Open Forum: November 3, 2018

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1,219 Responses to Open Forum: November 3, 2018

  1. Trudeau is collecting 500,000 bank account details to “help govern better.”
    What he’s actually doing is setting up for an account grab like the Greek government did – confiscate peoples savings. I forgot the details.
    Bill Shorten will be all over this, and he’ll bring it in after he’s brought in death duties, confiscated the super nest egg, and gotten the deficit up to 3 trillion dollars.
    Comrades.

  2. RobK

    Helen,
    I know just how you feel. I had to help my sheep dog on her way last year. It wasn’t until a couple of months later, on getting her rego renewal, i phoned to say the rego was no longer required. I asked the girl when the dog was first registered, she said; Oh, 2001, we dont get many that old, especially on farms.
    She had been a good sheep dog, though more of a ute dog the last half dozen years. I still miss her and haven’t wanted to replace her since we are trying to sell the farm. They sure are good mates.

  3. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    We do the house visits and get the purple dream for the dogs. They go to God whilst looking at our verdant yard that is filled with doggie scents and mysteries.

    Bloke up in the Wheatbelt, a few years ago, took a terminally ill sheepdog into town to be euthenased. He was bringing the body home, to be buried under a shady tree, when an officious copper pulled him over and wrote him a ticket for having an unsecured load….

  4. Armadillo

    Had Miss A’s dog come home in a box this week.

    Apparently they charge $10 per kilo (so says the credit card charge and invoice).

    Don’t get me wrong. It’s all very nice. Cremated. Bows and ribbons. Death certificate and stuff. Or maybe it was a scroll with a poem or something. I haven’t read it.

    This is what happens when you live in a house with Sheilahs.

  5. Cactus

    However, with your recommendation in mind, I will ensure that Hairy, my very sensible niece and I have a handy bottle or two of Arras on ice in an Esky in the boot of her Audi or ours, and that the motel is within walking distance, so we can indulge with the best of them, carrying our secret glasses back into the house.

    Lovely Lizzie

  6. Cactus

    Ha whoops screwed up the italics. Should be thw rwvwrse of my last post

  7. Westie Woman

    Helen

    I’m in tears after reading your beautiful words about Bill – a wonderful companion and your words just give me a picture of your surroundings and that gorgeous dog.

    We’ve just arrived home from the vet – our youngest kitty was bitten by a brown snake here in suburban Sydney- he’s only outside on a lead when we’re home as I’ve lost too many cats outside on the busy road so the bastard snake was near our back door!

    Awaiting a progess call from the vet and emailing a snake catcher…

    Saturday evening in Sydney..

  8. .

    Trudeau is collecting 500,000 bank account details to “help govern better.”
    What he’s actually doing is setting up for an account grab like the Greek government did – confiscate peoples savings. I forgot the details.

    Our “retirement savings” have already been declared as “taxes paid”, see the Roy Morgan tax case.

  9. Delta A

    An anxious time for you, Westie Woman. Hope it all turns out well.

    Please keep us informed.

  10. .

    On Halloween,

    Surely those with English or British heritage ought to celebrate Walpurgis night – named after an English saint, nun, Abbess, doctor and missionary!

  11. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Bill Shorten will be all over this, and he’ll bring it in after he’s brought in death duties, confiscated the super nest egg, and gotten the deficit up to 3 trillion dollars.
    Comrades.

    He will then declare any houses above a certain value to be “property of the State” (except the elite few), and commence a programme of “Year Zero.”

  12. Armadillo

    Let’s not forget that dogs are ultimately descendants of wolves.

    Don’t start me on Cats. “Westie Womans” snake was probably protecting itself and its young from pure evil.

  13. Mark A

    .
    #2856051, posted on November 3, 2018 at 9:03 pm

    What would be her (Munro-Leighton’s) motivation to lie about this? Conversely, what would be her motivation to tell the truth?

    You don’t know people well, do you?
    There are millions of reasons why people lie. May not be obvious nor logical, or proper to you or me, but for them is compelling.

  14. Helen

    Don’t forget Armadillo, there are recipes for cooking … armadillos.

    Our animals are a path we tread with happiness, so many faithful companions on my trail, not sure I want another. Westie Woman, all the best for your kittie, hope he comes through.

  15. Armadillo

    Snakes have copped a “bad rap” ever since the “Garden of Eden”. It’s all bullshit. When was the last time a snake tried to talk you into eating a forbidden apple?

    Besides, who eats the rats? The Cats?

    Snakes are “multi-skilled”. They can do both.

    I rest my case.

  16. Armadillo

    Don’t forget Armadillo, there are recipes for cooking … armadillos.

    Night all.

  17. Westie Woman

    Thanks Delta A – much worrying because he was almost dead.

    Snakes have been seen around my suburb but this is our first experience and my poor Stanley- naturally inquisitive young kitty was the victim.

    Snake catcher will be here at 8am thank goodness because I’m barricading us in the house until its caught and hopefully killed in front of me!

  18. Gab

    Helen, you are a born writer!
    You have this way with words that makes me want to read on without pause only to be left wanting more at the end. A beautiful story so lovingly written from the heart. (Brought a few tears to my eyes). Thank you for sharing it with us.

  19. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Snake catcher will be here at 8am thank goodness because I’m barricading us in the house until its caught and hopefully killed in front of me!

    You’ve never had a snake – a king brown, one of the most venomous – actually inside the house, and the nearest snake catcher a hundred kilometers away? It met it’s end with the finest device ever for killing snakes, a long handled post hole shovel, with a sharpened blade.

  20. Westie Woman

    Thanks Helen

    No more pets – weve been saying for years after the loss of another beautiful companion but somehow new animals arrive for their share of love…

    Little Stanley comes from the garden section of Bunnings – go to Bunnings for a new wheelbarrow and come home with a kitten!

  21. .

    You don’t know people well, do you?
    There are millions of reasons why people lie. May not be obvious nor logical, or proper to you or me, but for them is compelling.

    Yes well. I think she is Jane Doe and I cannot understand her motivation to come forward and come clean without pressure from an investigation. Obviously, I think she lied to shaft Kavanaugh.

  22. .

    You don’t know people well, do you?
    There are millions of reasons why people lie. May not be obvious nor logical, or proper to you or me, but for them is compelling.

    Yes well. I think she is Jayne D’oh and I cannot understand her motivation to come forward and come clean without pressure from an investigation. Obviously, I think she lied to shaft the new USSC Justice.

  23. .

    Arrrgh!

    You don’t know people well, do you?
    There are millions of reasons why people lie. May not be obvious nor logical, or proper to you or me, but for them is compeeling.

    Yes well. I think she is Jayne D’oh and I cannot understand her motivation to come forward and come clean without pressure from an investigation. Obviously, I think she lied to shaft the new USSC Justice.

  24. mh

    Gavin R Putland
    #2856046, posted on November 3, 2018 at 8:58 pm
    Just to clarify:

    “Jane Doe” has not withdrawn the rape allegation against Kavanaugh. Rather, the woman who subsequently claimed to be “Jane Doe” has recanted that claim. But every headline I’ve seen gives the impression that there is only one woman and that she has withdrawn the allegation.

    I don’t know what Kavanaugh did or didn’t do. (The presumption of innocence applies, and it is quite normal for that presumption to apply to two parties who can’t both be innocent.)

    But I sure as hell know what the media are doing.

    As highlighted by Chuck Grassley, ‘In addition to being from an anonymous accuser, the letter listed no return address, failed to provide any timeframe, and failed to provide any location — beyond an automobile — in which these alleged incidents took place.’

    The Jane Doe letter only got any credibility because Ms. Judy Munro-Leighton advised the Senate Commitee that she was Jane Doe and Kavanaugh had done those things to her in the car. Now that Ms Munro-Leighton has been found out as a liar, once again there is nothing to the Jane Doe letter.

  25. Armadillo

    go to Bunnings for a new wheelbarrow and come home with a kitten!

    I’ll be somewhat surprised if the brown snake sticks around for too long.
    They are generally nomadic (unless there is a good food source readily available).

  26. jupes

    Tailgunner has done an excellent job today.

    Bastard cost me $5!

  27. Arky

    I don’t think this has been posted often enough:
    ..
    #2856086, posted on November 3, 2018 at 9:52 pm
    Arrrgh!

    You don’t know people well, do you?
    There are millions of reasons why people lie. May not be obvious nor logical, or proper to you or me, but for them is compeeling.

    Yes well. I think she is Jayne D’oh and I cannot understand her motivation to come forward and come clean without pressure from an investigation. Obviously, I think she lied to shaft the new USSC Justice.

  28. Arky

    .
    #2856086, posted on November 3, 2018 at 9:52 pm
    Arrrgh!

    You don’t know people well, do you?
    There are millions of reasons why people lie. May not be obvious nor logical, or proper to you or me, but for them is compeeling.

    Yes well. I think she is Jayne D’oh and I cannot understand her motivation to come forward and come clean without pressure from an investigation. Obviously, I think she lied to shaft the new USSC Justice.

  29. Arky

    .
    #2856086, posted on November 3, 2018 at 9:52 pm
    Arrrgh!

    You don’t know people well, do you?
    There are millions of reasons why people lie. May not be obvious nor logical, or proper to you or me, but for them is compeeling.

    Yes well. I think she is Jayne D’oh and I cannot understand her motivation to come forward and come clean without pressure from an investigation. Obviously, I think she lied to shaft the new USSC Justice.

  30. JC

    There’s no male/female wage gap because of discrimination. It’s 100% horseshit

    Why do women earn less than men? Evidence from train and bus operators
    by Tyler Cowen November 3, 2018 at 12:36 am in

    Data Source Economics

    Even in a unionized environment, where work tasks are similar, hourly wages are identical, and tenure dictates promotions, female workers earn $0.89 on the male-worker dollar (weekly earnings). We use confidential administrative data on bus and train operators from the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) to show that the weekly earnings gap can be explained entirely by the workplace choices that women and men make. Women value time and flexibility more than men. Women take more unpaid time off using the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and work fewer overtime hours than men. Men and women plan to work similar overtime hours when they are scheduled three months in advance, but men actually work nearly 50% more overtime hours than women. Women with dependents value time away from work more than do men with dependents. When selecting work schedules, women try to avoid weekend, holiday, and split shifts more than men. To avoid unfavorable work times, women prioritize their schedules over route safety and select routes with a higher probability of accidents. Women are less likely than men to game the scheduling system by trading off work hours at regular wages for overtime hours at premium wages. Conditional on seniority, which dictates choice sets, the weekly earnings gap can be explained entirely by differences in operator choices of hours, schedules, and routes.

  31. .

    Sorry Arky I thought I got moderated for the mention of Sir Robert Peel, lemon peel, banana peel or the Peel River.

  32. Wipe the glue off your fingers Arky.

  33. sdfc

    Our “retirement savings” have already been declared as “taxes paid”, see the Roy Morgan tax case.

    Seems like that case rested on the fungibility of money.

    By the way I saw Halloween with my daughter today, it was truly dreadful.

  34. Roger

    Midst our various concerns, spare a thought for Asia Noreen Bibi of Pakistan, whose indictment for blasphemy against Muhammed with the accompanying death penalty has been over turned by the Supreme Court of that country, but who now faces a travel ban and an appeal which the Pakistani government has indicated it will not oppose.

    If you are inclined to prayer, please pray for her and her family and contact your local Federal member, even (why do we play international cricket against Pakistan?).

