to buy the domain name from Mr James to use the website for his initiative, or think of another name altogether.

    Mr James declined to comment when contacted by The Australian about discussions he “may or may not be having with Mike Cannon-Brookes”.

    The Atlassian co-CEO is also yet to register a trademark for the new venture, with a trademark search for “Fair Dinkum Power” coming up blank.

    He does run the Twitter ­handle @fairdinkumpower, which has notched 1000 followers but is yet to tweet.

    Mr Cannon-Brookes tweeted from his own account late yesterday that he’d be appearing on the Ten Network to talk more about his power thought bubble, and is also running a $200 logo contest for members of the public to come up with a Fair Dinkum Power logo that he intends to “display somewhere big”.

    “Crap. Should have thought of a deadline,” he wrote after announcing the competition. “Yes — we’re making this up as we go. Why don’t we say 24 hours to vote/submit a new one?”

    Labor spokesman for climate change and energy Mark Butler was aware of Mr Cannon-Brookes’s plight and told The Australian that when Mr Morrison said “fair dinkum power”, it was actually “code for new coal”.

    Left-wing activist group GetUp joined Mr Cannon-Brookes’s renewable mission on Thursday. “It seems Mike Cannon-Brookes feels exactly the same way as the majority of Australians,” GetUp campaign ­director Sam Regester said.

    From The Comments

    – Why does this guy get print time, just a rich kid telling us all how to live.

    – Another billionaire poser . Any publicity for the overvalued is seen as worth it .

    – Yes. He gets sudden “vision” and it is all over the media. The vision comes with a noble purpose, a snappy label, but absolutely no idea what to do next or how to go about it.

    – Clive Lite perhaps?

  99. Peter Castieau

    Is it just me or has everyone else noticed how visible TLS has been lately? Is it because this has just happened?

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2018/11/court-attendance-notice-and-brief-of-evidence-in-the-gillardwilson-slush-fund-matter.html

  100. m

    Thanks OO – much appreciated

    Now you have me speculating – who is Stephen James or is that a furphy name

  101. Mother Lode

    What it’s really about is boasting. It’s certain women (almost all of a certain age) saying ‘I too was sexually pursued and propositioned by a beastly, libidinous man!’
    Me too!

    Now that words like ‘hero’ and ‘survivor’ have been so debased as to mean something didn’t kill you, to undergo any ordeal and come out the other end has the same cachet as used to be the preserve of men who single-handedly took a machine gun nest with nothing but a pointed stick and bad language, a woman in Hollywood who of her own accord agreed to indulge the carnal peccadilloes of a director, each for their own advantage, is allowed to call herself a ‘survivor’.

  102. lotocoti

    they’ll have to work and won’t get free welfare.

    Reading Max Hasting’s latest – draft dodgers who fled to Norway were upset about receiving only $15 pw welfare.

  103. cohenite

    The Wall Street Journal is reporting, and several media confirming, the likely nominee to replace U.N. Secretary Nikki Haley will be current State Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert.

    Good stuff. When they’re good women are superb; and when they’re not they’re clementine ford.

  104. Mindfree

    Thanks Old Ozzie – much appreciated

    Now you have me thinking – who is Stephen James or is this a furphy name?

  105. cohenite

    Is it just me or has everyone else noticed how visible TLS has been lately? Is it because this has just happened?

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2018/11/court-attendance-notice-and-brief-of-evidence-in-the-gillardwilson-slush-fund-matter.html

    What’s TLS? Smith is the bravest man going around. Gillard should be prosecuted for various reasons:

    http://onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=14428

  106. Tintarella di Luna

    What’s TLS?

    It might mean The Lying Slapper

  107. Senile Old Guy

    Their ABC rewriting history, again.

    The widespread feeling that the Morrison Government is doomed will only be reinforced by this week’s outbreak of hostilities between the former and current prime ministers.

    Actually, these “hostilities” are entirely due to Turnbull having his usual dummy spit.

    At one level, it’s hard to believe we’re seeing a rerun of this old script; at another, it confirms that disunity has become baked into a Liberal Party probably unable to get beyond its dysfunction without a cleansing period in opposition. For three years, Mr Turnbull had to endure the sniping of Tony Abbott, the man he brought down.

    Utter crap. When Turnbull was dumped, due to being a useless opposition leader, in favour of Abbott, Turnbull leaked and sniped from the first day of being dumped and continued leaking, sniping and sabotaging the LNP until he was returned.

    We can assume Mr Turnbull’s mood is dark. That is understandable. It is also dangerous for the Government, especially as many voters neither understood nor welcomed the leadership change.

    Evidence for that? Absolutely none. Let’s remember why Turnbull was done…he registered a record number of negative polls. He also lost all of the advantage won by Abbott. That suggests that the public mostly don’t care about Turnbull. Those that do like Turnbull are lefties who will not vote for him or the LNP.

    But this is the ABC and Michelle Grattan; eternal Turnbull boosters, unfortunately, paid for by us.

  108. Rebel with cause

    Studying Aboriginal culture is pretty thin gruel for students. No written records, very little technology, no significant interactions with other cultures prior to the arrival of Europeans.

    The national curriculum sounds like an absolute snooze-fest. No wonder standards are falling.

  109. I am bespoke

    On Tucker today. A women’s shelter maybe shut down because it refused a drunk transgender even though they payed to send him to hospital for treatment.

  110. Atoms for Peace.

    Science did improve spear chucking. “Revenge of the nerds” shows how a javelin can be redesigned.

  111. Bruce of Newcastle

    Highway Traffic BACKED UP FOR MILES to See TRUMP in Columbia, Missouri

    I must’ve missed the reports of this on Seven and Nein 11:30am news just now.

    Instead both US politics reporters were lurving Oprah campaigning for some Dem.

    Why is that news in Australia? If Bob Hawke campaigned for some Labor candidate would it be news in the US? The MSM is off its collective tree.

  112. Bruce of Newcastle

    Bit of metallurgy humour there.
    None of you got it.

