Open Forum: November 3, 2018

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1,219 Responses to Open Forum: November 3, 2018

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  1. zyconoclast

    What is the White Privilege Symposium?

    The White Privilege Symposium (WPS) Denver is an evening followed by a full day event designed to examine patterns, cultures, and systems that contribute to identity, power, and privilege. In examining and challenging concepts of privilege and oppression, WPS Denver offers solutions and team building strategies to work towards a more equitable world. The event is open to everyone and invites diverse perspectives to provide a comprehensive look at issues of privilege, including race, gender, sexuality, class, disability, and other intersections of identity.

  2. zyconoclast

    Major Ingredient in Ben and Jerry’s ‘Resist’ Ice Cream Declared Racist

    But perhaps they should rename it “Pecan Racist,” because according to animal welfare activist group PETA, a main ingredient included in the flavor is exactly that — racist. In March 2017, PETA wrote that “dairy milk has long been embraced as a symbol of white supremacy.”

  3. Oh come on

    Ask and ye shall receive!

  4. Hey Sinc, are we going to get a US midterms prediction thread too? Those are always fun.

  5. .

    A note to TE. …

    “I recommend this book

    https://www.amazon.com/Jaws-Death-Sharks-Predator-Prey/dp/1602390215

    Read up on the MV Dona Paz.

    Terrifying stuff.”

  6. Oh come on

    Not as fun as the 2016 Presidential election thread, m0nty. You loved that one so much that your hangover lasted for several months.

  7. Not looking forward to this one, OCO? Who knows, Putin could pull a rabbit out of his hat for you again.

  8. .

    How does Vlad. P. control all 50 states, US territories and D.C.’s voting systems, monty?

  9. DrBeauGan

    I agree but the correlation between getting high scores in IQ tests and being successful in life is pretty weak,

    Tel, have you considered the possibility that very intelligent people don’t have the same objectives as the average person? Maybe they don’t think having large houses, fast cars and impressing the neighbours is worth the effort. Or having status and prestige in large organisations might look rather stupid.

    Maybe they think being happy is more important. And maybe they are. Which would account nicely for the weak correlation.

    Just a thought.

  10. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I claim this thread in the name of Winston Churchill, the greatest Conservative leader of all time, and declare this thread, a zone free of fascist hyenas.

  11. zyconoclast

    The end of toxic chemo? Blocking vitamin B-2 may stop cancer

    Starving cancer cells of energy
    Prof. Lisanti and his colleagues used drug-screening to identify the compound, which is called diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI).

    As the researchers explain, various cell assays and other cell culture experiments revealed that DPI reduced over 90 percent of the energy produced in the cells’ mitochondria.

    DPI achieved this by blocking vitamin B-2 — also known as riboflavin — which depleted the cells of energy.

    “Our observation is that DPI is selectively attacking the cancer stem cells, by effectively creating a vitamin deficiency […]. In other words, by turning off energy production in cancer stem cells, we are creating a process of hibernation.”

  12. How does Vlad. P. control all 50 states, US territories and D.C.’s voting systems, monty?

  13. JC

    Does Tony N fall in that category, Ronery? You recall the leftoid, right? You used to try and suck his dick like the site’s one true cocksucker you’ve always been.
    Another one of your pals who got the boot. You sure pick’em. 🙂

  14. Oh come on

    Not looking forward to this one, OCO? Who knows, Putin could pull a rabbit out of his hat for you again.

    LOL all those hours of therapy and you still haven’t accepted reality, m0nts. Wussians Wussians Wussians!

  15. JC

    I’m not sure that holds for all smart people, Doc. Human traits are broadly the same up and down the bell curve. Also, I would argue the most intellectually stimulating jobs would be high up in organizations. Janitor requirements aren’t as mentally stimulating as being the CEO or CFO for instance.

  16. DrBeauGan

    I’m not sure that holds for all smart people, Doc. Human traits are broadly the same up and down the bell curve. Also, I would argue the most intellectually stimulating jobs would be high up in organizations. Janitor requirements aren’t as mentally stimulating as being the CEO or CFO for instance.

    There are a lot of top business people of very mediocre intellect, JC. If a man wants intellectual stimulus, he should try to make sense of quantum mechanics rather than trying to rise in an organisation, which only requires flattering the vanity of fatheads.

  17. DrBeauGan

    Man whose p3nis and t3sticles were bitten off and eaten by bulldog ‘was alone in room with the animal and had peanut butter spread on his crotch’

    I think we can save conclude the man’s IQ was less than that of the bulldog.

  18. zyconoclast

    Radical Muslim should be allowed to leave the country he hates: court

    Justice Des Fagan further urged authorities to assist violent career criminal Mohamed Naaman to realise his dream of leaving the country to live in Lebanon as “it would appear to suit all parties”.

  19. JC

    Doc

    I think you make it sound easy doing well in business. It’s not as easy as you think it is. I’m sure the talent variance in the field of quantum mechanics would be similar to those who succeed or fail in the business world.

  20. Mitch M.

    Maybe they think being happy is more important. And maybe they are. Which would account nicely for the weak correlation.

    Just a thought.

    Exactly what I said on the previous OF. Something many people don’t understand is that high intelligence also comes with the person making decisions not so dictated by cultural imperatives. That’s one reason why they can be “difficult” and eccentric. Not everyone wants to be rich and successful and many don’t think those qualities are so important in life. The higher the intelligence the more likely the person is to be nonconformist in such decisions. Business people don’t always get that, they often seem to think that everyone has the same life goals as themselves.

  21. Oh come on

    I’m fine with the GOP losing the HoR to the Dems. Obviously it would be better for the GOP to hold the house but history suggests it won’t and current polling suggests there’s a decent chance it won’t. If the GOP loses the Senate, I’d be dismayed.

    I’d dearly love it if the GOP retained the HoR just to enjoy the spectacle of the leftist head explosions – that would be epic. But there’s a good chance we’re going to see a Speaker Pelosi redux. That’s OK – the current HoR has sent a bunch of good legislation to the Senate where it’s died for want of 60 votes. A Dem-controlled HoR can send all the wacky shit it likes to the Senate, where it will also die from the threat of being filibustered into nothing. That’s fine. 2020 is looking great if Trump is running against the Dem crazies who stand to take over the HoR committees if the Dems take the house in a few says.

    Just to be clear, here’s what I think and what you can hold me to, m0nts:

    GOP retains majority in both chambers of Congress – hilarious! I’d love this to happen just for the spectacle of the vanquished opposition.

    GOP retains congressional majority and secures 60 Senate seats – highly unlikely but if it did happen, wow. Shit would get real.

    GOP loses control of HoR but retains control of Senate – meh. I mean, not ideal but…meh. Could well be an asset in 2020, assuming the Dems remain crazy. Which they almost certainly will.

    GOP loses control of the HoR and Senate – that’s really bad. (Unlikely but this would be a bad bad very bad scenario.)

    GOP loses control of the HoR and the Senate, and the Dems win a filibuster-proof majority in the Senate – total disaster. God help us all. (Extraordinarily unlikely result, but if it happened…see above.)

  22. mh

    Monty,

    US politics has had a devastating effect on your health.

    You need to sit out the mid-terms.

  23. DrBeauGan

    I think you make it sound easy doing well in business. It’s not as easy as you think it is.

    I don’t think it’s easy, JC.

    Kerry Packer was very bright. So is Donald Trump. Both would have IQs well over 150. Gina is also smart. But they are none of them intellectuals, with an interest in thinking.

    I knew an Israeli multimillionaire who was certainly bright but he reacted to things. Chewing over a problem until he cracked it was beyond him. If he couldn’t see a solution inside half a second, he’d abandon the problem. Or hire someone to think about it.

  24. Infidel Tiger

    GOP can’t lose the Senate and will gain seats.

    House is a hard way one to call. Dems should win easily but they are lunatics. However, Trump would almost be better off negotiating with Dems than the weirdos in the Freedom Caucus.

  25. JC

    Mitch M

    Let me speculate a little. Men’s sexual desire is strong up and down the IQ ladder. I’ve seen suggestions there is more in the lower ranks of IQ ladder, however even if that’s the case, the desire to have sex with sheilas is what drives us and the human world.

    With that desire comes the need to attract the opposite sex. Power and money are attractive aphrodisiacs for women. Another word for that is status.

    I’m not so sure that only geeks have high intelligence.

  26. mh

    From 37 seconds ago!

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    37s
    Will be going to West Virginia and Indiana today, TWO RALLIES! Don’t tell anyone (big secret), but I will be bringing Coach Bobby Knight to Indiana. He’s been a supporter right from the beginning of the Greatest Political Movement in American History!

  27. JC

    But they are none of them intellectuals, with an interest in thinking.

    They think differently and don’t waste much time pondering. In any event an intellectual of the type you’re obviously thinking about would be terrible at the presidency as they end up being all tied up in decision making.

    I knew an Israeli multimillionaire who was certainly bright but he reacted to things. Chewing over a problem until he cracked it was beyond him. If he couldn’t see a solution inside half a second, he’d abandon the problem. Or hire someone to think about it.

    It why I loved trading, Doc. Short term intense thinking and no over intellectualizing. 🙂 There’s no reason to overthink anything.

  28. Mitch M.

    I’m not so sure that only geeks have high intelligence.

    I didn’t write that. Again, always think about these things statistically.

    I’ve seen suggestions there is more in the lower ranks of IQ ladder, however even if that’s the case, the desire to have sex with sheilas is what drives us and the human world.

    The higher the intelligence the fewer the children. There is also anecdotal evidence that geniuses were not particularly interested in that game. Robert Wright has recently written a book “Why Buddhism is True” and part of his argument is that evolution is not our friend, that it primarily interested in procreation; intelligence and happiness be damned. So I’m inclined to think that the more intelligent a person is the less likely they are to be driven by evolutionary created innate imperatives. In Buddhism the idea of transcendence is partly about being free of those imperatives and cultural conditioning; and also about not taking language as an explanation of the world.

  29. OCO, you are right that Congress is probably not going to pass much legislation no matter what happens in the midterms. The Freedom Caucus has a veto and it will use it for everything, unless the Hastert Rule is dropped for good.

    The Democrats getting control of the committees would be fun though. So much openly conducted GOP corruption to investigate.

  30. JC

    Infidel Tiger
    #2855522, posted on November 3, 2018 at 12:53 am

    GOP can’t lose the Senate and will gain seats.

    House is a hard way one to call. Dems should win easily but they are lunatics. However, Trump would almost be better off negotiating with Dems than the weirdos in the Freedom Caucus.

    US elections are freaking hard, man. There’s what… 530 odd seats in the Congress and 40 or so are what will determine the result.

    I’ve seen anecdotes written about early polling results and they sound okay for the GOP. But then you read how the GOP has given up on some seats as they believe they are lost.

  31. Amazing US job and wage numbers

    Convenient that the next inflation number drops just after the election. Interest rates going up up up!

  32. Oh come on

    GOP can’t lose the Senate and will gain seats.

    Agree.

    House is a hard way one to call. Dems should win easily but they are lunatics.

    Yes. Talk about putting the ‘wild’ into wildcard.

    However, Trump would almost be better off negotiating with Dems than the weirdos in the Freedom Caucus.

    I don’t think so. There will be no Dem negotiations with Trump. They are running against him. He could offer them the farm – like he did with the Dreamers – and they won’t accept it, as they didn’t with the broad amnesty for Dreamers that was on the table. Trump could offer the most progressive Dems everything they ever wanted, and they’ll turn him down. They’re running against him – his policies are a secondary concern.

  33. mh

    To celebrate Trump’s tweet, a song about West Virginia:

    John Denver – Take Me Home, Country Roads
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1vrEljMfXYo

    And a song about Indiana:

    R Dean Taylor – Indiana Wants Me
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fZL_tZxyBDo

  34. JC

    The Democrats getting control of the committees would be fun though. So much openly conducted GOP corruption to investigate.

    Oh yes, can’t wait. Seriously I can’t wait for the laughs. The possible next chairman of the banking and finance committee.

  35. Oh come on

    The Democrats getting control of the committees would be fun though. So much openly conducted GOP corruption to investigate.

    You’re right. Let the spirit of Ken Starr prevail! That’ll work out well.

  36. Top Ender

    Nice clean Fred you’ve got here.

    Shame if anything should happen to it.

    $50 each in an envelope to the usual address please.

  37. Oh come on

    Hey, m0nts. Remember Muellerween? How’s that working out for you?

  38. Top Ender

    Thanks for the book recommend Dot.

    Must admit my shark understanding is based on scuba diving for 30 years.

    They tend to be nice to divers. Unless they can’t see you in murky water.

    All bull sharks must die. Grey nurses, I luv you.

  39. JC

    I can’t find the vid, but it was a beauty. Low IQ Maxine was in the banking and finance committee asking bankers really stupid questions. One dude, became antagonistic towards her because she was asking such dumb questions. She realized what was going on and became angry and he returned fire by almost laughing at her. She got even angrier. It was great.

  40. mh

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    29m
    Wow! The U.S. added 250,000 Jobs in October – and this was despite the hurricanes. Unemployment at 3.7%. Wages UP! These are incredible numbers. Keep it going, Vote Republican!

  41. C.L.

    Violent offender literally throws police girl from her car; her police girl colleague is no help.
    Luckily, two male civilians arrive to save the day.

  42. Infidel Tiger

    If Trump does win the House that is the biggest electoral victory in memory.

    Where the hell do the Dems and the media go after that? They have tried everything.

  43. Jo Smyth

    There is no doubt the Republicans will win both the House and the Senate? We ARE talking about President Donald Trump who also happens to be the greatest marketing machine.

  44. JC

    Monst

    Maxine Waters.. If the D’rats win the House, I’ll be posting that name every time I see you fat head here.

