Monday Forum: January 21, 2019

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1,841 Responses to Monday Forum: January 21, 2019

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  1. duncanm

    Dumb Headline of the year candidate from Fairfax:

    Why there are more prisoners but fewer crimes being committed

    FMD — what could possibly be the reason?

  2. feelthebern

    Following on from Bruce on the other thread, since the NFL put all this kneeling shit behind them, their ratings are up.
    I saw one figure on the weekend saying their adjusted ratings (adjusting for the games they play in London because of the time diff) are up 17% over last year.
    That equals billions in ad dollars & sponsorships.
    Sure it helps when you have 2 LA based teams doing well, but the NFL has done well to ensure any activism has to go via their funnel where they clip the the ticket.

  3. Bruce of Newcastle

    Global warming continues. Not.

    Bitter Cold Sets in as [US] Winter Storm Wreaks Havoc on Travel

    UK snow warning: DANGEROUS ice and SUBZERO temperatures this week -‘DISRUPTIVE SNOW’ alert

    And much much more to come.

    Meteorologist Joe Bastardi Warns Brutal Cold About To Grip Large Areas Of Northern Hemisphere

    For the end of January, the situation looks especially brutal, as temperatures are expected to plummet to some 15°C below normal across wide areas of the Midwest and Canada

    Also snow is expected to fall across Europe over the coming weeks, with the weather pattern having flipped from one of milder westerly winds to one with colder northerly and easterly winds.

    Expect alarmist climate scientists to launch another disinformation campaign, where they will blame warming for all the cold weather we will have been experiencing.

    Even the emperor with no clothes might have problems in all that weather.

  4. Boambee John

    Very cunning Doomlord, changing the switch over schedule!

  5. David from Canberra

    Well worth reading for a full account of the MAGA/Native American standoff: The Catholic Bonfire At The Stake

    Complete beat up by the MSM.

  6. DrBeauGan

    Expect alarmist climate scientists to launch another disinformation campaign, where they will blame warming for all the cold weather we will have been experiencing.

    Even the emperor with no clothes might have problems in all that weather.

    It does have its comical side. Reality catching up with the bullshit artists usually does.

  7. Mother Lode

    Why there are more prisoners but fewer crimes being committed

    For Fewfacts drones, it is more important to get incarceration levels down than crime, because Philip Adams opines that time in jail makes people more criminal.

    So let people out to reduce crime, even if that means more crime.

  8. Rossini

    Was still behind times reading the old fred

  9. DrBeauGan

    does have its comical side. Reality catching up with the bullshit artists usually does.

    Our children won’t know what snow looks like. Ho ho ho!

  10. DrBeauGan

    For Fewfacts drones, it is more important to get incarceration levels down than crime, because Philip Adams opines that time in jail makes people more criminal.

    Then the obvious thing to do is to keep them there.

  11. Black Ball

    For Fewfacts drones, it is more important to get incarceration levels down than crime, because Philip Adams opines that time in jail makes people more criminal.

    So let people out to reduce crime, even if that means more crime.

    Head explosion in my house at the stupidity of the plan.

  12. Confused Old Misfit

    Then the obvious thing to do is to keep them there.

    This is true.
    But when filtered through a red bandana things get twisted round some other way.

  13. Confused Old Misfit

    Too early!
    Wrong idiot!
    Not enough coffee!
    Fake! (but accurate).

  14. P

    David from Canberra #2912913, posted on January 21, 2019 at 8:23 am

    Well worth reading for a full account of the MAGA/Native American standoff:
    The Catholic Bonfire At The Stake
    Complete beat up by the MSM.

    Thank you so much David for the above link. I saw and read it earlier this morning.

    Here is a short article about Nathan Phillips from 2015:
    Native American claims racial harassment by EMU students dressed as indians

  15. stackja

    Further to Extreme heat in 1896: Panic stricken people fled the outback on special trains as hundreds die.

    Wilcannia, Friday. The heat has been unbearable today. The thermometer registered 119′ in the shade at 2 o’clock. Five deaths from heat have occurred since last night, the Rev. Father Daveren being amongst the number. He. intended to leave for Sydney yesterday, but complained of being unwell owing to the excessive heat. Last night Dr. Atkins was called in, and found the reverend gentleman unconscious. He expired at 2 o’clock this morning from heat apoplexy. He had been here for the past five years, and was universally esteemed by all sections of the community. The hospital is crowded, and a number of people are dangerously ill. More deaths are hourly expected.
    National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW), 20 January 1896.

  16. Top Ender

    Darwin’s Submarine – The Imperial Japanese Navy’s I-124

    By Top Ender

    Outside Darwin’s harbour, an enormous Japanese submarine still lies with her 80-man crew on board. The 20th January is the anniversary of her sinking in 1942.

    She is part of the secret history of the assaults on northern Australia. The aircraft carriers of the famous February 1942 strike were not the first major attack on the Australian landmass. They were the second strike – the first attempt to close down the northern port was made a month earlier with a submarine squadron.

    In January 1942 four giant vessels of the Sixth Submarine Squadron’s Imperial Japanese Navy were deployed to northern Australian waters. Darwin was a harbour of considerable strategic importance. Sweeping south after the assault on Pearl Harbor, and carrying all before them, the Japanese knew the deployment of any Allied warships or aircraft from the northern port would be a dangerous attack on their right flank as they drove east to secure New Guinea.

    Built by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, the four submarines of the Sixth Submarine Squadron were armed with twelve torpedoes in four 21-inch bow tubes and a foredeck 5.5-inch gun. They carried 42 mines, launched through torpedo doors in the stern. Under the leadership of Commander Endo, they made their way south, and deployed quietly around Bathurst and Melville Island.

    On the morning of 20 January one of the submarines attacked the US Navy fleet oiler USS Trinity with three torpedoes. The tanker was escorted by two destroyers. As the torpedoes were seen the USS Alden turned and launched depth charges. The response was unsuccessful, and the destroyer lost the contact and broke off the attack. But the alarm was given in Darwin.

    Later the Australian corvette Deloraine was searching near the scene with sonar. The Bathurst-class vessel, commanded by Lieutenant-Commander Desmond Men_love, was a newly launched ship, and her first action was nearly her last. Deloraine was ambushed by the I-124. Frank Marsh, a stoker on the vessel, remembered seeing: “…the trail of the torpedo which missed our stern so closely that the wake thrown up by the propellers actually caused the torpedo to come out of the raised sea surface.”

    The torpedo streaked towards the corvette. Deloraine turned right inside the torpedo’s course. It missed the ship’s stern by metres. Then she charged straight down the weapon’s track. An attack commenced with patterns of depth charges exploding astern of the warship as she wheeled and swooped as directed by her sonar. Then a Deloraine bridge lookout reported the submarine was breaking the surface, and abruptly the conning tower was seen ahead.

    Deloraine powered towards her enemy, and this time the depth charge explosion caught the submarine as it dived. Soon sonar confirmed it as motionless on the seabed. The boat’s captain, Lieutenant Commander Koichi Kishigami, his division commander Endo, and 78 others were dead or trapped on board.

    Later the boom defence vessel HMAS Kookaburra was deployed to the site, and Australian divers attempted to find I-124. They were unsuccessful, and engaged the help of divers from the American submarine repair ship USS Holland.

    The divers found the submarine, several nautical miles south of Bathurst Island, with hatch gaskets blown out, suggesting the stern sections were flooded. Some reports claim that divers from the American ship Blackhawk descended and heard the Japanese crew, still inside, tapping on the hull. The Allies were interested in recovery: taking the submarine’s codebooks would be a great intelligence coup. Secretly the Navy began to make arrangements for recovery, moving personnel and equipment to Darwin in preparation. But three weeks later Darwin was struck a shattering blow by the same carrier task force that had devastated Pearl Harbor. It was now too dangerous to attempt recovery.

    However, the submarine was not to quietly lie in her grave. Controversy was the I-124 companion for the next 50 years. Strange stories and theories surround the wreck. One sought to connect the I-124 with a supposed Japanese submarine working with the German armed raider Kormoran which sank HMAS Sydney in November 1941. Michael Montgomery, in Who Sank The Sydney? suggested a submarine was refueling or re-arming Kormoran when the Sydney was sighted, dived to escape detection, and torpedoed the Australian cruiser, winning the battle for the raider. Other stories say that a seaplane was sighted in the vicinity of the battle: many Japanese boats did carry folding planes in hangars on the foredeck. Suggestions have been made that a second submarine wreck – which some claim lies nearby – could be that alleged helper of the Kormoran; other stories have the I-124 itself involved as the Japanese submarine. Other fanciful theories suggest inside the wrecked boat the captain’s safe contained an answer.

    More than one source suggests codebooks were indeed recovered from the I-124, helping to win the Pacific war. Ed Drea in MacArthur’s Ultra wrote:

    Shortly after the outbreak of the Pacific War, US Navy divers had salvaged the Japanese Navy’s Water Transport “S” codebooks from a submarine that had been sunk off Darwin Australia in January 1942. With these documents in hand, navy cryptanalysts were able to read Japanese naval shipping messages…

    In the 1950s the daughter of the sub’s commander, Atsuko Kishigami, began a campaign to have the submarine raised and its entombed bodies returned to Japan. The Japanese Fujita Salvage Company, then in Darwin salvaging the wrecks of ships still lying in the harbour, made a brief investigation into the proposal, before it was decided the costs were prohibitive.

    In 1972 local salvage operators Sid Hawks, Harry Baxter, George Tyers and John Chadderton began preliminary salvage work on the submarine with three vessels. But ownership disputes arose between Baxter and the remaining three, including shots fired, and after a split the potential salvors were denied rights by the Federal Government and warned off the site.

    In 1976 Harry Baxter tried new recovery attempts, claiming his salvage attempts had penetrated the hull. By this time he had probably removed items from the exterior. He was warned off again and in a fit of pique went out with explosives to destroy the submarine. In November 1984 Navy divers from HMAS Curlew carried out descents to the boat to verify its condition: they reported the conning tower had been damaged, but the casing appeared undamaged and sealed.

    In 1989 the research vessel Flamingo Bay, captained by David Tomlinson, sent down a Remote Operated Vehicle: an unmanned mini-submarine equipped with a TV camera. The ROV sent back pictures of the I-124’s conning tower, still upright but with a list to one side. With personnel from NT and WA museums involved, the Flamingo Bay operation hoped to dive the submarine for research purposes, but the project was eventually cancelled due to political considerations.

    Stories about I-124 continued to re-appear. Claims that a valuable cargo of mercury was present on board appeared in the media. Baxter continued to make claims about the submarine, saying he had “been arrested by ASIO.” His stories appeared in the popular magazine Australasian Post, stating that he had been visited by a Japanese ambassador from Washington, who was worried about the “ship’s safe.” Baxter died a little while later, taking any secrets to the grave.

    In February 2017 the 80 men entombed in the submarine were commemorated in Darwin’s Parliament House.

    The unveiling of a plaque, to be later installed on Casuarina Cliffs, was undertaken by the Japanese Ambassador to Australia; federal Senator Nigel Scullion, and the Chief Minister of the NT, together with the President of the Australian-Japanese Association (NT).

    Mr Takashi Ootaki, grandson of crew member Petty Officer Second Class Ryohei Ootaki, made a short speech. WWII RAAF veteran, Mr Brian Winspear AO, who experienced the first Darwin air raid, was present in his uniform to reconcile with the Japanese Ambassador.

    Those attending were gifted with a paper crane to take away, which carried the name of a submariner. At 7pm, at the end of the event, 80 balloons were released outside to free the souls of the dead.

    In November 2018 the Japanese Prime Minister visited the Casuarina Cliffs memorial, the first head of state from that country to do so.

    I-124 still lies outside Darwin today. Strangely, she is less known to Australians than the three midget submarines which attacked Sydney Harbour also in 1942. But I-124 remains one of the country’s most interesting stories of the country at war: a tale of bravery on both sides, loss, and an insight into the secret war fought in Australia’s north.

    -o-o-O-o-o-

    Top Ender is a military historian. One of his books is Darwin’s Submarine I-124, published by Avonmore. He served in the Royal Australian Navy, retiring as a lieutenant-commander.

  17. stackja

    Regarding crime: Melbourne ‘alleged murder’ whilst on bail.

  18. Mark M

    The mighty see oh two,
    Is there nothing it can’t do …?