    Sorry Arky I was away with cementite problems of my own.
    Snapped a spoke while on treadly with a loud bang.
    Slooowly pedalled home.
    Then took the wheel in for fixing.
    Not confident that I can do it right myself, so the experts can do it.

  113. John Constantine

    The hashtag groping memory thing will really be meaningful once young female tennis players talk about the bulldeeks that ruled the sport.

    And the young girls that the activist left used to pressure to get their teen breasts out at every protest for extra publicity.

    Comrades.

  114. Rae

    Stimp’s back

    No. He just laid out some facts, then said “Bye” again.

  115. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2018/11/court-attendance-notice-and-brief-of-evidence-in-the-gillardwilson-slush-fund-matter.html

    Late last week I wrote to former Royal Commissioner John Dyson Heydon AC QC with notes about the brief of evidence against Ms Gillard and copies of the sworn Affidavits which will be led in evidence against her. Mr Heydon’s chambers have advised me in writing that the file I sent to Mr Heydon has been referred to the Commonwealth Attorney General.

  116. OldOzzie

    The Democratic Party Is Working To Destroy The American Way Of Life

    At this moment in history, the Democratic Party belongs to those who hate our institutions, hate the limits of our system of government, and hate America’s way of life.

    Hillary Clinton is right. We cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what America stands for. She’s right that we must fight against politicians and activists who degrade the rule of law, seek to delegitimize our elections, spread corruption, attack truth and reason, and try to undermine our national unity. A defiant, defensive, and dystopian political party must be met with determined aggression, not niceties. But she’s living in upside-down world if she believes that’s the Republican Party.

    Two years into Donald Trump’s presidency, there is no question the Democratic Party is on the side of those working to undermine the American system of government and the American way of life.

  117. has been referred to the Commonwealth Attorney General

    Well, that’s the end of that.

    Filed in a very very deep hole.

  118. OldOzzie

    At first whiff, the New York AG’s ExxonMobil lawsuit stinks

    New York’s attorney general has brought a lawsuit against ExxonMobil, saying the company misled investors about climate change. The New York Times reported, perhaps with disappointment, that the “the suit does not charge Exxon with playing a role in creating climate change.” The central claim is that Exxon will have problems over the next decades because of regulations designed to mitigate climate change, and it is defrauding its shareholders and potential investors by low-balling what that is going to cost.

    New York State Attorney General Barbara Underwood is bringing suit against ExxonMobil. (Hans Pennink / AP)

    Is that really a Female?

  119. RobK

    Is that really a Female?
    Non-binary perhaps.

  120. OldOzzie

    ***Live Updates*** Trump Holds Missouri Rally for Josh Hawley

    President Donald Trump will hold a Thursday evening rally in Columbia, Missouri, for Republican Senate candidate Josh Hawley, who is leading Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO) in the polls heading into election day.

    Trump will hold nine more rallies before Tuesday as he barnstorms across the nation to help Republican candidates.

    What a Non Stop Worker for MAGA – President Donald Trump!

  121. areff

    Modern education: male ex-stripper teacher stripped from rolls for, among other things, sharing the pet name for his penis and informing student of the cat tattoo at his groin.

    https://www.vit.vic.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/78336/Osmond-Decision.pdf

  122. Tintarella di Luna

    Alex Turnbull complained to no less than the chairman of the ABC Board Justin Milne about the leaking of an interview he’d done with ABC and his complaint saw the suspension of ABC journalist Peter Lloyd –

    comments running very much against dud and son of dud
    here’s one from Cassandra
    25 MINUTES AGO
    Such “noblesse oblige” from Turnbull junior, a real chip off the old block.

    Meanwhile, in the ordinary world…that is the world outside Point Piper, us ordinary folk (many of whom probably haven’t had a decent pay rise for the last 8 years), struggle to pay our mortgages and rents, struggle to pay increasing electricity costs, struggle to pay for school fees, struggle to pay for increasing food costs…..we struggle everyday….and then there are the Turnbulls. I wish they would just go away.

  123. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Filed in a very very deep hole

    Along with the Victorian (“A dozen detectives working on the case, with an unlimited budget’) and Western Australian police investigations.

  124. Rae

    New York State Attorney General Barbara Underwood is bringing suit against ExxonMobil. (Hans Pennink / AP)

    Is that really a Female?

    Yes. She is a Joo-ish female. Are you suggesting something about her looks?

  125. Bruce of Newcastle

    Is that really a Female?

    She’s the hand picked replacement for the notorious Eric Schneiderman who got #metooed recently. Couldn’t’ve happened to a more deserving lefty activist.

  126. H B Bear

    Studying Aboriginal culture is pretty thin gruel for students. No written records, very little technology, no significant interactions with other cultures prior to the arrival of Europeans.

    Stories Testes Aunty told him in other words.

  127. jupes

    We’ve done about 3,400 miles so far. I love the States, especially the varied landscape.

    What car are you driving Calli? v8?

  128. Gab

    Brazil moving its embassy to Israel

  129. calli

    Only for mens’ transgressions.

    Odd. I look at the Beloved and I don’t see a grey 66 year old at all.

    I see the gorgeous fellow who escorted me to my first dance (and danced every dance), who asked me out for a coffee, who proposed at the garden gate…I could go on about his physical bravery…but I won’t.

    Transgressions? Meh. I’d have to think about mine then. Best not to go there. 🙃

  130. jupes

    Alan Kohler ✔ @AlanKohler
    The best leader we’ve had in 12 years, by far, was Julia Gillard.

    Kohler is an idiot. TLS was the most incompetent PM in my lifetime. She was a one woman clown show.

    Others have been worse and the jury’s out on who is the most vile – Krudd or Turnbull.

  131. Bushkid

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #2854926, posted on November 2, 2018 at 10:45 am

    Very well phrased and expressed, Lizzie. Thank you.

  132. OldOzzie

    Rae
    #2855009, posted on November 2, 2018 at 12:24 pm

    New York State Attorney General Barbara Underwood is bringing suit against ExxonMobil. (Hans Pennink / AP)

    Is that really a Female?

