Open Forum: November 3, 2018

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1,219 Responses to Open Forum: November 3, 2018

  1. calli

    The only decent Bohemian Rhapsody (other than the mighty Freddie Mercury) worth posting is from Wayne’s World.

  2. John Constantine

    Tens of billions have been sunk into Australia’s cfmeu built gas export plants.

    Paying tax on turnover not profit won’t fund upgrades and depreciation.

    Chicom developers build dogbox apartments for chicom citizenship visas, and chicom developers build offices for State regulation and compliance parasites.

    They don’t build export gas plants.

    Who will end up owning them in the second term of shorten though.

  3. Tel

    Laying low and letting the Coalition banzai charge to liquidation will be the strongest campaign strategy he could do.

    The low profile strategy worked for Kim Beazley 1n 1998 and again in 2001 !!!

  4. Leigh Lowe

    As I wrote last week, there is a perfectly sensible, simple and non-distortionary alternative: limit investment property deductions in any one year to investment property income; with any excess able to be carried forward to be deducted against future income or capital gain.

    That has always been my view.
    It encourages a focus on the “cradle to grave” cycle of a housing investment, and it discourages fiddles like transferring costs from your principal residence to your investment property.

  5. Tel

    Most husband wife farm partnerships involve a multi million dollar agribusiness.

    Husband and wife both married to the bank.

  6. Armadillo:

    Its a fact. Muslims hate dogs. And pigs.

    Cats are OK.

    One of the things I vividly remember about Riyadh was the stinking garbage skips in the street. They would get emptied when they were full, and were generally home to diseased cats and rats. Many of the mangy cats had huge tumours growing on them.
    This was the showplace of the Saudi People.

  7. Zatara

    One of the things I vividly remember about Riyadh was the stinking garbage skips in the street. They would get emptied when they were full, and were generally home to diseased cats and rats. Many of the mangy cats had huge tumours growing on them.

    Emptied by Filipinos or Bangladeshis of course because the Saudis don’t do such menial tasks.

  8. Andreas

    As I wrote last week, there is a perfectly sensible, simple and non-distortionary alternative: limit investment property deductions in any one year to investment property income; with any excess able to be carried forward to be deducted against future income or capital gain.

    That’s how it used to be and makes the most sense. It was Labor under Hawke who first changed it so property loses could be applied to wages, thus contributing to the current ponzi.

  9. Entropy

    Armadillo
    #2856180, posted on November 3, 2018 at 11:43 pm
    Most husband wife farm partnerships involve a multi million dollar agribusiness.

    It’s a fair statement anecdotally. I would be surprised if there are statistics to back it up. Probably because there are none. And only because no one has bothered.

    Old age sayings would be the best guide. Money follows money. Birds of a feather, flock together

    The average capital of an Australian farm is $5.3 million. Average equity $4.3m. Rate of return excl capital appreciation 3.4%. Incl capital appreciation 7.8%.
    In the middle of a big drought.

  10. Old School Conservative

    OldOzzie
    #2856340, posted on November 4, 2018 at 9:49 am
    Queen – Live at LIVE AID 1985/07/13 [Best Version] in HD

    How does one man remain sane with all that adulation?
    It’s one thing to be talented, and another to have 72,000 people copying your every move and chorus.
    Yes, the audience participation was planned but it came off spectacularly.
    An individual who orchestrated that would have to be very sound of mind to not let the waves of genuine hero worship go to their head.

  11. Myrddin Seren

    Tel

    The low profile strategy worked for Kim Beazley 1n 1998 and again in 2001 !!!

    I accept your point on past precedent.

    I would posit that Shorten is genuinely unlikeable – even among some Labor voters.

    And he is probably amazed at the Coalition sitting there shooting themselves in the foot – repeatedly.

  12. areff

    Notice this at the foot of Andrew Bolt’s defence of Ross Cameron?

    NOTE: I was planning to make an announcement soon about my career. Given this post – and the wilful misreporting about Sky – I should make absolutely clear that my plans were made and discussed with many relevant people BEFORE Ross was sacked. What has happened and what I will do are unrelated.

    Intriguing

  13. Entropy

    H B Bear
    #2856362, posted on November 4, 2018 at 10:14 am
    The decision was made after an 18-month wait for the Coalition’s response to a landmark review into the sector, which heard Australia would eclipse Qatar as the world’s top gas exporter by 2020 but receive just $800 million revenue compared to Qatar’s $26.6 billion.”

    The fvck?

    Apart from confusing value of production with taxation, the Australian industry is in its infancy. A different point in the production/revenue cycle. The rivers of taxation gold are still years away for the feds. Meanwhile the states get their royalties, which exceed the fed revenue.

  14. Entropy

    Clearly Bolt is going to Outsiders.

  15. C.L.

    Only in Australia …
    A show called “Outsiders” to cock a snoot at leftists sacks its principal non-leftists.
    Other ‘conservative’ leaders demanded we approve gay “marriage”. Steve Price hates anti-abortion ladies with rosaries (once calling for them to be taken away in “divvy vans”) and appears on The Project to show that he’s Nice. Alan Jones hates coal mines and loves opera. Andrew Bolt is podcasting about great books of the Western world to differentiate himself from Pauline Hanson supporters whose idea of culture is the Bathurst 1000. Meanwhile, we have a Liberal government that tried to jail Bill Leak and is currently trying to jail Ben Roberts-Smith VC.

  16. C.L.

    An unforgiving, brutal country it is:
    He was well prepared, say police, with plenty of food and water but when adventure motorcyclist Daniel Price got bogged in soft ground in the Kimberley, he couldn’t escape the heat and died.

  17. OldOzzie

    Can any Cats Help?

    Miranda Devine has an excellent article in today’s Sunday Telegraph

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    MIRANDA DEVINE

    I have tried every which way to post it but it disappears into the Open Forum Monster Post Eater – tried cutting and pasting into text edit then copying from there – can’t see any obvious words that are verboten

    Any Thoughts?

  18. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Piers is a safe bet but he is not TV material.

    Oh noes. That’s killing the concept with dullness. Peers can write but not speak.
    He waffles and confuses along and you just turn off.
    BRING. BACK. ROSS. NOW.

    Bolt would be better but he is such a performer himself, he’d crowd Rowan out.
    The show worked its well for fun when it was three blokes sitting around doing the pub chat thing.
    It pushed along to an appreciable plane of intellect with Ross, Rowan and with the guest segments.

  19. C.L.

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    He sure did. Free hand-outs for the middle class.

  20. OldOzzie

    Mike Pence

    HUGE crowd in Pensacola, FL tonight for @RealDonaldTrump rally! Florida – Go vote for @ScottforFlorida for US Senate & @RonDeSantisFL for Governor! Great sunset, even better #MAGA supporters!

  21. Helen

    Husband and wife both married to the bank.

    Yep, she/he even gets invited to ‘do’s’

  22. Entropy

    Well you have to admit, there is a lesson in Howard’s approach to the 2001 election for SloMo.
    Howard didn’t have as many fifth columnists in the liberal party back then though, and SloMo has just about run out of time.
    Any change of direction now would look like chicken little panic, and will be treated with the respect and belief it deserves.

  23. OldOzzie

    C.L.
    #2856409, posted on November 4, 2018 at 11:30 am

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    He sure did. Free hand-outs for the middle class.

    Tell me the Difference to

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    Howard was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of Howard’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, Howard was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor Orban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the foetus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and abortion numbers had plunged by more than a third. Orban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its DNA which would be kryptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  24. Infidel Tiger

    Clearly Bolt is going to Outsiders.

    Perhaps he can teach Rowan how to tie a tie and brush his hair.

    He may also want to discuss the production values of a show that looks like it was put together by an amateur YouTuber.

  25. OldOzzie

    C.L.
    #2856409, posted on November 4, 2018 at 11:30 am

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    He sure did. Free hand-outs for the middle class.

    Tell me the Difference to

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    Howard was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of Howard’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, Howard was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor Orban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the f$$tus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and abortion numbers had plunged by more than a third. Orban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its DNA which would be kryptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  26. Helen

    An unforgiving, brutal country it is:

    There are times for these adventures and that is in the dry season when it is cooler, not the buildup. Also no excuse for no sat phone, no epirb. Sad for his family.

  27. None

    Remember when the press gaaped on the day John Howard promised 6 billion worth of handouts? No one would blink these days. Penny Wong made 106 disappear and nobody ask a question.
    How I did have his underminers those three screaming lefties Petro Georgiou and to others. Not dissimilar to the three pants wet is crying about Nauru now and just like Scott Morrison he caved in to them as well. I really don’t want anyone to declare war on Australia.

  28. Entropy

    When I lived in NWQ I was always amazed at the dudes riding heavily loaded bicycles down the flinders or landsborough highways in 40 degree temperatures. Mostly Japanese it seemed at the time.

  29. Zatara

    Daniel Price got bogged in soft ground in the Kimberley, he couldn’t escape the heat and died.

    “Bogged in soft ground”? Really? An ‘experienced’ motorcycle rider?

    How far away was the next fuel stop? Or the last one? What was his plan if a rock cracked the motor case? Did he plan on water from the worst drop dead point to the nearest resupply?

    I don’t think badly of him for trying to do something new but at the same time I’ve no sympathy for people who don’t respect the threat and plan/prepare properly.

    They present Darwin awards to people like that.

  30. Gab

    Any Thoughts?

    Yes. Praise the Spaminator for it’s discernment in knowing that Hand-out Howard is not worthy to be posted here.

  31. Entropy

    Let’s face it. The correct approach for SloMo now is land mine policies. Do unto the ALP what the ALP did unto you.

  32. calli

    Once it starts, it never stops.

  33. OldOzzie

    C.L.
    #2856409, posted on November 4, 2018 at 11:30 am

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    He sure did. Free hand-outs for the middle class.