    Global warming causes nice weather in Canada:

    https://globalnews.ca/news/3188392/climate-change-could-mean-nicer-milder-weather-in-canada-study/

    Jan 19,2019: Ottawa freezes its way to coldest capital city in the world

    Temperature slipped below those of capitals in Russia, Kazakhstan and Mongolia

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/coldest-capital-city-in-world-1.4985296

  19. stackja

    Youths and adults allegedly destroy entrance to one of Palmerston’s main shopping centres
    RAPHAELLA SAROUKOS, NT News
    January 20, 2019 2:00pm
    ONE of Palmerston’s main shopping centres was the victim of relentless destruction last night.

  20. stackja

    Detainees at the Don Dale Detention Centre allegedly set another child’s cell on fire while the boy was still inside
    MATT CUNNINGHAM, NT News
    December 3, 2018 1:30am
    Subscriber only

    DETAINEES at the Don Dale Detention Centre allegedly set another child’s cell on fire while the boy was still inside.

    The disturbing incident in July was one of four police have been called to at Don Dale in recent months, as staff warn they have lost control of the notorious youth detention facility.

    Territory Families confirmed four detainees managed to gain access to a staff-only area on July 7.

    Staff said they stole petrol before returning to the cell block and setting the boy’s cell on fire while he was still inside.

    Staff were able to remove the boy from his cell before he was injured, but they were then forced to abandon the centre as the fire spread and police were called in to control the situation.

    Four detainees were taken to the Police Watch House and later charged with arson, but it’s understood charges against two of those have since been dropped. Two others will face court later this month.

    The incident has similarities with the riot that took place at Don Dale last month, where detainees stole petrol from a storeroom before setting the education block on fire.

  21. Mark M

    Wait …

    So global warming is going to make it colder more often.

    Brace for the Polar Vortex: It may be visiting more often

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/18/climate/polar-vortex-2019.html

  22. struth

    Good Moaning.

    I don’t know if it’s been mentioned on the “roads melting” thread, but the roads aren’t being made like they used to be.

    Many a time on hot days the cheap, newly laid stuff will be melting while the old better quality bitumen was fine.
    Roads melting in Australia due to heat is nothing new anyway.
    Who hasn’t noticed some of our fine Australian roads sticking to your thongs on hot days?

    I always used to marvel at how the blackfellas could walk on it barefoot without a care in the world.

  23. stackja

    Pill testing trial calls from council, group of crossbench MPs pressure Andrews Government to act
    John Masanauskas and Matt Johnston, Herald Sun
    January 20, 2019 11:30pm
    Subscriber only

    An inner city council wants to run ­Victoria’s first pill testing at music festivals as a powerful group of state MPs pushes for a trial and builds pressure on the Andrews Government.

    The City of Port Phillip is pushing to host Victoria’s first trial after the drug overdose deaths of six young people at festivals across Australia in the past five months.

    The council’s proposal has been bolstered by news that a united front of crossbench MPs will on Monday demand the government give pill testing the go-ahead. Port Phillip Mayor Dick Gross said his municipality was the ideal place for a trial because of the crowds drawn to places such as St Kilda for entertainment and music festivals.

    But pill testing has been criticised as sending the wrong message on drug use, including by victims’ families.

  24. Nick

    What’s the point of pill testing if it just confirms the degree of MMDA in it? What use is that to a numbat who still takes it, oblivious to the effects it can have ?

  25. mh

    Bitter cold sets in as winter storm in Northeast wreaks havoc on travel

    …Meteorologists warned the primary concern now is plunging temperatures that will be some of the coldest felt so far this season.

    Wind chills were expected to hit in the teens in the New York City area, 25 below in Albany and down to 40 below in the Adirondacks.

    In New England, they’re expected to fall to as low as 20 below zero around Boston, 30 below zero in the Berkshires and as low as 35 below zero in parts of Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire.

    Officials warned people to limit their time outside to prevent frostbite and avoid treacherous travel conditions.

    https://www.foxnews.com/weather/bitter-cold-sets-in-as-winter-storm-in-northeast-wreaks-havoc-on-travel

  26. bespoke

    Nick
    #2912942, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:04 am
    What’s the point of pill testing if it just confirms the degree of MMDA in it? What use is that to a numbat who still takes it, oblivious to the effects it can have ?

    Its the next step for the government to provide good pills.

  27. Nick

    Bespoke, this is my point. A pill that is ‘good’ to the buyer in that it contains a decent amount of MMDA will still kill.

  28. stackja

    Monday 21 January 2019
    Latest Weather Observations for Penrith 40.2mm since midnight
    Latest Weather Observations for Richmond 37.2mm since 1am

  29. calli

    Ellen, if you are lurking.

    Thank you for posting that Distributism vs Capitalism debate last night. It was most informative and each speaker made good points and were easy to understand. The confusion over the brewery licensing was very amusing (it highlighted the British/American cultural divide). Some of the questions from the floor were excellent until the guy who wanted to turn it into a sectarian semi rant. Erk. There’s always one.

    Now I know where IT gets his local, artisan and intimate schtick from. 🙂

  30. Exit Stage Right

    It doesn’t matter how cold it gets anywhere in the world.
    It will still be the hottest year on record and require trillions of dollars to appease the weather gods.
    We laugh about how gullible medieval people were with burning witches at the stake and sacrificing humans
    into volcanos etc.
    Despite all the talk of a progressive society, we are still in the Dark Ages!

  31. duncanm

    Pill testing trial calls from council

    fuck I hate councils.

    Law-abiding visitors pay through the nose for parking — so free pill testing can be provided for those intending to break the law.

  32. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Animals Australia paid a live export worker knowing the man was partly ‘motivated by money’
    Annabel Hennessy & Sharri Markson, Exclusive, The Daily Telegraph
    January 20, 2019 5:06pm
    Subscriber only

    The animal activist organisation at the centre of the cash for cruelty scandal paid a live export worker for leaked images even after it was told he was partly “motivated by money”.

    New emails obtained by The Daily Telegraph also reveal how a whistleblower negotiated to get more cash from Animals Australia after he complained payments were “much lower than expectations”.
    Animals Australia campaign director used one whistleblower to connect her to other live export workers.

    The Telegraph has also obtained details of a $US2000 transaction from Animals Australia to a live export worker. The organisation had previously denied paying whistleblowers for cruelty images.

    Emails show Animals Australia campaign director Lyn White used one whistleblower to connect her with multiple live export workers who were paid for images and videos.

    In an email sent on May 28 Ms White asked about the motivation of one of the workers.

    The whistleblower replied: “First of all he didn’t have any idea that it is curality (sic) against cattles. When I told him and showed Fazal’s video then he came to know that it is curality (sic) of animals. Both the money and taking care of sheeps (sic) motivating him.”

    Fazal refers to Fazal Ullah – the Pakistani whistleblower who provided footage for 60 Minutes expose on the Live Export industry.

    Last week The Daily Telegraph revealed he himself had previously been disciplined for allegedly beating a cattle with a stick.

    Another email by the whistleblower to Ms White on March 16 complained about how much he was being paid.

    “I send you around 80 images/videos. If we select 40 of them only its around 2000$. you paid only 500$. If I worked and talk like this with any of my fellow in Pakistan he could donate my more than this,” the whistleblower said.

    On June 12 Ms White told the whistleblower she had transferred $2000 into his account. Pakistani live export workers are paid about $US350 per month.

    Earlier last year on May 25, Ms White told the whistleblower he had “made her day” by telling her he had friends on ships who could help supply her with footage and videos.
    In another email she discussed using a friend in Karachi to make payments to him.

    The good, the holy, the saintly animal activists….

  33. Stimpson J. Cat

    I am curious about the Catterati’s mental mechanisms in their selective attention in dealings with these people. They would well know of the futility of their efforts, as well as the perverse effects this would have on said trolls.
    These (trolls and socks) are mentally damaged individuals who get their rocks off by throwing missiles at reason and facts, getting attention which they wouldn’t otherwise get in their off-line life.

    You need to understand, a large percentage of the users of this site are old Sane people.
    They forget easily the simplest things, such as who is who, the name of their pets, etc etc.
    The simple explanation is that they forget and engage with people because they simply don’t know who is who.
    Also, quite a few people on here are disgusting deviants who use sock accounts.
    We should pity these poor failed real life transexuals and try to help them regain their dignity, sense of self, and some small modicum of value to human society, not discard them like the diseased filth they struggle inanely against becoming daily.
    Imagine actually choosing to pretend to be someone else when you aren’t an actor or a criminal.
    This is just a sign of a very weak mind, a soul out of sync.

  34. struth

    FMD, the weather is being the weather, just like it always has, yet we are bombarded with news of it being found all over the world?
    When I was younger, we didn’t get told of a cold snap in upper bumfuck, Canada, yet they were having them.

    I find I must not turn on media that has become insane, and our Main Stream Media are fucking frootloops.
    I come to catallaxy so as to avoid the dumb bints on the MSM who think everyone out there in TV land agrees with them …………on anything, especially men equals bad, and we blokes really need to take a good hard look at our evil ways, they are obsessed.
    )To apply the same logic to women would mean all women are baby killers, chucking inconvenient babies into the dumpster, or sold as parts.)
    They’re just so fucking gullible, their first reaction to propaganda is to ensure they are seen to be virtue signalling, not to analyse what they’re being told.
    To the good cat ladies here, you must feel bloody angry that these bints are ruining it for you.
    Mrs Struth now can’t watch them in the mornings, and reckons they’ve just gone nuts.
    Where have the blokes gone from morning TV?

    What are these bints on?
    It’s pure toxic female hysterics.

    I told you bastards this would happen if we let them out of the kitchen.

  35. jock

    Just to get back to economics for a tic. There was an article in the weekend oz originally from the leftist times. It lauded the policies espoused by occasio cortez. To wit print money. I now cant find the article. It may have been taken down because the pro EU times realised it argued against the euro. Did anyone read it? It was a bottler. Wish i had saved it.

  36. Stimpson J. Cat

    What’s the point of pill testing if it just confirms the degree of MMDA in it? What use is that to a numbat who still takes it, oblivious to the effects it can have ?

    Because if kids wanted to buy Ketamine they would buy Ketamine, not Ecstasy.

  37. Tom

    Among changes to the Sky News lineup this year (announced on P.2 of today’s Herald Sun):
    1. Paul Murray goes bush (boosted by Sky’s new free-to-air presence on regional commercial TV) with Paul Murray LIVE Our Town, Our Show premiering on Wednesday, February 20, from Toowoomba, one of 10 regional stops this year.
    2. Chris Kenny’s Kenny On Media every Monday premieres on January 28. While ethics-free misbehaviour by the news media isn’t as bad in Australia as it is in America, we’re getting there. Very timely.
    3. Outsiders (an hour from 11pm Mon-Thurs and two hours from 9am on Sunday), reverts to a trio of presenters, Rowan Dean, Rita Panahi and James Morrow from next Sunday after Sky sacked Mark Latham and Ross Cameron for not abiding by the company’s ludicrous politically correct censorship.

  38. stackja

    The Matildas sack Alen Stajcic less than five months before the FIFA Women’s World Cup

    On Saturday, the FFA confirmed Stajcic’s contract had been terminated after it was determined the “team environment was unsatisfactory” and the culture needed to drastically improve.

    This followed a Wellbeing Audit conducted in partnership with PFA, as well as a Gender Equality Culture Survey conducted by Our Watch, plus discussions with players and staff.

    Our Watch Who we are
    Our Watch has been established to drive nationwide change in the culture, behaviours and power imbalances that lead to violence against women and their children. Find out about our Chair, our board members and our ambassadors.
    Our patrons and ambassadors include:
    The Honourable Quentin Bryce AD CVO Patron
    Rosie Batty Ambassador
    Lucy Turnbull AO Ambassador

  39. min

    In Victoriastan the crime statistics went down even though more crimes were being reported . Seems someone has to be charged to become a crime statistic.

  40. stackja

    Tom
    #2912956, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:23 am

    NATIONAL AFFAIRS THE WINNER IN SKY NEWS REVAMPS
    SKY News will boost its national affairs coverage with three new programs, while a popular current show will be expanded.

    Paul Murray LIVE will be enhanced by broadcasting from 10 regional locations this year looking at issues and challenges in Australia’s heartland.

    Paul Murray LIVE Our Town, Our Show premieres on Wednesday, February 20 at 9pm, with the first stop Toowoomba in Queensland.