    And take note: this is the true face of Islam.

  35. Armadillo

    Bastard cost me $5!

    Let’s not be too harsh. A bookmakers child somewhere can afford to send a Christmas Card to their father from some flash University this year.

    Think of it as “doing your bit” to make the world a kinder place.

  36. Helen

    Stanley is a great name for a kitten from Bunnings, Westie Woman!

  37. Armadillo

    Arky’s starting to repeat himself. Sad.

  38. Snoopy

    There’s no male/female wage gap because of discrimination.

    That’s not what Leigh Sayles ($400k+ pa) says.

  39. Arky

    If Helen invites you to her place for tea and starts circling behind you: run.

  40. .

    Hmm. Watched Dave Cullen’s review of Dr Who.

    Makes it hard to be enamoured with Jenna Coleman; Capaldi is a total cuck and the whole thing died after Matt Smith (the best with Tom Baker).

    The franchise is dead.

    The 13th doctor…well it gets worse. Far, far worse.

    Get woke, go broke!

    Chris Chibnall is the Matt Ward of science fiction.

  41. Arky

    Woman complaing because this week I ate 2kg of peppermint choc seconds from Heritage outlet.
    They hate to see you happy.

  42. .

    Seems like that case rested on the fungibility of money.

    No.

    Shut up you maniac.

    It rested on our political classes being thieving arsewipes.

  43. sdfc

    Haven’t read the judgement then.

  44. Armadillo

    Is Stimpson still sulking, or have ASIO finally tracked him down?

  45. Mark A

    .
    #2856086, posted on November 3, 2018 at 9:52 pm

    Arrrgh!
    compeeling

    Now I now who grammar/spelling nazi is.
    I make it my duty to spellcheck every one of your posts, that I happen to read.

    Sheeesh!

  46. .

    That’s not the point you twit, sfdc.

  47. Shy Ted

    Feminist writer Germaine Greer has defended body shaming Australia’s first female prime minister, but says the bigger worry is Julia Gillard’s lack of an “important” job after politics.
    Prison librarian?

  48. jupes

    Asia Noreen Bibi of Pakistan, whose indictment for blasphemy against Muhammed with the accompanying death penalty has been over turned by the Supreme Court of that country, but who now faces a travel ban and an appeal which the Pakistani government has indicated it will not oppose.

    Seriously? How much aid do we give these evil fucks?

    And take note: this is the true face of Islam.

    Indeed. It’s not just the governments. It’s the people.

  49. Julia Gillard’s lack of an “important” job after politics.

    Bike rack?

  50. sdfc

    What is the point Dot? That Australia is like Greece? That’s just silly.

    The judgment rested on the fact that money is fungible.

  51. Helen

    Breakfast, Arky. Tea is quite safe.

  52. Roger

    Seriously? How much aid do we give these evil fucks?

    $50 000 000 in the current financial year.

    Most of it finding its way into the hands of corrupt government officials, I’d wager.

    Small beer overall, but enough to buy us some influence, surely.

  53. jupes

    How about this:

    Asia Noreen Bibi of Apartheid South Africa, whose indictment for breaking race laws with the accompanying death penalty has been over turned by the Supreme Court of that country, but who now faces a travel ban and an appeal which the South African government has indicated it will not oppose.

    Not quite the same I know. If the above was a fact, she would not be in danger of a lynch mob if she was released.

    Nevertheless consider the absolute silence of our government. The gutless pricks are enabling evil.

  54. .

    What is the point Dot? That Australia is like Greece? That’s just silly.

    We have no debt ceiling and no party that can win government that ever wants to cut spending or balance a budget.

    We have overly powerful unions and a plethora of overstaffed government departments, agencies and NGOs that are paid above average salaries.

    We have a looming demographic crisis and a shrinking base of net taxpayers, whilst we are increasingly subjected to lengthy approval processes for businesses.

    The reason you say the case rested on is precisely why that case can be abused.

  55. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Prison librarian?

    Washing dirty clothes in the laundry?

  56. Armadillo

    but who now faces a travel ban and an appeal which the Pakistani government has indicated it will not oppose.

    There is some weird shit going on in Pakistan at the moment, Jupes.

    The so called “Father of the Taliban” got stabbed to death in the last few days. He’s an ally of Imran Khan.

  57. jupes

    There is some weird shit going on in Pakistan at the moment, Jupes.

    Of course. It’s an Islamic shit hole.

  58. .

    2/3 academic tricksters who trolled moronic left wing gender studies journals on the Joe Rogan Experience.

    Wow! Woah!

  59. mh

    I remember Kevin Rudd saying that Pakistan was one of the world’s great democracies.

  60. Armadillo

    “Dawn” is always an interesting site for another perspective on what’s actually going on in Pakistan.

    https://www.dawn.com

  61. sdfc

    None of that makes us Greece Dot.

    It appears that Roy Morgan was just trying to get out of a penalty for not paying super to some of his employees.

  62. Roger

    There is some weird shit going on in Pakistan at the moment, Jupes.

    It’s simple really: to hold power the (cowardly) government of the day needs to assuage the militant Islamists.

    Read all goings on in that light, negatively or positively.

    A Christian woman falsely accused of blasphemy is an inconvenience.

    ’tis hoped the Donald will step forth if nobody else will (France & Spain have offered asylum, to their credit).

  63. I’ve been to quite a few conferences with Pakistani delegations. Always gave off a bad vibe.

  64. .

    …it looks like Peter Spencer just wanted to subvert the Kyoto Protocol…

    sfdc you are being a total sperg. Think of the implications of these decisions.

  65. Armadillo

    Dotty, that link is like about 2 hours long.

    No-one with even half a life is going to watch it.

  66. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Helen, write more and get published. Life on a cattle station needs your vision to immortalise it.

    Neither Hairy nor I can go by a certain park near a certain vet’s without a shadow falling on it that is our dog Spud. His last walk was there, his nose still alert although the rest of him was dying. Vale to Bill and to all good dogs.

    Vale Spud, the Well Known Good Dog of our children’s childhood. Our dog.

  67. Nick

    No one asks what post PM job Rudd has. Perhaps if he had a vagina…

  68. jupes

    From Arma’s link above:

    They were harvesting fruit when a row broke out about a bucket of water. The women said that because she had used a cup, they could no longer touch it, as her faith had made it unclean.

    Prosecutors alleged that in the row which followed, the women said Asia Bibi should convert to Islam and that she made offensive comments about the Prophet Muhammad in response.

    She was later beaten up at her home, during which her accusers say she confessed to blasphemy. She was arrested after a police investigation.

    I ask again. Why does DFAT give taxpayer’s money to these homicidal fucks? Where’s the national interest in supporting evil? Marise Payne … where are you on this?

  69. .

    No-one with even half a life is going to watch it.

    Stop watching TV. It is nearly all bollocks.

    Plus you can just listen to it, it is basically a radio show with a camera in the studio.

  70. .

    Arma

    Just listen to it as you drive from Sapphire Coast to Dapto whilst you’re working.

    Anyway. The short print version.

    https://www.skeptic.com/reading_room/conceptual-penis-social-contruct-sokal-style-hoax-on-gender-studies/

  71. jupes

    It’s simple really: to hold power the (cowardly) government of the day needs to assuage the militant Islamists. Muslim population.

    FIFY

  72. Top Ender

    You could start a blog Helen. Farmer’s Wife Life or something like that…

  73. jupes

    Stop watching TV. It is nearly all bollocks.

    Not if you are watching West Coast’s three finals on loop.

  74. Armadillo

    I’m sensing a #Ilovedogs moment developing.

  75. sdfc

    Fuck I wish I supported West Coast.

  76. Armadillo

    Stop watching TV. It is nearly all bollocks.

    The last time I watched TV (other than a horse race) was about 10 years ago.

  77. .

    I too desire to root for the Perth Eagles.

  78. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    “Why is it a criticism to say she has a big arse? It’s the truth, what is wrong with you?”

    Slanty-eyes, black hair and a yellowish tinge to the skin is the truth too, Germaine, but it just got a man fired here in Oz when he made a gentle and lightly ribbing observation when supporting such folk.

  79. sdfc

    Funny thing is, they’d been called Perth I probably would have supported them.

  80. Arky

    Armadillo
    #2856132, posted on November 3, 2018 at 10:40 pm
    Dotty, that link is like about 2 hours long.

    No-one with even half a life is going to watch it.

    ..
    Watching it on the telly now.

  81. jupes

    Just to labour the point:

    They were harvesting fruit when a row broke out about a bucket of water. The women said that because she had used a cup, they could no longer touch it, as her faith race had made it unclean.

    Prosecutors alleged that in the row which followed, the women said Asia Bibi should convert to Islam apologise and but that she made offensive comments about the Prophet Muhammad whites in response.

    She was later beaten up at her home, during which her accusers say she confessed to blasphemy race crime. She was arrested after a police investigation.

    Why do we play Pakistan in cricket?

  82. jupes

    Fuck I wish I supported West Coast.

    Surely you don’t support Freo?

  83. .

    Shit gets crazy in that Joe Rogan interview at around the 22 minute mark.

    One paper they wrote proposed that Myra Breckenridge would have remediated transphobia.

  84. sdfc

    Surely you don’t support Freo?

    It’s a burden.

  85. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Why do we play Pakistan in cricket?

    “Sport should be above politics.” Wasn’t that the argument when the issue of playing sport against the Saffies was raised?

  86. .

    I can’t even I can’t even…

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14680777.2018.1478689?scroll=top&needAccess=true

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    Commentary and Criticism
    Introduction: feminism and food media
    Tisha Dejmanee
    Pages 769-785 | Published online: 06 Jul 2018

    Download citation https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2018.1478689

    Food media have long been recognized as cultural artifacts that reference culturally- and historically-specific ideals of gender, drawing on the simultaneously mundane and omniscient qualities of food as a medium for interrogating ideas about feminism and identity performance.

  87. Infidel Tiger

    There is some weird shit going on in Pakistan at the moment, Jupes.

    The tribal lands of Pakistan and Afghanistan are the most backward hellholes on earth.

    You mix incest, tribalism and Islam together and the results are evil.

  88. Gab

    I remember Kevin Rudd saying that Pakistan was one of the world’s great democracies.

    Kevin rudd also said the Muslim Brotherhood were just a wonderful group and that they should not be banned as a political force in Egypt.

    Kevin rudd clearly studied at the monty School of Rakes.

  89. Armadillo

    Watching it on the telly now.

    Liar. You are in the shed shuffling about, and trying to figure out what the hell went wrong.

    The car you are attempting to build is a piece of junk. Nothing fits. Your daughter on a step ladder looks exactly like your wife. You have no comfort in life other than that they can both cook tasty noodles.

    Your kitchen draw has no knives or forks. Only chopsticks.

    It’s over for you, buddy.

  90. Confused Old Misfit

    Helen
    #2856035, posted on November 3, 2018 at 8:42 pm

    I can’t type for tears. God Bless. Both you & Bill.

  91. Arky

    Harsh Armadillo.
    Harsh.
    Say what you like about me, but I’ll be damned if I’ll stand here while you imply my missus can cook.

  92. Armadillo

    Sinc, can we get a dedicated thread to “Bill”?

    A “Go Fund Me” for a memorial garden might also be appropriate.

  93. Arky

    Look, I just got to the part of the video where they talk about putting stuff up your butt.