    Tell me the Difference to

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    Howard was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of Howard’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, Howard was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor Orban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the f$$tus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and ab#rtion numbers had plunged by more than a third. Orban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its DNA which would be k#yptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  34. calli

    Yikes. That last refers to Howard and his hand-out successors.

  35. Gab

    Calli, I was thinking of you when I posted the video of street scenes from Jerusalem in November 1929.

  36. stackja

    Menzies retired. Holt, Gorton, McMahon. Then came Gough. Fraser. Then came Hawke/Keating
    Then JH. Then RGR.

  37. OldOzzie

    C.L.
    #2856409, posted on November 4, 2018 at 11:30 am

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections

    He sure did. Free hand-outs for the middle class.

    Tell me the Difference to

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    Howard was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of Howard’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, Howard was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor O#ban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the f$$tus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and ab#rtion numbers had plunged by more than a third. Orban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its D#A which would be k#yptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  38. OldOzzie

    Gab
    #2856422, posted on November 4, 2018 at 11:42 am

    Any Thoughts?

    Yes. Praise the Spaminator for it’s discernment in knowing that Hand-out Howard is not worthy to be posted here.

    Gab

    so we have gone from


    1. His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    to

    H#ward was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    2. But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    Which of the two is more expensive

  39. OldOzzie

    Gab
    #2856422, posted on November 4, 2018 at 11:42 am

    Any Thoughts?

    Yes. Praise the Sp#minator for it’s discernment in knowing that Hand-out H#ward is not worthy to be posted here.

    Gab

    so we have gone from


    1. His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    to

    H#ward was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    2. But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    Which of the two is more expensive

  40. Infidel Tiger

    An unforgiving, brutal country it is:

    Riding solo in remote country without an EPIRB is madness.

  41. zyconoclast

    Howard didn’t have as many fifth columnists in the liberal party back then though, and SloMo has just about run out of time.

    SloMo is a 5th columnist.
    Another excuse needed.

  42. OldOzzie

    Gab
    #2856422, posted on November 4, 2018 at 11:42 am

    Any Thoughts?

    Yes. Praise the Spaminator for it’s discernment in knowing that Hand-out Howard is not worthy to be posted here.

    I tried to reply to this, but again no success on multiple tries – time to give up and get a life

  43. Armadillo:

    I’d disregard the US polling completely. My tip is that the GOP are going to smash it.
    The wave will all be red.

    I reckon you’re right.
    I had a lazy 1k that needed investing but my bookie doesn’t have that field to bet on. (Betfair)
    Do you have a better better?

  44. Penny Wong made 106 disappear and nobody ask a question.

    Speaking of Penny Wong, has anyone ever heard her give a critical analysis of China?
    I watched her dodge using the name China in an ABC interview a while back. She insisted on saying “Countries” in the region.
    She need not fear ever being picked up on it while the ABC are around.

  45. calli

    Was it this one Gab.

    The trees on the Mount of Olives are now surrounded by a walled garden. You walk down into the valley and up to the city. Regardless of the thing on the Temple Mount, the walls themselves beckon you on. This is the place of the Promise, where Abraham and his son believed God could raise the dead.

    I’ve walked up those lanes and steps, and the Beloved has ducked his head under the arches. There is something about Jerusalem that speaks with a small, persistent, eternal voice.

  46. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    the price is a cheap and easy one to pay for US citizenship. Many will eventually use the newborn – known as an “anchor baby” – as a stepping stone for the immigration of extended family.

    I guess we get these sorts of tourist country shopper ‘births’ too. Is Aust Citizenship then automatic?
    —————–

    Someone up-thread wished they could go to Jerusalem in 1967.
    Well, if you go today you can still see the bullet holes from that in strongly fought streets.

    Those pics from 1927 were not too different from the pics of today, especially in the Muslim quarter.
    More ‘ultras’ around now though, ultra-orthodox, with the dress and modes of mittel-Europa in the entirely rebuilt Joosh quarter razed by order in 1967. Those old streets elsewhere, a lot of them still left as they were, through which you negotiate Jerusalem could tell some tales. It is a fascinating place and I’m glad Hairy dragged me along.

  47. John Constantine

    Their looting left has been meme warring to get to tax turnover of big companies, not profit of big companies for years and tories have laughed at the stupidity.

    Now they are within grasp of looting capital.

    Looting capital through the special council farm tax on capital, where paddocks are taxed on capital value, not profit and the money used to save the planet through mass immigration of welfare clients for councils.

    Worse, any potential capital investor in massive high upfront cost, long life projects, like mines for export and gas fields for export can see the looting cartel declaring sunk capital is the property of all Comrade Maaaates, fairly and equally.

  48. .

    If Islam ripped off the (Torah and) Gospel, could the hatred of dogs stem from this?

    https://biblehub.com/revelation/22-15.htm

    Outside are the dogs those who practice magic arts, the sexually immoral, the murderers, the idolaters and everyone who loves and practices falsehood.

    Makes me want to follow the Kaballah or Thedish folk magic. It’s also very harsh to put philanderers with child abusers and murderers.

    The bolded bit – you know cats ought to be thrown into the lake of fire.

  49. Gab

    Yes, that’s the one Calli.

  50. Mitch M.

    I don’t think badly of him for trying to do something new but at the same time I’ve no sympathy for people who don’t respect the threat and plan/prepare properly.

    I think badly of people who go on these “boys’ own adventures” for whatever stupid reason. Get over it there are a plenty of other challenges in the world that don’t involve being a bloody idiot.

  51. Myrddin Seren

    If Islam ripped off the (Torah and) Gospel, could the hatred of dogs stem from this?

    How about: bit hard for a bunch of back-stabbing camel thieves to sneak up on people in the dark and kill, pillage and rape them if their camp dogs are going ‘woof, woof, woof’ ?

  52. Mother Lode

    Perhaps he can teach Rowan how to tie a tie and brush his hair.

    As a rule Brits are shocking with ties rendering them twisted, straggling and lifeless.

    So regularly so that you would conclude it is deliberate: a little act of defiance.

  53. calli

    God doesn’t hate dogs at all.

    Matthew 15:21-28 – Even the dogs get something. Woof!

    2 Kings 9:10 – but they can be fussy eaters.

    🙂

  54. .

    To our dear Catholic apologists DB and C.L.

    Why don’t English speaking Catholic countries celebrate St Walpurga more?

  55. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    You walk down into the valley and up to the city.

    And a very hot trek it is too. We went by way of the Tomb of Absolem, that prodigal son, and then up to the Tombs of the Old City of David, the archaology of which tumbles down the hill near the spring at source.

    The blocked Golden Gate on the city walls opposite the Mount of Olives is thought by three world religions to be the place for the coming, or second coming, of their Messiah. Of it all, I like the Garden of Gethsemane the best. Fenced from entry but very visible, a nice place to sit and contemplate, beautiful, and with one of the gnarled and very old living olive trees there dating back to the time of Christ. It is much smaller than the original now, of course, and surrounded by claimant memorabilia and an Orthodox church. Claimants are everywhere in Jerusalem. Part of its charm for me.

  56. P

    Political Memes – Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture Finale

  57. John Constantine

    “This is serious news for a few reasons. First but definitely not foremost, Australia seems to specialise in high-cost LNG projects. We are home to the Ichthys project in Darwin, which was made possible thanks to the world’s largest ever project financing deal. Other investments in places like Curtis Island have seen tens of billions of dollars more sunk into LNG export plants. In fact, a total of seven new Australian LNG projects, worth a combined $193 billion,”

    https://www.marketforces.org.au/australian-lng-projects-the-next-stranded-assets/

    The coal seam gas projects require continual drilling development to provide the feed for the plants. can the looters really destroy a hundred billion dollars of sunk export plant capital by declaring drilling bad and capital bad?.

    The future is nearly here.

    Comrades.

  58. calli

    Suleiman blocked the Beautiful Gate.

    Silly bugger.

  59. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    It is a tremendous mistake to assume that anti–sem1tism arises from any political activity or ideology. It is a pathology based on the wish to exterminate the Joosh people — a moral and spiritual sickness unique in human history, and which morphs and mutates across religious, secular and political systems.

    Adjusted for the spammer, from Melanie Philips article linked above, which is very good indeed.
    All Cats should read it to see the picture from inside the tent, painted with tremendous intelligence.

    Hairy told me this British lady also keeps an apartment in Jerusalem. Good on her.

  60. I am bespoke

    Mitch M.
    #2856450, posted on November 4, 2018 at 12:08 pm

    Gender quotas at quilting bees?

  61. .

    An hour into the Boghossian & James Lindsay JRE podcast – “healthism”, “ableism”, “thin privilege”.

    “Obesity is a medicalised narrative”. “Being fat is healthy”. “Health is white privilege”. “The Journal of Fat Studies”.

    To which I say, coronary heart failure is a “funeral parloured narrative”.

    This has to be the best of the worst:

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21604851.2019.1534469?journalCode=ufts20

    Fat Studies
    An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society

    Articles
    Theorizing fat oppression: Intersectional approaches and methodological innovations
    Ariane Prohaska & Jeannine A. Gailey
    Published online: 25 Oct 2018

    Download citation https://doi.org/10.1080/21604851.2019.1534469

    ABSTRACT

    The oppression of fat people is built into institutions, pervades the cultural landscape, and affects the relationships and perceptions of people of size. In this introduction to the special issue on fat oppression, we examine the concept of oppression and its place in fat studies before reviewing the extant literature on fat oppression. We also discuss how the articles chosen for this issue contribute to the existing theoretical and empirical understanding of fat oppression. We conclude by encouraging scholarship that utilizes diverse theoretical and methodological approaches to studying the oppression of fat people.

    If you think Emily di Donato and Hannah Davis are beautiful, that’s a social construct.

    The pseudo-academics never ask WHY it is a social construct.

  62. Olive trees from the time of Christ would be pushing it a wee bit.
    1500 years is the upward end for them, with 500 usual.
    Bristle Cone Pines could be 2000 years old, but wrong continent.