    Paul Murray said: “We all say Australia is a great joint, we want to show everyone why it is. Too many people in power take regional centres for granted. “This project is about celebrating towns, but equally giving those towns a chance to talk directly to the people in power.”

    Sky News chief executive Paul Whittaker said the Paul Murray LIVE Our Town, Our Show tour would tap into the heart of the nation.

    “Looking at the great things taking place in regional and rural Australia that we rarely hear about as well as discussing the issues facing Australians living outside of the big cities,” he said.

    Sky News anchor and associate editor of The Australian Chris Kenny will also have an expanded role with the launch of two new programs.

    Kenny on Media premieres on Monday, January 28 at 8pm, with Kenny saying never before has the role of the media been a hotter topic.

    His other show, The Kenny Report, will debut on Monday, February 11, at 1pm.

    In other changes, Herald Sun columnist Rita Panahi will join Rowan Dean and James Morrow for a revamped Outsiders program, which returns Sunday, January 27, 9am.

    Also from Sunday, David Speers, Kieran Gilbert and Laura Jayes head back to Parliament House to lead Sky’s coverage of national affairs.

    Commentators Andrew Bolt, Peta Credlin and Alan Jones will also be back next week.

  41. duncanm

    .. even back in 1897, they had worked out why SE Australia gets heatwaves

    The Express and Telegraph, Adelaide, 17 Dec 1897 (I’ve cleaned it up a little.. but typos due to OCR):

    THE HEAT,
    The weather on Thursday: was exceedingly unpleasant. A hot north ‘ wind was blowing throughout the early. portion of the day and the thermometer registration was unusually high.
    The maximum reading was 110° in the shade and 166° in the sun. This is the highest reading in the shade in December since 1876, when it was 114.2°, and the highest in any month since February ; 17, 1896, when it was 110.9°.

    Sir Charles Todd, speaking on Thursday afternoon, said “The tendency is to the formation of a barometrical trough from the north-west coast to Streaky-Bay with northerly winds on the east side. A high barometer is coming in from the westward, and we must therefore, shortly expect a cool change to set in—probably to-night. The in dications are riot favorable for expectation of rain in South Australia,, but there will probably be electrical disturbances in the far north or interior.”

    There have only been four days in thehistory of the colony when the December temperature in the shade .was higher than on Thursday. They occurred in the following years
    1857, 113°; 1869, 112°; 1871, 111-4° ; 1876, l14.2.
    … etc

  42. struth

    2. Chris Kenny’s Kenny On Media every Monday premieres on January 28. While ethics-free misbehaviour by the news media isn’t as bad in Australia as it is in America, we’re getting there. Very timely.

    I’d actually call that and suggest they are actually worse, and it’s such a closed shop, with such lack of internet alternatives fact checking and disputing, that they are literally getting a free run.
    It’s why we are more of a shit hole than the states.
    Yet reading things, you’d think it was the opposite.
    They have their political wars out loud and proud and you notice them.
    Here no such thing is allowed.

  43. John Constantine

    _African swine fever.

    Harmless to humans, but deadly to pigs.

    In theory, pigs with african swine fever are killed and destroyed to stop the epidemic spreading through all of china.

    Headology though informs us that some people will see a pig with swine fever as a profit waiting to be sold at speed.

    Tests of pork products entering australia last month indeed showed positive for african swine fever.

    Blowing up the australian pig industry and eating infected chicom pigs instead Is Our Strength.

    Comrades.

  44. Tom

    Also in today’s Herald Sun, the Cat’s Peter Campion stars in a six-par story talking about daughter Vicki’s second pregnancy with Bananaby Joyce. “Australia needs more strong, patriotic young men,” says Pete.

  45. stackja

    jock
    #2912954, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:23 am

    Maybe?

    A new economic theory is taking root, but will politicians be brave …
    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/…/a-new-economic-theory-is-taking-root-but-will-politicians…
    2 days ago – … Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been championing it. … Foreign investors might lose money on their dollar assets, but the debt can …

  46. duncanm

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2912925, posted on January 21, 2019 at 8:40 am

    That’s sad – Windsor Davies was a hoot.

  47. stackja

    jock
    #2912954, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:23 am

    Maybe?

    Modern Monetary Theory: Who’ll be brave enough to try it?
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/…be…/56ffd9bca34199c5488ba78942d97f0e
    1 day ago – In the past decade, the world has suffered two global crises: the financial disaster of 2008 and the eurozone sovereign debt crisis two years …

  48. Old School Conservative

    Thanks Tom, from a late riser.
    Loved Leak’s sign on the Gillette execs desk – “All gone to Schick”

  49. stackja

    jock
    #2912954, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:23 am

    Modern Monetary Theory: Who’ll be brave enough to try it?
    US Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a champion of Modern Monetary Theory.
    By PHILIP ALDRICK

    In the past decade, the world has suffered two global crises: the financial disaster of 2008 and the eurozone sovereign debt crisis two years later. Policymakers responded with bailouts, cheap funding schemes, zero interest rates and quantitative easing. In one sense, the past ten years was a period of intense economic experimentation. In another, nothing has changed.

    Following previous crises, macroeconomic ideas were replaced. After the Second World War, Keynesian, under which governments spend to create demand and protect jobs, was ascendant. After the inflation-induced recessions in the 1970s, the big idea was monetarism, using interest rates and the money supply to keep prices under control.

    And now, after two existential crises? Nothing. The fundamental macroeconomic ideas have not changed. Labour and the Tories do battle on the scale of the deficit, like two old fools arguing who should pay for the last round long after the bar has closed. Beyond that, John McDonnell’s socialist revolution is pilfered from crumbling communist textbooks. It’s all a bit disappointing.

    A new idea is slowly gaining momentum, though, particularly in the United States, where the charismatic Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been championing it. The idea is modern monetary theory and, as with many new ideas, it is not actually that new. Its origins date back to 1993 and it even featured in the 2016 US election. Bernie Sanders’ economic adviser was Stephanie Kelton, a prominent advocate of MMT.

    Although MMT has been jumped on by deficit-spending left-wingers, the theory is not intrinsically fiscally irresponsible. Mr Mosler claims to have developed the idea after a steam room session with arch-hawk Donald Rumsfeld, the former US defence secretary. JW Mason, an economist at the City University of New York, reckons it would lead to smaller budget deficits over the long term, provided politicians are bold enough to combat inflation with higher taxes.

    Ultimately, the theory reframes and simplifies our conception of the economy, drawing the focus on to the core priorities of employment and inflation. The deficit would no longer be an obstacle. There would be no tension between fiscal and monetary policy, just a single lever. Responsibility for economic management would fall to politicians, ending the outsourcing to technocrats that has provided legislators cover for so long. And there would no place for an independent central bank.

    In a way, MMT is nothing new. Japan’s national debt is 2.4 times the size of its economy, three times UK levels, but most is owed to Japanese pension funds and its money-printing central bank. In Britain, the 527 billion pounds of debt raised by the state between 2009 and 2012 was largely matched by the Bank of England’s 375 billion pounds of QE. Today, Donald Trump is blowing up the US deficit and driving up inflation in what looks like a practical demonstration of MMT.

    There, in a nutshell, is the problem. The theory states that President Trump should be raising taxes, not cutting them. But would politicians ever have the courage to raise taxes if domestic inflation is climbing, despite high unemployment? The whole reason central banks were given independence was because politicians cannot be trusted to make unpopular decisions.

    What MMT does prove, however , is that we will not run out of new ideas as long as we can describe the world in different ways. That, at least, is encouraging.

    Philip Aldrick is Economics Editor of The Times

  50. Mother Lode

    Our Watch has been established to drive nationwide change in the culture, behaviours and power imbalances that lead to violence against women and their children. Find out about our Chair, our board members and our ambassadors.
    Our patrons and ambassadors include:
    The Honourable Quentin Bryce AD CVO Patron
    Rosie Batty Ambassador
    Lucy Turnbull AO Ambassador

    Brilliant.

    The Graeae – sharing a single eye and a single tooth between them. Possessing the gift of prophesy – but only of whatever is in their own heads.

  51. C.L.

    Leftists, lesbians, Labor Party, ABC itching to call in the police to private girls schools ….

    Many private schools resist push for pants, shorts options for girls’ uniforms.

  52. Leo G

    What’s the point of pill testing if it just confirms the degree of MMDA in it? What use is that to a numbat who still takes it, oblivious to the effects it can have ?

    Illicit drug distributors have an independent means of testing the quality of drugs supplied to them and thereby gain commercial advantage.

  53. Top Ender

    Paul Murray Live needs a few more people who disagree with him and Julie Bishop to improve the show.

  54. stackja

    duncanm
    #2912960, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:31 am

    Thank you.

    Todd, Sir Charles (1826–1910)
    by G. W. Symes
    This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 6, (MUP), 1976

    Educated locally he was appointed to the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, as a supernumerary computer in 1841; he showed ability in mathematics and potential as an observer.

    Todd’s meteorological plan, which he had submitted in 1856, depended on a network of observation stations which were required to report daily to the observatory. The telegraph system was the answer; he trained his own observers, including interested private individuals. Growth was slow initially and it was not until 1860 that the observatory was ready with the necessary instruments and fourteen selected stations. As the telegraph system expanded so did the meteorological stations, with a greater impetus ten years later when post offices came under Todd’s control.

  55. Nick

    Illicit drug distributors have an independent means of testing the quality of drugs supplied to them and thereby gain commercial advantage.

    Probably. It’s a strange world where a Government forces me to jump through hoops for a Panadol but helps 19 year olds to get the best quality disco biscuits they can find.

  56. Bruce of Newcastle

    Our patrons and ambassadors include:
    The Honourable Quentin Bryce AD CVO Patron
    Lucy Turnbull AO Ambassador

    Trundling out two of the most detested women in Australia to scold men is going to work just so amazingly. /s

  57. Snoopy

    Many private schools resist push for pants, shorts options for girls’ uniforms.

    It’s outrageous when you consider that parents are forced to send their girls to these schools.

  58. Dr Fred Lenin

    Zulu, been watching the show on youtube on my ipad ,after all these years I still grt a few belly laughs , this is comedy before to global fascists killed it . The bearer guy is great gets lots of great lines ,”we British””you bloody coolie , “ ,the whole cast was brilliant ,and the writing fantastic . In those days the writers had true freedom ,they wouldnt dare write like this today , they would end up in u.n. Gulag , with butch lesbian guards carrying strapons .

  59. areff

    So Jane Hume ISN’T going to do a Gorton and swap the Senate for Higgins. So whose name is being mooted to take the seat held by Holt, Gorton and Costello? Why John Pesutto, the Vic Lib who marked the utter thrashing of the befouled padded cell stuffed with utter, tin-eared incompetens that constitute the Vic Libs by appearing on the ABC and attributing the loss to his party’s lack of support for gay marriage, renewables, gender quotas, gender fluidity, speed cameras, and every other issue that good cuckservatives think they need to back in order to win the votes of people who will never support them, not in a million years.

    John Pesutto, the great hope of the party of Menzies. God help us.

  60. Nick

    Our patrons and ambassadors include:
    The Honourable Quentin Bryce AD CVO Patron
    Lucy Turnbull AO Ambassador

    Strange that nothing says equality more than two priveliged, buck toothed old bats.

  61. stackja

    Flightradar24
    ‏Verified account
    @flightradar24
    3h3 hours ago
    Long haul flights streaming into Australia as the week begins.
    https://fr24.com/-28.74,145.31/5

  62. Makka

    Interesting take on ‘Straya’s property boom and bust cycle. Things could get a little difficult….

    https://www.prosper.org.au/2019/01/18/the-economy-made-easy/

  63. OldOzzie

    5 Reasons Masculinity Is Increasingly Coming Under Attack in America

    1. Feminism is now centered on getting special privileges and man-hating

    2. Fewer men see themselves as capable of being masculine

    3. Traditional men don’t fit into America’s victim-oriented culture

    4. Divorce and single moms are factors

    5. The contributions of traditional men are habitually ignored

  64. stackja

    Nick
    #2912946, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:11 am

    John Faine is retiring.

    Long-time ABC radio presenter Jon Faine is stepping down
    Herald Sun
    40 minutes ago

    Long-time ABC radio presenter Jon Faine says this year will be his last presenting the broadcaster’s Melbourne morning show.