    Yes. She is a Joo-ish female. Are you suggesting something about her looks?

    Nope

    I thought it was Michael Moore

  133. Notafan

    Modern education: male ex-stripper teacher stripped from rolls for, among other things, sharing the pet name for his penis and informing student of the cat tattoo at his groin.

    nothing hides from google

  134. calli

    I wish. Kia Sorrento.

    It goes.

    I’d preferto ponce around in a convertible, but the suitcases wouldn’t fit.

  135. OldOzzie

    calli
    #2855014, posted on November 2, 2018 at 12:30 pm

    Only for mens’ transgressions.

    Odd. I look at the Beloved and I don’t see a grey 66 year old at all.

    I see the gorgeous fellow who escorted me to my first dance (and danced every dance)

    So he didn’t have to

    “Save the Last Dance for Me”

  136. calli

    No he didn’t Ozzie. The music started, he dragged me out onto the dance floor and didn’t leave it until the music stopped.

    At 20, he was a god-like being to my 16 year old eyes. He’s still not bad at all, but a little wider in girth.

    Also his long, curly dark locks are somewhat thinned. I, of course, haven’t changed a bit.

  137. H B Bear

    Alan Kohler ✔ @AlanKohler
    The best leader we’ve had in 12 years, by far, was Julia Gillard.

    Alan must have missed every episode of Insiders where Ol’ Leathery and his sofa buddies said her government would be fine if only it could get clean air – right up to the point Peanut Head knifed her and re-installed KRuddy to try and save the furniture. Pure ALPBC though.

  138. calli

    Watched the first part of Trump’s rally. Impressive.

    No wonder CNN are having conniptions.

  139. Senile Old Guy

    Also his long, curly dark locks are somewhat thinned. I, of course, haven’t changed a bit.

    Of course! 😉

    I went grey decades ago, shortly after my kids were born. But correlation does mean causation!

  140. C.L.

    The Democratic Party Is Working To Destroy The American Way Of Life

    That’s not exactly a news flash.

  141. Mother Lode

    What is this nonsense about studying Aboriginal spear throwing?

    I doubt they are talking about the biomechanics, I expect they are talking about projectiles.

    When I was a kid that meant predicting the path of a projectile based on initial conditions – launch velocity and angle.

    It was about cannons where the angle was measurable and the velocity could be calculated and then used in other calculations.

    This is not how someone approaches throwing a spear.

    Not every culture possesses what we call science. They just have a way of doing things. Inn fact, it is impossible without a certain material and conceptual substrate like measurement and means of modelling and comparing like mathematics or geometry.

    Not every culture has what we call history – viewing the past as being a set of facts on the basis of evidence, weighing evidence, objectively and independently of what we might like – a bit like an autopsy. Other cultures are content to see the past as a series of myths and legends which inform the present differently than our historical sense.

    But what is most annoying is that we are now to treat Aboriginal ideas as having universal validity, and yet they are to remain the sole custodians of them. Will non-Aborigines be allowed to conduct those silly smoking ceremonies? Debate whether a batch of land is really sacred or not? Will we be allowed to contest their claims in their own conceptual framework.

    Trust SloMo to get this wrong. He really is heir to Trumble.

  142. calli

    The best leader we’ve had in 12 years, by far, was Julia Gillard.

    Ahahah! Gingerella? The Nemesis of blue ties and wristwatches? The Hyperbowl kid?

    She was the first feimoyle PM but. No one can take that from her stabby mcstabbyface self.

  143. C.L.

    It would be hard to spear a hopping ‘roo but all the other critters in Australia are pretty easy targets, let’s be honest. You don’t need to be Leonidas to nail a wombat.

  144. Mindfree

    Alan Kohler ✔ @AlanKohler
    The best leader we’ve had in 12 years, by far, was Julia Gillard.

    Reckon Kohler might be in line for a gig with the Global Educayshon Forum?

  145. RobK

    Not every culture possesses what we call science. 
    You would have to concede though that the tennis ball version of the woomera has been a boon to exercising the dog in many suburbs.

  146. CL;

    It would be hard to spear a hopping ‘roo but all the other critters in Australia are pretty easy targets, let’s be honest. You don’t need to be Leonidas to nail a wombat.

    Are you still referring to TLS?

  147. Boambee John

    SOG at 1121

    This, in science, is elsewhere known as “cooking”. What utter stupidity.

    Not quite. Some plants have toxic elements that must be removed. However, with the indigenous “science”, that seems to have been more a matter of applied (trial and error) technique than scientifically identifying the specific ingredient and tailoring a method to remove only that ingredient.

  148. Roger

    Will non-Aborigines be allowed to conduct those silly smoking ceremonies?

    They already do.

    😉

  149. OldOzzie

    Police investigate gang muggings, assaults in Melbourne

    Samantha Hutchinson
    Victorian State Political Writer

    Victoria Police are investigating a string of frightening incidents at St Kilda last night involving what is believed to be teenagers of African appearance, including a mugging and an assault, after observers reported seeing a lone chef defending himself with a shovel against a gang of more than ten.

    A police spokesman confirmed this morning Victoria Police was investigating two incidents at St Kilda overnight, including reports a man had his phone and wallet stolen after being surrounded by a gang of 10-15 males, and another incident in which a 25-year-old man was assaulted.

    According to the police, a man was walking on Jacka Boulevard when he was approached by another man who demanded his phone and wallet about 10pm.

    A group of about 10-15 males surrounded the victim and assaulted him, stealing his phone. The 23-year-old victim was assessed on scene for minor injuries.

    At about 10.35pm, a 25-year-old man in the same area was approached by a group of youths and assaulted. Police understand the offenders tried to take the man’s wallet, but were unsuccessful.

    The victim received minor lacerations to his head during the incident and was treated on scene. Another man, who was with the victim, was also assessed at the scene but did not require any treatment.

    “The offenders in both incidents are perceived to be of African appearance,” police said.

    Police confirmed the investigation after a number of listeners called 3AW’s Neil Mitchell with reports that chefs of an up-market restaurant chased a number of youths of African appearance away with kitchen knives, after an incident at the restaurant.