  63. calli

    Gender quotas at quilting bees?

    I, for one, welcome gentlemen at my next quilting bee.

    Provided they can do twenty stitches to the inch.

  64. calli

    Yes, Gez. I expect the trees we see on the Mount of Olives are children of the ones 2000 years ago. They are fery old and gnarled though.

    Like so many trees, they might even be shoots from the original rootstock, so genetically the same treeas those that bent over and witnessed the arrest.

  65. Myrddin Seren

    Well played, RNC, very well played.

    ‘Hey everybody – here is an ad that CNN refused to run !’

    Everybody – except CNN’s dwindling viewership that would never have looked at the ad or gone in to a rage fury if they had watched it:

    ‘Wait – what ad ? Show me that ad….’

    And the MSM falls for it yet again.

  66. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    camp dogs are going ‘woof, woof, woof’

    Good one, Myrddin. 🙂

    Dogs are great. So are cats.
    Cockroaches are not though, so I’ll never be a Buddhist.

    Yesterday we were out of fly spray and a big cockroach had come in from the garden, so I disinfected him with a spray shot of Glen 20 disinfectant. It worked, but he died slowly on his back, and I felt bad then. He seemed to look at me, feebly moving his feelers, every time I walked by. I got a dustpan and brush and chucked him out of a high window, wishing I had been game enough to squash him at first sight.

  67. C.L.

    Julie Bishop and David Panton at the Kennedy marquee on Derby Day 2018

    I’m glad she has finally covered up those arms but the hat is a bit young for her. Like, by about 45 years.

  68. Roger

    Why don’t English speaking Catholic countries celebrate St Walpurga more?

    I suggest it’s because her missionary exploits took place among the Franks.

    Likewise St Patrick has always loomed much larger in Irish Christianity than in that of his British homeland.

  69. John Constantine

    “According to corporate transparency data published by the ATO, there were at least 39 fossil fuel companies that paid no income tax in 2015/16 despite a combined income of almost $72 billion. The majority of those companies also paid no tax in the 2013/14 and 2014/15 years.

    New fossil fuel extraction projects would generate some economic benefit from jobs, payroll tax, and local procurement of goods and services, but the same applies to new climate-safe projects. Creating new jobs is a poor reason for allowing new climate-damaging projects.

    Nor do we need new fossil fuel extraction projects to keep the wheels of industry turning or the lights on at home. We already export around 75 percent of the coal we extract and over 50 percent of the gas. (Oil is a bit more complicated. We export crude oil and import refined petroleum products because we lack sufficient refining capability.)”

    https://greens.org.au/magazine/banning-new-offshore-oil-and-gas-what-will-it-cost-us

  70. Myrddin Seren

    I, for one, welcome gentlemen at my next quilting bee.

    Provided they can do twenty stitches to the inch.

    That is straight up stitchism right there. Check your quilting privilege, lady.

    If a bunch of men who can’t even tie their shoe laces want to join the space, you had better be celebrating their slip on shoes and velcro jacket fasteners or you will be getting a Change.org petition and a Get Up picket line before you can say ‘Lock-and-load’.

    ( Disclaimer – this may or may not be #FakeNews. It is increasingly difficult to tell where satire ends and NPCing begins )

  71. A Dendrologist could tell us the age of the Mount of Olives trees.
    Dendrology is big in the climate change debate. Tree ring analysis was used by advocates to act as a proxy for past temperatures. Very dodgy stuf and a favourite of the Hockey Stick man, Michael Mann.
    All roads lead to climate change.

  72. Myrddin Seren

    Lizzie

    Cockroaches are not though, so I’ll never be a Buddhist.

    Ticks. Satan’s Bugs. Destroy with a clear conscience.

  73. We export crude oil and import refined petroleum products because we lack sufficient refining capability

    And our local stuff is shite. Full of wax.

  74. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Olive trees from the time of Christ would be pushing it a wee bit.

    All of them are very old and gnarled in this Garden, but one is claimed to have been genetically tested to show a date in the first century AD, a few others at 1,500 years old. It is certainly the extensive in its trunk formation, although the others are coming up from behind in terms of being old looking. In medieval times these trees were identified and protected, so there may be some truth that this was the actual garden and its stock. Nice to think so anyway.

  75. John Constantine

    Trump is making America independent from threats of energy embargoes.

    The democrats wanted to sink america into a quagmire of energy importation vunerability
    Tha australian greens lunatic arm of the one party State aim for an australia so vunerable that the threat of fuel blockades would gridlock australian cities inside 72 hours, no resiliance at all.

    A continent floating on gas, made out of coal with untapped oil all over the place must suicide its own economy in the name of fashionable decolonialisation theory.

    Purge the Anglosphere to genocide.

    comrades.

  76. Armadillo

    Lizzie, you need to get hairy to buy you an Alexanderite.

    Tanzanite is nice, but a poor substitute for decent j3w3l3ry. If he really loves you, he would get you one. Or two.

    https://www.gemsociety.org/article/alexandrite-jewelry-and-gemstone-information/

  77. .

    Don’t forget the uranium and thorium.

  78. feelthebern

    Anyone expecting Stephen Fry to give an anti Trump tirade at the “Festival Of Dangerous Ideas” was sorely mistaken.

  79. John Constantine

    https://aip.com.au/resources/australian-crude-production-and-refining

    “ustralian crude oil and condensate is insufficient/incompatible for our needs and is largely exported

    Domestic crude production has been in decline for some time and Australia does not produce enough compatible crude oil to run existing domestic refineries.
    Most crude oil production is located long distances from Australian refineries and has better transport proximity to key Asian markets.
    Bass Strait crude oil is refined in Victorian refineries given transport proximity and economics (delivered via pipeline) and some local condensates are trucked to refineries.
    Much of Australia’s crude oil production is also of a quality (light sweet) which is very commercially attractive for processing in other countries. Australian refineries require a blend of crude oils to produce the product slate demanded by Australian fuel users.
    In general, it is more commercially attractive to use a majority of imported crude oils in Australian refineries to meet the balance of transport fuels needed by Australian fuel users, and this imported crude diet better matches Australian refinery processing capabilities.
    Transport fuel security depends on flexible supply chains and diversity of product supply, not domestic refining of domestic crude oil.”

    Australias crony business system makes it easier to ship australian condensate [ good enough to run a lawn mower on unrefined] overseas than have crony big union ships move it from one part of australia to another.

  80. Armadillo

    Stimpson, don’t force us to get Tailgunner to hunt you down and drag your sorry arse back in here.

  81. Tel

    I don’t think badly of him for trying to do something new but at the same time I’ve no sympathy for people who don’t respect the threat and plan/prepare properly.

    They present Darwin awards to people like that.

    Traveling in groups is a good idea.

    A basic mylar/foil sunshade doesn’t set you back a whole lot.

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Camo-Emergency-Mylar-Survival-Blanket-Foil-Thermal-First-Aid-Outdoor-Camping-/323120942452

    There’s one for four bucks. You probably need some string, which also is available on eBay for not much.

    Hey that reminds me, the Australian military calls green para-cord “hoochie cord” but the other names for the same thing are “camp cord” and sometimes you still hear “signalling cord”.

    Now I get it that a “hoochie” is a crude tent, therefore green cord makes sense. I’m presuming that “camp cord” is also a reference to making a tent, but what I’m curious about is does anyone have reference material regarding “signalling cord” ? Not sure if I’ve discussed this here before, but the idea that I heard was you can run the green string along the ground and one soldier tugs the string to nudge the next soldier as a way of very simple communication. Does anyone have better information?

  82. feelthebern

    Did Julie Bishop pay her own way, or was she there on official business?

  83. Calli:

    Provided they can do twenty stitches to the inch.

    Of course.
    We made a machine that does that for us.
    Your point is ?
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
    (I think I got away with it…)

  84. C.L.

    Dot, I had to look up St Walpurga and Walpurga’s Eve.
    A ninth century confessor, she was hailed for converting various Frankish heathens and was invoked against witches – specifically, on the night it was thought all the top witches had their AGM atop a local mountain. She wouldn’t be on any Anglophone national feast day calendars.

    Shame, really. We still need her assistance.

  85. C.L.

    It’s a shame the Dome of the Crock spoils the vista in the Mount of Olives.

  86. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Hey that reminds me, the Australian military calls green para-cord “hoochie cord” but the other names for the same thing are “camp cord” and sometimes you still hear “signalling cord”.

    For “camp cord” read “comms (communications) cord” – used as you describe – and I’ve never heard “signalling cord.” The other use was “perimeter cord” laid out on the perimeter in close country, and raised to chest height at night. It stops a soldier, who has just woken up and may not have night vision, wandering outside the perimeter at night, and getting shot by his fellows.

  87. Roger

    The US & China, among others, regard oil from a national security viewpoint.

    We regard it from an economic viewpoint. That’s all very well in a stable world, but ours is increasingly not that. Indeed, our region is the likely flash point for the next major conflict.

  88. .

    From the silly, very silly interview Jordan Peterson did with that fat, foulsome British anti-male campaigner:

    I think that abortion rights are absolutely fundamental to women being able to function as full humans in society…

    So where are men’s abortion rights?!

  89. .

    We regard it from an economic viewpoint. That’s all very well in a stable world, but ours is increasingly not that. Indeed, our region is the likely flash point for the next major conflict.

    Loose a few counter value nukes and both perspectives become irrelevant.

  90. calli

    Stop needling me Winston.

  91. John Constantine:

    …there were at least 39 fossil fuel companies that paid no income tax in 2015/16 despite a combined income of almost $72 billion.

    Is this a deliberate lie?
    I thought businesses paid a different type of tax – only income earners pay income tax.

  92. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I don’t think badly of him for trying to do something new but at the same time I’ve no sympathy for people who don’t respect the threat and plan/prepare properly.