    After more than two decades, Faine on Monday told ABC 774 listeners “it’s time for someone else to have as much fun as I have had”.

    “Thirty years ago this week, I joined the ABC to make the law report in what I thought would be a brief detour from lawyering,” he announced at the start of his program.

    “And now I find myself presenting the morning show on ABC radio Melbourne now for the 23rd year. But it will be my last this year.

    “I’ve told the ABC that when my present contract expires, I do not seek another.”

    The announcement comes after heavy speculation about the long-time broadcaster’s retirement.

    Faine is no stranger to controversy. Last year he came under fire for comparing a disability campaigner’s skin with that of a “burns victim”.

    More to come

  65. Old School Conservative

    they wouldnt dare write like this today

    Correct.
    AND they won’t even show repeats.
    Cowards.

  66. cohenite

    WA store owner detains aboriginal 9 year old for repeatedly robbing him and rings police; the clan arrives, assaults the store owner, trashes the place, stealing stuff before the wallopers arrive.

    Guess who gets charged?

    CEO of Ngalla Maya Aboriginal Corporation, Mervyn Eades, who is spokesperson for the boy and his family, said there was no excuse for the shopkeeper’s behaviour.

    “His actions aren’t justified no way whatsoever, you do not touch anyone else’s child no matter what,” Mr Eades said.

    The Indigenous activist said the boy has been left traumatised.

    “He won’t go into shops without any adults or his parents with him,” Mr Eades said.

  67. stackja

    Man charged after woman thrown from balcony on Moorehead Road in Redfern
    Adella Beaini, The Daily Telegraph
    13 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    A man has been charged with attempted murder after he allegedly threw a woman from a first-floor balcony in inner Sydney during a domestic incident.

    Police officers were called to the unit block on Moorehead Road in Redfern at about 9.25pm yesterday where a woman in her 30s was found injured.

    She was taken to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in a stable condition with fractures.

    Officers arrested a 45-year-old man shortly after in a unit at the block where he was taken to Redfern Police Station and assisting police with their inquiries.

    ..

    In an unrelated incident, a 34-year-old man was arrested after damaging a police car parked at the unit block with a cricket bat.

    He was also taken to Redfern Police Station where is expected to be charged with malicious damage.

    Social housing?

  68. stackja

    cohenite
    #2912986, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:13 am

    I am shocked!

  69. Port Phillip Mayor Dick Gross

    Your kidding me.

    Our own Biggus Dickus. (or Dickus Biggus)

  70. stackja

    MDMA-using NSW MP wants no sniffer dogs
    Luke Costin, The Daily Telegraph
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    Sniffer dogs and high-visibility policing at music festivals are making drug-taking youth make riskier choices, a NSW Greens MP says.

    Cate Faehrmann, who today admitted she has taken ecstasy or MDMA occasionally since her 20s, has taken aim at the state government’s zero-tolerance approach to illicit drug use.

  71. Snoopy

    “He won’t go into shops without any adults or his parents with him,” Mr Eades said.

    That’s a good thing, right?

  72. stackja

    State government makes repeated excuses to why Court Information Act hasn’t commenced
    Janet Fife-Yeomans, The Daily Telegraph
    January 20, 2019 10:00pm
    Subscriber only

    The state government has repeatedly delayed moves that would force the courts to be more transparent, The Daily Telegraph can reveal.

    Despite being passed by parliament back in 2010, with backing from the courts and the powerful Bar Association, the government has made repeated excuses for why the Court Information Act has never been commenced.

    Shadow attorney-general Paul Lynch has slammed the government for its secrecy and for not enabling the act, which comes with a presumption in favour of open justice.

    It was passed in the final year that Labor was in power.

    Since then, the number of suppression orders made across the courts has reached record levels soaring from 97 in 2011 to 185 last year.

    MPs have regularly raised the progress of the Court Information Act in parliament as it languishes in legal limbo.

    In November 2013, Greens MP David Shoebridge was told that the Department of Attorney-General and Justice had “convened an advisory group to assist in implementing the act” and amending it to “address a range of practical concerns that have been identified,” according to official parliamentary reports.

    The NSW Attorney-General at the time, Greg Smith, told parliament “action is expected to be taken in relation to the act in 2014.”

    In August 2014, Mr Lynch was told in parliament that the act had not been commenced “due to a number of operational issues that have been identified by the court and other stakeholders”.

  73. stackja

    Mega-mine’s future in hands of greenies

    EXCLUSIVE
    STEVEN WARDILL

    THE fate of Queensland’s Carmichael mine is in the hands of an environmental group whose members champion radical action on climate change, oppose coal and have appeared as expert witnesses against Adani.

    In an extraordinary departure from normal processes, the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has been handpicked by the Palaszczuk Government to review one of the mine’s environmental management plans.

    The review, which is holding up construction, will reassess plans to conserve 33,000ha of pastoral land, purchased around the mine to offset habitat loss for the black-throated finch. Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch refused to detail how the Hub was appointed.

    An Adani spokeswoman said the Government was “shifting the goalposts” at the 11th hour.

  74. stackja

    Families on an average wage of $86,000 can afford to buy a home in cheapest suburbs
    Aidan Devine, The Daily Telegraph
    January 20, 2019 9:00pm
    Subscriber only

    Falling prices have made homes across much of Sydney­ affordable again for middle-income families.

    Homes in western suburbs like Kingswood, St Marys, Liverpool, Granville, Punchbowl and Harris Park are back in reach for families on Sydney’s average wage of about $86,000 a year.

    Typical properties in those areas went beyond the budgets of average wage earners when prices hit a peak in mid-2017 — and the required mortgage repayments on a median-priced house would have eaten up more than a third of the buyer’s income.

    Such a situation, known as “mortgage stress”, generally precludes banks from issuing a loan.

    But prices have dipped below the middle-income mortgage-stress threshold over the past year.

  75. Mak Siccar

    jock
    #2912954, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:23 am
    Just to get back to economics for a tic. There was an article in the weekend oz originally from the leftist times. It lauded the policies espoused by occasio cortez. To wit print money. I now cant find the article. It may have been taken down because the pro EU times realised it argued against the euro. Did anyone read it? It was a bottler. Wish i had saved it.

    Jock, in case you can’t get past the paywall at the Australian, I posted the article on this blog two days ago under the How worse can it get thread.

  76. Des Deskperson

    Here’s the Our Watch board:

    https://www.ourwatch.org.au/Who-We-Are/Board-of-Directors

    Stott Despoja, Kerry Chikarovski but check out the photo of member LT GEN David Morrison AO [retd].

    He’s looking more and more like an ageing window-dresser. Only a person of immense vanity and absolutely no self-knowledge could see this depiction as anything but risible.

  77. Mother Lode

    Cate Faehrmann, who today admitted she has taken ecstasy or MDMA occasionally since her 20s, has taken aim at the state government’s zero-tolerance approach to illicit drug use.

    So they have a zero tolerance policy?

    In that case hasn’t she just opened herself, by means of her own admission, to investigation?

    It should certainly mean her stepping down since she herself admits to knowingly breaking the law, which she spends all day voting on making people obey.

  78. areff

    The best form of pill/mushroom/tab testing is to let everyone else down them first, then watch carefully.

  79. Not Uh oh

    When they’re testing these pills will they require proof of age or can any fourteen year old get their stuff through?

  80. Snoopy

    In other shop news… Another game of Spot that Missing Word.

    Footage of children allegedly taking part in a riot outside the Northern Territory’s Palmerston Shopping Centre has appalled community leaders and residents.

    Three children, aged 12, 13 and 17, and three adults, aged 18, 20 and 31, were arrested after the violent disturbance at the shopping centre, in the satellite city 20 kilometres east of Darwin, where tensions have long simmered about youth crime.

    The children were released for youth diversion, and the adults charged with a number of offences, including assault, taking part in a riot, armed with an offensive weapon and damage to property.

    No information as to whether the centre manager or any tenants were also charged.

  81. Twostix

    He’s looking more and more like an ageing window-dresser.

    He looks like billy the puppet from saw.

  82. lotocoti

    Illicit drug distributors have an independent means of testing the quality of drugs supplied to them and thereby gain commercial advantage.

    Imagine the premium you’ll get for government certified Uoglobe No.4 heroin.

  83. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2912983, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:08 am

    And women don’t need men? I can’t see this ending well.

  84. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    He’s looking more and more like an ageing window-dresser.

    Aging pervert…

  85. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Bespoke, this is my point. A pill that is ‘good’ to the buyer in that it contains a decent amount of MMDA will still kill.

    That’s the kind of hysteria that teaches kids the anti-drug war is BS. There is an estimated 20-30 million annual users of mdma and fatalities are miniscule, mainly resulting from overheating or over consumption of water.

    The problems with ecstasy is not the mdma it’s the other crap that gets passed off as ecstasy which can lead to overdoses. This is what pill testing aims to address.

  86. stackja

    Snoopy
    #2913003, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:34 am

    Always Black Colour missing.

  87. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    https://www.ourwatch.org.au/Who-We-Are/Board-of-Directors

    Ms Mariam Veiszadeh

    Muslim activist, founder of the “Islamophobia” register, heavily involved in the “I’ll Ride With You” campaign?

  88. stackja

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2913008, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:39 am

    I have heard proper pill testing takes time and a lot of money. So government must legalise drugs and provide the properly tested pills?

  89. stackja

    Sydney family charged over international baby formula syndicate
    Mark Morri, Crime Editor, The Daily Telegraph
    19 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    A family that runs a humble suburban newsagency is allegedly behind a baby formula syndicate orchestrating the theft and export of more than $1 million worth of stolen baby formula, Manuka honey and vitamins overseas.

    Four members of the Ke family, who run a Carlingford newsagency, have been charged over their roles in the alleged operation which police say employed thieves to steal the formula from supermarkets across NSW.

    Lie Ke, 48, her husband Wueqi, 53, and their two children Xiaoyu, 29, and Jian Feng Ke, 31, have all been charged by a Robbery and Serious Crime Squad strike force set-up in February to investigate the “co-ordinated theft” of baby formula, vitamins and Manuka honey.

    Police will allege in court the syndicate was behind the theft of the items much sought-after in China.

  90. Roger

    Dumb Headline of the year candidate from Fairfax:

    Why there are more prisoners but fewer crimes being committed

    It took 12 years of modern schooling and 3 years at university to produce that.

  91. Snoopy

    The annual reports of Our Watch are totally opaque about the breakdown of funding received from government and private sources.

    I suspect it’s not named Our Watch for no reason.

  92. Snoopy

    A family that runs a humble suburban newsagency is allegedly behind a baby formula syndicate orchestrating the theft and export of more than $1 million worth of stolen baby formula, Manuka honey and vitamins overseas.

    Dutton?

  93. struth

    Hopefully that Bint Sharri won’t be continuing on with her show.
    Not hard to look at, but that doesn’t mean it should be heard.

  94. Memoryvault

    I have heard proper pill testing takes time and a lot of money. So government must legalise drugs and provide the properly tested pills?

    The kids will buy whatever is cheapest on offer, regardless of source.
    Human nature does not change.

  95. stackja

    Snoopy
    #2913016, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:50 am

    Migration lawyers?

  96. Makka

    Many left wing commentators such as Waleed Aly have voiced the opinion that the left will win this argument eventually. That the stupidity of the Bogan, red necked white trash who wave our flag and love our nation will be eventually washed away through the left wing dominated education system. But if it hasn’t happened over the last 20 years of indoctrination it seems unlikely in the extreme that another 20 years would do much more. Australians quite like Australia, It’s something the far-Left will never understand.

    The far-Left is losing this battle. They may win many more, they may ultimately destroy everything of value in our nation altogether. But for now they’re losing. Bill Shorten can see it, the editors of major left wing media outlets can see it (although they don’t like it). The culture of the Australian nation is (at least for now) simply too strong to be crushed.

    So listen to the self-hating socialist scumbags squeal, and know that they know that you know they’re losing.
    Take their pain, take their anguish and make it into sauce for your lightly scorched snags. Because there really is no better condiment than an Australia-hating leftist’s tears.

    http://www.theunshackled.net/rundown/why-is-bill-shorten-backing-australia-day-because-the-left-is-losing/

  97. OldOzzie

    Makka
    #2912982, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:08 am

    Interesting take on ‘Straya’s property boom and bust cycle. Things could get a little difficult….

    https://www.prosper.org.au/2019/01/18/the-economy-made-easy/

    When Shorten was asked last week if the measures would reduce house prices, however, he backed away. “No, it won’t,” he said. “Let’s be clear about that.”