  45. mh

    CNBC headline:

    Jobs smash estimates with gain of 250,000, wage gains pass 3% for first time since recession

  46. Mark A

    mh
    #2855543, posted on November 3, 2018 at 1:22 am

    Great optics with Air Force One in the background

    Maybe great optics but the tweets run almost 100% against him there.

  47. areff

    JC: don’t think this is the clip you mentioned, but Mad Maxine is in full loon mode throughout:

  48. Zatara

    OCTOBER JOBS: +250K…
    MANUFACTURING: +32K…
    HISPANIC UNEMPLOYMENT ALL TIME LOW…
    WAGE GAINS STRONGEST IN DECADE…
    POLL: TRUMP APPROVAL 51%…
    RECORD 156,562,000 EMPLOYED

    That’s not a bad set of headlines going into the weekend before the mid-terms. (h/t Drudge)

  49. mh

    Maybe great optics but the tweets run almost 100% against him there.

    Thanks, Scoop

  50. Oh come on

    To be fair, JC, the overwhelming majority of HoR seats aren’t in contention. It’s the several dozen that are in play that determine the HoR majority.

    Take John Conyers as an example. He was brought down because the geriatric couldn’t resist pawing the help. #metoo and all that. Conyers quit, but he successfully anointed his son to inherit his seat. He wasn’t even subtle about it. And for every Conyers protecting their feudal turf, there’s a Republican congressman cemented to their seat and working to predetermine their legacy. It’s a bipartisan problem.

  51. DrBeauGan

    It why I loved trading, Doc. Short term intense thinking and no over intellectualizing. 🙂 There’s no reason to overthink anything.

    It’s a matter of linguistic acuity. Some people can’t easily distinguish two spots on a piece of paper if they are close together and just see one blob; they have poor visual acuity. A bigger telescope lets you see two stars where a smaller one shows just one. In a similar way, some people cannot distinguish the meaning of two sentences. For some people, aggressiveness and belligerence mean the same thing. They lack conceptual acuity. They can’t make fine distinctions.

    Sometimes fine distinctions can make a considerable difference and sometimes they don’t. You prefer the sort of world where they don’t and I prefer the sort of world where they do. That’s because I enjoy thinking, which develops conceptual acuity. You like winning trades.

    It would be a boring old world if we were all the same.

  52. JC

    A good one, but that’s not it, Areff. I think it was back between 2010/2013.

    I recall the dude saying, in a frustrated tone…

    What are you talking about?

    and it sent her over the edge with anger, because the tone suggested he thought she’s a moron.

  53. Steve trickler

    Some old footage of a bunch of vegans, stealing a chook.



  54. Oh come on

    That’s because I enjoy thinking, which develops conceptual acuity. You like winning trades.

    Dr Beau, this statement of yours lacks “fine distinctions”. The implied assertion that ‘there are two types of people in the world’ you put forth undermines your estimation of yourself. In this instance, you have shown yourself to be a binary thinker.

  55. DrBeauGan

    Dr Beau, this statement of yours lacks “fine distinctions”. The implied assertion that ‘there are two types of people in the world’ you put forth undermines your estimation of yourself. In this instance, you have shown yourself to be a binary thinker.

    I didn’t say that and don’t believe it, OCO. I think there are over 7.7 billion different sorts of people in the world. And counting.

  56. OldOzzie

    State of Disorder

    Victorian election: police hunt African teen suspects in chef-beating attack

    Samantha HutchinsonVictorian State Political Writer
    and Rachel Baxendale Victorian Political Reporter

    A young chef says he thought he was going to die when about 20 youths of African appearance set upon him with a metal pole, knuckle dusters and a champagne bottle, after asking him for a cigar­ette as he left a restaurant in ­Melbourne’s St Kilda at the end of a shift.

    “That’s what I was thinking … if it’s my turn to die — then well I’m basically ready for it,” 24-year-old chef Daniel Maetzing told Nine News.

    Victoria Police is hunting a group of teenagers who robbed two men and assaulted chefs in St Kilda on Thursday night, in a frightening attack that occurred outside the upmarket Donovans beachside restaurant.

    Mr Maetzing was one of three victims caught up in the rampage, which began at about 10pm when a group of 10-15 teens surrounded a 23-year-old man and demanded his wallet and phone, before assault­ing him.

    Half an hour later, a group of youths approached Mr Maetzing before assaulting him and leaving him with lacerations to the head.

    Other staff at Donovans are believe­d to have been caught up in the attack, with the husband of one employee reporting that the group was armed with metal bars and attack­ed about five chefs who had just finished their shift.

    The husband also said the youths had attempted to barricade other staff inside the restaurant to prevent them from helping their colleagues, all while terrified diner­s sat inside the restaurant.

    Victoria Police released footage yesterday of the teens congregating in a carpark opposite the restaurant and walking through the centre of St Kilda, at the end of a day when temperatures across the city soared to more than 33C and people flocked to the beach.

    The attack occurred just metres from the scene where, last December, more than 100 youths of African appearance robbed and mugged beachgoers, before congregating at the nearby McDonald’s, where they damaged more than $30,000 worth of property.

    A local, who wanted to remain anonymous, said yesterday that warmer weather made violence inevitable at the beach. “It’s a matte­r of when, not if,” she told The Weekend Australian. “And we’re sick of it … it gets hot and you always know how it’s going to end, with people fighting and police turning up. But the police are alway­s 20 minutes too late.”

    Detective Sergeant David Schaefer said the police were confident of catching the teens after securing a raft of CCTV footage from the area, but also appealed to witnesses who might have filmed the event on their phones.

    “These attacks are quite coward­ly and vicious and unprovoked and they’re an ugly event that has occurred in a normally peaceful environment where peopl­e enjoy themselves,” Sergeant Schaefer said. The police decline­d to speculate on how many youths were involved.

    A man who witnessed the brawl outside the restaurant told The Weekend Australian he had seen a man in chef whites and chequered pants fighting off a crowd of 10-15 youths of African appearance with a shovel, as he ran backwards ­towards the restaurant.

    The man, John, said: “It was a life-or-death situation, he had 10 or 15 kids surrounding him and they were coming for him. They really ­wanted to get him.”

    The attack represents the ­second major crime event in a week, after a group thought to be teens carried out a string of assault­s, robberies and a carjacking on Wednesday night across South Yarra, ending in the city’s southeast.

    The Coalition announced yesterday it would force convicted carjackers and home invade­rs to wear GPS ankle bracelets for a minimum of two years, with Opposition Leader Matthew Guy announcing the plan alongside a victim of two home invasions. “When people say that crime is not an issue in Melbourne, that these instances are just dealing with a growing population, they are ignoring the fact that crime is out of control in our city, and crime is out of control under Daniel Andrew­s and his government and they’ve ignored it for four years,” he said.

  57. OldOzzie

    Turnbull joins miserable ghosts haunting living rooms

    Gerard Henderson
    Columnist


    It was a Friday night in early March 2008 when I received a call from Malcolm Turnbull on my home phone. The (then) shadow treasurer was in an agitated state. He told me Brendan Nelson, who succeeded John Howard as Liberal Party leader in December 2007, was hopeless and should step down.

    I was not a Liberal Party member and I certainly did not have a vote in the partyroom. I doubted Nelson would be a successful opposition leader. However, I reminded Turnbull that Nelson had been leader for only a couple of months and that he deserved time.

    Turnbull’s position was that the Liberal Party would collapse unless Nelson was replaced by him. I advised patience and we never spoke about the issue again.

    As it turned out, Turnbull successfully challenged Nelson for the Liberal Party leadership in September 2008 and held the position until he was replaced by Tony Abbott in December 2009.

    The lesson from that exchange a decade ago was that Turnbull is impulsive and impatient.

    There is more evidence of this right now. A month ago the former prime minister was recorded making the following comment at a forum in New York: “When you stop being prime minister, that’s it. There is no way I’m going to be hanging around like embittered Kevin Rudd or Tony Abbott … these people are like some sort of miserable, miserable ghosts.”

    Turnbull is a clever man. So he would have expected that his “miserable ghosts” reference would raise attention.

    Rudd took the bait, Abbott remained silent. Returning to Sydney on October 22, Turnbull defended his decision not to publicly support Liberal candidate Dave Sharma in the Wentworth by-election on the basis that he had retired from politics. Then on Wednesday the ABC’s Q&A announced that Turnbull would be appearing on a special program next Thursday. There will be no one else on the panel. From retiree to miserable ghost in just more than a couple of weeks, it seems.

    ABC news and current affairs is in such poor shape at the moment that it cannot run a specialist current affairs program on its main channel late at night. The once news-setting Lateline died recently while on Emma Alberici’s watch, which leaves Q&A.

    During the early period of the Abbott government, Q&A presenter Tony Jones and executive producer Peter McEvoy used the program to promote Turnbull. It provided an opportunity for the ambitious Liberal to put on his leather jacket and appeal to a green-left audience on what are called progressive issues.

    In the lead-up to the 2013 election, the ABC’s Lateline and Q&A effectively had promoted Clive Palmer, then head of the Palmer United Party. Palmer narrowly defeated Liberal Party candidate Ted O’Brien in the Queensland seat of Fairfax.

    As Abbott said on Sky News’ The Bolt Report on Monday, the ABC criticises the Coalition and the Labor Party from the Left. That’s why the public broadcaster is so loved by the Greens and self-proclaimed “progressives”. The ABC is a conservative-free-zone without a conservative presenter, producer or editor on any of its prominent television, radio or online outlets, and many of its panels go to air without the voice of even one conservative commentator.

    However, the ABC has plenty of time to hear from disaffected present or former Liberal Party members. That’s why John Hewson appears so often on the public broadcaster. And that’s why Malcolm Fraser received such a friendly reception when he appeared on Q&A in 2010 with Jones in the presenter’s chair. Stand by for many appearances by Turnbull in the years ahead.

    The unfashionable fact — which dare not speak its name on the ABC or in Fairfax Media — is that Turnbull is primarily responsible for the Coalition’s present circumstances. He lost 14 seats to Labor in the July 2016 election. It was Turnbull’s idea to call a double-dissolution election, including an eight-week campaign. It was Turnbull’s decision to run a meaningless “jobs and growth” campaign and not take the attack to Bill Shorten and Labor on issues such as border protection and trade union abuse of power. It was the worst campaign by a government in recent memory.

    Turnbull led the Coalition to a narrow one-seat majority. Then, after he was replaced by Scott Morrison, he quit Wentworth causing an unnecessary by-­election. Then he intervened from New York by publicly advising the Prime Minister to refer Peter Dutton’s eligibility to sit in parliament to the High Court. Then from Indonesia he criticised Morrison’s decision to consider relocating the Australian embassy in Tel Aviv to Israel’s capital in Jerusalem.

    It was perfectly appropriate for Turnbull to discuss this matter with Indonesian President Joko Widodo when he represented Australia at the oceans conference in Bali. Where Turnbull erred was in talking to the media about his personal views following the meeting. That was entering the political debate, something he said he would not do three weeks ago. Turnbull gave the impression he believed Australia’s position on Israel should be determined by the attitude of the government in ­Indonesia. No former Liberal leader has been as disruptive as Turnbull so soon after losing the top position. The fact is that Abbott was quiet in the lead-up to the 2016 election. When Turnbull rejected Howard’s advice and refused to give his predecessor a good job after the 2016 election, Abbott made life tough for Turnbull, as he is quoted as acknowledging in David Speers’s new book, On Mutiny (MUP).

    Before the leadership change, Morrison advised Turnbull not to initiate a spill. He did. Morrison then supported Turnbull against Dutton’s challenge. When it was obvious Turnbull had lost the support of most of his colleagues, Morrison entered the contest and won. His reward is to be attacked and criticised by his predecessor in full miserable ghosts mode — soon to be brought to us all in its entirety on Q&A.

    Gerard Henderson is executive director of The Sydney Institute. His Media Watch Dog blog can be found at theaustralian.com.au.

  58. OldOzzie

    Andrew Gillum and the Mystery of 311 East Jennings Street

    By Steve Miller, RealClearInvestigations
    November 02, 2018

  59. OldOzzie

    Memo to PM: immigration cuts could be a vote-winner

    Judith Sloan
    Contributing Economics Editor

    At the rate the Morrison government is going, it will need only two or three second-hand Taragos to ferry around the surviving Liberal parliamentarians after the next election.

    For the life of me, I can’t understand why Scott Morrison doesn’t do something to avoid this outcome. But for a number of ­reasons — some fathomable, ­others a complete mystery — the Coalition government is surely heading towards the rocks of electoral annihilation.

    The most obvious thing to do is to cut the high rate of immigration with its associated high rate of population growth and the attendant urban pressures. Recall that immigration is contributing about two-thirds of population growth and the population is growing about 400,000 a year. The vast majority of new immigrants are crowding into Melbourne, Sydney and southeast Queensland.

    Now, you might have thought that the Prime Minister and his newly appointed Immigration Minister, David Coleman, would be fully briefed on current attitudes to ­immigration.

    But let me help: attitudes towards our high rate of immigration are now distinctly negative. Most people think the pop­ulation has been allowed to grow too quickly and the migrant intake should be curtailed. There is also a growing unease about the impact of immigration on our ­national identity.

    I can be even more helpful by providing some details on Australians’ attitudes towards ­immi­gration and how these are now changing. It would be fair to say that in the past most Australians have had a favourable view of ­immigration. The Roy Morgan poll, which goes back many years, shows that the majority of Australians have generally taken the view that the migrant intakes at the time have been about right or could be increased.

    To be sure, there have been variations over time. Periods of rising unemployment have always been associated with declining support for immigration, for instance.

    There has however been something of a structural break in attitudes to immigration over the past two or three years. According to a recent Newspoll, three-quarters of respondents favoured reducing the permanent migrant intake.