    FWIW, the Wes Australian news has his friends describing him as “an experienced camper and motorcyclist” who had ridden across the Nullabor.

  93. .

    LOL*

    Jordan Peterson: “There was plenty of motivation to take me out. It just didn’t work” | British GQ

    Don Lemon
    Don Lemon
    4 hours ago
    Is it legal for Peterson to film his counselling sessions?

    *How on earth does the interview have a poundmetoo twit thingy?

  94. So John, it’s not Aussie crude that causes the fuel filters to look like a hippy candle shop in Winter?

  95. calli

    I think that abortion rights are absolutely fundamental to women being able to function as full humans in society…

    Saw that, Dot. And commented on the thread.

    The Unborn are, of course, not “full humans”. They are expendable.

  96. Farmer Gez;

    And our local stuff is shite. Full of wax.

    …and we aren’t wax producers to the world?
    Why?
    Oh, don’t bother.

  97. Roger

    Loose a few counter value nukes and both perspectives become irrelevant.

    That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t prudently prepare for the most likely scenario – a conventional war fought largely on sea and in the air.

  98. John Constantine

    The balkanisation and blind rage running australias road networks suggests that if an interruption occurred to australias fuel imports the roads would become gridlocked with vehicles driven until they ran out of fuel.

    Run a newish vehicle out of fuel and chances are it will need a mechanic to prime and bleed it to get it going again, let alone the chance of being written off if particles of sludge come free from the bottom of the tank and ruin the fuel injection system.

    Even rationing fuel to heavy transport to keep logistics running means nothing if the roads are clogged and the fueled up trucks are blockaded by wrecks.

    The only way to free the streets would be to work in from the outside with forklifts and stack the broken down cars ten high in piles on any flat space available.

    Australia stops, cant work, cant fight, cant feed itself and all inside days of fuel blockade.

    Then we see looting.

    No point having a charged up electric car if the roads are gridlocked and the trucks can’t stock the supermarket shelves.

    Make sure your families have a rainwater tank and a sack of dried beans for Christmas, and tell them to keep quiet about it.

    Comrades.

  99. RobK

     way of very simple communication. Does anyone have better information?
    I think you are on the right track. In mine shafts there is communication between the skip (man cage) and the winder driver. That communication is a bell and hammer arrangement connected by a fine multistrand steel wire rope about 4mm diameter. It is called “knocker line” and transmits a code for stop, go and the various levels of the platforms (plats), also some emergency codes.

  100. JC

    Just putting it out there. 🙂

    The New York Times Co. continued its digital ascent in the September quarter. Nearly two-thirds of the quarter’s $417 million in revenue came from subscriptions, said the publisher this morning in an announcement that has sent its shares (ticker: NYT) up 8%, to $28.52. Thanks to more than 200,000 in new digital subscribers, the Times ended the quarter with over 4 million subscriptions—more than 3 million of those digital-only.

    Despite the newspaper industry’s loss of advertising to the internet, the Times is finding success as a digital news source whose reliable journalism is winning subscribers despite—or because of—the attacks of President Donald Trump. Some investors now consider it the news industry’s version of Netflix (NFLX).

  101. H B Bear

    Anyone expecting Stephen Fry to give an anti Trump tirade at the “Festival Of Dangerous Ideas” was sorely mistaken.

    You mean no-one?

  102. jupes

    Hey that reminds me, the Australian military calls green para-cord “hoochie cord” but the other names for the same thing are “camp cord” and sometimes you still hear “signalling cord”.

    Para-cord and hootchie cord are not the same thing.

    Para-cord is thicker and stronger and used for attaching the parachute to the harness, hootchie cord doesn’t have much strength and is used for setting up a hootchie.

  103. Roger

    Australia stops, cant work, cant fight, cant feed itself and all inside days of fuel blockade.

    NRMA estimates of Australian supplies:

    Petrol at service stations – 3 days

    Hospital supplies – 3 days

    Pharmacy supplies – 7 days

    Food requiring cold storage – 5 days

    Dry goods – 9 days

  104. C.L.

    Why on earth does this country not have a strategic petroleum reserve?

  105. John Constantine

    Winston, i take it that the greens call turnover income, as in counting all the money through the till, not just the profit margin.

    Gez, australias condensate reserves are first class, and most of australias oil is heaps better than heavy sour.

    https://smallcaps.com.au/oil-gas-stocks-asx-ultimate-guide/

    The product australians are sold as fuel however is a witches brew of political compromise. The way fuel goes ‘off’ if the firefighter pump is left to sit from season to season unused is as good an example as any.

  106. Top Ender

    Devine article as requested

    John Howard wrote blueprint for winning elections
    MIRANDA DEVINE
    November 3, 2018 7:30pm

    YOU’D think, with all its troubles over the past five years, the Liberal Party might listen to the time-tested advice of its most successful modern leader.

    The best way for the Liberal party to win elections, writes John Howard in the introduction to new edition of Howard: The Art of Persuasion, is to emphasise the “the central role of the family”.

    It’s what he’s always said.

    “Intact and fully functional families constitute the least costly social welfare system yet devised by mankind,” Howard wrote in his bestseller, The Menzies Era.

    “There is no institution that provides more emotional support and reassurance to the individual than the family,” he wrote in a 1988 policy document, “Future Directions”, whose package of family values, home ownership and “one united nation” became the blueprint for the Howard government eight years later.

    “There is no institution which is a more efficient deliverer of social welfare than a united, affectionate, functioning family. It’s the best social welfare policy that mankind has ever devised.”

    Making the family a central priority was the key to Howard’s success. He insisted every policy be judged on whether it strengthened the family unit, “the great building block of our society”.

    His government had “a responsibility to ensure that the family unit has the legal, financial and social support necessary to sustain it. This will require action on two levels — reversal of modern anti-family attitudes and positive incentives to reinforce the family.”

    As PM he promised a “bias in our taxation system towards families with dependent children”.

    His ambition was “to profoundly advantage the families of Middle Australia. It has meant more to me than anything else and it remains at the core of my political being”.

    And that is what he delivered, with generous family tax benefits, Family Relationship Centres to counsel couples in difficulty, a baby bonus and assistance for single income families with dependent children.

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    The 2014 Abbott budget tried to cut the Family Tax Benefits but was blocked in the Senate.

    The Turnbull government, with Scott Morrison as Treasurer, tried again and managed a freeze last year, saving $2.4 billion.

    Howard was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of Howard’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, Howard was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor Orban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the foetus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and abortion numbers had plunged by more than a third. Orban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its DNA which would be kryptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  107. P

    “Operation Faithful Patriot” Underway….

    ” ‘Operation Faithful Patriot’ is the name given for the U.S. military deployment on the southern U.S. border ahead of several thousand central American migrants. Pictures of advance military preparation are beginning to come from the Arizona and Texas border regions with Mexico. “

  108. Top Ender

    Tried to post the Miranda Devine article – no joy. Can’t see anything in it to offend the Spaminator.

  109. Steve trickler

    The Raid on the Medway.

    The Dutch, and that kick-ass naval raid against the British Navy.



  110. John Constantine

    Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot fight and must capitulate within days of a blockade.

    Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot take part in an anglosphere alliance against anybody that can enforce a blockade.

    This is the future australias crony surrender monkeys have deliberately constructed.

    For a price.

    Comrade Maaaaates.

  111. Does anyone know the refining behind Summer and Winter fuels?
    We seem to get a lot of waxy stuff.

  112. C.L.

    That chapel is quite nice but … “interfaith.”
    Has no soul.

  113. Ubique

    An English bulldog has been euthanased after biting off his Scottish owner’s testicles, which had been coated in peanut butter

    It seemed like a good idea at the time.

  114. .

    Winter fuels can have a higher proportion of more volatile, lower weight olefins as they raise the vapour pressure in the combustion chamber and therefore enable ignition more easily at lower temperatures.

  115. Knuckle Dragger

    Para cord. Highly prized by jungle grunts.

    Hoochie cord. Easy to tie up in torrential rain but common as muck.

  116. areff

    Angry Anderson’s son beaten to death in Sydney. Poor devil. There can be no worse pain than losing a child.

  117. I’d disregard the US polling completely. My tip is that the GOP are going to smash it.
    The wave will all be red.

    Oh I am so looking forward to the midterm threads.

  118. Steve trickler

    This Dutch film provides the visuals.

    MICHIEL DE RUYTER.



  119. Cassie of Sydney

    What about Tim Blair for Outsiders?

    I thought that Rowan’s introduction this morning was very good and heartfelt. You can see he is taking what happened to Ross very hard….as we all are. I really think that Ross should have been given the opportunity to apologise on camera. Yes, his choice of words was poor however his sacking is purely political. It is very clear that Sky has caved to the intolerant anti-free speech left due to the fact that a very sinister and pernicious organisation is now targeting Sky’s advertisers. Sky should have stood strong against the tirade. But they caved and this sets a very, very bad precedent. The organisation in question is a group called “Sleeping Giants” which I am pretty sure is financed from the US…..all roads lead to Soros. The organisation’s sister group in America is called “Media Matters’ which has been targeting (unsuccessfully) Fox News and in particular Hannity and Laura Ingraham. It is very clear that Sleeping Giants has been out to get Outsiders and Sky for months primarily because of the channel’s line up after dark doesn’t accord with their hard left worldview. Last night I looked at the twitter feed of Sleeping Giants and it isn’t pretty. They are gloating about what happened to Ross and are quite open about the fact they’re now going after Rowan. On the twitter feed I perused, that grotesque and well known race pimp…aka Soupman…was openly encouraging and egging on the organisation to go after and shut down Rowan Dean.

    So well done Sky for caving in to an illiberal Marxist and Soros funded group…..a group that only has a few followers but is successful because they routinely threaten and harass organisations and advertisers if they don’t like their politics. This pernicious organisation called Sleeping Giants succeeds precisely because companies and particularly the people that run these companies are now craven cowards and lack spine. Sleeping Giants will not stop at Outsiders….next they will be going after Bolt, Credlin, PML and the rest.

