Coal shares rise on the back of divestment

Jo Nova signals that coal shares are on the rise despite the efforts of greens to block investment in coal mines. Despite? More likely because of! Something to do with supply and demand I suppose. Ask the Professor.

Meanwhile hundreds of new coal-fired power plants are coming around the world, including one Germany (with a new coal mine!). I suppose they will add to the demand for coal or will they be modified to burn wood pellets like the giant Drax plant in Britain? I wonder where the coal will come from.

And in Australia…

AEMO update. A bit of wind around delivering 1.5GW, 30% of capacity and providing 7% of demand. Remember it is the choke points that matter when the demand builds up in the summer.

This entry was posted in Divestment, Global warming and climate change policy, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to Coal shares rise on the back of divestment

  1. JohnL

    And in Australia…

    We are trying to prove that the perpetual mobile system works by pumping the shit up the hill and letting it run down the hill again and trying to compete with Don Quichote in fighting windmills.

  2. Mark M

    “Not every country is bailing out of coal.

    In fact, Australian coal miners are likely to have markets in the region for decades to come.

    “South-East Asia is still on a coal-fired power station expansion program, that’s really the last bastion of growth”.

    Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines are all planning to build new power plants.

    Tim Buckley said if all those plans come to pass, the rest of the world’s cuts won’t be enough to compensate for that increase.

    “Therefore we have to assume that the world is going to go off the climate cliff.”

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-11/can-we-quit-coal-in-time/10361552

    Climate cliff? I lol’d.

    Schwarzenegger is correct.

    Schwarzenegger to CNN’s Axelrod: Environmentalists doing a terrible job selling [doomsday global warming] concerns

    https://thehill.com/homenews/media/414752-schwarzenegger-to-cnns-axelrod-environmentalists-doing-a-terrible-job-selling

  3. RobK

    My comments at Jonova:
    RobK

    November 13, 2018 at 9:27 am · Reply

    https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/update/fossil_fuel_stocks.php#tabs_stocks2-1

    In August 2018, U.S. coal stockpiles decreased from the previous month, down to 104 million tons. This decrease in total coal stockpiles follows the normal seasonal pattern, whereby coal stockpiles decrease during the warmer, summer months when the demand for electricity generation is greater.

    Coal stockpiles are like money in the bank. Secure energy supply.

    RobK

    November 13, 2018 at 9:41 am · Reply

    From:eolss sample chapter

    Some reasons for coal storage are given below:
    * Decrease of demand for coal in the market,
    * To be ready for the bottlenecks caused by the halts which may occur in production,
    * To meet the consumers’ demand without interruption,
    * To produce in mild climate conditions and market it in winter,
    * To decrease the moisture content of coal,
    * The defects which may occur in thermal power stations and washing plants,
    * To feed the thermal power stations continuously with coal of specified properties.

    Tens of Millions of tons of stockpiled coal in the US alone is energy security batteries and hydro can only dream of. Wake up Australia

  4. John Constantine

    A State welfare plantation services economy only needs electricity between nine in the morning and three-thirty in the afternoon, with a siesta at midday for however long.

    Clients can be just as effective at consuming welfare services if they only live barefoot in mudhuts.

    Once the peoples liberation army can source resources from central asia through the one belt, one road, one way infrastructure project, Australia can make do with living to be happy by clapping and singing as we squat in the dust and queue for our rations.

    No electricity needed for the proles as long as the elites can equip death squads for control of Nazis and fly to New York City for united nations cocktail parties.

    Comrades.

  5. Dr Fred Lenin

    Bet the carpetbaggers are using some of the taxpayer subsidy money to buy shares in coal so they still get a dollar when the windmills wear out and the solar panels are stuffed .

  6. Rafe

    George Soros was allegedly buying into coal before the election as an insurance policy. Very cheap investment. Peabody was down to about 1.10 from100.

  7. BoyfromTottenham

    Rafe, re your ‘I wonder where the coal will come from’ comment – I’m not sure if you were being sarcastic here. Surely you are aware of the truly vast amounts of easily accessible coal in many countries across the world, a low cost energy (and essential steel-making) resource that has many virtues including being benign in its raw state, easily and cheaply stored outdoors for long periods in large piles (hence ‘stockpiles’), etc. We Aussies are fortunate enough to have lots of easily accessible low cost coal assets, and export most of what we mine to dozens of countries that rely on our high quality, reliable output to power their economies. Sadly our government never seems to mention these salient details in their speeches – have they been convinced that we should be ashamed of our good fortune and excellent mining industry? Are they ashamed of the large and steady export revenue that our coal exports provide? What would they rather be proud of our uneconomic, heavily subsidised solar and wind ‘industries’ that rely on expensive 100% imported components to deliver a tiny fraction of their advertised ‘capacity’ to our grid, and will soon destabilise it to the point where they will have to get paid NOT to produce any power at certain times to avoid blackouts? Why did we vote for these idiots?