  94. Entropy

    Food media have long been recognized as cultural artifacts that reference culturally- and historically-specific ideals of gender, drawing on the simultaneously mundane and omniscient qualities of food as a medium for interrogating ideas about feminism and identity performance.

    That is, the mum is the smart cookie to which the children are in awe. Hubby is the bumbling fool whose life would be a disaster without a clever woman nearby to save him. All advertising is this way as we all know who makes purchasing decisions in the household.

  95. Entropy

    That is, the mum is the smart cookie to which the children are in awe. Hubby is the bumbling fool whose life would be a disaster without a clever woman nearby to save him. All advertising is this way as we all know who makes purchasing decisions in the household.

    I forgot. University feminist hates this ad meme as it represents a life they will never have, becuase they are so twisted, angry and thus turned ugly on the outside too, that they will never mate with a bumbling fool.

  96. Westie Woman

    Helen

    We had a cat naming competition at work – someone printed out all the brands that Bunnings sell

    Stanley won

    And I’m another admirer of your words – your book will be wonderful!

    Btw a friend of mine writes about country Australia and he’s doing well

    Bill “Swampy” Marsh …

  97. pete m

    Why presume Helen is just a farmer’s wife? Most husband wife farm partnerships involve the wife doing more farming than housework etc.

    Farmer Helen’s Blog!

    Helen, best wishes to you and vale to Bill for when you must say goodbye.

  98. Armadillo

    while you imply my missus can cook

    I only implied it. I made an assumption based on the girth of your gut in the videos.

    Do you have a secret “Cookie Stash” you haven’t told her about?

    Not that I’d blackmail you or anything. It’s not in my nature.

  99. Gab

    Jerusalem, November 1929 street scenes.

  100. Armadillo

    If someone here posts a “Kill Bill” video link, all hell will break loose.

  101. Armadillo

    Not a suggestion, merely an observation.

  102. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Why presume Helen is just a farmer’s wife? Most husband wife farm partnerships involve the wife doing more farming than housework etc

    Most husband wife farm partnerships involve a multi million dollar agribusiness.

  103. Armadillo

    Most husband wife farm partnerships involve a multi million dollar agribusiness.

    It’s a fair statement anecdotally. I would be surprised if there are statistics to back it up. Probably because there are none. And only because no one has bothered.

    Old age sayings would be the best guide. Money follows money. Birds of a feather, flock together.

  104. jupes

    Jerusalem, November 1929 street scenes.

    I would really like to see the Jerusalem street scenes from June 7 1967

  105. Top Ender

    Mrs TE is away so stuff we watch together has been shelved.

    Happened across Rake on Netflix, which we both said we’d never watch as it’s Australian.

    Nevertheless, it’s not bad so far. Original scripts to say the least with some genuine Aussie humour.

  106. Top Ender

    Julia Gillard’s gone nowhere after politics: Greer
    REMY VARGA

    Feminist writer Germaine Greer has defended body shaming Australia’s first female prime minister, but says the bigger worry is Julia Gillard’s lack of an “important” job after politics.

    Ms Greer was speaking at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas at Sydney’s Cockatoo Island along with former Westboro Baptist Church member Megan Phelps-Roper and US writer Ayelet Waldman.

    The Female Eunuch author said her controversial 2012 comments about Ms Gillard’s weight and clothing during an appearance on ABC program Q&A weren’t criticisms, merely statements of facts.

    “Why is it a criticism to say she has a big arse? It’s the truth, what is wrong with you?” she said. “It doesn’t matter, the thing is she used to wear the black top, the black and then wide blazer thing. It never fitted.”

    Ms Greer then compared Ms Gillard’s wardrobe with that of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

    “For me it was a real worry that the Prime Minister’s jacket’s never fitted for f***’s sake.” She said. “Let me tell you as well, Angela Merkel … we will miss Angela when she’s gone … I’ve noticed that her jacket’s always fitted.”

    Ms Greer said she was more concerned by what, or what wasn’t, offered to Ms Gillard when she left the prime ministership.

    “What’s more serious for me about Julia is she left power in this country and where did she go? The answer is nowhere.

    “There was no big job for her, there was no important role for her to play in international politics….”

    Ms Greer said that reflected a broader power imbalance in society.

    “We still don’t get power. The whole thing about Julia is she has none. And this is the lesson you need to learn: I can be as snippy as I like about what she wears.”

    Ms Greer, who has repeatedly denied that transgender women are actually women, also spoke of the campaign waged against her by LGBT and trans-activists, likening it to the tactics used by violent men who terrorise their wives.

    “In my case what was going on is that transsexual activists, LGBT activists, would contact the venue where I was supposed to speak, and they would say that they would disrupt the meeting and it was extraordinary … it was a straight threat.”

    “The interesting thing was, and this is the thing that really gets me, because it connects with domestic violence.

    “One of the thing that would happen again and again is that they didn’t show up. They’d have everyone frightened, they’d have the venue hire extra security and they just don’t show up.

    “And I’m a member of a sex that is kept silent by threat, I am used to this and I won’t wear it.

    “You keep threatening, I’ll be there. If you want to kill me, kill me. You won’t kill me; they won’t even spit on me.”

    Ms Greer also responded the outrage her essay On Rapehad generated, calling it madness to keep accepting that all non-consensual sex was rape.

    “This is what we cannot go on believing without going mad: it is now agreed that non-consensual sex is rape.

    “That doesn’t mean that violent sex is rape …. It means that you can be raped by the man you love in the bed you’ve always slept in with him, it means that he overrides your capacity to object to him.”

    Ms Greer said that non-consensual rape was common and stemmed from people not understanding the agency of their partners.

    “If you agree that non-consensual sex is rape then I’m here to tell you that its happening in every street on every night in every suburb.

    “Its not rare, its not shocking and it is done with complete impunity because people don’t understand about the autonomy of people that are in a relationship, they don’t understand what it means to say no.”

    Ms Greer said that most women were unsure on whether or not they were consenting, and ultimately it was meaningless.

    “Did I consent or did I give? Did I do it so he wouldn’t be in a bad humour tomorrow and make the children miserable? What was my reason for spreading my legs? Do I do it because I really really wanted to have sex?

    “As long as the answer is no, you’ve been raped. But is anything going to happen about it? No, no ones going to prison, this is what’s so idiotic.”

  107. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Aisha looks like she is from Finland

    She did seem to have been a convert. I’m repeating a point that was made a couple of years ago, on this blog. “It’s all well and good, converting to Islam in the West. It’s all soft and fluffy – Susan Cartland take note – nobody will hack at your girlie bits with a rusty razor blade, there’s no death penalty for apostasy, and there’s a certain “Look at me, I’ve converted” factor. If you are serious, go and convert somewhere like the Sudan, Somalia, or the Yemen, where you can experience Islam at it’s finest and most purest.
    FWIW, the BBC ran a programme four or five years ago. It was about English girls from Manchester, IIRC, who had converted to Islam – the full chadour, the lot, married Yemeni men, and gone back to meet their husband’s families, in the Yemen. They couldn’t get back to Manchester, and re convert quickly enough…

  108. Top Ender

    Hey, looks like the rape word got past the filter!

  109. Mark A

    zyconoclast
    #2856182, posted on November 3, 2018 at 11:53 pm

    Aisha looks like she is from Finland

    Yes she does.

    And some wonder why people lie or do stupid things.
    What benefit could she have converting, that she does not have now?

    If she finds the religion truly superior, then good for her, can’t see that myself.

  110. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Nevertheless, it’s not bad so far. Original scripts to say the least with some genuine Aussie humour.

    The first two or three series were done well enough – after that, I thought Cleaver Green was a bit of a wally.

    I’ve got “Phoenix” somewhere….together with “Janus” the last decent drama’s the A.B.C. ever made..

  111. Armadillo

    Mrs A was born in Iran whilst her parents worked there for 19 years. She was 14 when the revolution happened.

    The Shah was considered very much a “moderate” at the time. The bint in the video has no idea. None.

  112. zyconoclast

    It is now clear from where the illegal money is: the European Union sends them bank cards to BiH!

    Local residents have reported for a long time about the use of Mastercard cards in BiH
    “Migrants who catch us and go back, in a few days or weeks they again try to break into Croatia. Some of them are really poor, but many are well-equipped and well-equipped: they have new footwear, new clothes, sophisticated smartphones, cold weapons, and some have also found Mastercard’s banknotes without name, they are just numbers. They raise money at ATMs, but we do not know who pays them, ” said a local policeman at the beginning of September for portal kamenjar.com . It was right at that time that we already reported that migrants buy massive swords and knives there. When will the taxpayers resist this insanity ?!

  113. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I would really like to see the Jerusalem street scenes from June 7 1967

    I don’t have a reference, but one very good history of the Six Day War claims that the Israeli commander who led the recapture of East Jerusalem, was give a direct order that he was NOT to order the demolition of any mosques, especially the Al -Aqsua, that has been nothing but a source of trouble since.

  114. jupes

    “There was no big job for her, there was no important role for her to play in international politics….”

    Well that was probably because she was too busy getting reimbursed for corruptly giving a lazy $292 milion of taxpayers money to the Clinton Foundation linked Global Partnership for Education.

    As Tony Thomas notes:

    * As Australian PM, she commits $A292m of our money into GPE, a hugely disproportionate amount, into what is supposedly a non-partisan US-based global charity
    * Ex-PM Gillard in early 2014 is installed by GPE as chair
    * While chair, and without any disclaimer re her GPE leadership, she takes further starring roles as Hillary Clinton backer for president and rubbisher of Hillary’s Republican opponent.
    * This compromises the GPE non-political brand as effectively as if the chair of the Australian Red Cross had fronted with Bill Shorten in Labor Mediscare election ads, bagging Malcolm Turnbull.
    * Gillard is enveloped in new status as global icon for the “progressive” charity set.

    She might have been incompetent as PM but she sure as hell has ‘legal’ corruption squared away.

  115. Steve trickler

    36 hourss is all it took for 11,500 miles / 18507 km’s of railway track to be converted to the standard gauge in 1886.



  116. Bruce in WA

    Surely you don’t support Freo?

    Surely any thinking Western Australian does??

    (The only teams I support are the Dockers … and whoever is playing against the Eagles.)

    Q: Name 4 teams that start with “F”.

    A: Well, there’s Fremantle, Fitzroy, Footscray, Collingwood …

  117. Armadillo

    Mrs A had a dog called “Shad”. German Shepard. Ex-US Army dog.

    Once the Iranian Revolution started the scum from the local mosque would come around and try and smash him over the head with snow shovels through the security fence. They eventually managed to “get him” by climbing over a wall. They tied him to the back of a car and dragged him around the streets of Tehran.

    By the time the in-laws found him, he was bloodied, and the pads of his paws ripped from his feet. He survived. Just.

    So why did they do that? The local Imam had preached in Friday prayers that Allah had been bitten by a dog, and that a Cat had laid on his lap. It was enough reason.

    Seriously, that’s a true story. It actually happened.

    Will no one think of Shad? It’s all about “Bill” with you lot.

  118. Bruce in WA

    That’s truly appalling, Arma.

    I’ve been a hunter for 50 years. I don’t harvest animals, I shoot them.

    Yet I abhor animal cruelty in any size, shape or form and would happily visit extreme physical punishment on those who inflict it on animals.