  120. rickw

    Does anyone know the refining behind Summer and Winter fuels?

    There is a winter / summer spec for LPG and Diesel from memory.

  121. Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot fight and must capitulate within days of a blockade.

    No one can blockade us! We have $50 bill of submarines that would stop that.

    err … wait.

  122. Cassie of Sydney

    One of my favourites… A Yiddish Song …….Belz, Mayn Shtetele Belz….a vanished world.

    https://youtu.be/88pCBld3TVk

  123. rickw

    Petrol at service stations – 3 days

    Jet A1 at Airports, depends a lot on the Airport, but can be as low as <1 day, my guess is that average is 2 days.

  124. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Para cord. Highly prized by jungle grunts.

    Usually kept under lock and key, to deter casual pilfering.

  125. Tintarella di Luna

    One of my favourites… A Yiddish Song …….Belz, Mayn Shtetele Belz….a vanished world.

    https://youtu.be/88pCBld3TVk

    What beautiful evocative music and such a lovely voice of the singer, it resonates right to the bone.

  126. .

    No one can blockade us! We have $50 bill of submarines that would stop that.

    Well, they need two different kinds of vessels to take both our eastern and western shoreline. The Defence Minister said so.

  127. Petrol at service stations – 3 days

    If so inclined a US carrier group could turn up within a few days (say 10).
    By routing our then occupier, we might get lucky and become a US state.

    Anyway, that is low risk, more likely that we will max out on the national credit card and won’t be able to afford to buy fuel.

  128. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Angry Anderson’s son beaten to death in Sydney. Poor devil. There can be no worse pain than losing a child.

    That’s awful. Who did it and why? Yes, I’ve just sat through a funeral for my nephew, comforting my sister on the loss of her child. It is a terrible thing for any parent to endure. My nephew had also suffered the pain of the loss of one of his little girls, through a dreadful accident, so there were two loaded griefs to deal with there, especially from the mother of both little girls, choked with emotion when she mentioned their dead child, who gave the Eulogy for their father with fortitude and strength of character not often seen, certainly not in someone once as addicted herself to heroin as that woman once was. With Big Sis’s help they had both come a long way back from that brink.

    Big Sis’s current partner had a child who was murdered in some wild drug rampage where his son was the innocent bystander. I think he belongs to a group of parents who have experienced this depth of grief; perhaps Angry can seek them out for help. He is going to need something like this to get through.

  129. rickw

    Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot fight and must capitulate within days of a blockade.

    How did we get here?

    Long term taxation looting of fuel sales by government. The end result of this is hyper price sensitivity resulting in razor thin margins, no one wants to carry any inventory.

    Long term de-industrialisation of Australia. Investing in Refinery capacity is a huge gamble, there is to much sovereign risk from government and to much risk of union bastardry. Every major oil company has been trying to quit Australia forever.

    Enviro mandates for biofuels in both Mogas and Diesel means that longer term storage of any of these fuels is fraught with technical difficulties.

  130. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Michael Smith News claims “Only a Labor Government will establish a National Integrity Commission.”

    Fuck off, Shorten, your mob of knuckle draggers couldn’t even spell the words.

  131. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    What beautiful evocative music and such a lovely voice of the singer, it resonates right to the bone.

    It certainly does. With highly evocative visuals too. Worlds past, but a culture still ongoing.

  132. Investing in Refinery capacity is a huge gamble, there is to much sovereign risk from government and to much risk of union bastardry.

    I actually contributed to a risk assessment for building a plant for an oil company (long time ago), you are correct (sort of).
    There are lots of other risks too. All downsides in AU.

    Overall risk for a refinery or petrochemical plant sited in a Singapore (for example) is so much lower that we are simply non-competitive.

  133. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot fight and must capitulate within days of a blockade.

    How did we get here?

    Short answer: lack of political leadership.

  134. C.L.

    Young Anderson’s killer did not go quietly.
    Several officers used spray and “significant force” to subdue him.

    ——-
    /ABC

  135. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    OK, just watched recorded Outsiders from this morning.

    I take it back. Peers Ackerman is doing OK. A shaky start, but when wound up a useful presence.

  136. rickw

    Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot fight and must capitulate within days of a blockade.

    If it goes a bit longer then you get into the issue of manufacturing war material, the specific pinch point being the machinery to make the materials. Pre WWII McPhersons Machinery did a lot to encourage the development of local manufacturers realising that things as inane as drills, taps and dies could be in shortage in the event of war, llet alone lathes, milling machines and presses.

    You can now count domestic manufacturers of these items on one hand.

    http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/mcpherson-william-edward-11024

  137. Old School Conservative

    An educated guess would be drugs (especially ice) were involved in the Anderson murder.

  138. Knuckle Dragger

    Australia 2/3 after three overs.

    As expected.

  139. C.L.

    It’s the greed and infantilism of Australia writ large.
    We have Paul Keating calling for a strategic Cash for Old Coots reserve but no strategic petroleum reserve – even though the government has been repeatedly warned about not having one.
    What I smell is that eye-watering hybrid du jour: the malodorous pong of the Greens and the vomitous waft of Liberal Party cowardice.

  140. Tel

    Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot fight and must capitulate within days of a blockade.

    Don’t be so silly.

    Our lot would capitulate long before any blockade started.

  141. Armadillo

    Oh I am so looking forward to the midterm threads.

    Give us your preview thoughts, mOnts. Entertain us.

  142. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Liam Anderson, 26, beaten to death in front of police in Queenscliff

    AAP
    2 hours ago November 4, 2018

    The son of rocker Gary “Angry” Anderson has been killed in a violent and bloody attackon Sydney’s northern beaches that may have lasted as long as half an hour.

    It took several officers and the use of pepperspray to restrain a man police say they found forcefully beating 26-year-old Liam Anderson early on Sunday morning.

    An emergency services helicopter arrived at the scene to transport Mr Anderson to hospital, but he died as it was taking off, police said.

    The 20-year-old alleged attacker was arrested at the scene in Queenscliff and is assisting police with their inquiries.

    Detective Inspector Michael Boutouridis described it as a particularly violent attack.

    “It was quite a bloody scene. The man we have in custody was violent and it took a number of police officers to subdue and arrest him,” Det Isp Boutouridis told reporters.

    “Capsicum spray was used, OC spray, and significant force was used to arrest him.” Det Isp Boutouridis said it was “quitepossible” the alleged attacker was under the influence of drugs during the attack.

    From the Oz.

  143. Armadillo

    If I’m going to wade into the betting market and have a plunge, I need some pretty solid rakes to back up my prediction.,Over to you.

  144. John Constantine

    “Under cold conditions wax can be seen as a light yellow suspension in the fuel. When the fuel is cooled below the temperature at which the wax comes out of solution (cloud point) it can block filters by forming a yellow waxy deposit. This is a result of using the incorrect fuel for the season or region, eg. using summer grade ADF in winter or bringing an ADF from warmer areas to a colder area during winter. The problem can be fixed by waiting for the fuel to warm up and changing the filter or by lowering the cloud point by the addition of up to 30% of heating oil to the fuel. To help prevent waxing problems you should always ensure that all fuel is changed over to fresh fuel by May at the latest. There is a two month lead time in the distribution of the fuel to ensure that all fuel available by May is winter grade for the cold period between the start of May and the end of July.”

    https://www.whichcar.com.au/gear/product-test-oz-diesel

  145. Knuckle Dragger

    Aaaaaaand now 3/8. It’ll be over in an hour at this stage.

  146. Armadillo

    Also, please quote some Democratic polling. It always reassures me and allows for a good nights sleep.

  147. John Constantine

    3/8

    Strategic Batting Reserve.

  148. Black Ball

    Yes Knuckle Dragger, not the best of starts to the cricket season.

  149. Top Ender

    For those of us who like Clint’s work:

    The 15:17 to Paris
    405 Premiere

    On Thursday 7:00pm – 8:35pm
    The real-life story of three men whose brave act turned them into heroes during a high-speed railway ride.

    DIRECTOR: Clint Eastwood
    CAST: Alek Skarlatos, Anthony Sadler, Ray Corasani, Spencer Stone
    YEAR OF PRODUCTION: 2018

  150. John Constantine

    How long would it take to divert Australian oil and condensate from export pathways to domestic consumption if things get tight?.

    Month/s?.

    The technical and logistic capacity is not there, and nobody wants it to be there, as decolonialisation theory calls for the end of the anglosphere in Australia at the earliest opportunity, not a agonising drawn out last stand, Rhodesia bush war style.

    Genocide the Churchill/Biggles/Blyton Nazi ethnostate

    Comrade Maaaaates.

  151. Helen

    Cassie, that is terrible. Thank you for sussing out the creeps behind Ross’s sacking and pathetic response from Sky. Sky will be even weaker, next time these hyenas go after someone.

  152. Tintarella di Luna

    Julie Bishop and David Panton at the Kennedy marquee on Derby Day 2018

    I’m glad she has finally covered up those arms but the hat is a bit young for her. Like, by about 45 years.

    C.L. – thank heavens Julie Bishop has covered up those skinned-rabbit arms but you’re right the hat is all wrong not because it’s too youngish but because it’s just the wrong style hat — it should have been a nicely-shaped black felt pork-pie hat or a black felt trilby. I can speak with a modicum of authority on these things having undertaken a rigorous June Dally-Watkins young gel’s deportment course when I was a young gel.

  153. cohenite

    NRMA estimates of Australian supplies:

    Petrol at service stations – 3 days

    Hospital supplies – 3 days

    Pharmacy supplies – 7 days

    Food requiring cold storage – 5 days

    Dry goods – 9 days

    Is there a link to that, I can’t find one and it would be worth bookmarking. Make no mistake this is an offshoot of alarmism and the green disease generally. The greens are insane; they want some bucolic paradise which never existed where the proles can frolic in the woods while they continue to enjoy their hyper unnatural lifestyle in the city. It is cognitive dissonance of a particularly vile kind and it is fucking this country.