    Eyewitness John, from Albert Park, told the radio station and The Australian that he had seen a group of teenagers of African appearance running towards a chef on Jacka Boulevard who was defending himself with a shovel.

    Speaking to The Australian, he said he believed someone could have been killed in the incident.

    “I initially thought it was a Hallowe’en prank, but then I realised ‘hang on, this is real’ when I had to swerve to avoid hitting the guy,” the telecommunications worker said.

    “And this chef was running backwards, and he tripped on the median strip before having to get back up again and keep running.

    “Any car coming down the street could have hit him. It was a life or death situation, he had ten or fifteen kids surrounding him and they were coming for him. They really wanted to get him.”

    The observer said he saw another fifteen or twenty youths of African appearance in a neighbouring carpark watching on as the group ran after the chef.

    He also said he saw the group chasing the chef throw a witches hat at the man, which then hit his moving car.

    Victoria Police said they are investigating whether the two incidents are linked.

    Investigators are speaking to a number of witnesses and looking for any footage that is relevant to the incident.

  150. Elle

    Carpe! Malcolm Turnbull on Q&A! Oy vey! Camera shy, only when it suits him. I was going to say zero interruptions, but Tony Jones can sometimes fool us. Depends on his and our ABC’s agenda.

  151. Peter Castieau

    Re: TLS court appearance
    Given that its a private prosecution I dont think the Attorney General can stop the proceedings. He has been notified of the prosecution by Dyson Heydon as it was his RC where the alleged offence occurred.

  152. Zatara

    The roads here really are a wonder. And being Aussies, driving long distances is a doddle.

    calli have you discovered one of the best kept Texas secrets… the ‘Farm Road’ system? The roads are generally dead straight for like 50-100 miles and built like nice wide runways.

    When the tourists have clogged the interstate highways the locals get on the Farm Roads and drive like they were on the autobahn.

  153. Old School Conservative

    Elle
    #2855040, posted on November 2, 2018 at 1:06 pm
    Carpe! Malcolm Turnbull on Q&A! Oy vey! Camera shy, only when it suits him. I was going to say zero interruptions, but Tony Jones can sometimes fool us. Depends on his and our ABC’s agenda.

    I’ve already got dibs on zero (10.52am).
    I’ll only be wrong if Jones goes full court jester and interrupts with additional praise, over and above Petit Mal’s own self aggrandisement.

  154. A Lurker

    Aboriginal culture gave us…a bent stick that sometimes come back, dot paintings and some very brutal practices.

    The Mesolithic Polish people got to the boomerang first.

    As for dot painting – well it’s an ancient cultural practice dating back to the….1970s, and even then it was created in collaboration with an anglo-Aussie art teacher.

    Their failure to discover pottery still boggles my mind given that Australia possesses natural clay deposits and Aboriginals knew how to use fire. The absence of pre-European-contact pottery sherds indicate that the intuitive leap of employing both together to create cooking and storage pots just never happened.

  155. Neil

    Ford announced they were leaving when Gillard was PM. Anyone with a brain knew the other manufacturers would then leave. Our car industry died under Rudd/Gillard. Locally made cars went from 25% of the market in 2006 to only 10% by 2013. And this was when the car makers were getting all the money from the govt that they asked for.

    There should be an investigation into why after giving the auto makers heaps of govt money nobody wanted to buy the cars they made. I think it shows that govt subsidies do not work

  156. calli

    Their failure to discover pottery still boggles my mind

    Quite. It has to be one of the oddest things about the culture, textile development being the other.

  157. OldOzzie

    “Don’t Ever Repeat This”: Beto Aides Busted Funneling Caravan Funds In Undercover Sting

    James O’Keefe’s undercover operatives at Project Veritas have done it again; this time filming campaign staffers for Congressman and US Senate candidate Robert Francis “Beto” O’Rourke seemingly engaging in the illegal use of campaign resources to help transport Honduran nationals traveling in the Central American caravan.

    O’Rourke staffers Dominic Chacon and AnaPaula Themann admit to facilitating transportation to airports and bus stations.

  158. Roger

    “The offenders in both incidents are perceived to be of African appearance,” police said.

    So according to VicPol they’re not gangs but groups of young people…

    …and now they are only perceivedto be of African appearance by the victims.

    Cue a news story about how Africans are being victimised by a racist society, with “community leaders” vowing to cease cooperation with authorities unless it stops.

    Another step towards tribalisation.

  159. Bruce of Newcastle

    Their failure to discover pottery still boggles my mind given that Australia possesses natural clay deposits and Aboriginals knew how to use fire

    .

    Lurker – Pottery is heavy. Not something nomads would want to carry around. Much better to make stuff from light wood and bark – they don’t survive in the archaeology in Australian acidic termite-ridden soils.

  160. Tintarella di Luna

    Oh dear a rejection of my comment on the Alex Turnbull story – perhaps Alex might be monitoring the comments –

    The apple and the tree are as one – and my goodness doesn’t the apple resemble the tree in every way including, dare I say it, the hairline or lack thereof

    I think it was my daring what done it.

  161. Percy Popinjay

    tyeacher

    Sacré bleu, areff – the correct spelling is “tacher”.

  162. Percy Popinjay

    tyeacher

    Sheesh, areff – the correct spelling is “tacher”.

  163. A Lurker

    Lurker – Pottery is heavy. Not something nomads would want to carry around. Much better to make stuff from light wood and bark – they don’t survive in the archaeology in Australian acidic termite-ridden soils.

    Surely tribes would return periodically/seasonally to what could be classed as semi-permanent camps, especially to camps on the coast or near rivers/creeks where they had set up traps etc. If the camp was a semi-permanent one then it would make sense to bury useful pots in the ground or hide them in a tree hollow or fallen log for later reuse.

  164. Percy Popinjay

    Grate – two comments off to the spaminator for reasons that are not apparently obvious.