  119. Gavin R Putland

    mh at #2856087:

    Sure, “Jane Doe” could have been a twentysomething male with a keyboard. But the headline writers have instead chosen to create the impression that the author of the “Jane Doe” letter retracted the allegation. That ain’t what happened.

  120. Armadillo

    That’s truly appalling, Arma.

    Its a fact. Muslims hate dogs. And pigs.

    Cats are OK.

  121. DrBeauGan

    So why did they do that? The local Imam had preached in Friday prayers that Allah had been bitten by a dog, and that a Cat had laid on his lap. It was enough reason.

    I think you meant that Mohammed had been bitten by a dog, not Allah.

    In which case, the dog had the right idea.

  122. Armadillo

    I can’t help but think the Koran is the greatest act of plagiarism in human history.

    It’s like Mohammad was told this great story within the Torah and Bible and just decided to “tweek it a bit”. Whatever suited the agenda, at the time.

    He must have been a bit pissed off about the dog (or at least the Scholar who wrote his memoirs a few hundred years later was).

    How long has peanut butter been about?

  123. Bruce in WA

    Subscriber to the Oz (I know … my wife took it out). Trying to comment, and this is what I get (read from the bottom upwards …)

    Point proved …
    whatshot0likesreply0replies
    Story: Be better than you are: Fry
    REJECTED
    JUST NOW
    You don’t even read the comments; you have an algorithm that rejects them automatically. Based on what? My guess is writer’s name …

    whatshot0likesreply0replies
    Story: Be better than you are: Fry
    REJECTED
    28 SECONDS AGO
    Why bother commenting? You don’t post them anyway.
    whatshot0likesreply0replies
    Story: Be better than you are: Fry
    REJECTED
    1 MINUTE AGO

    Doubt that I have ever read such an illiterate article. It is enough to give a copy editor a major cardiac infarction. For heaven’s sake, someone with at least Year 7 literacy skills please rewrite it.
    whatshot0likesreply0replies
    Story: Be better than you are: Fry
    REJECTED
    3 MINUTES AGO

    ” … recognised by every major science body in the world … ”
    Evidence, please! And no, you won’t find any.
    whatshot0likesreply0replies
    Story: Climate change trial to go ahead
    REJECTED

  124. Bruce in WA

    Its a fact. Muslims hate dogs. And pigs.

    Yes, I know. We’ve had a couple of taxi drivers here in Perth hauled over the coals for refusing to carry a guide dog in the cab … as well as someone who had a couple of bottles of wine in a shopping bag.

  125. Armadillo

    I think you meant that Mohammed had been bitten by a dog, not Allah.

    I stand corrected.

    My mind was wandering to something about “White Winged Horses” at the time. Im easily confused.

    I need more beer.

  126. Old School Conservative

    .
    #2856106, posted on November 3, 2018 at 10:08 pm
    The franchise is dead.
    The 13th doctor…well it gets worse. Far, far worse.
    Get woke, go broke!

    After many enjoyable years of watching Dr Who, including many of the episodes the BBC erased, my interest has declined so much that I didn’t even know a woman was the thirteenth Doctor.
    It did give our family lots of shared enjoyment over the years.

  127. Armadillo

    I was under the impression that everyone in “The West” travelled by limousine these days.

    #goldfever

  128. stackja

    OSC – Does BBC care? They get money anyway?

  129. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2856213, posted on November 4, 2018 at 1:16 am

    I was under the impression that everyone in “The West” travelled by limousine these days.

    Only the bookies, Dillo.

  130. Armadillo

    I woke up to “Dr Who” being a total fraud from the tender age of four.

    Walking into a telephone booth and ending up somewhere totally different never happened. I tried it multiple times. Nope nothing. Even when wearing my mothers long scarf and my sisters frizzy Afro wig. Didn’t work.

    Total fraud.

  131. stackja

    Armadillo – Bill and Ted?

  132. Armadillo

    Bookies and their lackeys in Eastern Australia only travel by helicopter these days.

    How do you reckon Bronwyn Bishop got in so much shit?

  133. mh

    This from earlier in the week

    Mark T Jay
    @MarkTJay3
    Watch
    @BarackObama
    unhinged. Look at his facial expressions, he’s losing it. #VoteRedStraightTicket #VoteDemsOut #KAG2018.

    https://twitter.com/MarkTJay3/status/1057104469488533505?s=20

  134. Oh come on

    According to the ABC, the Chinese believe the world’s oceans are an oyster that they own:

    But for larger countries, the sea is literally their oyster.

    Mr Bergenas says China has “perfected a strategy” where they send fishing vessels into disputed waters.

    So the sea is literally an oyster – the sea is an animal, not a body of water – that belongs to larger countries like China. More top-notch journalisming from the ABC there.

  135. Armadillo

    The Chinese need to eat. A hungry population is an angry population.

    Ask the Venezuelans. Here is something interesting I didn’t expect to find.

    Venezuelan people are people identified with Venezuela. Venezuelans are predominantly Roman Catholic and speak Spanish. The majority of Venezuelans are the result of a mixture of Europeans, Africans and Amerindians. Approximately 51.6% of the population are Mestizos of mixed European, African and Amerindian ancestry, and 43.6% of Venezuelans identify as European or Middle Eastern. An additional 3.6% identify as Black/African-descendants, while 3.2% identify as Amerindians.[20]

  136. Bosco Baracas

    Long time lurker gutted Stimson left. Damn shame with the level of intellect here we can’t defend ourselves against “bird droppings” yet we tolerate our resident communist. And I thought this was a libertarian website!

  137. Armadillo

    Can any Cats suggest how I might be able to make $1 out of each of the billions of Chinese and Indians on the planet? It’s one miserable dollar. Just one. Per person.

    Suggestions welcome.

  138. DrBeauGan

    Yes, I miss Stimpy too, Bosco. We sort of tolerate m0nty to see him stomping one rake after another. It has a horrid fascination.

    I guess the filter is to cover the Doomlord against legal shenanigans. Dunno if it works.

  139. Steve trickler

    This iconic vision and sound is still shocking the world!



    And the birds chirp at the end.

  140. Armadillo

    Boscoe, Stimpy is “dead to us”.

    If he wants to go and hide in a corner and cry, when we find him, we’ll kick him.

    #welcomebackstimpy

  141. Bosco Baracas

    Silly me, But can’t we argue birdy and our resident communist based on facts. We do for our commy but yet we ban the other guy! Let’s use this opportunity to squash them all in an open forum.

  142. Armadillo

    I’ll be back, Bosco. I’m at 1% battery charge.

  143. Bosco Baracas

    Armadillo, suggestion is poop dropping cleaning. Or did I click the bait.

  144. Bosco Baracas

    dDr B. Must be nAive myself! Do you think the Russians felt the way before 1917?

  145. Armadillo

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing. In comparison to Stalin, the Russians had it pretty good under the Tsars.

    Wikipedia now prefers to call them “Emperors of Russia”. Funny that. History is constantly rewritten.

    The 20th century brought us wonderful things. Everything from flying machines to plentiful food and Wi-Fi.

    It also brought us mechanised death. Stalin, Hitler, Mao and Pol Pot were simply the pioneers.

    Be ever vigilant.

  146. Armadillo

    Killing kids “in the womb” is the latest “hip craze”. That and the elderly.

    Abortion and euthanasia is “socially acceptable”. No one blinks an eyelid.

  147. Armadillo

    Makes you really wonder if we have progressed, or regressed.

    At least a few hundred year back, you had the choice to “fight or die”. Nowadays, you just nod your head.

    Mechanised killing of the human soul is complete.

  148. Mark A

    Ahoy Stimpy, there is good news for you in today’s week in pics.

    (McDonald’s fries and boldness)

  149. Armadillo

    The reason Trumps message resonates is simple.You CAN.

    Our “betters” in Government have being saying YOU CAN’T for years. Can’t do this. Can’t do that. More regulation. More laws. We will force you to do it. We will fine you. We will tax you. You will bend. A few grumble, and they are quickly pounced on by those in power.

    It’s totally against the human spirit, but you have to have a “leader” to follow.

    I’d disregard the US polling completely. My tip is that the GOP are going to smash it.

    The wave will all be red.

    There will be seats that have traditionally been solid Democrat become marginal. Inner cities will be the ones to watch.

  150. Armadillo

    Don’t encourage Stimpy, Mark.

    If he doesn’t want to jump on the Trump Train, he can cry in the baggage area and wave goodbye.

    The sooky bastard.

  151. Armadillo

    Stimpy also might be gay. Probably got his tounge lodged in some Rabies mouth as I type.

    Not making aspersions, and I’m not saying it’s true. I’m just saying it’s possible.

    Anything is possible.

    You can eat an entire Elephant if you put your mind to it. Might take awhile, and you would want a pretty big freezer. Breakfast, lunch and dinner for a few years.

    It’s “doable”.

  152. Armadillo

    We all should also be mindful of “feelings”. The Cat is a caring and inclusive online environment.

  153. calli

    I like it, but does it come in white?

    Thanks Tom.

  154. calli

    Any religion that demonises dogs should be banned from the country.

    Apparently dog shaming is a “thing”. Oh look, there’s my little guy.

  155. calli

    Okay, I know it’s Sunday morning.

  156. Armadillo

    Okay, I know it’s Sunday morning.

    I’m adding another dot point to my list of “Why I know evil exists in this world”.

  157. Mark A

    calli
    #2856244, posted on November 4, 2018 at 5:41 am

    Any religion that demonises dogs should be banned from the country.

    Apparently dog shaming is a “thing”. Oh look, there’s my little guy.

    The one on the left looks shifty to me, the white one is cute.

  158. calli

    Mine is a mixture of the two – cute looks (on the right) but evil habits. I have to walk him early so he doesn’t pick fights with other dogs.

  159. Mark A

    We have a couple of Kelpies at home, the daughter looks after them.
    Too much hassle to shift them over here and no off leash place I know of.
    They love running free. Lovely temp.
    If we move permanently then they go to the family farm, unless my daughter stays and wants them.

  160. OldOzzie

    The UN’s Terrifying, But Ever-Receding, Human-Caused Climate Catastrophe


    Just in time for Halloween, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has released yet another in a 30-year stream of spooky stories: Global Warming of 1.5 Degree Celsius, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

    Like its five predecessors, it makes terrifying predictions about human-caused climate catastrophes that are always just about to occur, unless governments reduce the level of the harmless trace gas carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from its current four-hundredths of one percent to the three hundredths it was before industrialization.

    Notice that the title chosen by the UN gives the game away. It presents correlation as causation by implying that all the warming since pre-industrial times has been caused by industry. There’s no room here for a natural oscillation back from the well-documented lows of the 1700s, which themselves were rebounds from a higher temperature period in the 1400s. (See this NOAA chart).

  161. Mak Siccar

    The left displaying their bigotry of low expectations and different rules depending on the level of melanin in the skin.

    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/11/03/judge-wonderful-aboriginal-walk-free-court-spitting-police-white-dogs/

    ‘Wonderful’ Aboriginal Activist Walks Free After Assaulting and Spitting on Police She Branded ‘White Dogs’

    3 Nov 2018
    A mixed race woman who has repeatedly assaulted, spat on, and racially abused police officers has been allowed to walk free from court by an Australian magistrate who called her “wonderful”.
    20-year-old Leilani Clarke, who describes herself as an Aboriginal activist, was found in an agitated state in Sydney just two days after she had been bailed for another incident in which she had spat at police officers, kneed one in the groin, and called them “white dogs” after they caught her stealing a chicken curry from a 7-Eleven, the Daily Mail reports.