  154. Helen

    Tinta, I was thinking the same thing. Should I click? If I do will the arms be in or out. In! Thank the Lord!

  155. Boambee John

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #2856567, posted on November 4, 2018 at 2:30 pm
    Without a strategic fuel reserve australia cannot fight and must capitulate within days of a blockade.

    How did we get here?

    Short answer: lack of political leadership.

    Even the mighty potential we had for a while seemed to fizzle out.

  156. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    a black felt trilby

    I have one of those Tinta.
    I must wear it to Cat drinks sometime to compete with your famous Snood.
    Not suitable for summer, sadly.
    And now the Melbourne Cup cometh soon upon us.
    What will I wear for a hat this year? Looks like a trip to the milliner for me.
    Via Hairy’s credit card. 😀

  157. Armadillo

    Sportsbet has suspended betting on the Republican candidate in Indiana.

    So it begins.

  158. Snoopy

    I can speak with a modicum of authority on these things having undertaken a rigorous June Dally-Watkins young gel’s deportment course when I was a young gel.

    The incredible ‘Miss Dalley’ is still on the job.

  159. wivenhoe

    Sportsbet has suspended betting on the Republican candidate in Indiana.
    So it begins.

    So what prompted that Arma, did Monty predict an Indiana blue wave?

  160. Boambee John

    Custard/Peter Castieu

    NRMA estimates of Australian supplies:

    Petrol at service stations – 3 days

    Hospital supplies – 3 days

    Pharmacy supplies – 7 days

    Food requiring cold storage – 5 days

    Dry goods – 9 days

    Draw this to Cory’s attention. It is a perfect issue. Even our dishonest MSM would have difficulty describing a campaign based on this as waaacism, You-know- who-ophobia or misogny.

    Dot

    Ditto fot David L

    A campaign on greater self sufficiency in essential supplies would attract a lot of support.

  161. Snoopy

    Armadillo
    #2856599, posted on November 4, 2018 at 3:26 pm
    Sportsbet has suspended betting on the Republican candidate in Indiana.

    How do bookmakers get such a bad reputation when outfits like Sportsbet do their best to prevent punters doing their dough?

  162. zyconoclast

    An English bulldog has been euthanased after biting off his Scottish owner’s testicles, which had been coated in peanut butter

    It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    For the dog or the owner?

  163. wivenhoe

    How do bookmakers get such a bad reputation when outfits like Sportsbet do their best to prevent punters doing their dough?

    It appears that I must have been wrong. It was only a few weeks ago that I said that there are no comedians in Australia.

  164. Armadillo

    How do bookmakers get such a bad reputation

    Liar. Everyone loves us. Otherwise you punters wouldn’t keep coming back.

  165. Armadillo

    It’s not our fault if people get addicted to greed. It’s yours. We simply provide a service .

  166. Armadillo

    Let me make this clear. Punters are greedy whores. There will be millions of the bastards out there on Melbourne Cup day trying to stick their grubby paws in some innocent bookmakers pocket.

  167. Boambee John:

    A campaign on greater self sufficiency in essential supplies would attract a lot of support.

    John, I’ve been banging on about it for about twenty years.
    No one is interested.
    Trust me, I’ve bloody well tried to alert people to the danger, given heaps of examples of what we could do to ameliorate the problem, but it’s hopeless.
    You get labeled as a “Prepper” and hence a nutter.

  168. wivenhoe

    Arma, a serious question. What percentage do on course bookies need to maintain to stay afloat these days?

  169. Armadillo

    We’re just trying to feed our families and the orphans we adopted. Don’t diss us.

  170. Tintarella di Luna

    The incredible ‘Miss Dalley’ is still on the job.

    Yes she is, what a gal. I remember seeing her when I first went to their offices in George Street, in the City. She had on a beautiful forest green tailored suit (skirt and jacket) with a matching hat and deep brown shoes. She was magnificent. June Dally-Watkins, Audrey Hepburn and Bettina Arndt, what a trio.

  171. Tintarella di Luna

    What will I wear for a hat this year? Looks like a trip to the milliner for me.
    Via Hairy’s credit card. 😀

    What a good idea.

  172. Armadillo

    Arma, a serious question. What percentage do on course bookies need to maintain to stay afloat these days?

    Profit margin should be running around 18-19%. Our long term average is about that mark. Some years are better than others. The MOST important thing is actually holding money in the bag. Like most business, it’s all about turnover. 18-19% on holding 100k will see you starve. 18-19% on turning over a few million is worthwhile.

  173. wivenhoe

    Thanks Arma. Was curious with all the tax rates and ongoing costs these days.

  174. mh

    Oh I am so looking forward to the midterm threads.

    Monty, you will disappear from this site when things don’t go well for your team.

    Like you did with Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

  175. Armadillo

    If the Democrats win the senate, I’ll buy mOnster a steak. And Ill post it to him via snail mail.

  176. Knuckle Dragger

    Aussies now 6/66 after 21 overs.

    Don’t know whether to laugh, cry or start breaking stuff.

  177. Boambee John

    Likewise, even the faintest sniff of a move towards the Demorats will see the lackey of the fascist left j’isming all over the thread for days on end.

  178. zyconoclast

    The victims of the horrific events in Huddersfield and other cities are not best served by a polarised debate on race

    Rotherham, Rochdale, Oxford, Bristol, Peterborough, Newcastle – and now Huddersfield. These are the places across the country where young girls, failed by those supposed to protect them, have been preyed on by gangs of men who repeatedly rape and abuse them. Every new case that emerges raises the question: how many more are there to come to light?

    No words can do justice to the horrific abuse perpetrated by a gang of 20 men in Huddersfield, believed to be Britain’s single biggest grooming prosecution. The men plied vulnerable girls as young as 11, including those in care and with learning disabilities, with alcohol and drugs in order to s3xually abuse them. The abuse included men [email protected] intoxicated girls while others watched, s3xual abuse with a drinks bottle and gang [email protected] by men using plastic bags as condoms.

    There is an understandable urge to react out of raw anger. Yet the most important question we can ask as a society – calmly, rationally – is how to prevent this sort of abuse from happening again.

    But the vexed issue of the ethnicity of the perpetrators – they were all of Asian descent – has prepared the way for a kneejerk reaction and a polarised debate between those who argue that these men’s race and faith are the main factors driving these crimes on the one hand and those who strenuously deny that they play a role at all.

    Some, such as Tommy Robinson, who put the very trial of these men at risk by breaking reporting restrictions, are acting purely in bad faith, using the fate of these girls to further their own racist agenda. Others may be acting out of concern that discussing the ethnicity of these men could stoke racist sentiment. All are failing the victims. To prevent these crimes in the future, we first have to understand two things. Why did the institutions that were supposed to protect these girls fail? This is the subject of the continuing independent inquiry into child s3x abuse. Second, what explains the patterns of behaviour of these male abusers? This is a question that isn’t being properly explored, because everyone already thinks they have the answer.

    What lies at the root of such criminal behaviour is likely to be extremely complex. It is clearly wrong to imply, as many have, that faith and culture are the only driving factor. Profession may play a role: Asian men are more likely to work in the night-time economy, which gives them greater opportunity to exploit vulnerable children. The disgusting prejudice towards the mainly white, working-class victims in places such as Rotherham and Rochdale was not limited to the mainly Asian perpetrators, but extended to the police and social workers.

    But neither can culture nor their own racism be taken off the table as contributing factors in explaining how individuals become perpetrators. It would be preposterous to suggest that the sexual exploitation of children is concentrated among people of a particular ethnicity: it goes on everywhere. But it is certainly plausible that within different cultures s3xual abuse might take different forms, or manifest itself in different ways, and, if so, it is crucial to understand that.

    It is imperative, though, to be clear that exploring this question to inform the prevention of abuse in no way implies whole ethnic or faith communities are more likely to sexually abuse children than others. That’s why the home secretary’s careless, simplistic tweet about the case was deeply irresponsible.

    There will almost certainly be another trial, another set of horrifying revelations. To complement the review of the institutional failures that allowed child s3xual exploitation to happen, we also need to improve our understanding of how and why these men commit their vile crimes, with no potential explanation off the table. But the sad reality is that this is unlikely to happen in a climate where everyone from the home secretary down is so quick to fill in a narrative that best serves themselves, not the young victims.

  179. Rafe Champion

    Trump’s agenda paying off in the USA.

    WASHINGTON—Strong hiring and low unemployment are delivering U.S. workers their best pay raises in nearly a decade.

    Employers shook off a September slowdown to add 250,000 jobs to their payrolls in October, above monthly averages in recent years, the Labor Department said Friday. With unemployment holding at 3.7%, a 49-year low, and employers competing for scarce workers, wages increased 3.1% from a year earlier, the biggest year-over-year gain for average hourly earnings since 2009.

  180. Boambee John

    Winston at 1541

    It will take only an inability to refuel on demand, or a shortage of booze at the supermarket to change that attitude.

    Prepare the ground, then wait to take advantage of the (probably inevitable) crisis. Even if the fuel and booze are soon available again, the message will resonate.

    Time spent on both reconnaisance and battlespace preparation is never wasted. I have made a point this year of pointing out the high dependency of some regions on diesel generatirs to friends with diesel vehicles. They now have a degree of wariness about the likely effect on them should renewables have a bad week.

  181. Armadillo

    Would posting a bible to the local mosque as a Christmas present be considered as a “hate crime” Unfortunately, I suspect so.

    There is also something else that has been troubling my mind. Do blind Muslims have “guide dogs”? Does anyone know?

  182. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    There is also something else that has been troubling my mind. Do blind Muslims have “guide dogs”? Does anyone know?

    No. It is the “will of Allah” if they get run over.