  165. Elle

    I’ve already got dibs on zero (10.52am).
    I’ll only be wrong if Jones goes full court jester and interrupts with additional praise, over and above Petit Mal’s own self aggrandisement.

    Old School Conservative, I just scrolled back. Dam! You got in first. Onya! 🙂
    I may just submit my lotto number. Not sure I will be able to watch Turnbull. I feel sick to the stomach when I see the tool. 🤢😩

  166. Roger

    I suspect the indigenous failure to create pottery was the result of an aversion to using clay for anything other than ceremonial purposes, i.e. body decoration for ritual purposes.

  167. First question:

    Mr. Trumble, why do you think you were such a consistent failure at polls (Wentworth excepted)?

  168. RobK

    Their failure to discover pottery 
    In places like Fitzroy Crossing there are small mountains of beer containers both glass aluminium, much like the small mountains of clay pottery in Rome.

  169. Notafan

    Pottery is heavy. Not something nomads would want to carry around. Much better to make stuff from light wood and bark – they don’t survive in the archaeology in Australian acidic termite-ridden soils.

    Not sure of your point-they continued to make such items until the modern day so whether ancient examples survived or not should be irrelevant.

    Europeans were one nomadic too.

    Some of the land in Australia was clearly suited to agriculture had Aborigines a mind to settle in one spot and if they brought dogs with them why not other useful animals?

    No need to innovate if your preferred method of ensuring sufficient food is killing off excess to requirements consumers.

  170. Rae

    Surely tribes would return periodically/seasonally to what could be classed as semi-permanent camps, especially to camps on the coast or near rivers/creeks where they had set up traps etc. If the camp was a semi-permanent one then it would make sense to bury useful pots in the ground or hide them in a tree hollow or fallen log for later reuse.

    You are really trying hard to justify your biggotty bigotedness,

    #Anti-Boongismrules

    PS. Not many woolly mammoths to make ivory boomerangs out of in Paleolithic Oz.

  171. Percy Popinjay

    Mr. Trumble, why do you think you were such a consistent failure at polls

    “Because, Mr Rambler and let me defer to brevity here, as I usually do in respect of most matters that lesser mortals might bother me about while in the presence of such greatness, deliberately diverting me from my life’s work of waddling around, interminably extolling the virtues of myself, the ALPBC, the economic benefits of renewable energy sources and the reasons why I will not tolerate my shining political legacy being besmirched by the likes of revolting peasants such as your good self, – err, what was the question again?”

  172. Second Question:

    You have been accused of waffling on, interminably.
    Do you have an answer to that?

  173. Notafan

    Isn’t the point here that Aboriginal culture remained firmly in the stone age and including the incredibly slim pickings from that in modern science and mathematics classes is just plain stupid?

    They aren’t the only remnant stone age culture in the world, in any case.

  174. Mother Lode

    Their failure to discover pottery still boggles my mind given that Australia possesses natural clay deposits and Aboriginals knew how to use fire.

    I used to wonder about that too. But pots are kind of heavy, and fragile, which would be slightly problematic for nomadic peoples. And the best they could probably manage would be baked clay rather than fired because a kiln is not something you carry around either.

  175. Bruce of Newcastle

    If the camp was a semi-permanent one then it would make sense to bury useful pots in the ground or hide them in a tree hollow or fallen log for later reuse.

    Human nature was the same then as now. If not nailed down it’ll be nicked.

    Pottery makes sense in combination with agriculture, where the people necessarily have to stay in one place. Which allows them to defend stuff they have which can’t easily be carried around. Agriculture gives the food to allow them to do that, and pottery gives an improved means to store surpluses that rats can’t get at. And cook stuff in, which makes food more digestible.

    You can be a nomad and carry pottery…provided you have access to pack animals. Aboriginal Australians had no domesticable load carrying animals available. And no decent species for high yield agriculture. And poor soils. And frequent droughts.

    Australia is a busted flush when it comes to human advancement. Just did not have any sufficiently A class useful species.

  176. Tel

    There should be an investigation into why after giving the auto makers heaps of govt money nobody wanted to buy the cars they made. I think it shows that govt subsidies do not work

    Australia used to be great at swimming, back when the Olympic selection process was to go down to the beach and look around for who seems pretty quick. Then government stepped in to help things out a bit, now we struggle in swimming.

    Australia used to be great at cricket, back when Don Bradman was practicing out in the yard with a fence paling. Then government stepped in to help things out a bit, now we have Cricket Australia.

    I’m from the government, and I’m here to help!

  177. Roger

    There should be an investigation into why after giving the auto makers heaps of govt money nobody wanted to buy the cars they made. I think it shows that govt subsidies do not work

    Every auto industry in the world is subsidised to some extent, even Japan’s, with some – e.g. the US – receiving much higher levels than Australia’s ever did. Without subsidies the cost of unit production here, which was higher than competitors due to the relative absence of economies of scale, labour costs and other factors, could not be sustained.

  178. Elle

    Second Question:

    You have been accused of waffling on, interminably.
    Do you have an answer to that?

    Lifts his jacket collar and discreetly whispers into the link up to home – Luucccy! Help me!

  179. Woolfe

    Tintarella di Luna Here is my rejected comment.

    I’m going to query it as it is true.

    Alex is a “business” man who makes money from renewables and pays tax in Singapore not Australia.

  180. Rae

    Every auto industry in the world is subsidised to some extent, even Japan’s, with some – e.g. the US – receiving much higher levels than Australia’s ever did. Without subsidies the cost of unit production here, which was higher than competitors due to the relative absence of economies of scale, labour costs and other factors, could not be sustained.

    Correct.

  181. max

    Melbournians afraid to go out. Hype, right ?

    Not to the retired couple who moved from Townsville and who spoke to my daughter. They don’t know Melbourne at all and, hoping to see a lot more of beloved grandchildren, bought a place in Tarneit out west. Going to the supermarket became an ordeal. Glowering looks and sullen menace from young layabouts in the shopping centre. Little or no English from people working at the local market. It got to the point where they really were afraid for their safety going out so they sold their house and moved to a small town – one that hasn’t yet been overrun by refugees.