    In this year’s Lowy Poll, it was revealed that there had been a 14 percentage point jump from the previous year in the proportion of respondents who agreed that “the total number of migrants coming to Australia each year is too high”. Most (54 per cent) now agree with this statement. ­Additionally, 41 per cent agree that “if Australia is too open to people from all over the world, we risk losing our identity as a nation”.

    A poll conducted by Essential Research in April this year found that 54 per cent of respondents thought Australia’s population is growing too fast (only 4 per cent thought it was too slow) and 64 per cent expressed the view that the level of immigration has been too high over the past 10 years. Thirty-seven per cent thought the level of immigration was “much too high”.

    The Morrison government should also take note of the fact that the views of Labor voters don’t diverge greatly from those of Coalition voters when it comes to immigration. On the question of whether the level of immigration has been too high, 62 per cent of Labor voters held this view compared with 68 per cent of Coalition voters. Labor voters were more ­inclined to think that population growth is too fast than Coalition voters — 53 per cent compared with 50 per cent.

    The electoral message for the Morrison government is clear: there are Labor voters who could be swayed to change sides by promoting a distinctive and well-­defined population and immi­gration policy. It is interesting to note that in the Essential Research poll, nearly two-thirds of respondents agreed with the statement that “our cities can’t cope with further population growth and we should reduce immigration until the infrastructure is in place”.

    A fundamental question arises from this depiction of changing attitudes to population growth and immigration: Why have our political leaders failed to respond, by proposing to reduce the ­migrant intake, for instance?

    This question has been discussed by Katharine Betts of Swinburne University and The Australian Population Research Institute. Last year TAPRI conducted a survey of voters. In line with other poll results, it found that three-quarters of respondents thought that Australia did not need any more people. Just over half wanted a reduction in ­immigration.

    But as Betts notes: “Adverse public opinion has had little ­impact on policy.” According to her, there are two reasons for this: “political pressures on policy­makers applied by the growth lobby, Treasury and the Reserve Bank, and social pressures by cultural progressives (most of them university graduates)”.

    On the first reason, I have written about this in the past. We know that the Treasury holds the jaundiced view that the only thing that counts is GDP growth and the ­assumed associated growth of tax revenue. But, of course, from the point of view of living standards the measure that counts is per capita GDP growth.

    We also know that the GDP fails to take into account many ­aspects of daily living that matter to people — lack of congestion, ­access to affordable housing, education and health, cultural cohesiveness and the like.

    When it comes to the growth lobby, it is obvious why certain commercial groups would favour high rates of immigration — think property development, build­ing products, retailing and similar groups.

    These pressures have led to some very bizarre comments from certain politicians. NSW Planning Minister Anthony Roberts, for instance, recently ­declared that there is no such thing as over­development. His solution is for recalcitrant local governments and whingeing local citizens to get over their objection to rapid population growth.

    In the context of the recent policy change by NSW Premier ­Gladys Berejiklian to curb excessive population growth, these comments are extremely embarrass­ing. Just ask politicians about how many complaints they receive about overdevelopment — so many that it is simply referred to as OD.

    On the social pressures applied by cultural progressives, Betts notes that the TAPRI survey found that nearly two-thirds of ­respondents thought people who question high immigration are sometimes thought of as racists.

    Around one-third who agreed with this statement actually thought these sceptical people were racists, with an over­representation of graduates in this group. The other, much larger group thought the accusation was unfair “because very few of them are racists”.

    The overall conclusion that Betts draws is that people she refers to as “guardians” — they maintain that those who query high migrant ­intakes are racists and want an ­increase in immigration — have a disproportionate sway in the media as well as influencing the policy positions of the political parties.

    So my advice to Morrison is to get the real message. Your supporters are calling for a substantial reduction in the migrant intake. You could even pick up some Labor votes. It is not racist to be concerned about the pressures ­associated with excessive population growth. And forget half-baked proposals to send ­migrants to the regions — it will never work.

    Above all, remember that the “guardians” are not your friends, even those associated with factional groups within the Liberal Party.

    Judith Sloan
    Contributing Economics Editor

    Judith Sloan is an economist and company director. She holds degrees from the University of Melbourne and the London School of Economics. She has held a number of government appointments, including Commissioner… Read more

  60. OldOzzie

    Thanks Tom

    Pat Cross nails it today

    (Back to bed and hopefully sleep)

  61. calli

    Took Zatara’s advice and headed down the backroads to San Antonio. Lovely countryside and lots of funny little towns with Western-style commercial buildings. The freeway coming into town was dire though. One of those hideous elevated things that confuse the GPS.

    We’re a block away from the Alamo, so about to take advantage of the perfect weather and pay a visit. Perhaps I’ll get a coon skin cap to go with the Beloved’s cowboy number. Yee-haw!

  62. RobK

    BoN,
    In the setup descibed for the SA steelworks, it is said Gupta will install co-generation. I have seen co-generation in nickel sulphide roasters but I’m not familiar with steel making plant. The question is: would Gupta be able to run extra coal through the furnace arrangements if he needed some extra electricity. Put differently: could he arrange it so that the furnace provided the firming for heavily subsidised RE?

  63. The Barking Toad

    Thanks Tom – always a good start to the day.

    Zanetti nails Turncoat

  64. Leigh Lowe

    We’re a block away from the Alamo, so about to take advantage of the perfect weather and pay a visit. 

    Pop down and pay respects to Admiral Custer.

  65. Mark A

    Leigh Lowe
    #2855584, posted on November 3, 2018 at 7:02 am

    We’re a block away from the Alamo, so about to take advantage of the perfect weather and pay a visit.

    Pop down and pay respects to Admiral Custer.

    LOL
    I hates you LL!
    I thought of it first but got sidetracked.

  66. Bruce of Newcastle

    Rob – It’s conventional to generate steam from the hot gas exiting a smelter. The issue is the quality of the steam and whether it can be used for turbines. You probably know more about that than I.

    The steam from non-ferrous smelters is pretty low quality and is often used for stuff like heating process solutions, if there’s a wet plant attached.

    I’m not a blast furnace guy, but I presume the exit gas is used in preheating duties, for example the air to the tuyeres. Whether they can do steam generation then use the cooled furnace gas to do that preheating duty I don’t know. You can do the reading as easily as I could, or one of our Cat steel guys could tell us both.

    You can’t use extra coal in the blast furnace without stuffing up things like slag fluidity and pig iron quality. You could maybe inject pulverised coal into the off gas but how is that any different from a coal fired power station? The other option may be post-combustion of carbon monoxide – but that doesn’t generate much energy. They probably post-combust now, I haven’t looked it up as it’s not my field. Adding cool air to provide oxygen for the CO combustion offsets the energy of the combustion process, so raising steam from it isn’t going to be great I would think.

    I should really read up on all this. Ask me about non-ferrous metallurgy!

  67. Pickles

    Sister! Calli said coon!

  68. Boambee John

    m0nty
    #2855500, posted on November 3, 2018 at 12:13 am
    Not looking forward to this one, OCO? Who knows, Putin could pull a rabbit out of his hat for you again.

    More likely Xi for the Demorats.

    All that investment in the party since Bill Clinton needs a return. And with the info his Paki infiltrators got from the Congressional IT system, the party is his oyster.

  69. miltonf

    Great articles by Gerard and Judith. Thanks old ozzie. The libs really don’t like their base much. Is Slomo done with Trumble today?

  70. miltonf

    This included a statement that said NSW parliament “agrees with those who have described Mr Trump as ‘a revolting slug’ unfit for public office”. As the president of the upper house, Harwin allowed the term “revolting slug” to stand as suitable parliamentary language. The motion was passed

    The liberal party in 2016.

  71. duncanm

    Major Ingredient in Ben and Jerry’s ‘Resist’ Ice Cream Declared Racist

    note the ingredients..

    “Chocolate ice cream with white & dark fudge chunks, pecans, walnuts & fudge-covered almonds.”

    how appropriate. Surely the designer’s of that particular flavour are having a lend? 🙂

  72. RobK

    Thanks Bruce oN,
    I’ll read up on it when i can. The preheating sounds staight forward enough. If i had to guess, a combined circuit gas plant would compliment the RE component .

  73. Bruce of Newcastle

    Rob – Another thing: blast furnaces are batching operations, so Gupta may be planning to time blast furnace runs so that the steam raised can be used in turbines at night – to fit in with solar panel operation during the day.

  74. Shy Ted

    Don’t you people ever sleep?

  75. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ted – If I don’t get up the house mapgie stands on my front doormat and sings noisily until I do.
    I am his obedient servant.

    It’s ok – he lost his mate not long after their eggs hatched and he has three full-sized chicks to feed.

  76. RobK

    BoN,
    I expect a CC gas plant can be arraned to scavange heat from various sources and the gas turbine component can load follow well. It makes sense, except for the RE bit having to be subsidised.

  77. I am bespoke

    Stop watching men play with b-all-s and follow a 21st century sport.

  78. duncanm

    New Brazilian Pres. is off to a good start:

    Brazil is set to follow the United States and move its embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

  79. Entropy

    So my advice to Morrison is to get the real message. Your supporters are calling for a substantial reduction in the migrant intake. You could even pick up some Labor votes. It is not racist to be concerned about the pressures ­associated with excessive population growth. And forget half-baked proposals to send ­migrants to the regions — it will never work.
    Above all, remember that the “guardians” are not your friends, even those associated with factional groups within the Liberal Party.

    Quite so.

  80. pete m

    Sure m0nty, let’s talk about mid term results:

    your guys bleed blue right?

    Senate is safe imho.

    House will be close but ok, even if small minority.

    Rest rep wave

  81. min

    Bright people can be very passionate about their interests also High IQ does not mean high EQ which is more important for doing well in life.
    I was speaking with a very bright young man who did extremely well in his Science degree. His particular interest is reptiles and he was getting lots of research work but now no money and no job in that area .
    He is now forging a career in making armour for medieval jousting tournaments .

  82. whirrwhirr

    Alinsky fanboy James O’Keefe concocting nothinburgers once again. It was under $300, it was reported to the FEC. Nothing to see!

  83. C.L.

    Didn’t Monty swoop in here yesterday on NPC wings to mock Trump for caving on Iran sanctions?

    This morning:

    Donald Trump restores Iran sanctions, hitting oil exports over its support for militant groups.

    The Trump administration has announced it has restored sanctions on Iran’s vital oil industry as it grapples with an economic crisis that has sparked sporadic protests over rising prices, corruption and unemployment.

    The oil sanctions will come into effect on Monday and will target the country’s largest source of revenue in the most punishing action taken since the Trump administration withdrew from the 2015 nuclear agreement in May.

    The decision will also affect Iranian shipping and financial transactions.

    It is the second lot of sanctions imposed since May, after the US targeted Iran’s financial transactions involving US dollars, automotive sector and the purchase of commercial airplanes and metals, including gold.

  84. C.L.

    Alec Baldwin arrested in New York …

    Angry Alec Baldwin, 60, is arrested after ‘punching and hospitalizing man, 49, in dispute over NYC parking spot’ as Trump quips: ‘I wish him luck’.

    Hotheaded actor Alec Baldwin has been arrested for assault in New York City after allegedly punching a New York man in a dispute over a parking spot on Friday where he was trying to leave his Cadillac SUV…

    After learning about the arrest the president said he ‘wished him luck’ and his son Don Jr. called the actor a ‘piece of garbage’.

  85. Alinsky fanboy James O’Keefe concocting nothinburgers once again.

    Put down the gin bottle and move away from the keyboard

  86. He is now forging a career in making armour for medieval jousting tournaments .

    I see what you did there 🙂

  87. OldOzzie

    Breathtaking hypocrisy of the conflicted ‘progressives’

    Chris Kenny

    The so-called progressives want to remove what they see as the ­redundant construct of gender from our birth certificates. Yet they push for this at the same time they advocate for gender quotas in parliaments, boardrooms and workplaces. Something doesn’t compute; does gender matter or not?

    We live in an age of non-sequiturs, paradoxes and hypocrisy. We have access to more information than ever but our attention spans are shortened and, with an atomised media landscape clearing the public square, we’ve lost the propensity to discuss issues and form cohesive views around consistent values. Those trumpeting the popularly virtuous lines on any ­individual outrage don’t notice when their sanctimonious stands clash.

    In the Fairfax press this week, Nicola Philp railed against Halloween. “I detest Halloween. I loathe it,” she spat. “Why is it that we seem so hellbent on adopting so much of American culture?”

    Putting aside ignorance of the festival’s Irish origins, would we countenance such a race-based ­attack on other cultural events?

    Is Tim Soutphommasane using this article to canvass for racial vilification complaints from American-Australians? Imagine the reaction if Philp decried next week’s incursion of Deepavali (or Diwali) into our nation’s annual life. Would she dare ask why we encourage our children to adopt Indian culture? Or Muslim ­culture? (I must have missed the pieces complaining about celebrations of Eid al-Fitr when Ramadan ended in June.) Lighten up. The more festivals the better.

    In Victoria, politicians have worked across party lines for change but don’t get too excited; it was only to feather their own nests. This month’s state election is being run under new arrangements restricting political donations but doling out $45 million in public campaign funding, more than tripling the taxpayer allocations to political parties, which will now receive $6 per lower house vote. The politicians say donations expose them to corruption. Their breathtaking argument is that they can’t be trusted to raise funds and behave ethically — so they make taxpayers fund their party-political activities. These politicians are like crooks taking money from our bank accounts and boasting that this prevents them from mugging us.

    The politicians didn’t take this plan to an election — perish the thought. This inside job was cooked up by all parties with a minimum of fuss between elections. While the Andrews Labor government has more than 20 MPs under investigation for allegedly fraudulent use of taxpayers’ funds at the last campaign, it shares unprecedented amounts of officially sanctioned taxpayer funding in this campaign.