    The Opposition Leader’s predicament suggests one of two things: either he is unable to listen to wise advice, or there is a lack of wise advice to which he can listen.

    Enemies? Bowen needs to get to know Labor’s friends

    Nick Cater

    A quick glance at opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen’s tetchy Twitter feed will dispel any suggestion that Labor takes the federal election result for granted.

    Barely a day goes by without Bowen jabbing out an ill-humoured riposte to Josh Frydenberg, who stands accused of misleading voters about Labor’s tax policy. Someone should tell the last treasurer but two that indignation never plays well on Twitter, especially high-minded indignation.

    Then again, someone should have told Bowen that the politics of house prices was a dangerous game to play even before capital city real estate prices started tumbling. One person’s unaffordable dream is another person’s nest egg, and Labor needs both votes.

    Someone should have told Bill Shorten that a promise to impose new taxes is no way to endear oneself to voters. No opposition leader since John Hewson has given his opponents so much delicious material to play with.

    Boiled down, Bowen’s beef with the Treasurer is less about economics than semantics. Frydenberg says Labor wants to maximise tax revenue. Bowen says Labor has “a plan to tackle tax minimisation”. Either way it amounts to the same thing: the punters pay more. The pretence of any higher purpose has almost entirely disappeared. A fortnight ago, Bowen was claiming that winding back negative gearing and capital gains concessions would make housing more “affordable”, a euphemism for cheaper.

    “What we’ve consistently said is that this was a policy designed to put downward pressure on housing,” he said on January 8.

    When Shorten was asked last week if the measures would reduce house prices, however, he backed away. “No, it won’t,” he said. “Let’s be clear about that.”

    The Opposition Leader’s predicament suggests one of two things: either he is unable to listen to wise advice, or there is a lack of wise advice to which he can listen.

    Lending weight to the second explanation is that the closest thing Labor has to an elder statesman these days is Wayne Swan, whose grasp of economics has become even less perfect since he retired as treasurer. Swan, like Bowen’s assistant spokesman Andrew Leigh, has fallen for the cognitive error known as ­Piketty syndrome, the conviction that the abstract arguments of an obtuse French theoretician, Thomas Pik­etty, can serve as a guide to the world as it actually is.

    Bowen once believed that economic growth was fuelled not by governments but by the energy of an entrepreneurial middle class. Now he too has fallen for the fallacy of “inclusive growth”, an ungrounded theory that stealing from the idle rich and giving to the poor boosts the economy.

    His first mistake is to believe there is such a class as the idle rich who stuff their money selfishly and unproductively under their beds, rather than put it to work in investments that generate jobs while self-provisioning for a comfortable retirement. His second error is to assume there is enough of them to provide the hundreds of billions of dollars Labor needs to fund its spending programs.

    His third error might be called the chimera of the serene slaughterhouse, the belief that the pork can be extracted without having pigs squeal.

    Bowen may well be right to claim that half the negatively geared property is owned by the top 10 per cent of income earners.

    So what? The price of admission to the top-income decile in Australia is a disposable income of barely more than $1700 a week or $91,000 a year.

    And what of the other half? Thanks to the universal franchise, they have votes too, and rather more of them would normally vote Labor than Shorten and Bowen might imagine.

    Typically, an estimate of the number of Australians with investment property is drawn from Australian Taxation Office data. The actual number of those who will feel threatened by Labor’s tax increases, however, is likely to be considerably larger.

    Husbands, wives and partners of taxpayers, not to mention children with an eye on future inheritance, become caught in the loop.

    Everyone who rents their home is part of the wider circle of stakeholders since the supply of available property to lease might tighten if investors are deterred.

    So too are owner-occupiers, for whom a promise of affordable housing implies that their delightful residence with an ensuite master bedroom and triple remote control lockup garage will be worth less. Labor’s property tax will frighten everyone, in fact, except the destitute.

    Bowen’s defence that existing investments will be grandfathered may satisfy a few. But as the Coalition learned to its cost at the last election, when it comes to retirement savings, voters are loath to trust assurances that begin “yes, but …”.

    There is further bad news for Labor in the 2016 Australian Election Study that paints a clearer ­picture of the supposed idle rich than the bland data drawn from tax returns. One in five voters reported a stake in investment property, somewhat higher than the 15 per cent or so of taxpayers who claim negatively geared tax relief.

    One explanation is that cohabiting partners who may not even be on the title deeds, let alone claim tax deductions, have a legitimate claim to ownership.

    The study found 16 per cent of those who voted for Shorten’s Labor at the 2016 election owned investment property, compared to 13 per cent of Green voters and 26 per cent of Coalition voters.

    Labor can draw little comfort from the fact that the investment property-owning class was 60 per cent more likely to vote for Malcolm Turnbull three years ago than for Shorten. Labor’s housing tax will threaten the economic wellbeing of a sixth of Labor’s vote, putting 775,000 first-preference lower house votes in doubt.

    If the AES analysis was extended to those who benefit from franking credits, Labor, with its limited imagination, might be equally surprised.

    Whoever devised Labor’s punish-the-rich campaign failed to recognise how widespread investment property and share ownership has become. Which is surprising, since part of the credit for the democratisation of wealth over the past quarter century belongs to the Labor governments of Bob Hawke and Paul Keating.

    Australia has the one of highest levels of share ownership in the world. They are not, for the most part, investments of lazy spare cash, but sources of hope for the future.

    It is little wonder that Bowen is on the defensive.

  98. Mother Lode

    Lie Ke, 48, her husband Wueqi, 53, and their two children Xiaoyu, 29, and Jian Feng Ke, 31, have all been charged by a Robbery and Serious Crime Squad strike force set-up in February to investigate the “co-ordinated theft” of baby formula

    They go to the moon, occupy islands, but can’t even make baby formula – which would have to be one of the things the Chinese especially would find easiest to make.

    Just remind me – how many babies do you need to make one tin?

  99. stackja

    Here’s why women in tennis don’t have equal pay
    Serena Williams
    Sam Groth
    40 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    Fact of the matter is prizemoney comes from revenue generated by both governing bodies.
    Money made by the ATP goes back into their players and their events — same deal on the women’s side. The disparity, quite simply, comes from one business model working better than another right now.

    The ATP has been fortunate to enjoy a golden era in the last 15 years. What Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer have done for the sport is unbelievable. Second to that they have had the benefit of Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic and Stan Wawrinka shaking things up.

    It’s been phenomenal if perhaps a little lucky. But they haven’t relied on that luck. The ATP has worked tirelessly to build up its next gen of superstars. They have invested significant sums into their lower level tournaments to ensure growth.

    On the women’s side, while the WTA has lacked similar rivalries, they haven’t done enough to push their next group of stars.

    Everything seems to operate around one name — Serena Williams.

    Even when she took time out to become a mum all people were talking about was players “having a chance to succeed because Serena isn’t there”. It was the same when Maria Sharapova came back from a drug ban, it was all about her — not talent coming through the ranks and building their profiles.

    That’s not how you build your sport.

    There is so much talent in women’s tennis — we just don’t hear enough about them on a regular basis.

    The finger of blame must be pointed at the WTA.

    Leverage your athletes, create more drawcard names and sponsorships and revenue will follow. They’re simply not doing this.

    Look at this year’s Australian Open; to have world No. 1 Simona Halep playing the final without a sponsor is indicative of how imbalanced things are.

    I can’t imagine that happening in any other sport.

    If the WTA was generating cash like the ATP then there wouldn’t be a debate about prizemoney.

  100. hzhousewife

    Jon Faine is stepping down

    They will need to begin training the replacement in “ABC Think” immediately.

  101. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2913022, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:57 am

    Australian voters need some hard Labor to understand how silly ALP economics are. I believe my investments will survive. I don’t know about other people.

  102. OldOzzie

    Makka
    #2913021, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:56 am

    Many left wing commentators such as Waleed Aly have voiced the opinion that the left will win this argument eventually. That the stupidity of the Bogan, red necked white trash who wave our flag and love our nation will be eventually washed away through the left wing dominated education system.

    Makka,

    Further on the above

    Australia Day discord devised by academe

    BELLA D’ABRERA


    To understand the self-loathing narrative pushed on us by some Australians about the date of our national day, you need only examine the way Australia’s history is being taught.

    There is a direct correlation between the version of our history taught in universities, and the story that is yearly trotted out to Australians in the lead-up to January 26.

    And the historical themes preoccupying the academic community tend to frame public debate as well as policy decision making. The themes are based on class, race and gender, which are of course the Left’s trope du jour.

    In an audit of Australian history teaching at universities by the Institute of Public Affairs — Australian History’s Last Stand — by far the most dominant theme is identity politics. The report found that of the 147 subjects taught across 35 universities last year, a total of 102 either focus on or make reference to class, race and gender. This means the vast majority of subjects offered by history departments employ the lens, to a greater or lesser extent, of identity politics through which to view our past.

    It is almost impossible for students to study this nation’s past without encountering the modern obsession with class, race and gender. It appears that our history has been enlisted to support political causes by academics who are more concerned with rewriting the past through identity politics than they are with a narrative motivated by professional concerns.

    It hasn’t always been so. Historians such as Manning Clark, Geoffrey Blainey, Allan Martin, John Hirst and Stuart Macintyre might have been divided by politics, but they all shared a traditional approach to the discipline of history. They saw their roles with clarity, which was to understand and study Australian society, agreeing that history is about the expanse of time in which human beings have lived and acted.

    All operated under the assumption they were able to paint a fairly accurate picture of past events by using a linear model of historical thinking and sifting through historical evidence. However, in the 1960s there appeared a range of radical post-structuralist and postmodernist theories invented by a group of mostly French philosophers who essentially rejected such notions of the linear model, historical evidence, objective truth and knowledge.

    Perhaps the most influential of these was Michel Foucault, philosopher, historian, social theorist and inventor of the neologism power-knowledge. He proposed that knowledge is power, and history is fiction, and the historian’s only role is to be social commentator and political activist.

    The approach to Australia’s history in academe carries all the hallmarks of Foucault’s radical postmodernist theory. Many individuals who specialise in Australia’s history have wholeheartedly embraced the idea that they are political activists and social commentators whose self-proclaimed role is to rewrite the past as a way of empowering minorities and the oppressed.

    The problem is that history is distorted when it becomes a conscious vehicle for advancing contemporary political agendas. In Australia’s case, much of our history is not only being distorted but is being ignored completely. Because the story of our success as a modern nation based on the ideas of liberalism is almost absent from the university curriculum, it is completely omitted from the narrative being pushed by the anti-Australia Day lobbyists.

    There is little if any discussion of the fact that Australians laid the foundations of one of the world’s most successful liberal democracies, which has achieved unprecedented levels of personal freedom and social equality and which continues to attract people from all over the world. There is little, if any, recognition of Australia as a beneficiary of Western civilisation.

    But you only need to look at the result of the recent poll commissioned by the Institute of Public Affairs to understand just how wide is the divide between academe and the nation, and how mainstream Australians regard themselves and this country.

    The results showed that 75 per cent of Australians want to keep Australia Day on January 26, that 76 per cent are proud of Australia’s history and 88 per cent are proud to be Australian. Moreover, 92 per cent think freedom of speech is important and 77 per cent believe freedom of religion to be an important value.

    There is clearly no identity crisis among the majority of Australians who turn out in force each January to celebrate this country’s past, present and future.

    Bella d’Abrera is the director of the Foundations of Western Civilisation at the Institute of Public Affairs.

  103. Nick

    They go to the moon, occupy islands, but can’t even make baby formula – which would have to be one of the things the Chinese especially would find easiest to make.

    There’s nothing the Chinese wont fake or re create product wise. Recycled tampons anyone ? Fake eggs? Fake coke?

    They become undone because they can’t help themselves and produce products used by babies and children that not only fake, are harmful. They do of course have the ability to prouduce unadulterated milk powder, but that would be be too costly and too hard.

  104. struth

    Couldn’t be that watching tennis is like watching paint dry and watching people with no real upper body strength playing it is even worse.

  105. Roger

    Well, we’ll all remember where we were when the Great Baby Formula Heist went down.