  183. Dr Faustus

    How long would it take to divert Australian oil and condensate from export pathways to domestic consumption if things get tight?.

    Month/s?.

    Probably wouldn’t happen at all.

    Most Australian crude oil production is incompatible with the technology set-up of the remaining refineries – and there isn’t a lot of it. So, months/years of re-engineering while our leaders lined up to prostrate, bang their foreheads on the floor, and kiss Emperor Xi’s ring.

    Condensate will indeed run (badly) in a simple 4 stroke engine, however the principal problem is the very low octane value. More sophisticated engines, and anything with a turbo, would either fail to start at all, or would be quickly destroyed by detonation/pre-ignition – long before the powerful solvent action buggered any polymer internals.

    In any event, condensate wouldn’t comply with the Fuel Quality Standards Act 2000 and the emissions would certainly be in breach of the Victorian Environment Protection (Vehicle Emissions) Regulations 2013.

  184. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    $270m plan to finally rejuvenate Fremantle includes food and retail precinct FOMO Freo
    Josh ZimmermanPerthNow
    November 4, 2018 12:00AM
    Josh Zimmerman

    AFTER buying the former Myer building in 2011, and then watching his anchor tenant walk two years later, Sirona Capital managing director Matt McNeilly has had a front row seat to Fremantle’s economic atrophy.

    So bad is the malaise — and the prevalence of shuttered store fronts — that in June Fremantle council voted to investigate hiking rates for the owners of vacant shops in a bid to force them to drop rents.

    That measure comes as the city centre’s commercial vacancy hover stubbornly around 10 per cent and visitors to Fremantle’s once-bustling Kings Square are more likely to run into beggars than bargains.

    But if the man injecting $220 million into the long overdue redevelopment of the Fremantle city centre is to be believed, both its reputation and its bustle are on the cusp of a comeback.

    “There is not a lot wrong with Fremantle but this part of town has just been allowed to decay,” Mr McNeilly said.

    “I suspect there is a whole range of reasons it died but the containerisation of the port (beginning in the late 1960s) had been a big part of that.

    “That meant less people involved in port activities and office tenants moving out that just haven’t been replaced. Originally this was the heart of the commercial precinct of Fremantle.”

    Now Mr McNeilly is performing a heart transplant as part of the $270 million Kings Square Renewal.

    The operation was made possible by a big assist from the State Government, which set the ball rolling when it committed to leasing all 21,000sqm of office space being created to house 1500 public sector workers from the relocated Department of Communities.

    Does this mean Fremantle City Council will be hanged from lamp posts, for the crowd of champagne socialists that they are?

  185. ZK2A:

    Does this mean Fremantle City Council will be hanged from lamp posts, for the crowd of champagne socialists that they are?

    Sadly, no.

  186. John Constantine

    Bulldog tractors can run on condensate.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uybslncIbVg

    Our Bulldog tractor fleet is our Strength.

  187. John Constantine

    A truckload of coal dumped in a pile down the back would be disaster insurance as well.

    Puts a whole new spin on a lump of coal as a Christmas gift.

    Comrades.

  188. Boambee John

    zyconoclast
    #2856629, posted on November 4, 2018 at 4:09 pm
    The victims of the horrific events in Huddersfield and other cities are not best served by a polarised debate on race

    Rotherham, Rochdale, Oxford, Bristol, Peterborough, Newcastle – and now Huddersfield. These are the places across

    Facts shall not be allowed to cause vulgar noises or foup odours in the Church of Mulitculti.

    NO FACTING allowed!

  189. Knuckle Dragger

    And now they’re running each other out.

    Just what you want. 7/89.

  190. .

    We need less of a strategic reserve with adequately protected and distributed nuclear power.

    Each plant can power the catalytic cracking and refining of avgas and diesel for the military.

  191. Dr Faustus

    What lies at the root of such criminal behaviour is likely to be extremely complex. It is clearly wrong to imply, as many have, that faith and culture are the only driving factor. Profession may play a role: Asian men are more likely to work in the night-time economy, which gives them greater opportunity to exploit vulnerable children.

    No doubt an enterprising social scientist will be able to use some post-modern non-parametric test to show a soothing correlation between the night economy and shit behaviour. Plus an explanation for why non-Asian night workers are not being hauled in for similar offences.

    There’ll be research funds for that…

  192. .

    Does anyone want to discuss petrol chemistry?

    What would a blend of toluene and n-butanol be like, blended to the desired RON or MON rating?

    What proportion of different compounds (pentane, toluene, naphtha, isooctane) do you get in store bought petrol? I’ve been looking for this online but cannot get a complete or reliable estimate.

  193. .

    Profession may play a role: Asian men are more likely to work in the night-time economy, which gives them greater opportunity to exploit vulnerable children.

    This is an absolute howler. They’re asleep when most kids are about. I don’t see most shift workers turning into child traffickers.

  194. Death Giraffe

    Trying out a new cameraman:


  195. Old School Conservative

    zyconoclast
    #2856629, posted on November 4, 2018 at 4:09 pm
    The victims of the horrific events in Huddersfield and other cities are not best served by a polarised debate on race

    I read your post. I read the original Guardian article. Slowly. I even used a “find” function.
    No-where did I find a mention of Islam.
    Plenty of references to “race” and a few mentions of “faith’ and “culture” but not one reference to the religion of peace and its influence on the perpetrators of those horrific crimes.

    There was however one suggestion that a causal factor could be that perpetrators worked in the night-time economy.
    Now that’s an in-depth analysis. (sarc off)

  196. Dr Faustus

    Bulldog tractors can run on condensate.

    Large diesel engines can be run effectively on coal-water slurry.

    The only practical problem would be stopping the GetUp protesters chaining themselves to the gates of the local coal slurry plant.

  197. Armadillo

    This should make mOnster all moist.

    https://www.chron.com/news/article/Voters-set-to-render-fresh-verdict-on-Trump-13360929.php

    Keep believing buddy. The big blue wave is coming.

  198. Snoopy

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6350311/Transgender-soldier-affair-soldiers-wife.html

    Every officer who had any responsibility, either prior or post, for this disgrace deserves to be cashiered.

  199. Makka

    Does this mean Fremantle City Council will be hanged from lamp posts, for the crowd of champagne socialists that they are?

    Not by the airheaded greenleftists that live there.

  200. John Constantine

    Puffing Billy can run on sustainable harvest wood.

    Our steam trains are our Strength.

  201. John Constantine

    The fluid now sold in australia as petrol is rarely discussed.

    Australian petrol is the worst and cheapest possible thing that could be sold and still pass as fuel.

    There are still lobbyists having a crack at lowering the standards just a little bit more.

  202. Top Ender

    Everybody’s doing it, doing it, doing it:

    An art director who admits his parents are white has said he chose his new identity from an African name book as he felt his given name ‘didn’t fullfill’ him anymore.

    Anthony Ekundayo Lennon has benefited from taxpayer support to propel his career as a black, Asian and minority ethnic (Bame) leader in the arts.

    When he started out his acting career he found it difficult to find roles and eventually adopted the identity of a black man and once he felt he had fully adopted his identity he referred to himself as an ‘African born again’.

  203. Makka

    RealSaavedra avatarRyan [email protected]·10h
    CNN reports that police have arrested James Polite for allegedly vandalizing a synagogue in NYC.

    CNN failed to report that Polite:

    Was a Democratic activist
    -Volunteered on Obama’s presidential campaign
    -Was a former City Hall intern who worked on combating hate crimes

    …….. and he’s a lipstick wearing black person.

    https://dailycaller.com/2018/11/03/nyc-synagogue-vandalism-suspect/?utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=atdailycaller&utm_source=Twitter

  204. John Constantine

    The full intent is for australias elite politicals to capitulate and then form a vichy quisling collaborative government for whatever transnational cartel cares to sign off on the decolonialisation process.

    Our left already have their ration plans drawn up, their gulags laid out, and their lists of the unsound painstakingly numbered from top to bottom for purging.

    No Dunkirk, no Sparta, no Rourkes Drift, no Long Tan. No last stand, no fight them on the beaches, no Masada. Just an australian left oozing with the passionpus of willingness to form punishment battalions to purge old australia.

    That will teach daddy for never buying that Pony.

  205. Marcus

    Well, as disappointing as Australia’s been at Optus Stadium, I’ve got to hand it to Foxtel for their coverage. Entertaining and insightful commentary and clean, colourful graphics, and whoever made the decision to finally get Kerry O’Keeffe a TV gig should get a hearty congratulations.

    The Australian top order, not so much.

  206. wivenhoe

    That will teach daddy for never buying that Pony.

    Bloody hell, I bought the pony, and the saddle and all the necessary stuff, but still have not been forgiven for not buying the cabbage patch doll. Ohh did I mention the outlandish cost of riding lessons.

  207. Dr Faustus

    What proportion of different compounds (pentane, toluene, naphtha, isooctane) do you get in store bought petrol? I’ve been looking for this online but cannot get a complete or reliable estimate.

    Composition varies fairly widely, depending on refinery/feedstock/storage and transport. The standard gives a guide to what should/should not be there – but there really is no such thing as ‘standard’ petrol.

    Incidentally, you are an inhuman monster for even mentioning a toluene blend. Governments have been to a lot of trouble to eliminate aromatics, despite toluene being a cheap power enhancer, because of the potential harm to baby kittens and people who sniff the stuff.

  208. Australian petrol is the worst and cheapest possible thing that could be sold and still pass as fuel.

    It won’t keep in a tank for long. Most lawn mower problems are the off fuel in the tank.
    They dye the crap a pale yellow because they are genuinely taking the piss out of you.

  209. Boambee John

    OSC at 1648

    Also no reference to “Pakistan”, the place of ethnic origin of most of the offenders, rather a reference to “Asian men”, which is as likely to turn the minds of the suspicious towards East Asia as towards South Asia. A deliberate attempt to shift the blame away from Muslim South Asians to non-Muslims.