    Little wonder the mainstream is restless. The political class looks after itself, unions have become big business and major corporates have broken faith with customers while they join wealthy individuals in virtue-signalling on fashionable causes. Just this week Mike Cannon-Brookes, who is worth more than $5 billion and just paid a record $100m for a Sydney harbourside house, mocked Scott Morrison for focusing on affordable and reliable energy.

    For the uber-rich, climate posturing is the ultimate in moral vanity, assuaging guilt about accumulated wealth. But the planet they are pretending to save is not the same one where families worry about how to pay quarterly electricity bills.

    In Canberra, our major parties are confused about this contest of economics, pragmatism, populism and posturing. They fudge it, not daring to address the irrelevance of Australian climate action. They know their climate policies have vandalised our national electricity grid, creating heavy costs and chaos. But rather than confess mistakes, they recommit to emissions targets, silently aware of their futility in the face of growing global emissions.

    Politicians will no longer embrace a complex discussion, preferring to rally around slogans. The Turnbull government’s ­national energy guarantee promised a magic pudding of energy policy; more reliable electricity with lower emissions at lower cost. It is astounding that such a self-evidently contradictory proposal got so far before it imploded.

    Emotion always battles reason in public affairs but now it has the upper hand. Intentions, gestures and assumed motives seem to matter more than rationality and outcomes.

    This is an era when the zeitgeist can carry campaigns to tackle suicide with the same zeal it applies to promoting euthanasia. We can flick the switch from Earth Hour to Vivid overnight. We push to put women in the perilous front lines of our military forces and then sack male soldiers for lewd texting about them. We prefer to ignore contradictions and complexities that might demand caution or ­create doubts.

    With political agendas, activist campaigns and self-interest as constants we look to the fourth estate to expose the cant but too often the media is part of the problem. Take the double standards in US politics. Even before a Trump supporter was arrested for the pipe-bomb campaign, the blame was sheeted home to the President. CNN’s Angela Rye, for instance, said, “This type of rhetoric is not coming from all sides.”

    This is demonstrably the opposite to reality. At a 2017 rally Madonna toyed with “blowing up the White House” and Robert De Niro fantasised about punching Donald Trump. Comedian Kathy Griffin paraded Trump’s severed head on TV and rapper Snoop Dogg pointed a gun at Trump in a video clip. Then there is the whole Trump “resistance” movement with street marches and violent protests, encouraged by leading Democrats.

    Just last month Hillary Clinton effectively said Democrats would not be “civil” until they won. “You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about,” Clinton said. “That’s why I believe, if we are fortunate enough to win back the house and/or the Senate, that’s when civility can start again.”

    Back in 2016 the Democrats attacked Trump over fears he might not accept the election result if he lost. Two years on it is the Democrats and much of the media/political class that haven’t respected what Nancy Pelosi then called the “sanctity” of elections. A strong showing from Trump in next week’s midterms will send them into fresh conniptions.

    In June last year we saw the most horrific expression of political violence when a leftist activist went to a baseball field where leading Republican congressman Steve Scalise and others were practising for a charity match. James Hodgkinson, a Bernie Sanders supporter, shot and seriously injured Scalise, his aide, a lobbyist and a police officer. Fortunately, only the gunman was killed. But in that instance, as was proper, nobody blamed Sanders or the Democrats. Different rules apply to Trump and the Republicans.

    We see similar inconsistencies here. Many commentators argued Tony Abbott had no right to complain about being overthrown by Malcolm Turnbull and eviscerated Abbott for subsequent interventions. The same people now are apoplectic about Turnbull’s downfall and somehow excuse him for resigning from parliament, refusing to advocate for his replacement in the Wentworth by-election and costing the government its majority. The sabotage is forgiven, they say, because Turnbull always said he would leave parliament if rolled. The ethical gymnastics are extraordinary.

    This rivals the manoeuvring by those who somehow have remained in alignment with Labor’s contortions on border protection. They opposed the Pacific Solution, applauded its dismantling, parroted the “push factors” excuse, agreed turnbacks wouldn’t work and then accepted a return to offshore processing.

    Yet the Coalition now appears to be bowing to media and activist pressure by resettling refugees from Nauru in Australia. It is worth remembering this follows the Howard government precedent when it took in the last cohort of offshore refugees, but it had the advantage of doing it quietly, so that people-smugglers and their potential customers were not alerted. Now, detailed reporting and relentless activism make that confidentiality impossible.

    The more noise that is made about the Australian resettlements, the higher the risk of the people-smuggling trade starting up again. Surely that is an observation all sides of the debate could comprehend and respect. But don’t expect a hypocrisy-free zone anytime soon.

    Chris Kenny
    Associate Editor (National Affairs)

    Commentator, author and former political adviser, Chris Kenny also hosts Kenny on Sunday, 7pm (AEST) on Sky News. He takes an unashamedly rationalist approach to national affairs.

  88. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    It’s ok – he lost his mate not long after their eggs hatched and he has three full-sized chicks to feed.

    Awwww. Poor little fella.
    Oxytocin in overdrive just thinking about it. 🙂

  89. C.L.

    Latest from Man-Boy:

    Ben Shapiro✔@benshapiro
    Get ready for my hottest take of the evening: whiskey tastes like turpentine. All who pretend otherwise may be safely categorized with those who say that they just LOVE salad.

  90. Zippy:
    After all the evidence that Project Veritas has gathered from Dumbarse Democrats, you would think they’d wise up to talking to strangers.

  91. C.L.

    This is real:

    Canada Upholds Allah/Muhammad’s Ban on Adoption.

    The Islamic prohibition of adoption derives from Mohammed’s desire to bed his daughter-in-law:

    The reason Sharia bans adoption revolves around Muhammad.

    In the Koran, when the prophet once went to visit his adopted son Zayd bin al-Haritha in his tent, Muhammad’s eyes fell upon Zayd’s unveiled wife, Zaynab, whom Muhammad had earlier pressured into marrying his adopted son. (Koran 33:36 — which commands Muslims always to obey Allah/Muhammad without objection — was “revealed” in this context.)

    Muhammad was instantly enamored by the sight of his scantily clad daughter-in-law. It was not long before Zayd realized that the prophet desired his wife. So he humbly offered to divorce her; but Muhammad, knowing how bad it would appear to his followers if he added his own son’s wife to his already burgeoning harem, refused.

    But then Muhammad received another “revelation” (Koran 33:36-42): Allah ordered him to marry Zaynab. This was the Islamic deity’s will all along — to expose the problems with adoption.

    This has been upheld as stare decisis by the Canadian government.

  92. Nick

    Didn’t Monty swoop in here yesterday on NPC wings to mock Trump for caving on Iran sanctions?

    Yep, last night.

  93. Bruce of Newcastle

    Barbarella declares Barbarossa:

    Jane Fonda: Trump-Era has ‘Parallels’ to ‘Hitler and the Third Reich’

    She must’ve been reading the book.

  94. Percy Popinjay

    Some early morning LOLs – he is so missed:

    Number 1

    Number 2

    Number 3

  95. Didn’t Monty swoop in here yesterday on NPC wings to mock Trump for caving on Iran sanctions?

    This morning:

    Donald Trump restores Iran sanctions, hitting oil exports over its support for militant groups.

    Ah, but in the details, the story I linked yesterday is fully supported by today’s news. A bunch of countries are getting waivers to continue importing Iranian oil, and Trump is not blocking Iran using the SWIFT banking system – both of which form the basis of that Free Beacon story.

    Don’t believe the hype.

  96. OldOzzie

    PM must turn his back on Turnbull and forge ahead -The Australian Editorial

    In a way, Malcolm Turnbull has made it easier for Scott Morrison to do what he needs to do. The Prime Minister has been apologetic about assuming the leadership from Mr Turnbull, bending over backwards to avoid criticising his predecessor and even sending him to Bali as an emissary. Mr Turnbull’s posturing on that trip and subsequently has made it abundantly clear he does not intend to make Mr Morrison’s life easy. This now crystallises the choice for the Prime Minister. Clearly, he must forget about any pangs of personal loyalty or continuity with the Turnbull government — of which he was a leading light — and strike out on his own mission. He needs to consign Mr Turnbull’s Wentworth sabotage and other protestations to history, and quickly outline the character and priorities of the Morrison government. While there are positives from five years of Coalition government that must not be jettisoned — strong border protection, budget repair, free trade deals and the lowering of personal and corporate taxes — the legacy is most certainly not so rosy that it doesn’t require improvement. Rather than getting all tongue-tied every time he is asked to explain the demise of Mr Turnbull, Mr Morrison should admit the leadership switch was an internal corrective and that the government now has changed course.

    Most obviously behind the overthrow of Mr Turnbull was a dramatic adjustment of climate and energy policy. Over the previous weeks Coalition MPs rose up against the emissions reductions component of the national energy guarantee. There was so much consternation and confusion about writing the Paris Agreement targets into law that, in a desperate attempt to save the policy and his leadership, Mr Turnbull dropped the emissions component altogether. This was the moment his prime ministership was finished and the Coalition returned to the climate and energy priorities that powered it into office in 2013. Mr Morrison has split the energy and climate portfolios and charged Energy Minister Angus Taylor with the task of lowering electricity prices. This will be crucial to maximise distinctions from Labor at an election where Bill Shorten will be promising to more than double the national renewable energy target to 50 per cent and almost double the emissions target to 45 per cent by 2030.

    Mr Morrison will be mistaken if he thinks a drift to the green left is the road to salvation for his government. That is where he will be directed by Mr Turnbull’s intercessions, the national broadcaster and many commentators who use the Wentworth by-election protest vote to promote their policy predilections. The Coalition needs to focus on core strengths — economic development, individual aspiration and national security. While resettlement of all refugees is a priority, the latest movements from Nauru to our shores will be a matter of great regret if they presage any rekindling of the people-smuggling trade. One of the Coalition’s most difficult achievements has been restoring integrity to the immigration system by ending the deadly people-smuggling trade, emptying and closing 17 detention centres and striking a resettlement deal with the US. It must not imperil these gains, and it would be unwise to surrender a clear electoral advantage on the issue compared to the risk of another softening under Labor.

    In a related field, Mr Morrison needs to do more to address concerns over population. Facing state elections, the NSW Coalition government and Victorian opposition are promising action on population planning. They recognise the pressures in a way the federal government must comprehend. There is much more to this debate than raw numbers — voters are demanding reassurance on infrastructure, housing, planning, jobs and wages. This debate should be led by Canberra rather than the states.

    Workplace relations is an area where incremental reform under the Coalition would be wound back under Labor. This is an issue that is crucial to productivity growth and unites the Liberal Party base. Mr Morrison must highlight what has been delivered, outline plans for further flexibility and detail the risk of a Labor Party so in the thrall of unions that it will undo reforms implemented under previous Labor governments. Mr Shorten is so vulnerable on this issue that he has yet to detail his policy, but the government only needs to look at the ACTU script to show how the economy could be hit by draconian re-regulation and nationwide industrial action that could jeopardise investment and job creation.

    Mr Morrison’s trump card must be to contrast his agenda for lower taxes against Labor’s high-taxing and big-spending alternative. He must trumpet returning the budget to surplus and make a virtue of spending restraint to consolidate fiscal repair and pay down debt. This is prosaic but vital Coalition work, standing in stark relief against Labor’s record and promises. The Prime Minister doesn’t need to be everybody’s friend to offer a reliable choice against the clear risks of a return to Labor.

  97. Armadillo

    Is Project Veritas getting any air play on US TV, or is all only internet coverage?

  98. OldOzzie

    The Return of Big Infrastructure as a Geopolitical Tool

    Highlights

    Infrastructure is a high priority in developing countries, but its expense presents major problems for countries trying to secure financing.

    China’s focus on building infrastructure in some of the world’s most strategic places not only represents a geopolitical threat to the West but also challenges the long-standing Western approach to development.

    The new U.S. International Development Finance Corp. offers an alternative to countries that are desperate for infrastructure but don’t like the risk and sovereignty implications of some of China’s financial terms.

  99. Senile Old Guy

    While there are positives from five years of Coalition government that must not be jettisoned — strong border protection, budget repair,

    Who writes this nonsense? There’s been no”budget repair”. The LNP has the budget in deficit for decades. The LNP has spending taxpayer money out of control and only slightly lower than the ALP.

  100. OldOzzie

    Sea Platforms

    Images emerge of new Chinese submarine

    Andrew Tate, London – IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly

  101. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Domestic crisis. I can’t find my favourite hairbrush.

    Got another one, similar, somewhere, somewhere…..

    Meanwhile, wild-haired, I am amusing myself by reading Tim Blair in the November Quadrant putting forward his protocol for ranking the quality of left-wing protests, starting from the low base of those protests that never happen (moving to Canada; or Jupiter), and one person protests (shoe throwers and climate unfriendly self-immolations predominate), moving on then to saintly organisations and their guides under threat (ABC of course, and pale aboriginal gurus), rising to the upper echelons of the scale with global protests (Occupy, the movement of ‘common street leftists’ notable here) and concluding with protests of instant violence (Greens and Animal Libs) that actually produce a result: guaranteeing the other side wins.

    Buy it, out on newstands now for under ten bucks, and read the whole thing. Inimitable Blair, with the above just a hint of the further details inside. Of particular note is Philip Ayers on Poor White Trash in the US. A sample:

    “Many doctors and other professionals, progressive idealists all, were advocating castration of criminals and sterilisation of the diseased and degenerate. One Michigan legislator proposed that his state simply kill them off. A bright eugenicist, putting the cart before the horse, conceived the idea (based on deterrence and family fondness) of dealing with convicted murderers by by executing their grandfathers. There were sterilisation laws on the books of twenty-seven states by 1931, with a wide range of specified types needing the knife.”