  106. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Australian voters need some hard Labor to understand how silly ALP economics are. I believe my investments will survive. I don’t know about other people.

    Mine will, but I’m waiting for all the whining from the Millennials, who haven’t experienced a severe recession, or high unemployment rates.

  107. C.L.

    David Morrison is the dishonest dirtball who rose to fame condemning the non-existent “Jedi Council” – driving one genuine battle veteran to a suicide attempt (Morrison himself never saw any military action, despite the Idi Amin medal collection). He has never apologised. There is probably no more hated figure in the ranks of Australian soldiers (the ones properly so-called).

  108. Memoryvault

    Australian voters need some hard Labor to understand how silly ALP economics are.

    As compared to how astute Liberal Party economics have been.

  109. Roger

    watching tennis is like watching paint dry…

    The popularity of tennis as a spectator sport is one of the triumphs of modern marketing, right up there with McDonald’s hamburgers.

  110. Myrddin Seren

    In an extraordinary departure from normal processes, the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has been handpicked by the Palaszczuk Government to review one of the mine’s environmental management plans.

    Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch refused to detail how the Hub was appointed.

    Stall approval until the Federal election, then it is ‘Goodbye Adani’, as Australia commences a retreat from mining/farming/forestry/smelting/fishing and morphs in to the world’s biggest national park.

  111. OldOzzie

    Nick
    #2913029, posted on January 21, 2019 at 11:08 am

    There’s nothing the Chinese wont fake or re create product wise. Recycled tampons anyone ? Fake eggs? Fake coke?

    They become undone because they can’t help themselves and produce products used by babies and children that not only fake, are harmful. They do of course have the ability to prouduce unadulterated milk powder, but that would be be too costly and too hard.

    Bought a pair of large multi-grips yesterday at Bunnings – Went out of my way, as I always do, to make sure that they were NOT “Made in China” (Synonymous with Crap)

    Cost more, but the Multi-Grips were made in the USA – All USA Made Products I have purchased over many years have been excellent – My Australian Sidchrome Spanners and Sockets from the 60s are still going strong, as are all my Sears Craftsman Tools from the 70s and 80s

    The Funny thing is products Made in Taiwan are usually excellent, as were products made in Hong Kong

  112. Infidel Tiger

    McDonald’s is fantastic Roger.

    Very very delicious.

  113. struth

    Stackja you should know by now it won’t be their fault the economy goes down.
    It’ll be Trump, global forces, pull factors and other such lies.
    Remember. …”that’s not real socialism”

    You infer people will put two and two together regardless of propaganda.

  114. Roger

    McDonald’s is fantastic Roger.

    Very very delicious.

    I rest my case.

  115. C.L.

    Report: Indian drum man banged the skins outside Trump tower a few years ago.
    Turns out he’s a Democrat reservation redskin. What a surprise.

  116. Snoopy

    Threatened Species Recovery Hub

    Who says this organisation won’t be capable of an independent, unbiased, fact-based review?

  117. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I have heard proper pill testing takes time and a lot of money. So government must legalise drugs and provide the properly tested pills?

    Legalise the industry and remove the criminal element, that is what is happening with marijuana and mdma is less damaging than marijuana. mdma is self-limiting, realistically can’t be used more than a 6-10 times a year and decreases sharply each year. The ratio of mdma’s effective dose to toxic dose is in the same ballpark as alcohol or codeine.

  118. Peter Campion

    Scrolling thru troll-wars detracts from the enjoyment, that’s all.

    Gilas, the responses to trolls give useful combat ides to those of us who fight outside the Cat.

    I always used to marvel at how the blackfellas could walk on it barefoot without a care in the world.

    Struth, as a kid in Cairns I never wore shoes until high school and had a tar-coating on my feet for most of the hot season. It was like permanently-attached strapless thongs.

  119. OldOzzie

    Infidel Tiger
    #2913038, posted on January 21, 2019 at 11:18 am

    McDonald’s is fantastic Roger.

    Very very delicious.

    I think I prefer Hungry Jack’s (Burger King) Burgers Flame Grilled to Maccas

  120. struth

    Bloody hell once I get out of this Barber shop I reckon Maccas might be the go.

  121. struth

    Or an ozzie burger from Hungry’s

  122. Peter Campion

    Tom, here’s the Cairns Post version of the second Baanababy story…

    THE grandfather of Barnaby Joyce and Vikki Campion’s second child says he is pleased the former deputy prime minister has ignored Malcolm Turnbull’s “bonk ban.”

    Ms Campion’s Tolga-based father, Peter Campion, has confirmed to the Cairns Post that his daughter is expecting her second son to Mr Joyce.

    The former firefighter said he and his wife, Tracey, were delighted with the news.
    “Australia needs more strong, patriotic, young men,” Mr Campion said.

    “Vikki shared the news of the pregnancy with us in the very early weeks.
    “She had to – Tracey’s lengthy career in early childhood education means she can spot signs of pregnancy a mile off.”

    It is understood the baby boy is due in June and will be named Thomas, after Mr Joyce’s grandfather.

    Mr Campion said he was particularly pleased to learn Mr Joyce – whom he has nicknamed “Baanyard” and “Baany” – had ignored former prime minister Turnbull’s infamous “bonk ban”, which was announced early last year.

    Mr Joyce resigned as deputy prime minister and Nationals leader last February after revelations surfaced of his affair with Ms Campion, his former media adviser.

    The couple already have a baby son, Sebastian, and Mr Joyce has four daughters from his marriage with now estranged wife Natalie.

    In the wake of the scandal, Mr Turnbull banned sex between ministers and their staff.

    “I was particularly pleased to learn Baanyard had ignored ex-PM what’s-his-name’s bizarre bonking ban,” Mr Campion said.
    “It’s just weird when 1960s swingers get all puritanical in their dotage.

    “The ban on employing wives as staff is dreadfully anti-women.
    “A pollie’s partner with excellent skills plus exceptional loyalty seems a very logical pick and a win-win for all involved, including voters.”

    He said his wife had travelled to northern NSW to visit his daughter, Mr Joyce, and Sebastian several times, reporting that “people adore them”.
    “Baany is an absolute legend to his voters.” he said.

    “Politically speaking, Baany is still the best leader the Nats have.”

  123. Infidel Tiger

    Let’s see if the media can have a worse week than last.

    Will be hard to top the Buzzfeed debacle and the Covington Catholic School beat up.

  124. Makka

    Don’t expect the population ponzi to go away anytime soon.

    The Reserve Bank of Australia’s ability to raise interest rates has become almost an impossible task in the eyes of the futures market, which now sees the prospect of an interest rate cut at the last meeting of 2019 as a 50-50 scenario.

    A plunge in consumer confidence by the most in more than three years because of softening expectations about the economy and household finances, forecasts of a deeper downturn in residential property prices, and elevated concerns around household debt have detracted from the economy’s reasonable growth and improving employment conditions.

  125. OldOzzie

    Parental responsibility is vital

    Bill Shorten’s pledge that all children would have access to school-based swimming lessons under Labor reflects his “ big government’’ outlook — spending taxpayers’ money and usurping roles better left to individuals and families. The spate of 65 drownings over the summer is tragic. But it underlines the need for parents to take responsibility for ensuring their children learn to swim. In many — if not most — cases, that is before the children start school.

    The Opposition Leader wants to work with schools, states and territories, local councils, swim schools and lifesaving clubs to provide a nationally consistent learn-to-swim program to ensure no child misses out.

    However well-intentioned, that is hardly the role of national government. He has promised, from next year, to fund extra swimming lessons for schools that need help, catch-up lessons for children who need them, extra funding for transport and pool entry fees, and more support for children with disabilities.

    Swimming lessons, Mr Shorten says, “aren’t just something parents should have to organise on weekends or during the holidays”. Why not? Most parents expect to do so and enjoy it, as part of family life in a hot country surrounded by great beaches and with increasing numbers of backyard pools.

    As many families know from experience, reluctant swimmers can benefit from the encouragement of a family member before gaining confidence in the water. As Scott Morrison said, states and territories run learn-to-swim programs. These, as well as school programs, are important. But they are no substitute for parents taking responsibility.

  126. John Constantine

    ” Fossil fuels and nuclear power are dangerous not only because they pollute, but also because an energy-intensive society based on increasingly sophisticated technological systems managed by bureaucrats and technocrats will grow less democratic and egalitarian over time.”

    Degrowth activists want an end to western industrial civilisation, by any means.

  127. Roger

    I think I prefer Hungry Jack’s (Burger King) Burgers Flame Grilled to Maccas

    Yes, much better.

  128. struth

    Don’t go flaunting your white privileged childhood around here Peter C.
    Fancy wearing shoes to high school.
    Bloody toff.

  129. Memoryvault

    Struth, as a kid in Cairns I never wore shoes until high school and had a tar-coating on my feet for most of the hot season. It was like permanently-attached strapless thongs.

    Ditto for me and many others, both in Perth and Kalgoorlie.

  130. John Constantine

    https://www.greattransition.org/publication/the-degrowth-alternative

    ” share the aims of downscaling affluent economies and their material flows in a just and equitable manner.4 Reducing such material flows would likely lead to a decrease in GDP as currently measured.5 However, degrowth is not synonymous with recession or depression, the terms we use for negative growth in a growth economy. Degrowth, instead, involves a rethinking of the organization of society signaled by terms such as limits, care, and dépense.”

    Degrowth racist literally nazi australia, because downscaling our economy Is Our Strength.

    Comrades

  131. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2913051, posted on January 21, 2019 at 11:28 am

    I believe swimming lessons are common in states except Qld. More BS from BS?

  132. Jo

    Jon Faine is stepping down

    I wonder if Clementine is looking for a job. You know, equality and all.

  133. Roger

    The spate of 65 drownings over the summer is tragic. But it underlines the need for parents to take responsibility for ensuring their children learn to swim.

    What say the gummint makes it mandatory that migrants know how to swim?

    Why do they let in those who can’t?

    It’s tantamount to leaving the pool gate open!

  134. stackja

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2913043, posted on January 21, 2019 at 11:22 am

    And when someone dies? Who gets sued?

  135. Snoopy

    the Covington Catholic School beat up.

    Was a triumph for the legacy media and their leftist running dogs. The truth is well and truly buried.

  136. Fred

    If our elite want to reduce the number of Aborigines in jail, does that mean that Melbourne’s latest murderer should be released?

  137. mh

    What is the go with skilled migration to the USA? I recall reading that there are about 2 million jobs in manufacturing going unfulfilled because of skill shortages. As an example, if you are an Australian fitter/machinist with many years CNC machine tool operating experience, and say 40 years of age, how difficult is it to go work in the U.S. ?

  138. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Amsterdam’s red-light district overcrowded with selfie-taking tourists, sex workers say
    New York PostNews Corp Australia Network
    January 21, 2019 3:32AM
    Topics

    Amsterdam’s once seedy red-light district has become a mainstream tourist attraction in recent years — and the city’s sex workers aren’t happy about it.

    Prostitutes who stand in the neon-lit windows in De Wallen say crowds of selfie-snapping tourists who pose for photos in front of them and choke the streets drive away real business.

    Gawkers and shutterbugs also put the women at risk of unwanted social media exposure, according to a report by the BBC.

    “It’s the biggest free attraction park in the whole of Amsterdam,” said Frits Rouvoet, a bookstore owner in the district who’s friendly with the brothel workers.

    “If they want to make a living, they have to stand in the window but there are many, many men coming,” he said.

    “From England, Scotland, Ireland. Drunk, screaming, trying to take pictures.”

    Some prostitutes have put up signs in the their windows of a camera with a red line through it, but it may not be enough.

  139. Mother Lode

    The great tragedy wrought by the deliberate politicisation of one previously venerable institution after another is that that we now no longer have entities dedicated to

    > Monitoring temperatures and rainfall, providing reliable and close to accurate forecasts
    > Providing the knowledge skills to learn more of the world and people and discover new things never even imagined before
    > Providing the most robust defence of the country should they be called upon
    > Protecting citizens from criminals and crime, and sending miscreants where they will regret their misdeeds and think twice of repeating

    and so on.

    And we will not get them again because, nominally, these functions are already filled.