  210. wivenhoe

    Governments have been to a lot of trouble to eliminate aromatics, despite toluene being a cheap power enhancer, because of the potential harm to baby kittens and people who sniff the stuff.

    Well, that settles it, if governments and/or Monty are against it then it must be a good thing.

  211. Tel

    I read your post. I read the original Guardian article. Slowly. I even used a “find” function.
    No-where did I find a mention of Islam.

    You would almost get the feeling that they know the name “Tommy Robinson” but have never paid the slightest bit of attention to anything he ever said.

  212. Roger

    There is also something else that has been troubling my mind. Do blind Muslims have “guide dogs”?

    Yes, there have been several fatwas (rulings) issued on this.

  213. wivenhoe

    Yes, there have been several fatwas (rulings) issued on this.Do infidels wearing a collar and on a lead class as “guide dogs”.

  214. .

    Those national fuel standards are bizarre. Diesel is only allowed to be 5% biodiesel?

    It doesn’t really matter about the source. If something is refined to a particular standard, it ought to be fine.

    If we really wanted to, we could derive sugar from meat. It would be pointless but pure sucrose derived in this way is the same as pure sucrose from sugar beets.

  215. Bruce in WA

    Julie Bishop and David Panton at the Kennedy marquee on Derby Day 2018

    I’m sorry, but those boobies seem to have an apex somewhere mid-line between collarbone and navel.

  216. Roger

    Also no reference to “Pakistan”, the place of ethnic origin of most of the offenders, rather a reference to “Asian men”, which is as likely to turn the minds of the suspicious towards East Asia as towards South Asia.

    In current British usage “Asian” refers to people of Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi or Sri Lankan origin.

    East Asian people are generally referred to by their specific nationality or ethnicity – Chinese, Korean etc..

    It’s the opposite of Australian usage, where we usually refer to South Asians by their nationality and East Asians as “Asian”.

    That aside, the general absence of the Muslim angle in reporting on the grooming gangs is certainly out of PC cowardice.

  217. wivenhoe

    I’m sorry, but those boobies seem to have an apex somewhere mid-line between collarbone and navel.

    That is only because of the benefit of uplift bra’s, Bruce. Do not be deceived.

  218. egg_

    Howard didn’t have as many fifth columnists in the liberal party back then though, and SloMo has just about run out of time.

    Too many cocks spoil the broth?

  219. egg_

    Julie Bishop and David Panton at the Kennedy marquee on Derby Day 2018

    Pants-On looks like he’s put on some weight.

  220. Dr Faustus

    Diesel is only allowed to be 5% biodiesel?

    Apparently due to concerns about bio-diesel being hygroscopic and possible atomization issues in common-rail injection systems.

  221. RobK

    Dot,
    I like the idea”We need less of a strategic reserve with adequately protected and distributed nuclear power.

    Each plant can power the catalytic cracking and refining of avgas and diesel for the military”as a concept.

    Re; only allowed to be 5% biodiesel.
    Biodiesel is a long chain, water soluble, fatty alcohol. It is good for upper cylinder lube and replaces sulphur compounds for that purpose but it does age poorly, absorbs moisture and plays havoc with sump oil.
    Seperately, the link on coal slurries above was very interesting. New to me. It would provide quick response and low capex. Shame the greenies wouldn’t like it.

  222. RobK

    Coal is a source of humic a fluvic acids which are used as fertilizer and soil ameliorants by leaching coal with hydroxides. The residual carbon could potentially be slurried as a fuel for turbines or ICEs. I expect there’d be some extra wear but may make the prospect more viable in the regions.

  223. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Marked Turkish police cars belonging to an elite squad responsible for monitoring and arresting opponents of Erdogan have been seen in areas of Berlin with high Turkish populations.

    If it upsets Lefty politicians in Germany, what’s the problem?

  224. .

    Okay then biodiesel isn’t analogous to petroleum diesel per se.

  225. RobK

    Okay then biodiesel isn’t analogous to petroleum diesel per se.
    No. It can still be sold as biodiesel i believe.
    If swapping to biodiesel in a vehicle that has run on diesel, a lot of gum and moisture is scoured from the system and fuel filters will need frequent changing until it has cleared out. BD does burn clean.

  226. C.L.

    Muslims in England makes gifts of the koran to upper echelon wallopers who accept it.

    Just look at that despicable coward.
    We see the same thing here. (Muslims use the same workshopped tricks everywhere). To wit: police officers invited to mosques so they can be photographed with Mohammedans. The copy is always the same: allay fears, better inform, build bridges, nothing to fear, open to questions, bla bla bla. It’s all an orchestrated con.

  227. C.L.

    A strategic blunder by the DNC to dispatch Obama to the hustings.
    They should have concocted, then campaigned off, a mystique (albeit bogus) surrounding the former President. But to have him in rolled-up shirt sleeves doing a weird hybrid of teleprompter and ad hoc bullet point rambling (badly imitating Trump) only reinforces in the public mind that it’s safe (and advisable) to keep moving away from his phony presidency.

  228. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The copy is always the same: allay fears, better inform, build bridges, nothing to fear, open to questions, bla bla bla. It’s all an orchestrated con.

    What’s the doctrine that says lying to or deceiving unbelievers, is acceptable in the name of Islam?

  229. OldOzzie

    John H#ward wrote blueprint for winning elections

    YOU’D think, with all its troubles over the past five years, the Liberal Party might listen to the time-tested advice of its most successful modern leader.

    The best way for the Liberal party to win elections, writes John H#ward in the introduction to new edition of H#ward: The Art of Persuasion, is to emphasise the “the central role of the family”.

    It’s what he’s always said.

    “Intact and fully functional families constitute the least costly social welfare system yet devised by mankind,” H#ward wrote in his bestseller, The Menzies Era.

    “There is no institution that provides more emotional support and reassurance to the individual than the family,” he wrote in a 1988 policy document, “Future Directions”, whose package of family values, home ownership and “one united nation” became the blueprint for the H#ward government eight years later.

    “There is no institution which is a more efficient deliverer of social welfare than a united, affectionate, functioning family. It’s the best social welfare policy that mankind has ever devised.”

    Making the family a central priority was the key to H#ward’s success. He insisted every policy be judged on whether it strengthened the family unit, “the great building block of our society”.

    His government had “a responsibility to ensure that the family unit has the legal, financial and social support necessary to sustain it. This will require action on two levels — reversal of modern anti-family attitudes and positive incentives to reinforce the family.”

    As PM he promised a “bias in our taxation system towards families with dependent children”.

    His ambition was “to profoundly advantage the families of Middle Australia. It has meant more to me than anything else and it remains at the core of my political being”.

    And that is what he delivered, with generous family tax benefits, Family Relationship Centres to counsel couples in difficulty, a baby bonus and assistance for single income families with dependent children.

    He was the most family-friendly prime minister in Australian history.

    His version of income-splitting was Family Tax Benefits Part A and Part B, giving families the choice of having one parent stay at home when children were young, if they so desired, as many do. His reward was four terms in government.

    But over the past decade, his policies came to be derided as anachronistic “middle-class welfare”, even by his own side.

    The 2014 Abbott budget tried to cut the Family Tax Benefits but was blocked in the Senate.

    The Turnbull government, with Scott Morrison as Treasurer, tried again and managed a freeze last year, saving $2.4 billion.

    H#ward was exercised enough about this dismantling of his legacy that he made a rare policy critique after the 2014 budget, telling the ABC: “Family Tax Benefits are not welfare payments; they’re tax breaks for couples who have children … I think there should be tax breaks for the cost of raising children.”

    But his successors bought the feminist gospel and lost their way with ill-fated paid parental leave schemes and expensive subsidised child care, denying families choice and impelling parents to outsource child-rearing to strangers.

    This rejection of H#ward’s unifying narrative is an inexplicable failure by a party which has embedded in its constitution the concept of “family life … as fundamental to the wellbeing of society”.

    The federal platform adopted in 2002 states: “the interests of families should be at the centre of national policy making.”

    Corporate tax cuts, jobs and infrastructure are important, but they leave people cold. Spending money to strengthen families is an investment in social infrastructure. Why is it better to build a road than to buttress the building blocks of society?

    Far from being anachronistic, H#ward was ahead of his time.

    Take Hungary, where Viktor O#ban has defied the conventional wisdom in Europe that mass migration is necessary to counteract declining fertility rates.

    Hungary spends almost five per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on family support, twice as much as the OECD average, encouraging couples to have large families, to foster a child-friendly society and ease cost of living pressures for families. A staggeringly generous Family Housing Allowance Program offers $50,000 to married couples who commit to having three children and buy their own home.

    There are generous tax deductions for families with children which start when the f##tus is 91 days old, tax allowances that encourage young couples to marry, free holiday camps for children, lowered utility costs and a “pro-family culture” written into the Hungarian constitution.

    After eight years, the results are in, and they are spectacular.

    There’s been a baby boom in Hungary, women are more likely to get married than elsewhere in Europe and marry younger. By last year the number of marriages had risen by 42 per cent, divorces were down 25 per cent and abortion numbers had plunged by more than a third. O#ban was re-elected for a third straight term this year.

    Of course, feminists, sociologists and Euro-crats hate him.

    That’s because strengthening families, giving them a stake in society, helping them rear good citizens and own a home, results in an electorate more likely to vote conservative.

    Hungary’s measures are probably too drastic for Australia, but the Liberal Party already has a sure-fire formula for success from Howard and a blueprint embedded in its DNA which would be k#yptonite against a Labor Party captured by identity politics.

  230. Armadillo

    But to have him in rolled-up shirt sleeves doing a weird hybrid of teleprompter and ad hoc bullet point rambling (badly imitating Trump) only reinforces in the public mind that it’s safe (and advisable) to keep moving away from his phony presidency.

    It’s a really bad look. The dude appears as if he’s seriously ill. I kid you not. He looks older than Trump.

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