    It’s a warning Cats of just how silly (and dangerous) some people can get when genetics gets discussed with little understanding of the limits of unwarranted extrapolations into lived everyday life.

    Take care of grandad now. And in these days of equalidy, know that they may come for grandma too. 🙂

  102. C.L.

    Fairfax has suddenly discovered that China has gulags.
    China has had gulags for several decades.
    Mmm.
    Oh, I see. These gulags imprison Muslims. So now they’re bad.

    They are the buildings in far western China that haunt the sleep of Uighur Australians. People go in and they don’t come out.

    “Everyone talks about their absolutely ruined dreams,” says Sydney resident Ruqiya of anxiety levels among her fellow expatriates.

    In the past 18 months, hundreds of these buildings have spread rapidly across the desert towns of China’s remote Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region.

    The Chinese government has rejected claims that up to one million of Xinjiang’s 10 million Uighur Muslims are being held inside. It claims the buildings are education centres that teach the Chinese language to Turkic-speaking Uighurs, part of a campaign to “get rid of the environment and soil that breeds terrorism and religious extremism”.

  103. OldOzzie

    Matching Australia?

    Brand-new German tanks, helicopters need improvement before deployment

    The bulk of the tanks, fighter jets and helicopters delivered to the Bundeswehr were not ready for deployment, the Defense Ministry has said. Manufacturers delivered 97 large items but only 38 were fully operational.

  104. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    The bulk of the tanks, fighter jets and helicopters delivered to the Bundeswehr were not ready for deployment,

    The Chermans are getting soft.
    Perhaps Angela’s latest workers are not as good as local Hermans at the job.

  105. rickw

    These gulags imprison Muslims. So now they’re bad.

    Equally silent on the bulldozing of Churches, burning of Bibles and threatening and incarceration of Christians.

    The media are mentally ill.

  106. Gab

    Tom, along with the Early Morning ‘Toons, perhaps include a quote from Monty each day to add to the laughs. Ta.

  107. OldOzzie

    An inconvenient truth for Gore

    Graham Lloyd
    Environment editor

    Climate champion Al Gore has given a frank assessment of the latest UN report into the dangers of global warming. Interviewed by US public broadcaster PBS, Gore said the language used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in its report on limiting global warming to 1.5C had been “torqued up” a little to get the ­attention of policymakers.

    This was appropriate, he said, because climate change was a global emergency that posed “an existential threat to human civil­isation on this planet”.

    There has been plenty of “torquing up” as conflicting signals buffet what is supposed to be a milestone in implementing the Paris Agreement in Poland next month. Peak stupid in climate change politics usually is timed to coincide with key decisions that have to be made to keep together a UN process in which the annual bill for meetings alone is calculated at more than $150 million.

    Internationally, the conflicting signals include the demise of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and the rise of authoritarian president-elect Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil. Together with Donald Trump’s withdrawal of climate change funding and threats to leave the Paris Agreement altogether, the global sentiment going into Poland is vastly different from that coming out of Paris.

    Analysis by the pro-action Climate Home News is that “the ­alliance of rich, emerging and poor economies that sealed the Paris climate deal is falling apart”. In many countries, it says, climate scepticism and economic nationalism are usurping the international green enthusiasm of 2015.

    Even countries that remain committed to climate action are consumed by domestic concerns, such as Brexit in Britain and political instability in Germany.

    But in Australia, “torquing up” continues to reach new heights. In a speech to the National Press Club this week, Australian Conservation Foundation chief exec­utive Kelly O’Shanassy out-torqued the IPCC. “If we continue to burn coal and gas for decades to come, we will kill the 1.5 degree target, we will not have a habitable planet and hundreds of millions of people will die,” she said.

    Tech billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes tweeted from his recent­ly purchased $100m harbour-front mansion a modern-day equivalent of “let them eat cake”. Cannon-Brookes’s answer is a $200 prize for a new logo for “fair dinkum” power that is reliable, renewable and cheap.

    However, the real torque is the way in which small deceptions, repeated often, are allowed to become fact. The results of a recent survey of company directors illustrate the point. Federal opposition climate change and energy spokesman Mark Butler says: “We’ve also seen the biannual survey of company directors for the first time place climate change, or action on climate change, at the top of the list of challenges that company directors think the federal government should be acting on.”

    A full reading of the Australian Institute of Company Directors report shows otherwise. The leading economic challenges cited are rising global economic protectionism, global economic uncertainty, energy policy, taxation system, high energy prices, red tape, low productivity growth, the China economic outlook and then climate change. Climate change is considered a major long-term issue for government to solve. But what business wants the government to concentrate on now is energy policy, tax reform and infrastructure.

    Likewise, it has become an ­article of faith among many that the Wentworth by-election was swung by climate change, which would be a dominant issue at the next election. The ACF has activated a lobbying effort in marginal seats to push the issue. “We are making this the climate election,” O’Shanassy says.

    But research by Essential Media shows that pushing renewable energy is a first-order issue only among those who already vote Green. According to Essential’s October 23 report, the most important issues for the federal government to address in the next 12 months are cost of living, improving the health system and housing affordability. Promoting renewable energy was a first-order issue for only 7 per cent of respondents. Overall, the issue of renewables ranked eighth behind the major concerns and then job creation, improved wages, economic growth, national security and terrorism.

    What is not in dispute is the cost of the low emissions transition so far. Nathan Vass, founder of the Australian Power Project, which is championing a continued role for coal, says renewable energy subsidies at state and federal levels to date amount to $42.5 billion.Across that same period 10 coal-fired power stations have been taken out of action and, according to the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission’s recent report, electricity prices have increased in real terms, adjusted for inflation, by 56 per cent. For the $42.5bn spent, greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector have risen by 50 million tonnes a year or 40 per cent since 1990. Globally, greenhouse gas emissions are back on the rise after slowing with the global financial crisis.

    Ironically, it is the US that is bucking the global trend: its emissions fell 2.7 per cent last year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Reported emissions from large power plants declined 4.5 per cent since 2016, and 19.7 per cent since 2011 due mainly to a switch from coal to natural gas from fracking.

    US EPA acting administrator Andrew Wheeler says the Trump administration has proven federal regulations are not necessary to drive CO2 reductions. “These achievements flow largely from technological breakthroughs in the private sector, not the heavy hand of government,” he says.

    From The Comments

    When it comes to climate change alarmism it seems the rest of the world is waking up while Australia’s major political parties sleep.

    – There have been many preachers telling death defying plunge of climate change stories from Al Gore and Tim ( 1000 year drought) Flannery.

    With no opposing story being told we are to believe these two “experts” know it all to be true.
    We cannot really provide precise weather reports every day as the climate has it’s own agenda.
    Mr Flannery’s view of rising oceans doesn’t fit with his houses on beach front property.

    – “Opposing stories” are shut down or ridiculed by the media before they get a chance.

  108. rickw

    Tom, along with the Early Morning ‘Toons, perhaps include a quote from Monty each day to add to the laughs.

    The title for the series should be: “From The Garden Shed”

    ie. the storage place of rakes.

  109. John Constantine

    Language has always been seen as the soil that thoughtcrimes spring from.

    Their montys handlers either haven’t supplied him with the talking points about the new language for Australia, or it is too soon to reveal it yet..

    Nuspeak, Comrades.

    Only instead of double plus ungood, they use Nazi.

  110. OldOzzie

    Army Issues Lighter Armor For Bigger Wars

    After a generation of guerrilla warfare, the Army is issuing new, lighter body armor that can be tailored for a wider range of missions, from plainclothes advisor roles to high-intensity combat. It’s part of a new push to improve infantry equipment, from rifle calibers to targeting optics to augmented reality training, coming from the Secretary of Defense himself.

    Lt. Col. Ginger Whitehead, Army Product Manager for Soldier Protective Equipment, shows off the new, better-fitting female body armor.

    “We have to have the ability to scale up…and scale down,” said Lt. Col. Ginger Whitehead, “from armed individuals with rifles — maybe they’ll have an RPG or grenade … all the way up to a near-peer, where you’re going to see the full gamut of weapons systems,” from heavy machinegun bullets to Russian-style storms of artillery shrapnel.

    The Army’s new body armor package, the Soldier Protection System, is designed to scale up and down depending on the tradeoff commanders want to make between protection and mobility.

  111. Gab

    Not bad, rickw. Or maybe even The Rajke edition or how about Rakeorama of the Left? Any other suggestions are welcome.

  112. rickw

    Sea Platforms

    Images emerge of new Chinese submarine

    A no fin barracuda?! Maybe they stole our new submarine design so they could check how bad it was?

  113. Myrddin Seren

    Chuck Grassley refers a Kavanaugh false accuser to DoJ for criminal prosecution after she admits fabricating a rape allegation to frustrate the nomination.

  114. John Constantine

    If Ross Cameron is a Nazi, and that makes Enid Bottom a thoughtcrimes Nazi, Australia’s mindless seething hordes of leftist orcscum must of course denounce the speeches of Churchill as literally the words of Hitler.

  115. Sea Platforms

    Images emerge of new Chinese submarine

    Only 35m long, would have a very small ships company

  116. John Constantine

    Godless commo auto-correct already censors Enid Blyton’s. Name.

  117. rickw

    After a generation of guerrilla warfare, the Army is issuing new, lighter body armor that can be tailored for a wider range of missions, from plainclothes advisor roles to high-intensity combat. It’s part of a new push to improve infantry equipment, from rifle calibers to targeting optics to augmented reality training, coming from the Secretary of Defense himself.

    The more likely story is they need lighter options for women. OZ’s new body armour was designed with quick releases because it was found that if a female soldier fell face first in a puddle with full kit on, she could easily drown. Then they had trouble making the quick release easy enough to operate.

  118. rickw

    Nazi

    John, you realise that if you capitalise nazi you’re most probably a Nazi, or something! 🙂

  119. Old Ozzie:

    The bulk of the tanks, fighter jets and helicopters delivered to the Bundeswehr were not ready for deployment, the Defense Ministry has said. Manufacturers delivered 97 large items but only 38 were fully operational.

    Not enough data about “Ready for Deployment.”
    Much equipment is delivered to units in a “Not Ready For Combat” state. Tanks may require replacement of tracks to fit local conditions, addition of armour plate, or application of different camouflage paintwork. This will take about 2-3 days, depending. A rifle will be delivered to a soldier but will require ‘sighting in’ – no one goes into battle without checking equipment. A grenade or artillery shell will have to have a fuse inserted.
    Yes, the whole idea of equipment waiting for repairs or unfinished maintenance due to funds for repair not being available is real but I suspect there is a lot more to this story which is repeated world wide.

  120. OldOzzie

    rickw

    #2855644, posted on November 3, 2018 at 9:51 am

    After a generation of guerrilla warfare, the Army is issuing new, lighter body armor that can be tailored for a wider range of missions, from plainclothes advisor roles to high-intensity combat. It’s part of a new push to improve infantry equipment, from rifle calibers to targeting optics to augmented reality training, coming from the Secretary of Defense himself.

    The more likely story is they need lighter options for women. OZ’s new body armour was designed with quick releases because it was found that if a female soldier fell face first in a puddle with full kit on, she could easily drown. Then they had trouble making the quick release easy enough to operate.

    rickw

    you are right

    Lt. Col. Ginger Whitehead, Army Product Manager for Soldier Protective Equipment, shows off the new, better-fitting female body armor.

    Slow Is Dead

    There’s a lot of history here. In Afghanistan and Iraq, the Army had to uparmor its soldiers in a hurry, just as it uparmored its vehicles. That armor saved lives, but for humans and Humvees alike, the layers of protection grew so heavy they often impaired mobility.

    The price of protection had many parts. Heavy armor slowed soldiers climbing Afghan mountainsides or boiled them in Iraqi deserts. Ceramic plates cut off circulation when smaller soldiers — including most women — sat down in vehicles for hours-long convoys. The backs of helmets snagged on collars when soldiers hit the dirt and went prone, making it harder to turn your head to see. Torso armor restricted arm movements, impairing aim.

  121. OldOzzie

    Rap Sheet: ***632*** Acts of Media-Approved Violence and Harassment Against Trump Supporters

    When not calling Trump supporters “Nazis” as a means to dehumanize us, the establishment media like to whine about the lack of civility in American politics, even as they cover up, ignore, downplay, or straight-up approve of the wave of violence and public harassment we are seeing against supporters of President Trump.

    It is open season on Trump supporters, and the media is only fomenting, encouraging, excusing, and hoping for more… The media are now openly calling Trump supporters “Nazis” and are blaming Trump for a mass murder he had nothing to do with. This, of course, is a form of harassment because it incites and justifies mob violence.

    Here is the list, so far, and remember that if any one of these things happened to a Democrat, the media would use the story to blot out the sun for weeks. Remember how crazy the media went over a nobody rodeo clown who wore an Obama mask, a GOP staffer who criticized Obama’s daughters? And yet, hundreds of Trump supporters are harassed and brutalized and the media only dutifully report them, if at all. That is because the media are desperate to normalize and justify violence and harassment against Trump and his supporters.

  122. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Rats of Tobruk still white-hot over WWII feather injustice

    exclusive
    Jamie Walker
    ASSOCIATE EDITOR
    @Jamie_WalkerOz
    12:00AM November 3, 2018
    46 Comments

    When he thinks about Tobruk, Gordon Wallace remembers the blood and tears his mates shed to hold the forsaken outpost in North Africa in the darkest days of World War II.

    Then the thanks they got from home: white feathers.

    All these years later, the injustice of it still animates Mr Wallace, 96, one of the last men standing among the fabled Rats of Tobruk.

    This is the unknown part of the Tobruk legend, forged by dogged, determined men who fought their hearts out for their country only to be branded by the mark of the coward because some Australians, fearful of a Japanese invasion, ­believed the cream of the army was facing the wrong enemy.

