Load shedding in NZ. The AUFLS system (not joking)

Thanks to NTOldie, an explanation of the aptly named AUFLS load shedding system to protect the grid in the north island of New Zealand. Somewhere there must be an explanation of the way the system works here. Buried somewhere in the AEMO website perhaps.

More about distorted voltage on the grid. Relevant to the thread with Jo Nova’s post on the topic.

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12 Responses to Load shedding in NZ. The AUFLS system (not joking)

  1. RobK

    Rafe,
    The video descibes what normally happens in management of frequency excursions in the baseload situation. Certain commercial customers get attractive rates for agreeing to be shed in emergency. After that there maybe rolling blackouts via substations. Of its own, this is not a function of RE….however, the erratic behavior of RE increases the amount of variables in play and the likelihood of instability(viz.surges, islanding,intermitant cloud etc). Im sure the AEMO has these details but I’m busy with the threat of dry lightning strikes in paddocks again today. One yesterday at a neighbours’, just to tune us in..

  2. Bruce of Newcastle

    One of the things that has gone quiet is “poles and wires” spending. Also “gold plating” has gone quiet.

    The poles and wires spending of yore, and the so-called gold plating was all about handling solar panels. The voltages at street level were exceeding the Australian Standard, and Ausgrid scrambled to install big ugly box-shaped galvanised steel transformers on power poles all through the suburbs to drain the excess kW back into the grid.

    Now we’re seeing it all happen again as street level voltages are again overwhelming the gear Ausgrid installed in the last wave of panic. So we’re all panicking again. Sheesh.

    Financial evaluation of renewable energy should, if fairness was the intention, include these capital spends in the overall cost of electricity. Greens conveniently forget this. So they think the electricity retailers are price gouging when the prices rise double digits each year. They aren’t gouging, they’re just trying to survive the hidden costs this crappy green electricity is inflicting upon them and their customers.

  3. Roger

    Financial evaluation of renewable energy should, if fairness was the intention, include these capital spends in the overall cost of electricity.

    If they did RE couldn’t be billed as “cheaper than coal”.

    Consumers are in for a nasty shock when they discover the truth…via their bills.

  4. Barry Bones

    Why are u guys posting in NZ electricity and silent about the Muslim menace of Melbourne ??

    Be relevant. Forget sensitivity or someone else will fill the vacuum

  5. RobK

    Anything that changes the load in an area will affect the voltage (eg. Infill housing, mass reverse cycle air con, new housing estates. Larger substations can remotely change their voltage but pole mounted or smaller transformers in the suburbs have to have their taps changed manually. Its an ongoing thing.
    Unfortunately high penetration solar, when it’s outputting, takes load off feeders so voltage rises, then solar tries to inject surplus into the grid by raising voltage even more. It used to be that where you were in relation to the nearest transformer determined what issues you might have regarding voltage. Now you need to add in how many PV panels are in your area as well.
    Note too that more houses are putting in bigger PV systems. The average size has gone from 1kW to 6kW in the past couple of decades. Houses have big A/C systems etc and more houses per hectare, more with solar. The loads come and go depending if the sun shines.

  6. RobK

    Barry,
    There’s a certain irony to your post regarding relevance.

  7. David from Canberra

    Excellent video on the effect of harmonics on voltage. The lecturer’s tone and delivery reminded me of this lecture from Rockwell: The Retro Encabulator

  8. RobK

    Ha. I thought only Rockwell would be cheeky enough to get away with that Encabulator promo but apparently GE and Chrysler too.☺
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turboencabulator

  9. An important part of the AUFLS system is the agreement each generator acknowledges in gaining acceptance to the grid system.
    If a generator is bid into the market at a given load and fails to produce that load (i.e. trips off), the fine is commensurate with the extent to which the system frequency has been affected.
    This does two things:
    a) It provides a huge incentive for generators to avoid unscheduled trips. Taranaki Combined Cycle Power Station (TCCP) is a large generator on the NZ grid. I recall one such trip from a load of 350 MW that produced a fine of about 300 grand. ( I think it was in late 1999).
    b) Any fines provide a source to fund the spinning reserve necessary for FCAS.

  10. DaveR

    Its sad to hear that in this North Island example renewables and their potentially damaging effect on grid stability is simply accepted as part of the current generation mix.

  11. Tel

    If a generator is bid into the market at a given load and fails to produce that load (i.e. trips off), the fine is commensurate with the extent to which the system frequency has been affected.

    Does that apply to wind?

  12. Tel
    NO. Wind does not need to adhere to any of the rules the other generators heed.
    If there is a gust of wind a windmill trips out. It does not need to bid back in to generate. It just comes back on when it feels like it. If there is a lull it trips off again.
    Unicorn farts and rainbows are exempt. If they were not exempt there would be not wind and solar. But electricity would cost a lot less.

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