    Will older Australians be shunted off to Nauru ? I hear there are vacancies. Better health care, too.

  182. Tel

    Every auto industry in the world is subsidised to some extent, even Japan’s, with some – e.g. the US – receiving much higher levels than Australia’s ever did.

    If that’s really the case then where is this supposed subsidy coming from?

    In other words, which other industry do they have that is so incredibly efficient it can not only carry itself but also bear the weight of the subsidized auto industry? Must be something real good I guess.

  183. Makka

    What’s happening?

    Friday short covering.

  184. Going to the supermarket became an ordeal.

    The nearest Aldi to me is in a “diverse” suburb.
    Very secure. No problems.

    You ought to see the size of the Maori security guy.

  185. Zatara

    Every auto industry in the world is subsidised to some extent, even Japan’s, with some – e.g. the US – receiving much higher levels than Australia’s ever did.

    Other than bailing out GM, funding the short-lived Cash For Clunkers program, and the ridiculous amounts of subsidies for green automotive technology (all Obama actions) the US does not directly subsidize auto production.

    A number of protective measures are in place to help US manufacturers over foreign makers, but those protections aren’t subsidies, and they are ineffective when the foreign makers have local factories.

  186. I am bespoke

    If your trying to kill a hopping roo for food then your doing it the hard way.

  187. Roger

    A number of protective measures are in place to help US manufacturers over foreign makers, but those protections aren’t subsidies, and they are ineffective when the foreign makers have local factories.

    Sure, also factor in various incentives and tax breaks from state governments, but at the end of the day it amounts to a subsidy from the tax payer.

    I’m not arguing in favour of it, mind you, just making the observation.

  188. Viva

    Although these days it’s commonplace, I well remember the shock and outrage I felt when accused of being a Nazi about a decade ago in a blog forum I had happily posted in for years. Even though I had weathered many heated jousting matches with the lefties on site, I remember feeling that was the absolute last straw.

    Our friend and colleague Stumpy may well have had the same reaction as me having been so unjustly accused of anti semitism here. I never went back. I hope the disgust Stimpy must be feeling doesn’t lead him to the same decision. His unique perspective would be missed.

  189. Delta A

    When they’re good women are superb; and when they’re not they’re clementine ford.

    Liberty quote.

  190. Woolfe

    Ross Cameron fired from Sky.

  191. Carpe Jugulum

    Ross Cameron has been sacked from Sky

  192. Viva

    Stimpy! Bugger auto correct!

  193. JC

    Jeez lord, bit extreme

    Residents in Tanzania’s biggest city have been urged to inform on their neighbours and friends ahead of a police operation to hunt down and jail homosexuals.

    A 17-member committee appointed by Paul Makonda, Dar es Salaam’s powerful regional commissioner, will attempt to identify all gay men living in the coastal city after it first convenes next Monday.

    I’m taking a rough guess. There’s no Mardi Gras parade there.

  194. Tel

    Sure, also factor in various incentives and tax breaks from state governments, but at the end of the day it amounts to a subsidy from the tax payer.

    So if the local Mafia goons come around and give you a black eye, that’s actually a subsidy from the Mafia because they could have given you two black eyes?

  195. JC

    Makka

    Be careful over there, dude.

  196. Neil

    Every auto industry in the world is subsidised to some extent, even Japan’s, with some – e.g. the US – receiving much higher levels than Australia’s ever did. Without subsidies the cost of unit production here, which was higher than competitors due to the relative absence of economies of scale, labour costs and other factors, could not be sustained.

    Yes. But why did nobody want to buy aussie made cars? Locally made car sales crashed from 25% to only 10% of the market under Rudd/Gillard. Take away fleet car sales and nobody was buying them. The auto makers were getting all the subsidy money they asked for from Rudd/Gillard.

    Looks like subsidies make may manufacturers lazy because they think with subsidies the industry will survive

  197. Roger

    Ross Cameron fired from Sky.

    Surely ‘Outsiders’ is/was pre-recorded…

  198. JC

    Subsidies are and have always been the devils brew, Neil. Good call.

  199. Snoopy

    But why did nobody want to buy aussie made cars? Locally made car sales crashed from 25% to only 10% of the market under Rudd/Gillard

    Because Folden were making taxis and potential customers were buying SUVs and 4WD utes.

  200. Zatara

    Looks like subsidies make may manufacturers lazy because they think with subsidies the industry will survive

    Subsidies are generally cash paid from the taxpayers to keep Unions happy. Manufacturers are just the middlemen. In that environment Unions can rapidly price the manufacturers products out of the market.

  201. JC

    Where were their suv’s made?

  202. Robber Baron

    I can’t wait for Q and A with Turnbull. I wish it was on tonight. It will be a ratings winner. Canberra’s brothels and restaurants will be vacant between the hours of 8.00PM and 9.00PM on Thursday 8 November. Snowcone will be sporting a hard on that just won’t quit. Television history will be made. Turnbull will destroy any chance that Morrison had of saving the furniture.

  203. Roger

    Yes. But why did nobody want to buy aussie made cars?

    I suggest it’s because because consumers perceived them as poor value against comparable imported makes and local makers were always behind trends rather than driving them.

    I know that Ford Falcon sales slumped during the 2000s; that signalled the beginning of the end.

  204. Rae

    Ross Cameron fired from Sky.

    The pretence is over. His replacement will be an actual cigar store indian.

  205. Bruce of Newcastle

    But why did nobody want to buy aussie made cars?

    Carbon tax + payroll tax + unionized wukkas + ridiculous regulation = expensive shoddy cars.

    Recall that the wukkas at Toyota were agreeing to take a pay cut to keep their jobs when Justice Mordy Bromberg of s18c infamy stopped them from voting because fairness or something. Whereupon Toyota closed the operation.

    The full bench of the Federal Court unanimously overturned his judgement by which time Toyota were long gone.

  206. Cassie of Sydney

    “Woolfe
    #2855079, posted on November 2, 2018 at 2:06 pm
    Tintarella di Luna Here is my rejected comment.