    As the nation prepares to mark the centenary of the armistice that ended WWI on November 11, 1918, the surviving Rats are speaking out before this great generation of Australians fades into history as well. Of the 14,000 Diggers who fought in the longest siege in ­British military history — 242 days in 1941 while German and Italian forces pounded Tobruk’s defenders, their backs to the Mediterranean — only 53 Rats remain, aged from 95 to 108. Four have died in the past month.

    The white feathers of cowardice began to arrive from Australia when the Rats regrouped after ­Tobruk in 1942 and were hurled into the thick of the decisive ­battles at El Alamein that changed the course of the desert war.

    At the time, the home front was gripped by fear of Japanese invasion. As the enemy advanced on the Kokoda Track in New Guinea and Japanese raids hit Darwin, Newcastle and Sydney Harbour, the Rats received hate letters telling them they were shirking their duty to defend Australia.

    From the Oz.

  123. rickw

    Ceramic plates cut off circulation when smaller soldiers — including most women

    At least they will have better fitting body armour for teenage boys when they need to be conscripted in to help clean up the mess.

  124. rickw

    At the time, the home front was gripped by fear of Japanese invasion. As the enemy advanced on the Kokoda Track in New Guinea and Japanese raids hit Darwin, Newcastle and Sydney Harbour, the Rats received hate letters telling them they were shirking their duty to defend Australia.

    Political bent of the senders would be an interesting study, most likely fat lefty’s. After all, they later demonstrated that they were incapable of distinguishing between a soldier following orders and the government from which those orders originated- Vietnam.

  125. OldOzzie

    Pollie waffle a sweet earner for former PM Malcolm Turnbull

    Sharri Markson, National Political Editor, The Daily Telegraph

    MALCOLM Turnbull has signed up to the international speakers’ circuit, where his fee is understood to be $100,000 for each gig.

    The Greater Talent Network, which used to represent US President Donald Trump, announced it had exclusively signed the former prime minister, describing him as an extremely intelligent, humorous and charismatic speaker.

    If he is travelling to a gig in the US, the agency is quoting a fee for Mr Turnbull of $US75,000 ($104,000), plus airfares and accommodation.

    However, if Mr Turnbull is already in the country, his fee is understood to drop to $US60,000.

    When Tony Abbott left the office of prime minister, he signed up to the Washington Speakers Bureau, but his fee was reported to be a much lower $US40,000.

    The Greater Talent Network represents some of the biggest names on the speakers’ circuit including pop singer Paula Abdul, actor Michael J Fox, journalist of Watergate-fame Bob Woodward and author Nicholas Sparks, among many others.

    In an email alert spruiking Mr Turnbull as a speaker, the agency stated that “having just left office after serving as the 29th Prime Minister of Australia, Malcolm Turnbull possesses a unique and incredibly timely understanding of the current geopolitical moment”.

    “During his tenure, Turnbull was also involved in key policy decisions that have not only altered Australian society but also have international implications for other countries facing similar issues — same-sex marriage, environmental conservation and energy crises, global trade, cyber security, and the ever-worsening refugee crisis,” the email states.

    “Extremely intelligent, humorous, candid and charismatic, Turnbull shares his valuable insights into issues that are impacting the world.”

    Mr Turnbull could not be reached for comment.

    This Thursday, however, he will spend an hour on the ABC’s Q&A program, where he will take questions on politics, leadership and policy from the public.

    His decision to appear in the lengthy interview has infuriated the Prime Minister Scott Morrison and senior Liberals.

    When asked about Mr Turnbull’s conduct by radio host Alan Jones this week, Mr Morrison said John Howard and Julia Gillard showed how former leaders should behave.

    A public disagreement between Mr Turnbull and Mr Morrison ensued over the purpose of the former prime minister’s trip to Bali.

    Mr Morrison was forced to correct the record to concede he had given Mr Turnbull a brief on the government’s review of the Australian embassy in Israel, just hours after he said it was “not really part of the brief”.

    From The Comments

    – Look at moi, look at moi, look at moi’

    – If I wanted tripe, I’d go to the butchers. Anyone who pays to listen to malevolent Malcolm has more money than sense. Will the tax be paid in Australia or in the Caymen Islands. Knowing the treachery of Turnbull, I think the latter.

    – He is not capable of stringing a sentence together.

    Listening to Turnbull is flagellation in action.

    – If the Wood Ducks in the US pay to listen to this clown then it is quite evident they have no idea who he is or what a disaster he has been to Oz.

    It would be great to have a Turnbull free day in the media too thanks

  126. ZK2A:

    The white feathers of cowardice began to arrive from Australia when the Rats regrouped after ­Tobruk in 1942 and were hurled into the thick of the decisive ­battles at El Alamein that changed the course of the desert war.

    One thing I learnt was that the civilians do not automatically ‘have your back’. In fact I would have great difficulty in believing the Army does either.
    During 90 – 93 I saw some amazing examples of utter bastardry from the Officer and Enlisted soldiery I had the misfortune to serve with.
    Just look at the section that got sacked the other day for a Facebook post.

  127. Rae

    At the time, the home front was gripped by fear of Japanese invasion. As the enemy advanced on the Kokoda Track in New Guinea and Japanese raids hit Darwin, Newcastle and Sydney Harbour, the Rats received hate letters telling them they were shirking their duty to defend Australia.

    Fake news?

  128. Question:
    Is there a Brisbane Cat Collective get together the weekend 9/10/11?
    I need a drink with some like minded people.

  129. rickw

    MALCOLM Turnbull has signed up to the international speakers’ circuit, where his fee is understood to be $100,000 for each gig.

    Who on earth pays to hear these washed up dunces speak? Taxpayers is my guess?

    Probably the only two on the planet worth listening to are Trump and Viktor Orban.

    Can you bring your own old fruit and veg to these events? That might be the only reason to attend.

  130. OldOzzie

    Trump set to give Democrats another election shock

    JAMES MORROW

    STOP me if you’ve heard this one before: an army of left-leaning political experts predicts that when Americans go to the polls in a few days’ time, the Democrats come out winning big and Donald Trump winds up humbled and humiliated.

    Then, the morning after the big night, those same experts find themselves having to explain why the Republicans did so well, falling back on familiar narratives of ignorant voters swayed by a populist demagogue who probably got some under-the-table help from the Ruskies.

    That’s what happened two years ago when Donald Trump won the presidency.

    And, as America goes to the polls again this week to vote in so-called midterm elections that determine control of the US Senate and House of Representatives, it’s a scenario that’s increasingly likely to happen again.

    Democrats hope that they can take both houses of Congress, and in the process tie up Trump with inquiries and impeachment trials.

    After all, mid-terms generally swing against the party in the White House, and as Democrats keep telling themselves, how can anyone lose to Trump?

    But a closer reading suggests this will remain a fantasy as likely to come to fruition as a state dinner hosted by President Hillary Clinton in honour of Angela Merkel.

    There are many factors at play here, but just on the numbers the Democrats have a problem.

    A close look at the early voting, which can make up a third or more of ballots cast in some races, suggests that Republicans are voting in often substantially larger numbers than Democrats.

    As of Friday morning Australia time, Republicans had cast 1,557,418 ballots to the Democrats’ 1,495,192 in Florida.

    In states like Michigan and Ohio, the margins are even bigger: 330,540 to 215,176 and 348,451 to 274,231, respectively.

    It’s the same story in many other states.

    Assuming there aren’t massive numbers of conservatives protest-voting against their party, it means that in key House and Senate races in these seats Democrats will struggle to make up the numbers on the day.

    The reasons for this aren’t hard to make out. But they all come down to a Democratic opposition that has allowed Donald Trump to take up so much space in their heads he may as well open a casino in the frontal lobe of their collective unconscious.

    While in a number of individual races Democrats are looking good, the fact is that across America the economy is looking better.

    Many households uncomfortable with some of Trump’s more outlandish rhetoric are finding themselves hard-pressed to vote against their wallets and a surging economy experiencing the lowest unemployment since the 1960s.

    Yet the party that in the 1990s shed its radical-left baggage with the killer line “it’s the economy, stupid” is today spruiking star candidates whose socialist rhetoric wouldn’t sound out of place in Venezuela.

    Thus what remains for the left are culture war fights (which they tend to lose outside the big cities where people think standing for the national anthem is a matter of simple respect and the violent antics of Antifa activists represents exactly the chaos they want to avoid) and cult of personality celebrity candidates like Texas Senate hopeful Beto O’Rourke.

    O’Rourke, real name Robert Francis, has been talked up as the next JFK or Obama by so many campaign journalists looking to clap in a Democrat win that the Beto puff piece has already become a thing of legend.

    (The Congressman is “lanky, handsome and charismatic”, wrote Time Magazine recently; “He has a restless energy”, said the New York Times; “The early morning runs help O’Rourke … project youth and energy”, noted Politico.com in one profile.)

    O’Rourke is also down by anywhere from three to 10 points in the polls, depending whose survey you read.

    Which suggests that if anything, the disconnect between the media and pundit class in the US and the rest of the electorate is even greater than it was two years ago.

    It also means a lot of lefties may wake up after Election Day with a thumping hangover. And not just because someone spiked the kombucha.

    James Morrow is opinion editor of The Daily Telegraph.

  131. John Constantine

    Politicals on the speaker circuit, like book deals is :

    Afterpay.

    For services already rendered.

    This way it doesnt look like criminal crony corruption if a politician goes to be a hireling of the horde he betrayed his country to and gets paid off a year later.

    Comrade Maaaaaates.

  132. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Period of greatest national peril was Curtin’s finest hour

    By John Edwards
    12:00AM November 3, 2018
    2 Comments

    Momentous as they were, John Curtin’s finest hours as Australia’s national leader were not only in his unshaken demeanour when Japan attacked in the Pacific in December 1941, his “turn to America” a few weeks later, or his refusal to follow British demands that the Australian 7th Division defend Burma in February 1942.

    Those are pertinent episodes for us today, as the discord between China and the US again compels us think about where our national interests lie in what might become a dramatically changing world. But relevant also are the now forgotten weeks between Japan’s conquest of Java in late February 1942 and US general Douglas MacArthur’s evacuation from The Philippines and his arrival in Darwin on March 17. Those weeks after the British had left the region and before the Americans began to arrive, the weeks when Australia prepared for the blow to strike, also matter for us today.

    In the customary narrative of Australia turning from one great friend to another, we have forgotten that for a while we stood alone.

    The second volume of my Curtin biography opens with those weeks. It was the time of Australia’s greatest peril and Curtin’s most singular leadership.

    Interesting reading, highly recommended.

  133. Tom

    Tom, along with the Early Morning ‘Toons, perhaps include a quote from Monty each day to add to the laughs. Ta.

    I used to collect his wrongology, Gab. But it’s like the ABC: disinformation designed to endumben. Paying attention only validates the self-hatred that guided Monty to his worldview.

    However, Tuesday (Wednesday our time) promises to be a wonderful self-beclownment for our Twitter parrot — and our other expert wrongologist, Googleory — both of whom are unrelenting in their campaign to stop Australians from voting Republican in the US mid-terms.

  134. OldOzzie

    Vegans can kiss my grass

    James Morrow

    SO today is apparently something called World Vegan Day, which must be a bit like Halloween but without anything tasty to eat at the end of it.

    And while I’m certainly no fan of veganism — which is a sort of extremist version of vegetarianism that excludes even milk, cheese, and honey on the grounds that it’s cruel to the bees — it is only right that, like any other faith, they get their own day.

    And what a faith! In the space of a decade or so, veganism has become a new religion for inner-city trendies who don’t need to go to Heaven because there’s already two amazing macrobiotic grocery shops on their block.

    Veganism has also got its own ethical hierarchies, strict dietary codes, and an obligation to evangelise about and defend the faith.

    And this year they even got the ultimate prize, even better than a day on the calendar: Namely, Protected Victim Status, meaning that jokes about vegans are now made at one’s peril.

    Just look at what’s happened overnight to British food writer William Sitwell.

    Now Sitwell, you see, is one of those strange beings who thinks that if you love food, you think that you shouldn’t limit yourself to eating from only one slice (as it were) of creation. And he brings — or rather brought — this passion to his work where, until today, he was editing a food magazine for the UK supermarket chain Waitrose.

    Having taken a pitch for a collection of vegan recipes from a hopeful freelance vegan food writer, Sitwell fired back a sharp rejection.

    “Hi Selene, thanks for this”, wrote Sitwell, who is famously known for the fact that veganism gives him heartburn.

    “How about a series on killing vegans, one by one. Ways to trap them? How to interrogate them properly? Expose their hypocrisy? Make them eat steak and drink red wine?”

    Selene Nelson, the 29-year-old journalist in question, was stung by the rejection, and so of course did what any self-respecting millennial would do, namely, shopped the story to BuzzFeed.

    “To have this attitude towards others when he’s representing Waitrose is seriously bizarre”, she said.

    No prizes for seeing how this story ends: Waitrose and Sitwell went their separate ways, Nelson got a healthy hit of publicity, and the rest of the world was put on notice that vegans are Not To Be Joked About.

    Which is pretty ironic, given that in the West vegans are among the most privileged people in the world.

    As a dietary conceit or “lifestyle”, it exists most commonly in the most lilywhite and well-off suburbs where people can afford their free-range kale.

    What’s more, it seems that you can’t enter a grocery store or book shop without finding books and products promoting veganism. (It was Waitrose’s attempt to get in on this market that is thought to have been why they pulled the pin on the relationship).

    Which is why for those of us who sympathise with Sitwell, who once wrote that “(veganism) had slow beginnings among shampoo-averse hippies in the 1970s, but now vegans are parking their tanks on all of our lawns”, this is a bit worrisome.