    A statement of facts about the latest incident noted that police were “of a firm belief that the accused was affected by an illicit substance” at the time, and that she became aggressive and “started screaming, requesting to speak to an Aboriginal Liaison Officer” when she was told she would be taken to hospital involuntarily.

    She then spat on an officer while being secured to a stretcher in what was her fourth run-in with the law in 2018 — as, in addition to her arrest two days previously, she had pleaded guilty to assaulting and obstructing police, drug possession, and being a public nuisance in April, and assaulted a paramedic, spat on a police officer, and screamed “F*** you, white dogs” in March.

    Despite Clarke’s repeated pattern of assaulting and racially abusing police officers, however, magistrate Erin Kennedy opted not to punish her, instead expressing great concern for her wellbeing and even heaping praise on her.

    “The worst thing we see happening to wonderful people like you who have a great future ahead of them is if you don’t get the proper treatment and you start taking something to self-medicate and we lose you,” the female judge gushed.

    “Let’s not see you back in here,” she added, handing her a 10-month ‘good behaviour bond’ and declining to even record a conviction.

    Miss Clarke has self-diagnosed herself with “transgenerational trauma” passed down through her Aboriginal genes.

    She dropped out of Sunshine Coast University and deferred studies for an environmental science degree earlier in the year, but told the court she had recently completed a hospitality course — prompting another outpouring of acclamation from the judge.

    “That all seems amazing but you’ve got to stay on top of your mental health,” she wheedled.

    “Do not self-medicate. You need support. Just make sure you say no, you won’t take illicit substances.”

  162. Entropy

    Dog shaming?
    The world would quickly become a better place if one who owns a Maltese terrier, or those schitzu rat like creatures, were forced to wear a badge identifying them as such, so those conducting job interviews, exams and the like know what they are dealing with.

  163. Entropy

    That magistrate seems like a blonde Pat O‘Shane.

  164. min

    Old Ozzie the iIPCC probably believe that ice cream causes drownings . I remember something from Logic that in summer more ice cream is sold , there are more drownings in summer ,therefore ice cream causes sdrownings.
    Another logical fantasy, if Labor are planning, as Miranda Devine has written, to allow a man who claims to feel he is a woman to play in female sport then the Liberals will be able to claim that they have gender equality in their party if a a number decide to feel to be different to how they appear.

  165. Shy Ted

    Armadillo #2856216, posted on November 4, 2018 at 1:25 am I woke up to “Dr Who” being a total fraud from the tender age of four. Walking into a telephone booth and ending up somewhere totally different never happened. I tried it multiple times. Nope nothing. Even when wearing my mothers long scarf and my sisters frizzy Afro wig. Didn’t work. Total fraud.
    They have to be blue. Easier ways to enter alternate realities are watching Insiders, Q&A and The Project. I recommend the blue telephone box though.

  166. Shy Ted

    Aw, we’ve got Gerard but not David Marr. Can’t beat a dummy spit on a Sunday morning.

  167. OldOzzie

    IN DEFENCE OF SACKED ROSS CAMERON
    Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun

    November 3, 2018 11:39am

    Sets out the full context of the Outsiders Discussion

    But anyone who thinks, after reading this context, that Ross was being “racist” is an idiot or a liar:

    Then there is the Final Paragraph

    NOTE: I was planning to make an announcement soon about my career. Given this post – and the wilful misreporting about Sky – I should make absolutely clear that my plans were made and discussed with many relevant people BEFORE Ross was sacked. What has happened and what I will do are unrelated.

    and he makes a fair point

    (And note, by the way, the hypocrisy. Where was Sleeping Giants when then ABC host Red Symons asked a Chinese guest if she was “yellow”?)

  168. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    NSW police and crime agencies are preparing to use a new national facial recognition system to rapidly match pictures of people captured on CCTV with their driver’s licence photo, to detect criminals and identity theft.

    Under new laws the federal and state governments will be able to access data and photos from passports, driver licences, and visas for a national facial recognition system called the “National Facial Biometric Matching Capability”

    The Department of Home Affairs has been compiling the database for what is known as “The Capability”. Unlike the controversial My Health Record, people can’t opt out of their details being included in the system.

  169. Snoopy

    Sinc’s old mate Andrew Leigh claims Australian public companies average profit margins of 60% and by golly a Shorten government will do something about it.

    Alan Fells is inclined to believe Leigh’s claims but considers his proposed solutions don’t go far enough.

    Peter Hartcher says that Andrew Leigh’s analysis is indisputable as it is supported by Marxist theory.

  170. Crossie

    Heaven has a wall and strict immigration policies. Hell has open borders.

    Saw this quip at Breitbart this morning, gave me the first laugh of the day.

  171. zyconoclast

    NYC Synagogue Vandalism Suspect Is Former City Hall Anti-Hate Crime Intern

    Hate Crimes Hoaxes Strike Again, Anti-Semitic Bomb Threats Edition

    the main motivation behind the drumbeat of media coverage and social-media sharing is not to target hate crimes themselves, or even to advance policies designed to stop them, but rather to use them to discredit conservatives by tenuous association. As David Bernstein has observed, the organized anti-anti-Semitism groups in the U.S. have very specific incentives to blame anti-Semitic incidents on the Right:

    When Greenblatt took over the ADL from the long-serving Abraham Foxman, he announced that the younger generation among ADL’s primary constituency, liberal, secular J3ws, was no longer terribly interested in the issue of anti-Semitism, and instead wanted the ADL to focus on oppression more generally. The enthusiasm and fund-raising dollars were in supporting Black Lives Matter and transgender rights, not worrying about anti-Semitism on college campuses. One strongly suspects that this is because the threat of anti-Semitism was seen primarily as coming from the anti-Israel left. Trump created a wonderful entrepreneurial opportunity for the ADL to focus on what is naturally its core issue, anti-Semitism…by focusing on the threat from the right. The ADL’s reticent donors are no longer reticent in the age of Trump, with the media reporting that donations have been pouring in since Trump’s victory….

    Another group that has had a strong incentive to exaggerate the present threat of right-wing anti-Semitism is J3wish progressive activists. For the past decade or so, leftist J3ws have increasingly found themselves excluded from progressive coalitions that not only take very harsh anti-Israel lines, but also have refused to take seriously anti-Semitism in their midst, suggesting that allegations of such anti-Semitism are mere covers for the “privilege” of “white Zionists.” So long as the problem of American anti-Semitism was largely associated with anti-Zionism and far-left politics more generally, J3ws were not permitted to be part of a coalition of the marginalized.

    Those motivations themselves often creates the temptation to generate hoaxes. One hopes, in vain, that the latest arrest leads to even a little humility and reflection on the part of those who use media reports of hate crimes for that purpose.

  172. Zatara

    Flew in to Pensacola, Florida this morning to go to a wedding. Went right over the parking area for the Trump rally tonight and it is packed. Apparently people showed up last night, camped out and had a hell of a party. They are now standing or sitting in a serpentine line that would have to be a mile long if stretched out waiting to get in to the venue. What is amazing about that is that the rally is competing today with a major air show at the Naval Air Station here and a huge art festival downtown…. and it will still be packed to the rafters.

    An absolutely beautiful day for it. Clear, about 21C, light winds. Very high energy feel in the air.

    Rally scheduled to start at 1830 local (US central time). Wish I had thought ahead to get tickets, but I despise standing in lines so it’s a trade-off.

  173. Mark A

    Shy Ted
    #2856275, posted on November 4, 2018 at 8:06 am

    Armadillo #2856216, posted on November 4, 2018 at 1:25 am I woke up to “Dr Who” being a total fraud from the tender age of four. Walking into a telephone booth and ending up somewhere totally different never happened. I tried it multiple times. Nope nothing. Even when wearing my mothers long scarf and my sisters frizzy Afro wig. Didn’t work. Total fraud.
    They have to be blue. Easier ways to enter alternate realities are watching Insiders, Q&A and The Project. I recommend the blue telephone box though.

    No wonder it won’t work for you losers.
    It’s gotta be a police box!
    Do it right, and with the correct internal lubrication there is no problem.

  174. OldOzzie

    Break-up is so hard to do

    Nicola Berkovic
    Legal Affairs correspondent

    The slow and dysfunctional family law system is set for a significant shake-up if the government and Australian Law Reform Commission get their way. For the exhausted litigants who use it, change cannot come soon enough. But at all levels, the grown-ups are fighting while the kids suffer.

    The government has unveiled plans to restructure the family courts to improve efficiency but it is pitted against a powerful legal lobby opposed to the changes.

    Separately, the ALRC has been working on a comprehensive ­review of the family law system.

    But even within the legal advisory body, there has been disagreement about the best way to fix a system struggling with a backlog of 20,000 family law cases.

    Cynics argue that the fierce ­opposition to court reform from some lawyers may be related to the income they derive from drawn-out divorces.

    However, lawyers warn that the government’s plan to merge the Family Court and lower level Federal Circuit Court will hurt litigants, especially women and children, by dismantling a court with specialist expertise in family dynamics and violence.

    In a new book, Inside Family Law, released this week, a family law judge spoke out against lawyers who fuel conflict between ­divorcing couples, motivated by profit. Others criticised the ­“aggressive and combative” ­approach of some lawyers, espec­ially in Sydney, while in Melbourne people were “falling over themselves to settle”.

    The head of the Law Council of Australia’s family law section, Wendy Kayler-Thomson, says the criticism is unfair and the vast majority of family lawyers help their clients to resolve disputes outside court.

    “Most separating couples never go to court and of those who do, 84 per cent of Family Court cases settle,” she says.

    But there is deep anger among many litigants at “parasitic” lawyers who “milk” their clients for “blood money” — as some readers put it this week.

    Legislation to restructure the courts, which is stalled in the Senate, includes new powers for ­judges to hit lawyers with personal costs orders if they fail to help ­resolve disputes efficiently and if their fees become disproportionate to the issues in dispute. Litigants face similar penalties.

    It will be up to judges to use those powers to force change on those who abuse the system — if the laws make it through the ­parliament.

    At the same time, the government has appointed a respected legal academic, Melbourne Law School professor Helen Rhoades, to lead the wide-ranging ALRC ­inquiry into the family law system. It is understood there have been strong disagreements among those involved in the inquiry over the proposals.

    A retired Family Court judge, a former family law section head and the chair of Relationships Australia have been appointed to assist Rhoades on the ambitious review.

    Last month the ALRC set out its grand proposals for reforming the sector in a discussion paper. Some of its ideas have been warmly welcomed — including better triaging of cases as they come into court. But other suggestions have been rubbished as “bat-shit crazy”.

    Separating couples would be able to visit Families Hubs to ­access a range of services, including dispute resolution, counselling and legal advice, and other ser­vices such as health, gambling help and financial counselling.

    The hubs could build on the network of 65 family relationship centres nationally.

    Rhoades tells Inquirer the package of proposals is aimed at reducing the financial and wellbeing costs of engaging with the system. “We’ve seen the way to do that is through ‘front-ending’ — to try to help people before conflict escalates and they might end up in court,” she says.

    But the hubs could cost vast amounts of money. Family law ­expert Patrick Parkinson, dean of the University of Queensland’s school of law, questions whether any extra money could be better spent on the courts and existing services.