    I’m going to query it as it is true.

    Alex is a “business” man who makes money from renewables and pays tax in Singapore not Australia.”

    Good luck with that. I queried a rejected comment two weeks ago. I never heard back.

  207. OldOzzie

    I have to agree with Sky News sacking of Ross Cameron

    Ross Cameron sacked as Sky News Outsiders co-host

    Sascha O’Sullivan Cadet Journalist

    Co-host of Sky News’ Outsiders program, Ross Cameron has been fired from Sky News after “unacceptable” comments he made on Tuesday night.

    “If you go to the Disneyland in Shanghai on any typical morning of the week you’ll see twenty thousand black-haired, slanty-eyed, yellow-skinned Chinese desperate to get into Disneyland.” Cameron said on Tuesday night’s program.

    All podcast and digital copies of Tuesday’s program have been removed from all online platforms.

    “Sky News is committed to robust discussion and debate however this language is totally unacceptable and has no place on any of our platforms, nor in modern Australia society,” A statement released by Sky News CEO, Paul Whittaker, said.

    “We apologise for any hurt or offence caused by the remarks made by Ross Cameron,” the statement continued.

    Statement from Sky News Chief Executive Paul Whittaker regarding Ross Cameron. pic.twitter.com/wepBbYd5dT
    — Sky News Australia (@SkyNewsAust) November 2, 2018

  208. Notafan

    “If you go to the Disneyland in Shanghai on any typical morning of the week you’ll see twenty thousand black-haired, slanty-eyed, yellow-skinned Chinese desperate to get into Disneyland.” Cameron said on Tuesday night’s program.

    Why did he say that?

  209. Indolent

    I subscribed to Foxtel a couple of months ago and told them at the time that one of the main reasons was to see Outsiders. I will now have to reconsider and the way I feel at the moment it will be ta ta.

    The leftists can say whatever they like, up to an including death threats, not only without repercussions but often with plaudits. Something is wrong somewhere.

  210. Some of the land in Australia was clearly suited to agriculture had Aborigines a mind to settle in one spot and if they brought dogs with them why not other useful animals?

    The movement of people into Australia predates the domestication of four legged animals. Our local fauna are particularly unsuitable for the purpose.

  211. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Migrant caravan: Texas militia eager to confront those headed to US border

    By Boer Deng
    The Times
    1 minute ago November 2, 2018
    No Comments

    An armed militia in Texas is marching to the Mexican border to confront thousands of migrants making their way to the US.

    Up to 200 volunteers of the Texas Minutemen are heading to the Rio Grande River to join regular troops dispatched by President Trump, according to Shannon McGauley, a bail bondsman who is president of the group.

    Their deployment has raised fears of vigilantism in border towns, with the US border patrol warning residents to beware of “possible armed civilians”.

    The militiamen say they are protecting their country against gangsters and criminals who they believe are among the thousands of Central Americans trying to reach the US. “These people are breaking the law,” Mr McGauley said. “They’re fleeing from an area they didn’t like and they’re bringing that over here.”

    He has called for supporters to join the group as several migrant “caravans” approach. The closest is not expected to reach the border for two weeks. “We have people from all over, even two from Canada,” he said

    From the Oz.

  212. Mother Lode

    I can’t wait for Q and A with Turnbull. I wish it was on tonight. It will be a ratings winner.

    The left will love it, as Trumble gives them a whole range of new excuses to hang their hate on.

    The hate is a constant, it is always boiling up within. But unless they can articulate it, put it into words, it stays trapped inside until it bursts out. That is why so many of their rants are so unhinged and make so little sense. Give them a narrative to vent with and they are good to go.

  213. Ross Cameron’s ponderous musings were starting to give me the shits, so I’m not to sad to see him go. The Russian poisoning stuff made him look loopy.

  214. Old School Conservative

    Why did he (Cameron) say that?

    IIRC, it was in the context of praising China and arguing for greater involvement by Australia with China’s trade. He also mentioned the reliance of Australian universities on Chinese students.

    I heard the comment and was bemused at the time that he should simultaneously talk China up and also use a derogatory descriptor of her people.

    He probably thought for a nano second that “slanty eyed” was a unique and non-threatening description of the country he was supporting.

    I’m sure he will, in this time of stress, be stoic in his acceptance of life’s adversity.

  215. Cassie of Sydney

    “Indolent
    #2855117, posted on November 2, 2018 at 3:09 pm
    I subscribed to Foxtel a couple of months ago and told them at the time that one of the main reasons was to see Outsiders. I will now have to reconsider and the way I feel at the moment it will be ta ta.

    The leftists can say whatever they like, up to an including death threats, not only without repercussions but often with plaudits. Something is wrong somewhere.”

    Agree entirely. I am sick of the double standards. I also will now review my subscription. I watched the episode in question and heard what Ross said in context. I didn’t think much of it. And why wasn’t he offered the opportunity to apologise on camera. In fact, Ross is one of the greatest apologists for China on television.

    What bothers me is that Sky is running scared and caving to intimidation from the left and various GetUp activists. The left are trying to shut down Sky and are constantly on the attack with the latest being the taunt….”Sky after Dark”.

    Sky will lose subscribers….deservedly…if they continue to do this.

  216. Tintarella di Luna

    Tintarella di Luna Here is my rejected comment.

    I’m going to query it as it is true.

    Alex is a “business” man who makes money from renewables and pays tax in Singapore not Australia.

    Bloody hell woolfe so the snowflakes at the Oz can’t handle the truth or maybe it’s not THEIR truth.

  217. jupes

    Ross Cameron fired from Sky.

    I’d expect nothing less from such a gay-arsed station. They even have a segment called “Trump Watch” on one of their stupid morning shows.

    BTW Cameron is pro-China and was defending them in that comment. His point was that they aren’t a threat to the west and that they embrace western culture.

    I agree with Cameron on the appearance of Chinese people but I disagree with him on their intent.

  218. Old School Conservative

    Notafan
    #2855116, posted on November 2, 2018 at 3:08 pm
    Why did he say that?