  8. Leo G

    George Soros was allegedly buying into coal before the election as an insurance policy.

    About thirty years ago, I was assigned to investigate some serious problems in the expansion of the operation of coal loaders at Kooragang Island near Newcastle NSW, and that assignment prompted me to learn more about the export coal industry.
    What was obvious at the time was that the expansion of Australian coal exports was destroying the US coal export industry. Before the Australian exports ramped up the landed price of high quality coal in Europe and Japan was well in excess of US$100/tonne. The Austalian exports dropped that price to below US50/tonne. The Appalachian fields in particular were rendered uneconomic, even though they also supplied a local market.
    It seems to me that much of the pressure on Australia to constrain its exports is aimed at allowing international export prices to dramatically increase, improving the economic viability of further developing fields in SE Africa and South America.
    The global warming scare is very useful to the interests of those like Soros.

  9. Rafe Champion

    Sorry Boy from Tottenham, I was being sarcastic, thanks for the information:)

    It is just like oil and everything else, the more you look the more you find.

  10. RobK

    Interesting angle Leo G…….the web we weave…

  11. John Constantine

    IS coal the next uranium, or is uranium the next coal?.

    Useful, known, but emotionally branded a murderers poison by those that would rather march and weep and sob than think.

    Their green shorten looting cartel will not be kind to uranium and coal enterprises.

  12. Rafe Champion

    I forgot to mention gas, hundreds of years of supply practically everywhere you look in the world.

    And we subsidise power that comes and goes, like day and night and the wind.

    Approaching the evening peak at 24GW, wind is blowing 1.7G 30% of capacity and 7% of demand. Good luck with getting to 28GW in a couple of months on the back of new wind and solar!

  13. JC

    Rafe

    Can you do a current comparison of our power prices with what’s on offer around the world.

  14. Rafe Champion

    And a wind turbine is on fire at Windy Hill near Ravenshoe. A heads up from Peter Campion.

    Not that it makes any difference to the power supply, just a Mil or two down the drain.

  15. John Constantine

    Chicom peoples liberation army slave labour solar panels can provide all the electricity ration the Australian gulags are centrally planned to deserve.

    The days of privilege are over.

    Comrades.

  16. John Constantine

    When the profits from the wind farm scam are front end loaded, for the Homo Davos turnbullites Class that do the phone calls for the permits, when babcock and brown could strip the financial windfall of the upfront certificates and dump the husks and the decommissioning liabilities onto gamblers and suckers:

    What incentive was there to build them with the most expensive longest life bearings?. Why not put the cheapest copies in and pocket the difference?.

    Nobody is going to see all the way up the top.

    Comrade maaaaates.

  17. Nob

    Once the peoples liberation army can source resources from central asia through the one belt, one road, one way infrastructure project, Australia can make do with living to be happy by clapping and singing as we squat in the dust and queue for our rations.

    This is already happening.

    BoyfromTottenham
    #2863287, posted on November 13, 2018 at 1:39 pm
    Rafe, re your ‘I wonder where the coal will come from’ comment – I’m not sure if you were being sarcastic here. Surely you are aware of the truly vast amounts of easily accessible coal in many countries across the world

    China is aware of it.

    . Sadly our government never seems to mention these salient details in their speeches – have they been convinced that we should be ashamed of our good fortune and excellent mining industry? Are they ashamed of the large and steady export revenue that our coal exports provide? What would they rather be proud of our uneconomic, heavily subsidised solar and wind ‘industries’ that rely on expensive 100% imported components to deliver a tiny fraction of their advertised ‘capacity’ to our grid, and will soon destabilise it to the point where they will have to get paid NOT to produce any power at certain times to avoid blackouts? Why did we vote for these idiots?

    Yes.
    Yes.
    Yes.
    All of the above – voters desperate for the approval of a higher power.

  18. Nob

    John Constantine
    #2863480, posted on November 13, 2018 at 6:33 pm

    What incentive was there to build them with the most expensive longest life bearings?

    Good question.

    Back last century when I believed Peak Oil and thought Renewables was the way to go, every foray into the sector emerged with two engineering themes:
    1) bearings
    2)bearings
    3)bearings

    OK, that’s three, but it’s the most “renewable” thing about turbines. Maybe they got better, or just cheaper. I suspect the latter.

  19. Nob

    Rafe Champion
    #2863348, posted on November 13, 2018 at 2:47 pm

    It is just like oil and everything else, the more you look the more you find.

    or:
    “The best cure for high oil prices is high oil prices”

    Some financial wiz, please tell me about “divestment”.

    That just means “selling your shares”, right?

    So there has to be a buyer, right?

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