  140. John Constantine

    “Degrowth alternatives have begun to flourish as the formal economy has fallen into crisis. These include food production in urban gardens; co-housing and ecocommunes; alternative food networks, producer-consumer cooperatives, and communal kitchens; health care, elder care, and child care cooperatives; open software; and decentralized forms of renewable energy production and distribution. These alternatives are often accompanied, or even supported, by new forms of exchange such as community currencies, barter markets, time banks, financial cooperatives, and ethical banks.10

    Such projects display various facets of degrowth. They promote a shift to a more locally based economy with short production and consumption cycles. They emphasize reproduction and caring, to satisfy use values, not profits. They replace wage labor with voluntary activity. They do not have a built-in tendency to accumulate and expand, and they are less resource-intensive than their counterparts in the formal economy. Such practices of “commoning” cultivate solidarity and humane interpersonal relations, and generate shared, non-monetary wealth.”

    Their abc wymynsys class will never be happy watching the proles living in a western industrial civilisation.

    They demand downsizing into a deindustrialised services economy, where wymynsys are employed by the State to have conversations about rationing, and why half a fish finger per prole per day is exactly right.

    Comrades.

  141. Makka

    Property price falls could double previous estimates as weakening sentiment, tight credit and oversupply continue to hit residential markets, pushing falls to their largest since the early 1980s, according to Morgan Stanley.

    House price falls are steeper than thought as key indicators, ranging from rental conditions to credit supply, weaken, the investment bank’s analysis shows.

    Peak-to-trough property declines are expected to be around 15 to 20 per cent, compared to previous estimates of 10 to 15 per cent, which means the most benign best to worst-case scenario has doubled, it concludes.

    https://www.afr.com/business/banking-and-finance/property-price-falls-could-double-morgan-stanley-20190120-h1a9ad

    Drip feeding the bad news so as not to spook the horses.

  142. Peter Campion

    We not only had hardened feet as kids, but hands, too – from mud-boarding.

    Back then, Cairns’ mudflats hadn’t been ruined by Council trying to make a fake beach by dumping sand on the foreshore. The mud was deliciously soupy and full of mudcrabs. We’d go get them on our mud-boards (bits of masonite) with our crabbing poles (light reo bar with a hooked end).

    Forward progress was made by kneeling on the mud-board and paddling, surfer-style. We’d get to sprinting speed on soupy mud, but sandy or dry mud was tough going. The skin on the hands and knees got real tough.

    We’d take sacks to put the crabs in, otherwise they’d be having a go at you all the way home. Nothing worse than trying to pin a big muddy under your knees and paddling while the bloody thing is trying to get its monstrous nippers onto your legs! But they were delicious!

  143. dover_beach

    Leftists, lesbians, Labor Party, ABC itching to call in the police to private girls schools ….

    Many private schools resist push for pants, shorts options for girls’ uniforms.

    Indeed. It will involve a tried and tested liberal ploy of offering ‘choice’ to begin with, and then finally end with what was firstly introduced made mandatory, and what was always in place, prohibited. If you hadn’t noticed, that is what occurred with gay ‘marriage’; it began with the introduction of civil unions, and it ended with the redefinition of marriage so as to make it indistinguishable from civil unions themselves.

  144. John Constantine

    Losing 20 percent when you only have eighty percent equity means losing everything.

    Class actions against our property developer billionaire landshark class are the australian way to go.

    How could a Ponzi scheme possibly go wrong?.

  145. stackja

    Makka
    #2913070, posted on January 21, 2019 at 11:41 am

    And the towers came tumbling down?

  146. cohenite

    stackja

    #2912994, posted on January 21, 2019 at 10:25 am

    Mega-mine’s future in hands of greenies

    EXCLUSIVE
    STEVEN WARDILL

    THE fate of Queensland’s Carmichael mine is in the hands of an environmental group whose members champion radical action on climate change, oppose coal and have appeared as expert witnesses against Adani.

    In an extraordinary departure from normal processes, the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has been handpicked by the Palaszczuk Government to review one of the mine’s environmental management plans.

    The review, which is holding up construction, will reassess plans to conserve 33,000ha of pastoral land, purchased around the mine to offset habitat loss for the black-throated finch. Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch refused to detail how the Hub was appointed.

    An Adani spokeswoman said the Government was “shifting the goalposts” at the 11th hour.

    That is fucked.

  147. Mother Lode

    I believe swimming lessons are common in states except Qld. More BS from BS?

    Oh, I suspect he knows that, since swimming lessons are already being provided, they can ‘invest’ the money and there is in fact very little new service that need be provided – more left over for a big fat bureaucracy and some maaaaates.

  148. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    And when someone dies? Who gets sued?

    tired argument. I had a discussion with my doctor last week that went along the lines: She wants to put me on statins, I asked her what the side effects were. She said a possible side effect is bleeding in the brain. and I’m like oh…ok, maybe we can look at alternatives. And she’s trying to reassure me it’s extremely rare. That’s so comforting. Do you think I would be able to sue the drug company or the government for approving statins if that occured?

    The societal damage from alcohol is huge and it is a recreational drug. Overdose is extremely rare.

    Mdma is a recreational party drug, if you take it at home it will literally have minimal effect. Taken in party setting it becomes something else entirely. It does not make its users violent, quite the opposite. It is not addictive and is self limiting.

    Government pussies should stop being dicks and legalise it.

  149. Makka

    Back then, Cairns’ mudflats hadn’t been ruined by Council trying to make a fake beach by dumping sand on the foreshore. The mud was deliciously soupy and full of mudcrabs.

    Yep, and the Christmas king tides brought in tons of prawns. Literally. It was difficult at times to get a good pozzie on the esplanade flats. 3/4 of a sugar bag full of endeavours in under an hour was by best hall. Couldn’t cast quick enough at times, the water was so thick with them.

  150. John Constantine

    For diversity, shouldn’t their fainefilths slot go to a conservative?.

  151. Robber Baron

    Jon Faine is stepping down

    Superstar of the green-left can only be replaced by fellow superstar Waleed.

    ABC will set a salary record. Justifiably so!

  152. Ellen of Tasmania

    Calli,

    Thanks. I agree with your assessment – I sympathise with the distributists concerns, but think the smaller the gov, the free-er the market, the better the outcomes. (Get rid of the licences, the certifications, the regulations – don’t give them more power.) I’m prepared to listen to the disties because we haven’t been able to stem crapitalism and all its attendant evils.

    I can sympathise with IT – we love our local community and we actually buy local when we can. Buying is a process, not just a destination.

    I don’t think government can (or should) do what the gospel does re: culture, community, family etc.
    Religion/worldview/belief system/values matter. It comes out your finger tips and becomes the culture of tomorrow.

    I think it’s an interesting discussion, though, and would rather talk to the disties than the socialists!

  153. The A.D.

    The Prime Minister of New Zealand has vowed her country will stand by Britain after Brexit, encouraging it to leave the EU on terms which will allow the Kiwis to deepen their commercial ties to the mother country.
    Jacinda Ardern highlighted the fact that “four in every five New Zealanders still claims British heritage; our foundational Treaty of Waitangi of 1840 was signed by Māori chiefs and representatives of Queen Victoria, and our people served alongside one another through two world wars” in a column for the Telegraph, as well as her own “deep personal connection” to the kingdom.
    “Ours is not just a friendship based on history, it’s one that feels as necessary now as it ever has,” she insisted.

    The New Zealand lady horseperson has more sense than the Tory Brit PM.

  154. mh

    The cultural enrichment is strong with this one.

    Khan’s London: Acid Gang Sentenced after ‘Homophobic’ Attacks
    20 Jan 2019

    The gang have been identified and sentenced as follows:

    Huseyin Onel, 24 (30/03/94) of no fixed abode, but from the Hackney area, was sentenced to 17 years in prison for applying a noxious substance causing grievous bodily harm (GBH), plus an additional three years on extended licence. Onel was sentenced to nine years each for six counts of casting a noxious substance and three years for violent disorder to run concurrently.

    Mehmet Tekagac, 30 (03/09/88) of Kenworthy Road, E9 was sentenced to 14-and-a-half years in prison for applying a noxious substance causing GBH, plus an additional three years on extended licence. To run concurrently, Tekagac was sentenced to eight years for robbery and three years for violent disorder.

    Onur Ardic, 27 (02/11/91) of Frampton Park Road, E9 was sentenced to 14 years in prison for applying a noxious substance causing GBH plus three years on extended licence. He was also sentenced to three years for violent disorder to run concurrently.

    Guven Ulas, 20 (21/12/98) of Pultney Street, N1, was sentenced to 30 months in prison for violent disorder.

    Mustafa Kiziltan, 30 (10/09/88) of no fixed abode, but from the Hackney area, was sentenced to a total of three years in prison – 27 months for violent disorder and nine months for dangerous driving. He was also sentenced to three months for failing to stop, this will run concurrently.

    Serkan Kiziltan, 22 (03/11/96) of Well Street, E9, was sentenced to 18 months for violent disorder.

    Umit Kaygisiz, 21 (26/12/97) of Orsman Road, N1, was sentenced to a total of 28 months in prison for violent disorder and attempting to convey a prohibited item into prison (namely a mobile phone).

    Yasam Erdogan, 24 (24/11/94) of Nightingale Road, N1, was sentenced to 18 months for violent disorder, suspended for two years.

    Turgut Adakan, 23 (20/06/95) of Roman Road, E6, was sentenced to 18 months for violent disorder, suspended for two years.

    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2019/01/20/khans-london-acid-attack-gang-sentenced-homophobic-attack/

  155. stackja

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2913078, posted on January 21, 2019 at 11:47 am

    Trusting soul regarding ‘party’ drugs.

  156. OldOzzie

    The Liberals need Peter Costello, the best PM we never had

    peter van onselen


    Kelly O’Dwyer’s departure from politics at the next election is a blow to the government. But, with bold thinking, there is a massive opportunity.

    Peter Costello left politics long before his time should have been up. He was both exhausted and frustrated at the end of the Howard years, not having become prime minister courtesy of an ­orderly handover.

    If Costello returned at the next election in his old seat of Higgins, he would hold it, staving off a challenge by the Greens. Apparently O’Dwyer was genuinely worried that she might lose the blue ribbon seat. Whoever takes over will be at even greater risk of ­losing Higgins.

    Were Costello to be installed as Liberal leader for the next election, he would also be capable of retaining seats in Victoria under massive threat since the removal of Malcolm Turnbull.

    Costello’s return could see the government revive and muscle up to Bill Shorten. Currently down 45-55 per cent in the polls, the ­Coalition has nothing to lose.

    Scott Morrison could serve as caretaker prime minister until the election, with Costello the elected Liberal Party leader, much like happened with Campbell Newman in Queensland before his thumping victory. It just takes a ­little outside-of-the box thinking from a parliamentary team incapable of such thought.

    There are very few sitting days scheduled between now and the next election anyway, so an extra-parliamentary leader is a viable option.

    The only difference with the Newman comparison is that if elected prime minister, Costello would not implode the way Newman did. He has runs on the board as one half of the successful Howard government, one respected by voters longing for a return to such stability and competence.

    While it is far from ideal not ­selecting a woman in Higgins, given the Liberals’ gender problems, Costello’s return is too necessary to ignore. And he is the type of leader who would genuinely throw himself into cultural reform inside the Liberals to help more women secure parliamentary careers. As well, women pre-­selected for marginal Labor-held seats have little or no chance of winning. Under Costello, such candidates’ fortunes would blossom considerably.

    At 61, Costello is also younger than Turnbull, and Morrison has admitted he is an accidental PM anyway, having been unable to explain to voters why he’s there in the first place. The Liberal Party would finally have a Victorian leader again for the first time in decades.

    O’Dwyer’s departure isn’t only about family difficulties or gender problems in the Liberal Party. She has made a realpolitik calculation that the government is heading towards a big defeat, and spending six to nine years in the wilderness isn’t a good use of her time in the years ahead. She’s also unlikely to rise any higher than she already has, and O’Dwyer is on the wrong side of the factional war that has broken out in Victoria.

    There will be more Liberals making similar judgment calls ­between now and the next election, as well as immediately after it if the Coalition does suffer a heavy defeat, forcing a series of by-­elections around the nation.

    But the return of Costello just might be the spark to change the political settings, dampening factional feuds and making the ­Coalition electorally competitive — not to mention giving the conservatives serious policy and credibility ballast.

    Debate rages between Labor and Liberals over who is the best PM we never had: Costello or Kim Beazley. While Costello returning as leader from outside the parliament wouldn’t necessarily see him become PM this side of the election, his chances of beating Shorten and thus being installed as PM after it are high.