    Here’s another theory.
    He was tired. It was, after all, yet another post-11pm time slot for him.
    Are Sky really trying to support Outsiders or slowly strangle them/it?

  219. Mindfree

    Re: Ross cameron

    What’s going to happen to the Outsiders now?

    Replace him with Janine Parrot or Nicholas Reece? (You think I’m joking?)

    Or just can the whole program – it will be interesting to see what happens from here

    PS I reckon the decision to move them to 11pm weeknights was the start of the nobbling

  220. jupes

    I have to agree with Sky News sacking of Ross Cameron

    Why?

  221. John Constantine

    Ross Cameron is one of the biggest boosters China has in Australia.

    He would be happy to let the one belt one road thing just rip.

  222. Cactus

    I just dont support these firings. I want colour, movement, controversial opinions. I dont like his description of Chinese people, dont care for it at all and wouldnt say it. But everyone should be able to say stuff. It’s that simple.

  223. Infidel Tiger

    Ross Cameron is one of the biggest boosters China has in Australia.

    He would be happy to let the one belt one road thing just rip

    He’s a crackpot.

    Loves totalitarian dictatorships and Assange.

    Good riddance.

  224. OldOzzie

    Notafan
    #2855116, posted on November 2, 2018 at 3:08 pm

    “If you go to the Disneyland in Shanghai on any typical morning of the week you’ll see twenty thousand black-haired, slanty-eyed, yellow-skinned Chinese desperate to get into Disneyland.” Cameron said on Tuesday night’s program.

    = Why did he say that?

    Indolent
    #2855117, posted on November 2, 2018 at 3:09 pm

    I subscribed to Foxtel a couple of months ago and told them at the time that one of the main reasons was to see Outsiders. I will now have to reconsider and the way I feel at the moment it will be ta ta.

    The leftists can say whatever they like, up to an including death threats, not only without repercussions but often with plaudits. Something is wrong somewhere.

    from the post above

    https://twitter.com/SkyNewsAust/status/1058194426244329473

    RossCameron should not have been sacked. He was not being racist. He described a particular ethnic group, with no racist or malicious intent. I’ve listened to the recording. Context and tone are everything!

    Free Speech is dead.

    It isn’t nice … I agree…. but not sackworthy…. I was referring to the history of voices being shut down by Sky are never of the left no matter what is said.

    Like Clinton said ‘all blacks look the same’.

    Exactly. Apparently that’s perfectly fine. But ‘oh no, a Conservative has said something which could be seen as malicious, even though it’s not. Let’s take it out of context and have him silenced. ‘ The Left will kill free speech.

    NotaFan,

    I have no idea why he said it, but I find it offensive the same as Hillary Clinton’s comment above.

    Indolent and Cassie of Sydney

    I agree with both of you re Double Standards and yes Sky News will lose if they only regurgitate GetUp and Left Wing Views

  225. Armadillo

    Trump seems to have “ramped up” his stump speech a bit. Good to see.

  226. Top Ender

    Outsiders on Sunday morning is OK, but too long.

    Putting it on every night at 11pm was silly. As if you’d copy it and watch it the next morning – if you could.

    Ross Cameron on Paul Murray Live was good for a manic rant now and again. Or a good fisticuffs with someone. They’re one of the reasons for watching. Anodyne commentators all agreeing with each other are boring.

  227. Armadillo

    They even have a segment called “Trump Watch” on one of their stupid morning shows.

    This is where the left “don’t get it”. Any publicity is good publicity. People then start paying attention to his message, and quickly figure out that much of what he says is truth.

    The more they hound him, the more ridiculous and vindictive they look.

  228. Notafan

    The movement of people into Australia predates the domestication of four legged animals. Our local fauna are particularly unsuitable for the purpose.

    I think that was, in part, my point.

    Aren’t the nomads that came without dogs probably not the same as the ones we now call Aboriginals?

    In any case I am not offering any particular criticism of a stone age people other than to say that needing to include their ‘wisdom’ in science and maths classes is idiotic.

    There is nothing romantic or superior about a tribal culture whose members lives were invariably hard scrabble, brutal and short.

  229. Mindfree

    I have another theory on Cameron’s sacking – he made a comment re: Australian Conservation Foundation toerag Kelly O’Shannasy who made the comment “Monsters on Sky after Dark” at the Press Club (NPC) and RC’s response was in relation to her loopy remarks about “continued gas and coal usage resulting in millions of people will die in an uninhabitable planet” was to call out the “world’s greatest bullshit story”

    I think their (Outsiders) stance against “Climate Change” was the real reason to get Cameron sacked. Rowan, you might be next if the show is kept on

    Like Latham before him the pieces of human excrement on the left were just looking for an out to get it done and Whittaker just like the jelly back Frangelopoulos (or whatever his name) dutifully obliged

    PS I’m told Latham’s sacking was nothing to do with the Sydney High school kid he made comments about but comments on the ever growing politically correct environment in the big corporations and calling out and shaming the corporate slut HR managers

  230. Top Ender

    I just asked a Chinesey mate of mine about this and he thought it very strange.

    He made the point that Chinese are in fact possessed of black hair, and their eyes are indeed slanted compared to ours.

    He pointed out too that Chinese in general have lots of generic remarks about Westerners involving our overall looks, habits, and abilities which are generally regarded as funny and acceptable.

  231. The Trumble Q n A lotto should be for the number of times the word “Abbott” is used.

    Abbottlotto

  232. Robber Baron

    I don’t think The Outsiders and Sky are a good fit. It started off with Latham, Cameron and Dean, then Latham fell foul of management with some comments; it was always a matter of time before Cameron would also make that error.

    It’s time Sky renamed the program, The Survivor.

  233. Armadillo

    Ask him if we all “look the same”?

  234. Boambee John

    Mother Lode at 1515

    “The left will love it, as Trumble gives them a whole range of new excuses to hang their hate on.

    The hate is a constant, it is always boiling up within.”

    Leftism: An obsession with power over others, built on foundations of hate and envy.

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