    There are already too many areas of life where one must always be on the lookout for humourless scolds: the dinner table was, until now, one of the last redoubts of freedom.

    Because unless you actually buy into the idea of words-as-violence, it’s pretty clear Sitwell was being snarky in the spirit of the 18th century Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift, today best known for his sarcastic “modest proposal” to solve Ireland’s economic woes by selling the country’s babies for food.

    And if veganism is becoming as big a force as its backers say it is (and it is certainly being given a good kick-along by marketers who see money in them there hipsters), its adherents shouldn’t be so thin-skinned.

    But no matter: Offence is a currency in our culture, and the vegans have decided to grow their own.

    James Morrow is Opinion Editor of The Daily Telegraph.

  135. Cassie of Sydney

    Hi All, one of my favourites….enjoy….(hope my link works)

    [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XH1fERC_504&w=560&h=315%5D

  136. OldOzzie

    PS some comments on Vegans can kiss my grass above

    – man didn’t fight his way to the top of the food chain to eat grass

    = If I’m eating at a restaurant and enjoying my expensive steak and protesters start abusing me for eating meat which is my choice ,they better have a dental plan.

    – I am having a nice T-Bone tonight.

    – It’s not a proper meal unless at least one of the ingredients had a mother.

    – Who doesn’t enjoy a medium rare porterhouse steak bathing in its own juices with a nice bbqed spud and greens? Sometimes, we’ll load up with an extra sausage and blue cheese topper.

    – Veganism is another group of like minded morons. Milking a cow hurts it? Processing honey hurts bees? What a bunch of uneducated morons. The only thing that worries me is that these people have children!

    – I think the issue most people have with vegans is one of courtesy. I went to a vegan fair once, which was held in a public park. A family turned up to use the electric bbq, and were quite viciously abused by several vegans because “they had booked the park and didn’t want to smell cooking meat”. Actually, no, they didn’t book the whole park, only the space for their fair.

    Funny thing though, the catering organised by the vegans included food vans which sold meat products – go figure. As I am not vegan, but was there with someone else, I happily chowed down on the lunch of my choice, inwardly laughing at the frustrated faces on those around me who wanted to eat what I was eating, but couldn’t. I mean, how hard is it to book vegan caterers for a vegan fair?

    I was interested to see the products for sale at the fair. “Pleather” was everywhere. So instead of using natural, renewable leather, they chose to use products made from petrochemicals.

    Apart from the damage to the environment caused by refining and disposing of such items, can someone please remind me what oil comes from?

  137. Infidel Tiger

    AN ENGLISH bulldog has been euthanased after biting off his Scottish owner’s testicles, which had been coated in peanut butter.

    Love hurts.

  138. Infidel Tiger

    Crunchy nut peanut butter is of course the best peanut butter.

  139. .

    If only it was a Dutch Pomeranian owned by a German girlfriend of the Scotsman. Then it may have been true love.

  140. John Constantine

    Speaking of Nazi, in soulless bleak yarragrad, it is now three months loss of licence for twenty-five K over the limit.

    So if a council drops speed limits so they don’t have to fix rural roads, you go from a hundred K being legal to ninety five K being three months loss of ticket, plus a big revenue raising fine.

    Comrades.

  141. Tintarella di Luna

    Political bent of the senders would be an interesting study, most likely fat lefty’s. After all, they later demonstrated that they were incapable of distinguishing between a soldier following orders and the government from which those orders originated- Vietnam.

    Indeed, and let’s never forget Australia’s Secret War

  142. John Constantine

    Their andrews Nazgul regime launches their paramilitary death squad training video.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQij1k

  143. .

    it is now three months loss of licence for twenty-five K over the limit

    The freaks making the rules for everyone else have never personally owned a car with an engine over 1.5 litres capacity.

  144. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    There’s a lot of history here. In Afghanistan and Iraq, the Army had to uparmor its soldiers in a hurry, just as it uparmored its vehicles. That armor saved lives, but for humans and Humvees alike, the layers of protection grew so heavy they often impaired mobility.

    Many a battle of old was lost when knights in full armor fell of their horses and drowned in water or mud, or were knifed in the slits, or the slats, by more nimble warriors, who didn’t go much on the Chivalric Code.

  145. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    AN ENGLISH bulldog has been euthanased after biting off his Scottish owner’s testicles, which had been coated in peanut butter.

    I read that a sausage was also involved in that chop.
    A cheap re-gender for an aspiring trannie.

  146. max

    Anyone know what happened to the Tommy/ Gavin McInnes event scheduled last night for Melbourne ?

    Ticket holders left waiting for a text advising venue.

    Are they in the country or were they denied entry ?

  147. calli

    Any other suggestions are welcome.

    Karakeoke?

    Sorry, I’ve just had my first evah Margarita. On the River Walk. 🍸

  148. Jimmy the boy

    They should’ve euthanised the owner, poor bulldog.

  149. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Indeed, and let’s never forget Australia’s Secret War

    Similar rackets took place during the Viet Nam war – when the Centurion tanks were deployed there, in 1968, they couldn’t be serviced or maintained for some time after arrival, in country. The wharfies that loaded the tanks, had stolen all the tools, off every tank.

  150. calli

    AN ENGLISH bulldog has been euthanased after biting off his Scottish owner’s testicles, which had been coated in peanut butter.

    Good heavens. I take my recent apology back.

  151. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    I am really sick of buying tickets to an event in a free country and having to wait for advice re venue due to hired thugs and other loonies being allowed free reign for outright physical attacks on persons and property unless event holders pay ‘protection money’ to the forces of law and order provided by our taxes.

  152. Bruce of Newcastle

    Making America great again

    And Canada less great.

    Oil And Gas Firms Sound Alarm As Capital Once Destined For Canada Flees To More Competitive U.S. (2 Nov)

    The Trudeau government has been so hopeless at approving infrastructure projects that recently Albertan oil fell to $15/bbl.

    Desperate Canadian oil producers turn to tanker trucks to ship crude as supply glut grows (31 Oct)

    Canada’s pipeline bottlenecks are pushing Canadian crude prices to the lowest in at least a decade, which has made shipping oil by truck more cost effective. At Hardisty, Alberta, heavy Western Canadian Select sold for US$52.40 a barrel less than West Texas Intermediate crude futures earlier this month, the biggest discount in Bloomberg data going back to 2008.

    They just can’t get the stuff to anywhere that actually wants it. Which is most of the planet except Alberta.

  153. calli

    I carefully examined the memorials at the Alamo. On no plaque, brass or marble, were the words “George Custer” inscribed.

    I’m calling Fake News.

  154. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    I’ve just had my first evah Margarita

    Now you’re really starting to live, Callli.
    Salt around the edges of the glass, I trust?

  155. Tintarella di Luna

    Similar rackets took place during the Viet Nam war – when the Centurion tanks were deployed there, in 1968, they couldn’t be serviced or maintained for some time after arrival, in country. The wharfies that loaded the tanks, had stolen all the tools, off every tank.

    May they be trapped at the centre of Dante’s 9th circle

  156. calli

    The dead heroes of the Alamo would have called Trump “soft”. Those guys had guts.

  157. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Yum. Now I feel like a Margarita for elevenses.

    Better put the kettle on for a nice cup of tea.

  158. it is now three months loss of licence for twenty-five K over the limit

    speaking of nazis

  159. Gab

    both of whom are unrelenting in their campaign to stop Australians from voting Republican in the US mid-terms.

    😂😂😂

  160. Cassie of Sydney

    “Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #2855682, posted on November 3, 2018 at 11:12 am
    I am really sick of buying tickets to an event in a free country and having to wait for advice re venue due to hired thugs and other loonies being allowed free reign for outright physical attacks on persons and property unless event holders pay ‘protection money’ to the forces of law and order provided by our taxes.”

    Agree entirely Lizzie.

  161. Top Ender

    Naughty Alec Baldwin arrested for assault.

    Big question is can he somehow blame Trump for it in his appearances as The Man.

  162. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    It’s great to be back in Australia, the land of Steaks-R-Us.
    Rivalled only by Argentina for size and quality and availability.

  163. Confused Old Misfit

    And Canada less great.

    I do not understand this generation of Canadians. They are working very hard to destroy themselves.
    Perhaps they are hoping to turn the country into such a sh*thole that they will be invaded by the USA.

  164. ZK2A;

    Similar rackets took place during the Viet Nam war – when the Centurion tanks were deployed there, in 1968, they couldn’t be serviced or maintained for some time after arrival, in country. The wharfies that loaded the tanks, had stolen all the tools, off every tank.

    Which is why Australia needs two new ports run by and for the DoD. One on the midwest coast and one on the east coast. No bloody unions allowed.

  165. Rae

    They should’ve euthanised the owner, poor bulldog.

    The condemned dog ate a hearty meal.

  166. max

    Woops, mixed up the dates. Tommy Robinson coming next month.

  167. C.L.

    Images emerge of new Chinese submarine

    If they used Chinese steal and building standards, it will sink within five years.

  168. Interesting comment from Alec Baldwin.

    Everything I hated about LA I’m beginning to crave. LA is a place where you live behind a gate, you get in a car, your interaction with the public is minimal. I used to hate that. But New York has changed.”

    The Democrat forever State is South Africa for the famous. Joining the dots isn’t big with actors.

  169. miltonf

    I often wonder if provinces such as Alberta and Manitoba would be better off joining he US. Maybe leave Ontario and Quebec to the Trudeaus.

  170. C.L.

    In a further humiliation for Alec Baldwin, nobody watches his talk show:

    The most recent episode, with fewer than 1.5 million viewers, had the smallest audience of any prime-time program on the top four broadcast networks over the past week, the Nielsen company said.

  171. Lizzie:

    I am really sick of buying tickets to an event in a free country and having to wait for advice re venue due to hired thugs and other loonies being allowed free reign for outright physical attacks on persons and property unless event holders pay ‘protection money’ to the forces of law and order provided by our taxes.

    Then I suggest you go along and get some video of the thugs, etc, take piccies of them doing thuggish things and demand the wallopers take action.
    If that doesn’t work try a civil action and keep doing it.
    They do thuggish things because we are all standing around waiting for others to ‘do something about it’. No one is going to retrieve our chestnuts from the fire when we appear so reluctant to do so ourselves.
    Get organised and be prepared to deal with them.

  172. jupes

    I do not understand this generation of Canadians. They are working very hard to destroy themselves.

    How are they any different from this generation of Australians?

    Perhaps they are hoping to turn the country into such a sh*thole that they will be invaded by the USA.

    They could be so lucky. We on the other hand get to be invaded by China.

  173. Confused Old Misfit

    The $80 Trillion World Economy In One Chart

    I often wonder if provinces such as Alberta and Manitoba would be better off joining he US. Maybe leave Ontario and Quebec to the Trudeaus.

    Add Saskatchewan to that mix and the answer has to be YES!

  174. C.L.

    Remember when Fairfax laughed at the idea Melbourne restaurants were to be avoided because of African gangs? Today, they acknowledge reality after a night of horrors:

    Violent gang attacks men outside Donovans restaurant in St Kilda.

    Crime is back in the spotlight in the Victorian election after a gang of youths engaged in “vicious, unprovoked, ugly” assaults outside St Kilda’s popular Donovans restaurant without a single arrest being made.

    As many as 15 youths of African appearance were roaming St Kilda’s foreshore on Thursday night before setting upon a young chef and another innocent man.

    The violent incident spilled onto Jacka Boulevard blocking traffic as it escalated into a melee involving other kitchen staff…

    Chef Daniel Maetzing said he feared he would be killed as the gang rained punches and kicks on him, before clubbing him with a pole and glassing him with a champagne bottle.

    “The first thing I got was a blow to the back of the head,” he told Nine News.

    “All I saw was just a person jumping in full swing motion and then going straight at it. There was just constantly punching and kicking.”

    Another victim – a 23-year-old man who was taking a stroll along the foreshore on the hot and muggy night – was punched in the head and left with severe swelling to his face, police said. His phone was also stolen.

    The attack followed a Halloween-night crime spree by a group of mostly African youths that spanned six suburbs from South Yarra to Patterson Lakes.

    Five men ambushed a young mother in her driveway, threatening her with a machete and covering her mouth before stealing her car in the early hours of the morning.

    The Age can reveal police are also probing a violent home invasion in Brunswick West where six men smashed their way into a house about 4.30am on Tuesday.

    The home invaders, armed with knives and hammers, confronted two victims and demanded money and jewellery before fleeing in the victims’ black Jeep Cherokee. The vehicle was found in Deer Park the following day.

    They should be shot on sight.

  175. JC

    You have to laugh. The biggest sack of shit that’s ever existed on Wall Street , making a good slab of his billions lying, cheating and screaming at people is now running Just Capital… an ethical ETF.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/02/paul-tudor-jones-not-yet-at-bear-market-tipping-point.html

    What a turd.

  176. C.L.

    Catallaxy filter now banning reports on Melbourne’s African gangs.

  177. Rae

    Similar rackets took place during the Viet Nam war – when the Centurion tanks were deployed there, in 1968, they couldn’t be serviced or maintained for some time after arrival, in country. The wharfies that loaded the tanks, had stolen all the tools, off every tank.

    More fake news. You need to lay off the cheap scotch, Old Sot.

  178. Arky

    I enjoy thinking, which develops conceptual acuity.

    ..
    You enjoy “thinking” for two reasons:
    1. You are a lazy shit who doesn’t want to do any actual work.
    And:
    2. Your mummy didn’t hug you enough when you were little.

  179. C.L.

    Belieb all women latest …
    Breaking via Ace:

    Woman who claimed Brett Kavanaugh raped her now says she made the whole thing up.