    The ALRC also risks reigniting a bitter political fight between mothers and fathers groups over shared-parenting laws. The laws were introduced by the Howard government in 2006 in response to fierce lobbying from fathers who wanted more time with their children.

    However, the law is so convoluted that it trips up even judges and has created a mistaken belief that parents are entitled to equal time with their children.

    Instead, it creates a presumption in favour of equal respons­ibility (or decision-making) for parents in cases that do not involve violence. Judges also must consider whether equal time is in a child’s best interests and reasonably practical if an order for equal responsibility is made.

    In its discussion paper, the ALRC has proposed simplifying the long list of factors judges have to consider when making parenting decisions. A child’s “safety and best interests” would become the paramount consideration (rather than best interests alone).

    Rhoades says the changes are merely about simplifying the law. But Parkinson — who helped to write the 2006 changes — is not convinced.

    He says it is “troubling” that under the rubric of simplification the ALRC is proposing “a radical departure” from the shared-­parenting philosophy. “While there is a strong case for simplification … the ALRC team goes far beyond this to propose ­removing most references to the importance of both parents in children’s lives, or at least qualifying those statements heavily,” he says.

    Kayler-Thomson also has concerns. “We think ‘best interests’ encompasses a whole range of ­factors that relate to a child’s welfare, including their relationship with their parents and their safety,” she says. “We’re worried the introduction of the phrase ‘safety’ is going to lead to more legal ­arguments about what ‘best interests’ means.”

    Ahead of the ALRC’s final ­report, due in March, Attorney-General Christian Porter is ­attempting to merge the Family Court and lower level Federal ­Circuit Court, which both handle family law.

    A key benefit would be to stop about 1200 cases a year bouncing between two different courts.

    While opposition legal affairs spokesman Mark Dreyfus has ­argued any merger should be ­delayed until after the inquiry, Rhoades says the structure of the courts is not relevant to her review.

    “It was always clear to us that wasn’t part of our terms of reference,” she says.

    Some have described the courts restructure as a “surprise” but it has long been on the cards.

    Both sides of politics have recognised that running three separate courts — the Family Court, Federal Court and Federal Circuit Court — is not the most efficient way to structure the federal ­judiciary.

    In 2008 then Labor attorney-general Robert McClelland (soon to become Family Court deputy chief justice) tried to disband the lower level court and send its ­judicial officers to new second tiers of the Family Court and Federal Court. But the move was derailed by the then federal magistrates.

    More recently, in October last year, then attorney-general ­George Brandis announced the government was open to “radical change” to the structure of the courts after having merged their back offices in 2015. He chose a new Family Court chief justice, John Pascoe, who would retire after a year and have no vested ­interest in any structure.

    When Porter replaced Brandis in December last year, he took the reform ball and ran with it.

    On paper, at least, Porter’s ­restructure proposal is relatively modest.

    Both the Family Court and Federal Circuit Court would continue their present roles but as two divisions of the same court. The Family Court would become Division 1 of the new court and the Federal Circuit Court would ­become Division 2.

    Porter managed to put the legal profession offside, however, when he revealed he planned to phase out the Family Court.

    As he told The Australian back in May: “The intention is that we won’t reappoint into Division 1 … Over time there will no longer be a Division 1,” he said.

    The Family Court was created by the Whitlam government in 1976 as a specialist court for divorcing couples. It is a proud Labor achievement. There has long been suspicion that the conservatives wanted to dismantle it because it was viewed as overly favourable to mothers.

    In 1999 Liberal attorney-general Daryl Williams opted to create the Federal Magistrates Court as a quicker, cheaper alternative to the Family Court — rather than giving the Family Court more ­resources to deal with its expanding workload.

    Now known as the Federal Circuit Court, it has grown to handle almost 90 per cent of all family law disputes.

    For Porter to announce he planned to phase out the Family Court was arguably a misstep; he could not even control whether ­future governments appointed more Division 1 judges.

    But he told The Australian ­recently he did not regret the ­comments.

    “I want people to know what we’re doing, and why. My view is Division 1, or the Family Court at the moment, is the less efficient of the two jurisdictions, so naturally you’d want to rebalance and shrink that and grow Division 2, (but) that may change over time.”

    Both Pascoe and Federal Circuit Court Chief Judge Will Alstergren (who will replace Pascoe when he retires next month) support the courts restructure but have made it clear in recent speeches that they believe there will ­always be a need for superior-level judges to handle complex family law cases.

    For the family law silks and high-end solicitors, the Family Court is where most of their business is conducted. The judges there are called on to decide big-money cases involving complex trusts and tax arrangements, and particularly difficult parenting cases. They also interpret the law, applied by lower level judges and lawyers working in the area.

    A report by PwC — hotly contested by Family Court judges — found that litigants’ party/party costs in the Family Court were about $110,000 per matter, while in the Federal Circuit Court they were closer to $30,000.

    Some say results in the Federal Circuit Court can be unpredictable — but Porter says there is no evidence to support this.

    The Attorney-General also has angered Family Court judges by using the PwC report to argue they are less efficient than the lower level judges.

    The judges have been furious that their chief, Pascoe, has failed to defend them over the attacks.

    The data has been used to just­ify a controversial aspect of the ­reforms — to strip appeals from the Family Court and hand them to the Federal Court, which now does not do any family law. The move will free up Family Court ­appeal judges to handle trials.

    Commercial and family law barrister Bridie Nolan, a former ­associate to now Federal Court Chief Justice James Allsop, ­believes it will also provide rigour to family law and commerciality, which is sorely lacking.

    It shocks her, she says, that family lawyers “do not blink” at charging clients $250,000 for a fight over 20 per cent of a $1 million property pool in a no-costs jurisdiction.

    She says Federal Court judges, who also handle migration law, are empathetic and well-equipped to handle appeals.

    Family law partner Peter Magee says having Federal Court judges involved could prevent family law from being “insular”, and a single pathway for litigants will provide some efficiencies.

    However, the Law Council’s family law section argues the plan will not achieve the efficiencies Porter promises and families are best served by a specialist court.

    As Kayler-Thomson says: “At a time when there are calls for greater specialisation, experience and training in the complexities of family dynamics and violence, it is strange the government would seek to reduce (that).”

    Porter has tried to allay some of the concerns by maintaining a requirement that all Division 1 judges have specialist expertise — although that is little comfort if he is not going to appoint to the division.

    He also has added a new ­requirement that lower level and appeal judges have “appropriate knowledge, skills and experience”.

    However, the government has offered no new courts funding.

    Unless the courts dramatically change their case management — which Alstergren is trying to ­improve — it will be difficult to clear the crippling backlogs.

    Lower level judges have 350 to 600 cases in their dockets, according to the court’s annual report.

    The wait to reach a trial in the Family Court has blown out to 19 months, up from 11.5 months five years ago, and 17 months ­earlier this year, while in the Federal Circuit Court it is 12 months (down from 15 months earlier this year).

    Some judges are also taking far too long — in some cases four years — to deliver decisions.

    For now, Labor, the Greens and crossbench senators, including Rex Patrick, have managed to delay the restructure — meant to take effect on January 1 — until at least after parliament resumes next year to allow extra time for consultation.

    For Labor, delay is politically expedient — it could shelve the restructure if it is elected next year or deliver the reform itself.

    Whether the court changes and the ALRC reforms — which are a long way off from becoming reality — can fix the serious problems in the system remains to be seen.

    Nolan, for one, would prefer more radical change. She believes all parenting cases should be heard in an inquisitorial tribunal, similar to the Guardianship Tribunal, with a counsel assisting in relation to the children.

    Other groups, such as the Family Law Reform Coalition, want to do away with an adversarial system altogether.

    Pascoe has suggested a royal commission if the public is still ­dissatisfied after the restructure and ALRC review. It will probably happen at some point.

    But the misery of the present system is set to stay for at least a ­little while yet.

  175. OldOzzie

    Crossie
    #2856284, posted on November 4, 2018 at 8:29 am

    Heaven has a wall and strict immigration policies. Hell has open borders.

    Saw this quip at Breitbart this morning, gave me the first laugh of the day.

    Crossie,

    Love that quote – sums Illegal Immigration perfectly – will be using that Quote

  176. OldOzzie

    Beware Labor’s triple assault on investment

    Terry McCrann
    Business Columnist

    Bill Shorten and Chris Bowen are proposing the single greatest governmental assault on the capital formation process and investment that we have ever seen in Australia.

    It is utterly unprecedented in the 73-year post-war period of modern Australia and would produce a massive shift in both the overall investment environment and the specific dynamics which have broadly prevailed since the Hawke-Keating period of financial deregulation and tax reform in the mid-1980s.

    The attack has three components: the abolition of future negative gearing on existing properties, the halving of the so-called capital gains tax discount, and the termination of the refunding of excess franking credits.

    First, as the first two moves will be grandfathered — or at least, that is the pre-election promise: what if circumstances are considered to have “changed” post-election? — the immediate impact will be limited. The practical effect might even seem (deceptively) benign.

    That of course does not apply to the third, which will impact immediately, impact significantly on a range of individuals from high net worth to those of relatively modest incomes, and spark immediate and significant changes in investment behaviour.

    Secondly, while each can be individually justified — if not, most definitely in my opinion, in the ways or extent proposed by the Labor duo, it is their combined impact which will be so significant and so damaging.

    Labor certainly has not the slightest idea what the policy combination will do to the capital formation process and to investment decisions and outcomes; and even more importantly, what the flow-on consequences will be.

    There will be impacts — for the economy overall, on sectoral decisions and dynamics, on capital formation and flows, to investment, the budget and so on. They will be no less significant to the extent the impacts are “non-decisions” — a decision not to sell a property, so as to not lose the negative gearing or capital gains tax (CGT) benefits; a decision not to subscribe for shares paying franked dividends.

    In each of the three cases, the proposed policy is a mix of old-style Labor cloth-cap “hit-the-rich” and even just seeming-rich envy and more modern “good-idea at the time” ineptitude. It’s a combination which would lead to not only poor and extremely distorting policy, but potentially hurt the very people who Labor purports to seek to help.

    I dealt with the negative gearing disaster that would flow from the Shorten-Bowen “good idea” last week.

    Briefly, it would send lower income earners and lower net-worth individuals, whether as owner-occupiers or investors, into precisely the sort of properties that have the worst investment characteristics — inner-city apartment boxes and city-fringe postage stamp houses.

    On its own, but even more so combined with the other two changes, it would pour even more “investment” into CGT-free main residences.

    And who gets the greater gain from that over time? The owner of a property which appreciates from $10 million to $20m tax-free or one that goes from $500,000 to $700,000 tax — whoopee — free?

    As I wrote last week, there is a perfectly sensible, simple and non-distortionary alternative: limit investment property deductions in any one year to investment property income; with any excess able to be carried forward to be deducted against future income or capital gain.

    There is a respectable case for revisiting the so-called “CGT discount”. But it is important to understand — if no one hardly remembers, as our institutional and increasingly also individual memory now has a half-life of 24 hours in our wireless world — why the “discount” exists.

    The original Keating CGT sought only to tax real capital gains, so a realised nominal gain was reduced by cumulative CPI inflation between purchase and sale. This created an accounting nightmare and in 1999 the Howard-Costello government switched to allowing a 50 per cent discount of the nominal gain as a proxy for estimating the real gain.

    While it would be outrageous in any definition of fairness and even more so in terms of bad distorting policy to full-tax at an individual’s marginal rate the full nominal capital gain, arguably the 50 per cent is too generous, in this 21st century and especially post-GFC central bank-mandated world of exploding asset values, at a far, far faster pace than goods and services inflation.

    But the proposed Labor cut to 25 per cent could do exactly the opposite as it is introduced, especially with grandfathering, just as potentially we enter a yet new world of slowed asset inflation and potentially higher goods and services inflation.

    In any event, the reduction combined with the grandfathering will discourage the sale of assets and the realisation of capital gains. This would certainly encourage “bad” investment behaviour and potentially “force” higher net-worth individuals to accumulate even greater low-tax wealth.

    What seems to have completely escaped future-PM Shorten and future-treasurer Bowen is that the only shareholders who get excess franking credit refunds are low marginal rate taxpayers. Their marginal rate has to be below the 30 per cent corporate rate.

    Now while this cohort certainly includes some high-net worth or high-income individuals, it only does so as a consequence of deliberate policy — the tax treatment of retirees.

    But even more pointedly, the overwhelming majority, both by number and by value, are those on low or modest incomes or with low or modest net worth — mostly of course in superannuation funds paying a 15 per cent tax rate.

    If you are on the top 47 per cent tax rate, you do not get excess franking credit refunds.

    This three-pronged assault combined with Labor’s refusal to cut the corporate rate from 30 per cent would prove extremely damaging to the economy and not just in “the long term”.

    Especially, as it has to be noted, it would build on the assault on superannuation already delivered by the current government.

    And it will be delivered by a Labor-Green government with a majority in the Senate.

  177. cohenite

    Thanks Tom for the week in pictures. A real highlight.

  178. zyconoclast

    A New York hotel is staking its claim to have invented a new hospitality niche – birth tourism. The Marmara Manhattan offers “an exclusive package for new mothers that wish to give birth in the USA”, with the additional bonus of the newborn child gaining US citizenship.

    The hotel, which is part of the Turkish hospitality chain, exploits the 14th amendment to the US constitution, which states that all children born on American soil “are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside”.

    The Marmara Manhattan, which is located in New York’s Upper East Side, told The Times: “What we offer is simply a one-bedroom suite accommodation for $5,100, plus taxes, for a month, with airport transfer, baby cradle and a gift set for the mother.” There are also medical fees of about £20,500.

    However the price is a cheap and easy one to pay for US citizenship. Many will eventually use the newborn – known as an “anchor baby” – as a stepping stone for the immigration of extended family.

  179. Bill Thompson

    Outside Insiders – I had introduced myself to the Veterans’ Affairs Minister as he was heading into the coffee shop, so I was less formal in my greeting when he emerged for our chat, on his way to their ABC…

    https://youtu.be/YuQbsCuzFaI

  180. Nick

    Miss Clarke has self-diagnosed herself with “transgenerational trauma” passed down through her Aboriginal genes.

    The Left now actively practice eugenics that even apartheid era politicians would have been embarrassed to have instigated.

  181. OldOzzie

    The weight is over — scientists finally create a kilogram we can rely on


    It has been, for too long, an exceedingly weighty problem. The kilogram – that single chunk of metal in a vault in Paris that sets mass for the whole world – has been getting lighter. Except that, since it is by definition a kilogram, that’s impossible. So, instead, we have all been getting heavier.

    Now, after several decades and an experiment described as the metrological equivalent of the search for the Higgs boson, there is at last a solution. This month, scientists will announce a new definition of the kilogram.

    Instead of linking the unit to a changeable lump of platinum-iridium in a Parisian safe, the mass of every single object in the world will be measured against a fundamental physical constant. At a conference in Paris, the world’s metrologists are expected to vote to unshackle the last of the Standard International (SI) units still tied to a physical object. Then, the kilogram will simply be a kilogram.

    SI units are the measurements we use to describe our world: the metre (distance), the mole (amount of substance), the second (time), the ampere (electrical current), the kelvin (temperature), the candela (luminosity) and the kilogram (mass).

    When they were created, as part of a Napoleonic scheme to rationalise the world, many were linked to things you can touch. In the same institute that houses the kilogram there is, for instance, a rod of metal that used to be the metre. Now the metre is defined as the distance travelled by light in one 300 millionth of a second. So it is that, slowly, each of the units has been freed from physical artefacts.O

    Redefining the kilogram has proven harder. When it was made, a series of identical versions were also cast. Over the years the mass of each has diverged, with the official kilogram now among the lightest. The difference is not big – an ant walking over it would make it the heaviest by far – but it is annoying.

    According to Ian Robinson, from Britain’s National Physical Laboratory, that is just one problem. “A lump of metal kept in a vault somewhere is a single point of failure for the entire SI system,” he said. If it goes wrong everything goes wrong. “It also means every country has to send their mass to be compared to that one.”

    Dr Robinson has been one of the scientists who has developed the answer. He has done so by working on a device known as a Kibble balance, a machine analogous to traditional scales. Instead of a mass, though, the counterweight is the force produced by a magnetic field. In this way, you can not only relate mass to two constants – the ampere and the Planck constant – but also produce a machine anywhere that can determine a kilogram.

    At least, that’s the theory. “It was horrendously difficult to run,” Dr Robinson said. The machine requires such accuracy that the position of the moon, the sun, and air pressure matters. Even changes in the gravity produced by the water table can invalidate the result.

    So before anyone was prepared to redefine the kilogram, several Kibble balances around the world had to agree on a value of the Planck constant. Then their value had to agree with a separate one produced by something called an Avogadro sphere, which relates the kilogram to a precise number of silicon atoms.

    Finally, all the values are close enough. Now the world’s metrologists will convene to vote in the new definition. At least, that’s what Dr Robinson thinks will happen. “I have confidence everyone is primed to make the right choice. Until they’ve stuck their hands up, though, you can’t say,” he said.

  182. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    missing link for above (straight from china playbook)
    Surveillance state: NSW intensifies citizen tracking

  183. Twostix

    Lol “hahaa they used to take their measurements from the kings foot and weird arcane methods of measuring things, they so dumb!”

  184. Peter Castieau

    I’m watching Insiders so you don’t have to

  185. Zatara

    The City of Pensacola could have made a fortune if they combined the Airshow, the Art Festival, and the Trump rally which were all held today and charged admission.

    Having the parking franchise alone would have been like hitting the mega-millions lotto.

  186. Incel shoots up a yoga class in Florida, killing two women. An ominous development.

  187. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Miss Clarke has self-diagnosed herself with “transgenerational trauma” passed down through her Aboriginal genes.

    A condition, no doubt unique to Miss Clarke, and one of which Western psychologists have never heard…

  188. Twostix

    Yes we must be very careful about shut in beta males addicted to the internet who spend their lives relentlessly shitposting on blog comment sections mustn’t we m0nty?

    They’re usually harbouring much inner rage.

  189. Nick

    Incel shoots up a yoga class in Florida, killing two women. An ominous development.

    It was a yoga class. Nothing ominous for you at all, Monty.

  190. Tom

    Rowan Dean is now flying (almost) solo as Their Sky’s last remaining Outsider, political correctness having assassinated both his on-air partners Mark Latham and Ross Cameron. Dean has imported Piers Akerman as his new cohort; it remains to be seen whether Akerman’s presence on Sunday mornings will be permanent. There’s also the matter of what happens to the weekday version from 11pm to midnight Monday to Thursday.

  191. Peter Castieau

    Darren Chester doing his best to explain just how bloody hopeless the coalition is….

  192. John Constantine

    Australia’s quisling compliance class elites haven’t needed birth tourism, they Are doing very nicely out of visa tourism.

    Any crime cartel can shovel endless convoys of military age surplus males into Australia for a few thousand hours of working holiday visa, then the system gives them ten million dollars worth of Australian tax funded benefits for the lucky family who bought the package off the immigration cartel.

    For a fraction of a cent in the dollar and a promise to overthrow the Anglosphere.

    Comrades.

  193. Gab

    Miss Clarke has self-diagnosed herself with “transgenerational trauma” passed down through her Aboriginal genes.

    Trust me. This is a Thing as I so learned on the day I was forced to attend the Aborigines are Perpetual Victims training day. ( I may have made a comment or two about it here that day). The theory goes that the hurt they feel for the “invasion” and the continual ill-treatment from whitey right up to today and in the foreseeable future, is in their genes. Apparently lots more $$$ will soothe their “hurt”, someday in the unforeseeable future.

  194. I forget 26, are you married? Or are you an incel too.

  195. Mark A

    Tom
    #2856312, posted on November 4, 2018 at 9:14 am

    Rowan Dean is now flying (almost) solo as Their Sky’s last remaining Outsider, political correctness having assassinated both his on-air partners Mark Latham and Ross Cameron. Dean has imported Piers Akerman as his new cohort; it remains to be seen whether Akerman’s presence on Sunday mornings will be permanent. There’s also the matter of what happens to the weekday version from 11pm to midnight Monday to Thursday.

    Piers is a safe bet but he is not TV material.
    Blair would be silly to accept.
    Might be a good sidekick tho. (he is too flippant for serious stuff live)

  196. Helen

    SS for hurty feelings a la white invasion and provision of mobiles phones, healthcare, clothes, shelter, etc is only ever a down payment on a down payment. just as the NLC cry over their country up here, their spiritual association, but that can be put to one side for some silver dollars if you want to do something on it. Even if it is your land to begin with. This country s a basket case.

    We should invade NZ send all the NZ’s to Australian penal colony and leave all the hurty people behind in OZ. Anyone in the new country that starts showing signs of hurty should be instantly reeducated and if that fails, deported to the penal colony.

  197. Nick

    Trust me. This is a Thing as I so learned on the day I was forced to attend the Aborigines are Perpetual Victims training day. ( I may have made a comment or two about it here that day). The theory goes that the hurt they feel for the “invasion” and the continual ill-treatment from whitey right up to today and in the foreseeable future, is in their genes. Apparently lots more $$$ will soothe their “hurt”, someday in the unforeseeable future.

    Phew. Luckily Science can debunk such rubbish as it’ has done for Climate Change. Oh hang on.

  198. Mark A

    m0nty
    #2856318, posted on November 4, 2018 at 9:19 am

    I forget 26, are you married? Or are you an incel too.

    The interwebs and Monty are teaching us a new word every day.
    (Had to look it up.)
    Not quite sure I benefited?

  199. Peter Castieau

    Hendo dismantling the couch as usual

  200. John Constantine

    Their Monty can clutch his talking points, instructing him to yap about the requirement to genocide the Nazi Ethnostate of Churchill and Biggles and Blyton.

    The Anglosphere must be purged from the face of the earth, but it must first be branded the Nazi Ethnostate.

    Ban Biggles for Nazism is their mindless leftist conditioning.

    Comrades.

  201. Snoopy

    Climate change claims another victim.

    Searing outback heat claims life of experienced motorcyclist

  202. Hay Stockard

    Mark A,
    I think he is trying to say he is both married and an incel. Both are not mutually exclusive, particularly amongst betas and below.

  203. Nick

    Bohemian Rhapsody is worth a look at, Cats. Not always historically accurate, it’s worth seeing just for Rami Malek’s Performance, alone. The critics don’t like it, which is another reason to see it. It turns out that people don’t want to be preached to and just want to be entertained. Who would have thought?

  204. calli

    Good. You’re all awake. I started to worry for a moment there.