    Shannon Bream✔@ShannonBream
    BREAKING: This is quite a read. Woman who claimed Justice Kavanaugh raped her now admits they’ve never even met. She’s been referred to DOJ/FBI for investigation and could soon be in serious legal trouble.

    More details:

    She further confessed to Committee investigators that (1) she “just wanted to get attention”;
    (2) “it was a tactic”; and (3) “that was just a ploy.” She told Committee investigators that she had
    called Congress multiple times during the Kavanaugh hearing process – including prior to the time
    Dr. Ford’s allegations surfaced – to oppose his nomination. Regarding the false sexual-assault allegation she made via her email to the Committee, she said: “I was angry, and I sent it out.”
    When asked by Committee investigators whether she had ever met Judge Kavanaugh, she said:
    “Oh Lord, no.”

  180. rickw

    both of whom are unrelenting in their campaign to stop Australians from voting Republican in the US mid-terms.

    I’m voting Republican! 🙂

  181. Bruce of Newcastle

    Interesting comment from Alec Baldwin.

    “Everything I hated about LA I’m beginning to crave. LA is a place where you live behind a gate, you get in a car, your interaction with the public is minimal. I used to hate that. But New York has changed.”

    He has natural talent.

    New York City Joins The “Imminent Bankruptcy” Club

    (Bloomberg) – New York City faces future health costs for its retired workers of $103.2 billion, an increase of $40 billion over a decade. It has about $5 billion set aside to pay the bill.

    The so-called “other post-employment benefits” liability was disclosed in New York’s comprehensive annual financial report released by the city comptroller’s office Wednesday. The city’s $98 billion unfunded liability for retiree health care exceeds the city’s $93 billion of bond debt and $48 billion pension-fund shortfall.

    “The numbers are huge,” said Maria Doulis, a vice president at the Citizens Budget Commission, a budget watchdog group funded by the business community. “If you’re looking at the big three liabilities, this is the one that’s problematic, because there’s nothing set aside to address this and there’s absolutely no strategy on the part of the city.”

    New York, the most populous U.S. city, has almost 300,000 current employees and is responsible for more than 230,000 retirees and their beneficiaries. City employees with 10 years of service qualify for free retiree health care.

    I wonder which will be the next city the socialists flee to? Not LA, unless they don’t mind typhus.

  182. C.L.

    I don’t really care that Baldwin is an old-fashioned hot-head who lets his fists do the talking sometimes. It’s the moral hypocrisy I can’t stand.

  183. Zatara

    The dead heroes of the Alamo would have called Trump “soft”. Those guys had guts.

    They were well avenged calli.

    A month later Santa Anna’s Mexican army were basking in their success when they were located and attacked by Sam Houston’s ragtag but angry army of Texan militia at San Jacinto. 18 minutes later the battle was over, the majority of the Mexicans dead, and Santa Anna a prisoner in what some historians call the most lop-sided victory in history. Thusly was born the Republic of Texas.

    ‘Remember the Alamo” indeed. Don’t mess with Texas.

  184. It’s great to be back in Australia, the land of Steaks-R-Us.
    Rivalled only by Argentina for size and quality and availability.

    Oz does have great beef.

    I do miss a nice King Island Porterhouse, a bit pricey, but worth every penny. Even better than Kobe beef.

  185. Boambee John

    At the time, the home front was gripped by fear of Japanese invasion. As the enemy advanced on the Kokoda Track in New Guinea and Japanese raids hit Darwin, Newcastle and Sydney Harbour, the Rats received hate letters telling them they were shirking their duty to defend Australia.

    What, no mention that the Labor government of (Saint) John Curtin agreed that the 9th Division could remain in the Middle East in exchange for the despatch of the 32nd and 41st US Divisions to Australia?

  186. Cassie of Sydney

    “C.L.
    #2855717, posted on November 3, 2018 at 11:55 am
    I don’t really care that Baldwin is an old-fashioned hot-head who lets his fists do the talking sometimes. It’s the moral hypocrisy I can’t stand.”

    Hear hear and Baldwin is a very big hypocrite.

  187. rickw

    When asked by Committee investigators whether she had ever met Judge Kavanaugh, she said:
    “Oh Lord, no.”

    Can we now end the witch trials and get bact to Innocent until proven guilty?

  188. John Constantine

    “The State Government of Victoria has announced an increase in penalties for speeding, with excessive (or ‘high range’) speeding in the firing line.

    The changes, which are now in effect, mean anyone who is caught exceeding the speed limit “by 25km/h or more but less than 35km/h” has their licence taken away for three months. Previously, the punishment called for a one-month suspension.

    Why do we let speed limits get absurd?

    Anyone travelling at “20km/h or more but less than 25km/h” in a 110 km/h zone also cops a three-month suspension.

    At and above 35km/h over the speed limit, drivers lose their licence for six months, while drivers at or above 45km/h over the speed limit will have to go a year without their licence.

    VicRoads adds that demerit points are no longer accrued for excessive (more than 25km/h over the limit) speed offences. Drivers still get three points for exceeding the speed limit by 10km/h or more but less than 25km/h, and one for doing so by less than 10km/h.”

    Not making their media ahead of their election Big Push.

  189. rickw

    John, I just got done around $450 for 0.5s and three points on a red light doing a RH turn.

    If you’re an average wage earner, these pricks think it’s ok to slug you 0.5% of your before tax income in a single fine for which appealing against is basically impossible.

  190. Senile Old Guy

    If you’re an average wage earner, these pricks think it’s ok to slug you 0.5% of your before tax income in a single fine for which appealing against is basically impossible.

    No-one thinks it is about safety anymore, it is revenue raising for the government. Basically, it is legalised extortion.

  191. stackja

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2855715, posted on November 3, 2018 at 11:52 am

    Fiscal crisis in 1975 taught New York hard lessons of chopping, freezing that are handy now

    By ADAM LISBERG and CORKY SIEMASZKO
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS |
    FEB 03, 2009

    Years of fiscal mismanagement, coupled with a national economic downturn, forced then-Mayor Abe Beame to go to the White House begging for a bailout.

    President Gerald Ford turned Beame down, prompting the famous Daily News front-page headline: “FORD TO CITY: DROP DEAD.”

  192. calli

    Some principals have recieved death threats over this.

  193. Senile Old Guy

    I got done for going through a red light when I could not safely stop because the car behind me would have crashed into the back of me. Needless to say, that car was too close but I copped the fine.

  194. Tailgunner

    A tip for gambling Cats.
    Ascot, WA today.
    Back Pike(jockey) and drink what you like.
    His longest ride is @4.4
    Put a 5 on him in race 1 and roll the winnings.
    Over $8k tonight.

  195. Arky

    I got done for going through a red light when I could not safely stop because the car behind me would have crashed into the back of me. Needless to say, that car was too close but I copped the fine.

    ..
    That was you?
    Stay off the roads Granddad, and get out of my way.

  196. H B Bear

    An English bulldog has been euthanased after biting off his Scottish owner’s testicles, which had been coated in peanut butter.

    I didn’t know they played Rugby League in Scotland.

  197. Top Ender

    And on a Quadrant note, I have a new article in the latest edition: “Pushing and Shoving in the South China Sea” – all about implications for the West and implications for Australia.

  198. H B Bear

    Prof van Wrongselen’s weekly dose of wrongology attempts to defend the absurd bvllshit taxpayers are funding from some of his academic mates.

    All the wrongology all the time.

  199. John Constantine

    They do not want proles in private cars.

    It Offends Davos Man, to look down from their choppers and see the streets clogged with prole vehicular traffic, instead of seeing them hobbling on foot and crawling on hands and knees, the way it is Meant to be.

    Comrades.

  200. JC

    H B Bear
    #2855739, posted on November 3, 2018 at 12:25 pm

    An English bulldog has been euthanased after biting off his Scottish owner’s testicles, which had been coated in peanut butter.

    I didn’t know they played Rugby League in Scotland.

    Sounds like Florida.

  201. Mindfree

    I often wonder if provinces such as Alberta and Manitoba would be better off joining he US. Maybe leave Ontario and Quebec to the Trudeau

    Not Ontario Milton – that province is really adopting the Trump US approach going by Doug Ford’s leadership. Amazingly possibly Quebec as well going by the recent election but we will see.
    There are other provinces who are now ganging up on the feds to remove the fed carbon tax

    Leave British Columbia to Trudeau (Disclaimer: my Sisters-in-law live in Vancouver and lurve man-boy Justine

  202. Arky

    I haven’t had a fine in years, and yet everywhere I drive there is s multitude of fuckin’ spastics doing 5, 10, 20 ks below the limit, clogging the rh lane, rubber- necking at accidents and oblivious to the ambo or firetruck with the lights on stuck behing ’em.
    Then there is the dickheads who scoot down the left hand lane before the roadworks or blocked lights and want to merge in front of the thousand people they just pushed front of. AND THE ARSEHOLES WHO LET THEM IN.
    Listen, cockhead. You saw the merge signs two km ago, same as everyone else. You’re the reason this jam is going nowhere.
    And why when there is an accident on the other side of the freeway that can have no posible effect on this direction do you feel the need to slow down to a fucking stop in the hope of seeing a dead baby or some shit like that you sick fucking creep.

  203. JC

    I’m going with Pence. We’re keeping the House. 🙂

    Vice President Pence maintained in an interview with Hill.TV on Friday that Republicans will keep control of the House in next week’s midterm elections.

    “I think we’re going to expand our majority in the United States Senate, and I think we’re going to hold our Republican majority in the House of Representatives,” Pence told Hill.TV’s Buck Sexton.

    “But that being said, there is certainly common ground in areas that we can work that the president has laid out,” Pence added when asked about working with Democrats if they win the House, citing issues like trade and infrastructure.

    “I think there’s a broad range of areas that we’ll be able to work with that Democrat minority in the House and the Senate, and we’ll continue to reach out to do that.”

    The comments from Pence, a former six-term House member, came shortly after President Trump acknowledged earlier Friday that Republicans could end up losing control of the lower chamber in Tuesday’s midterms.

    “It could happen. Could happen. We’re doing very well, and we’re doing really well in the Senate, but could happen,” Trump said at a rally in West Virginia.

    “And you know what you do? My whole life, you know what I say? ‘Don’t worry about it, I’ll just figure it out,'” he continued. “Does that make sense? I’ll figure it out.”

    Trump has been active on the campaign trail in recent weeks, criss-crossing the country in an effort to boost GOP Senate and gubernatorial candidates and get Republicans to the polls.

    Democrats are widely favored to win the House. They need to net 23 seats to take control of the chamber.

  204. Top Ender

    Many a battle of old was lost when knights in full armor fell off their horses…

    True enough but they could get up very quickly. Tests with re-enactors wearing full plate show they could mount horses; get to their feet, and do all sorts of tasks.

    There was a cartoon woodcut doing the rounds in medieval times. It showed a knight in plate armour being craned onto his horse. It was a joke about how armour was getting heavier in the changeover from mail to plate, but it has since been interpreted by many as reality.

  205. John Constantine

    If you work out where there is no public transport, the State is happy to see you lose your job, house and get divorced for a split second snapshot of 25 kmh over the new Council declared unfixed roads speed limit.

    On the scrapheap of life for doing last years legal speed on a deserted road in broad daylight, just once for a few minutes.

    Not everybody has Uber.

  206. Boambee John:

    What, no mention that the Labor government of (Saint) John Curtin agreed that the 9th Division could remain in the Middle East in exchange for the despatch of the 32nd and 41st US Divisions to Australia?

    Didn’t fit the narrative.

  207. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    and why when there is an accident on the other side of the freeway that can have no posible effect on this direction do you feel the need to slow down to a fucking stop in the hope of seeing a dead baby or some shit like that you sick fucking creep.

    They also belong in Dante’s inferno. I’ve seen the sicko’s pull off the road, and walk up to the accident scene…

  208. Old School Conservative

    Calli
    #2855733, posted on November 3, 2018 at 12:13 pm
    Some principals have recieved death threats over this.

    Ironic. The very agitators who call for the death threats are simultaneously calling for acceptance of gay teachers.

    Claims by the schools that staff and students will not be targeted are ignored by the protestors. Statements by school heads that quality teaching is paramount irrespective of sexual orientation are not responded to.
    The protestors are setting up straw men and flinging invective at the schools instead of calmly addressing the issues.

  209. Senile Old Guy

    AND THE ARSEHOLES WHO LET THEM IN.

    Exactly. I never let them in. Do not reward bad behaviour.

  210. John Constantine

    As a percentage of discretionary disposable household income, paying the speeding fine, then funding the requirements for getting to work and back while driving rights are suspended for months hits rural working class hard.

    Their alex turnbull just flies overseas to live for summer.

  211. Arky

    And then there is this one:
    You are at the lights on a three lane arterial. In front of you there are three cars. One in each lane.
    The lights go green. You know what happens next man. You know. I don’t need to even type it.
    They take off and slowly reach a speed 10 ks below the limit. In perfect formation. Door to door. And hold it for kilometre after kilometre. Missing each subsequent light by three seconds each time, where the repeat the whole process, while you go nuts.
    Arseholes.

  212. Roger

    The Greater Talent Network, which used to represent US President Donald Trump, announced it had exclusively signed the former prime minister, describing him as an extremely intelligent, humorous and charismatic speaker.

    So they signed him up without meeting him then?

  213. max

    Some pommy expert out here for the racing comments on ‘Australians obsession with the pocket handkerchief worn without socks.’ Heh.

  214. BrettW

    Calli,
    Regarding your Alamo fake news comment I am guessing you are in Texas. Surely by now you should know that Custer died defending the Alamo in Montana.

  215. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    They take off and slowly reach a speed 10 ks below the limit. In perfect formation. Door to door. And hold it for kilometre after kilometre

    As do the morons, who are incapable of reading “Keep Left unless Overtaking” signs.

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