    Put San Antonio on the bucket list Cats. The River Climb is great, especially if it ends in Happy Hour at an Irish pub.

  205. Snoopy

    Trump just can’t win.

    Iran’s Supreme Leader Hassan Rouhani lashes out at Donald Trump for abandoning sanctions (h/t Monty).

  206. John Constantine

    Their western left have created vast herds of involuntary barren wymynsys to be their enraged cannon fodder.

    Giving birth to nothing but global Rage is the trap and price and curse of fashionable decolonisation theory.

    Comrades.

  207. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I forget 26, are you married? Or are you an incel too.

    asks the man who was a 40yo virgin

  208. Nick

    Melbourne Cup, combinations of:
    Rostropovich
    Avilius
    The Cliffsofmoher
    Magic Circle

  209. I am bespoke

    Twostix
    #2856310, posted on November 4, 2018 at 9:13 am
    Yes we must be very careful about shut in beta males addicted to the internet who spend their lives relentlessly shitposting on blog comment sections mustn’t we m0nty?
    They’re usually harbouring much inner rage.

    Nick
    #2856311, posted on November 4, 2018 at 9:14 am
    Incel shoots up a yoga class in Florida, killing two women. An ominous development.
    It was a yoga class. Nothing ominous for you at all, Monty.

    drops mic walks off stage.

  210. Peter Castieau

    Hendo debunked Cassidy about biggest electoral swing being Wentworth, it was Wills

  211. mh

    Crossie
    #2856284, posted on November 4, 2018 at 8:29 am
    Heaven has a wall and strict immigration policies. Hell has open borders.

    Saw this quip at Breitbart this morning, gave me the first laugh of the day.

    WHY GOD HATES OPEN BORDERS
    https://francismyles.com/shop/books/why-god-hates-open-borders/

  212. Gab

    To be clear, my comment above was directed at the Abo activists who insist on perpetuating Victimhood status. It is not directed at the likes of Bess Price or Jacinta Price (her daughter) nor any of those who are suffering at the hands of the abo activists – the ones who scream ‘stolen generation’ thereby preventing children from being cared for by foster families and thus being removed from dangerous situations.

  213. OldOzzie

    Nick
    #2856329, posted on November 4, 2018 at 9:36 am

    Bohemian Rhapsody is worth a look at, Cats. Not always historically accurate, it’s worth seeing just for Rami Malek’s Performance, alone. The critics don’t like it, which is another reason to see it. It turns out that people don’t want to be preached to and just want to be entertained. Who would have thought?

    Did you see it on the Big Screen – lined up to see with Elder Daughter next Month

    in the mean time

    Queen – Live at LIVE AID 1985/07/13 [Best Version] in HD

    Detail in HD is Superb

  214. Twostix

    No m0nty you definately don’t forget that the site smacked you when you awkwardly tried to gin up a mob against me and my young family. You knew all about me then but now you “forget?” Weird.

    I remember though, weren’t you in your forties before you got a girlfriend?

    Uhoh.

    I bet you have a softspot for anime too.

    INCEL ALERT.

  215. ZK2A;

    It met it’s end with the finest device ever for killing snakes, a long handled post hole shovel, with a sharpened blade.

    I much prefer the twisted three strand 1.5m length of baling wire.
    It flexes and is used to break the snakes back. Once it hits anywhere along the body, the distal end becomes a dead weight and hampers movement. You can then separate the head from the body with a spade if that’s your wish.

  216. areff

    The best version of Bohemian Rhapsody, and in full:

  217. Death Giraffe

    Their western left have created vast herds of involuntary barren wymynsys to be their enraged cannon fodder.

    ..
    Leave Monty alone.

  218. zyconoclast

    A 15-year-old alleged asylum seeker student is being investigated by the Home Office over claims he may actually be a 30-year-old man.

    The schoolboy, from the Middle East, started at Stoke High School in Ipswich, Suffolk, having arrived in the UK unaccompanied earlier this year.

    Today the boy, who is claimed to have a bearded selfie on a now-deleted Facebook profile, has been pulled out of school after the headteacher referred him to the Home Office.

  219. OldOzzie

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    Miranda Devine
    November 3, 2018

    YOU’D think, with all its troubles over the past five years, the Liberal Party might listen to the time-tested advice of its most successful modern leader.

    The best way for the Liberal party to win elections, writes John Howard in the introduction to new edition of Howard: The Art of Persuasion, is to emphasise the “the central role of the family”.

    It’s what he’s always said.

    “Intact and fully functional families constitute the least costly social welfare system yet devised by mankind,” Howard wrote in his bestseller, The Menzies Era.

    “There is no institution that provides more emotional support and reassurance to the individual than the family,” he wrote in a 1988 policy document, “Future Directions”, whose package of family values, home ownership and “one united nation” became the blueprint for the Howard government eight years later.

    “There is no institution which is a more efficient deliverer of social welfare than a united, affectionate, functioning family. It’s the best social welfare policy that mankind has ever devised.”

    Making the family a central priority was the key to Howard’s success. He insisted every policy be judged on whether it strengthened the family unit, “the great building block of our society”.

    His government had “a responsibility to ensure that the family unit has the legal, financial and social support necessary to sustain it. This will require action on two levels — reversal of modern anti-family attitudes and positive incentives to reinforce the family.”

    As PM he promised a “bias in our taxation system towards families with dependent children”.

    His ambition was “to profoundly advantage the families of Middle Australia. It has meant more to me than anything else and it remains at the core of my political being”.

    And that is what he delivered, with generous family tax benefits, Family Relationship Centres to counsel couples in difficulty, a baby bonus and assistance for single income families with dependent children.

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    The 2014 Abbott budget tried to cut the Family Tax Benefits but was blocked in the Senate.

    The Turnbull government, with Scott Morrison as Treasurer, tried again and managed a freeze last year, saving $2.4 billion.

    Howard was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of Howard’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, Howard was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor Orban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the foetus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and abortion numbers had plunged by more than a third. Orban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its DNA which would be kryptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  220. John Constantine

    “Oil and gas giants will be hit with a $6 billion tax hike over the next decade following years of concern that Australia has been hemorrhaging lucrative revenue to multinationals.

    The decision was made after an 18-month wait for the Coalition’s response to a landmark review into the sector, which heard Australia would eclipse Qatar as the world’s top gas exporter by 2020 but receive just $800 million revenue compared to Qatar’s $26.6 billion.”

    You would not want to be holding gas exporting companies in your portfolio when the crony shorten looting cartel grasp their vindictive crown of pricks.

    The sunk capital of the gas exporting plants is looking pretty worthless about year two of shorten.

    Comrades.

  221. Nick

    Areff,I like this one better:

  222. Twostix

    NPC Monty reads these stories of soy poisoned 30 something shut in internet autists and feels an echo.

    Out of site he quitely loads the popular wisequotes.exe file: beep boop “there but for the grace of Internet go I”.

    And then publicly joins the NPC mob in mocking them, he does so with extra gutso hoping that noone in the mob finds out that he was the prototype autistic internet computer goon.

  223. OldOzzie

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    Miranda Devine
    November 3, 2018

    YOU’D think, with all its troubles over the past five years, the Liberal Party might listen to the time-tested advice of its most successful modern leader.

    The best way for the Liberal party to win elections, writes John Howard in the introduction to new edition of Howard: The Art of Persuasion, is to emphasise the “the central role of the family”.

    It’s what he’s always said.

    “Intact and fully functional families constitute the least costly social welfare system yet devised by mankind,” Howard wrote in his bestseller, The Menzies Era.

    “There is no institution that provides more emotional support and reassurance to the individual than the family,” he wrote in a 1988 policy document, “Future Directions”, whose package of family values, home ownership and “one united nation” became the blueprint for the Howard government eight years later.

    “There is no institution which is a more efficient deliverer of social welfare than a united, affectionate, functioning family. It’s the best social welfare policy that mankind has ever devised.”

    Making the family a central priority was the key to Howard’s success. He insisted every policy be judged on whether it strengthened the family unit, “the great building block of our society”.

    His government had “a responsibility to ensure that the family unit has the legal, financial and social support necessary to sustain it. This will require action on two levels — reversal of modern anti-family attitudes and positive incentives to reinforce the family.”

    As PM he promised a “bias in our taxation system towards families with dependent children”.

    His ambition was “to profoundly advantage the families of Middle Australia. It has meant more to me than anything else and it remains at the core of my political being”.

    And that is what he delivered, with generous family tax benefits, Family Relationship Centres to counsel couples in difficulty, a baby bonus and assistance for single income families with dependent children.

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    The 2014 Abbott budget tried to cut the Family Tax Benefits but was blocked in the Senate.

    The Turnbull government, with Scott Morrison as Treasurer, tried again and managed a freeze last year, saving $2.4 billion.

    Howard was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of Howard’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, Howard was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor Orban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the foetus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and abortion numbers had plunged by more than a third. Orban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its DNA which would be kryptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  224. Senile Old Guy

    “Oil and gas giants will be hit with a $6 billion tax hike over the next decade following years of concern that Australia has been hemorrhaging lucrative revenue to multinationals.”

    The LNP now taxing and spending more than the ALP has ever done. And, under Turnbull, enacted many ALP policies. SloMo has done, what? Shorten does not even have to campaign to win.

  225. Helen

    Gab, goes without saying. There are plenty of people in Oz who live a mainstream life, pay their taxes, go to school, and there are those who seek advantage, the best way to do this is to keep a bunch of people on community in despair sucking on the welfare teat. it give the rent seekers something to point to saying see, we need more money. I don’t believe they want to help these people to find a way out – they would lose their useful props if that happened. And that might turn off the tap.

  226. H B Bear

    The decision was made after an 18-month wait for the Coalition’s response to a landmark review into the sector, which heard Australia would eclipse Qatar as the world’s top gas exporter by 2020 but receive just $800 million revenue compared to Qatar’s $26.6 billion.

    The fvck?

  227. stackja

    Zatara
    #2856349, posted on November 4, 2018 at 10:02 am
    Pensacola Trump rally live

    Thank you.

  228. Twostux

    The uk bugman class lets alien grown men that nobody knows anythung about sit in highschool classrooms.

    That is the society that the have built.

    It’s really shit for everyone but them.

  229. Myrddin Seren

    The sunk capital of the gas exporting plants is looking pretty worthless about year two of shorten.

    I am sure there will be willing buyers of the assets for cents in the $$, and a very persuasive lobbying effort from Maaates Are Us Inc.

  230. Mark A:

    Aisha looks like she is from Finland
    Yes she does.
    And some wonder why people lie or do stupid things.
    What benefit could she have converting, that she does not have now?

    She looks like she fell face first into a bowl of flour.
    The benefit is that all her friends can now see the she is Tolerant, Peace Loving, and Edgy.
    Aisha will bathe in the positive vibes from her idiot friends, and her friends will get kudos because one of their friends is Edgy, Tolerant, and Peace Loving.
    And then they wake up when the husband, who has belted the shit out of Aisha twice this week, brings out the kitchen knife to remove the clitoris which has offended both Allah and himself.
    Ooops.

  231. Myrddin Seren

    Shorten does not even have to campaign to win.

    Shorten’s personal ratings indicate the majority of punters recognise a Rat with a Gold Tooth when they see one.

    Laying low and letting the Coalition banzai charge to liquidation will be the strongest campaign strategy he could do.

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