    Better, certainly, than the ­chances of anyone else on the conservative side winning the election. A bold move to Costello is the last thing Labor would want the government to do. That says it all.

  157. Speedbox

    The problems with ecstasy is not the mdma it’s the other crap that gets passed off as ecstasy which can lead to overdoses. This is what pill testing aims to address.

    In the past decade, almost 800 new synthetic psychoactive substances have been identified using high resolution mass spectrometry. There are believed to be hundreds currently undetected/analysed and illicit drug manufacturers continue to create more.

    For example, one relatively new(ish) derivative is Carfentanil being a fentanyl like substance that is responsible for several deaths in heroin users. The lethal dose is about 20 micrograms – not 20 grams, but micrograms (there are 1,000,000 micrograms in a gram). So, an almost infinitesimally small impurity can kill you. Carfentanil has recently been found mixed with ecstasy.

    Most additives are impossible to test for in the context suggested at music festivals and similar. Testers don’t know what they are testing for and, the consistency of non-pharmaceutical drugs is questionable, at best. That testing could identify one or more of the hundreds of potentially lethal additives at an on-site facility is a ridiculous suggestion. For Christ’s sake, major laboratories with the benefit of permanent facilities and the latest equipment can’t keep up.

    On the other hand, just declare a free-for-all and let the Coroner decide.

    (And all of this is before we discuss the moral, legal and financial implications).

  158. OldOzzie

    Tony Abbott urges vote for Labor before minor parties, independent politicians

    Tony Abbott has attacked independent politicians and minor parties, telling voters they are better off voting Labor.

    The former prime minister said voting for independents, such as Rob Oakeshott and Clive Palmer, would diminish the parliament.

    “If you want a credible parliament, if you want serious government don’t vote independent. It is better to vote for the Labor Party than to vote for an independent,” Mr Abbott told 2GB radio.

    “Because for all Labor’s faults at least they are a party of government or potential government and that means there is a level of responsibility which the Labor Party has to take which no independent or minor party does.”

    Mr Abbott described Mr Oakeshott, who is running for the NSW seat of Cowper, as a “serial candidate” and “serial collector of taxpayer money”.

    “But his only significant contribution to the parliament was to put (Julia) Gillard back into government after the 2010 election and it was a seriously bad government,” Mr Abbott said.

    “And then of course knowing he was going to lose he cut and run in 2013. Now of course he wants to come back because he loves the publicity.”

    Mr Abbott labelled Mr Palmer “shameless” for his big spending political campaign while he still owes money to workers at his collapsed nickel refinery in north Queensland.

    “Literally millions a month are being spent at the moment by Clive Palmer and that is money that really belongs to creditors of his bankrupt nickel refinery, particularly the taxpayers and the workers,” Mr Abbott said.

    “The workers who got dudded and the taxpayers who then had to fund their redundancy payments. It is just outrageous. It is shameless. He is absolutely shameless this bloke.”

  159. Is Wrongsellin now plagiarizing Kates and the Cat?

    Besides Costello will have sniffed the air and realized the Libs have no chance.

  160. Stimpson J. Cat

    McDonald’s is fantastic Roger.
    Very very delicious.

    IT how does McDonalds Corporatism play into your eternal battle for Artisanal recognition and reconciliation?
    Must the Artisan option always Trump cheap affordable food for the punters?
    We need some guidelines.

  161. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2913091, posted on January 21, 2019 at 12:08 pm

    TA is offering BS enough rope?

  162. OldOzzie

    Jetstar system caused passenger overload

    Robyn Ironside Aviation Writer

    Low-fare carrier Jetstar has replaced its boarding management system after the airline repeatedly found more passengers on its flights than expected, potentially disrupting the weight and balance of the aircraft.

    The Australian Transport Safety Bureau was made aware of at least three times that Jetstar cabin crew reported between 15 and 22 extra passengers on flights after takeoff.

    In one case, on a flight from Brisbane to Melbourne, the passenger count discrepancy was discovered when a cabin crew member mentioned the “large number of passengers on board” to the flight crew.

    An in-flight passenger count found 15 more passengers aboard than were accounted for.

    Adjustments were then made by the flight crew to calculations for approach and landing.

    The issue was blamed on a “new type of mobile boarding manager (MBM) device” being used to scan passenger boarding passes and tally the passengers as they boarded.

    “Technical faults and/or ­erroneous operation of the MBM led to incorrect passenger loading information being provided to flight crews,” said an ATSB report on the incidents.

    On another two occasions, it was found passengers had not been allocated seats in ­accordance with weight and balance requirements, making the aircraft nose-heavy. In one such incident on a flight from Sydney to Hobart, the captain ordered the underfloor cargo be rearranged in a manner that contravened the aircraft’s loading requirements, rather than reallocate the ­passengers.

    An ATSB investigation said there were “probably other” instances of aircraft being loaded with incorrect passenger distributions or wrong passenger numbers. “This placed increased operational pressure on flight and cabin crews and, on at least one occasion, adversely affected aircraft performance during takeoff,” an ATSB report said.

    On two occasions, problems arose after a last-minute change of aircraft from an A320, which seats 180 passengers, to an A321 with a 220-seat capacity.

    Despite the findings, the ATSB discontinued the investigation due to Jetstar’s response and measures put in place.

    Jetstar head of safety Matt Franzi said the ATSB was satisfied with the airline’s “thorough investigation”.

  163. that means there is a level of responsibility which the Labor Party has to take

    An example of the ALP taking responsibility?

    Yes, you are talking crap Tony.

  164. Tintarella di Luna

    I love big trucks and one of these trucks caught my eye this morning on my way back from Bunnings

  165. Infidel Tiger

    IT how does McDonalds Corporatism play into your eternal battle for Artisanal recognition and reconciliation?
    Must the Artisan option always Trump cheap affordable food for the punters?
    We need some guidelines.

    McDonald’s has employed millions of yoots, and given then discipline and much needed skills.

    I give them a free pass.

    All other corporatist swines must be destroyed.

  166. Infidel Tiger

    Also Maccas have these gourmet burgers now that are very artisan.

  167. OldOzzie

    Shutdown Flimflam

    The media portray the partial government closure as a disaster.

    In every confrontation between the press and President Trump, there comes a time when media coverage becomes so aggressively bad that it turns into a parody of itself and “jumps the shark.” I knew that moment had arrived in reporting on the federal government’s partial closure when I opened my news-of-the-day app to find the headline, “How the shutdown will affect the Super Bowl.” Having once attended a Super Bowl during a period of genuine emergency—Super Bowl XXV, played in the first days of Operation Desert Storm in January 1991—I doubted that the furloughing of nonessential federal personnel could threaten the big game. Not surprisingly, much of the story consisted of Atlanta officials assuring the public that they didn’t anticipate any problems, followed by some conjecture about things that might go wrong, anyway.

    I’ve been ignoring most such stories, because I’ve seen no evidence that the shutdown will affect me and my family. I’ve heard no friend, neighbor, or relative even mention it. Virtually everyone I know outside of my professional life seems to be going about their business.

    The Obvious Question to ask is

    “If the shutdown of US Federal Government shows no impact, why not permanently shut down those US Federal Gobernment Departments?”

  168. Tintarella di Luna

    The cultural enrichment is strong with this one.

    Khan’s London: Acid Gang Sentenced after ‘Homophobic’ Attacks
    20 Jan 2019

    Where’s the diversity.

  169. Black Ball

    Also Maccas have these gourmet burgers now that are very artisan

    Coffees the best in Australia.

  170. Infidel Tiger

    See, Grill’d is the sort of company I would have closed.

    They pretend to be gourmet burgers and even worse that they are “healthy”. They also advocate for every SJW position going around. Reality is that they make poor quality burgers, have shitty fries and underpay their workers.

  171. Mother Lode

    Khan’s London: Acid Gang Sentenced after ‘Homophobic’ Attacks
    20 Jan 2019

    I assume they have British citizenship, so by the time Failfacts gets to it, the story will be about British men on a rampage pouring acid on gays, and the innate homophobia in British society.

  172. Memoryvault

    The Liberals need Peter Costello, the best PM we never had

    Geez, and I thought Mrs MV and I were a shoe-in for the gold medal in straw clutching.
    It’s so stupid it will probably happen.

  173. Nick

    Khan’s London: Acid Gang Sentenced after ‘Homophobic’ Attacks
    20 Jan 2019

    You get the feeling that it wasn’t the acid attack but the homophobia that had them locked up, lol.

  174. struth

    Burp.

    I just got shorn………………

    Then I decided for a little local artisanship for a meal.
    Deciding I’d like a personal relationship with the supplier I first made contact with her via an intercom.
    We discussed my various nutritional desires and just how I would like my coffee.
    She actually invited me to drive right up to the window where she worked to meet her personally.
    Good lord.
    I then went straight to the actual food preparation window where I could see the local artisans actually assembling my burger in just the fashion I had asked for.
    It was brought to me in record time and encased in renewable paper products.

  175. bespoke

    Ellen

    When that guy said government should provide transitional jobs between work for $10 hr. I thought.

    What kind of Job?
    Will they compete with similar work in the market?
    If so.
    Wouldn’t that depress wages for workers out side the scheme and reduce options for the unskilled?

    Some interesting ideas but easy to come with in a talkfest but real world its a lot more complicated.

  176. MatrixTransform

    Grill’d

    How many Arts Students does it take to make a burger heh?
    Every time I go Grilld there are something like 15 NPCs all trying to look busy.

    What is it with their coloured stick in the jar?

    Last time I went not only did the ‘waiter’ interrupt me essentially demanding an answer whilst I was mid-chew.

    When frowned and offered a ‘WTF MATE?” sorta look, the numbnuts flipped the coloured stick over and gave me some sortta smart-mouth as he left.

    The missus always gets a steak knife to cut her burger that comes in its own little marketing cardboard sheath.

    …I thought about it right then

  177. MatrixTransform

    How many Arts Students …

    Duh sorry … I meant Arts Grads

  178. John Constantine

    SGM sims metal slumps a bit more today, gone from a 3 billion market cap to two billion cap this last year.

    Just so important to recycle steel, but doesn’t mean doing it can’t be profitless.

    If sims are having trouble doing this, you have to wonder about trickier recycling run by worse managers.

    Not a sector for me.

  179. OldOzzie

    Australian Foundation Investment Co sells shares to beat Labor franking change


    The nation’s largest and oldest listed investment company, Australian Foundation Investment Co, has dumped shares in BHP and Rio Tinto to capture the value of franking credits for its mostly elderly, retired shareholders before the dividend imputation system is ripped up by a future federal Labor government.

    And the Melbourne-based Australian Foundation Investment Co investor will immediately distribute much of those funds to its own shareholders, declaring on Monday a special dividend of 8 cents per share to be paid in late February as it races to get the money into the hands of its shareholders so to beat any devaluation of the franking brought on by a change in government.

    The company also revealed that its 130,000 investors was were asking why they were being punished for its investments in some of Australia’s largest companies. “This is going to hurt a lot of people who are saying ‘I’m not rich, I’m not wealthy and why am I being forced to go on a higher tax bracket through this?’,’’ Australian Foundation Investment Co chief executive Mark Freeman told The Australian.

    “I think the key message is we are responding to the feedback we get from our shareholders. The consistent feedback we have had from our shareholders is this is a significant issue for them, they are saying ‘help us please’ because they don’t have a voice and most of them are elderly retirees,” he said.

    “People feel hurt that they are being classified as rich and wealthy and don’t understand why they are being forced into a higher tax bracket because they are not getting the credit back. Why them?”

    AFIC is the latest investment fund to re-engineer its share portfolio in the lead up to the federal election. The moves come in the wake of an ALP policy launched last year under which it would end the dividend imputation system which has been running for almost 20 years.

    The $7 billion fund told the market on Monday it had sold more than $120 million worth of shares in the twin mining giants over the last few months, walking away from large holdings in Rio Tinto and BHP, which are cornerstones of most conservative share funds. AFIC sold $105 million worth of Rio Tinto shares, or 40 per cent of its stake, and 3 per cent of its BHP shares, worth just under $16 million, into share buybacks from both companies.

    Mr Freeman told The Australian the selldown, as well as the payment of the dividend, was directly linked to the looming changes to franking as unveiled by the ALP.

    “We will get them (the dividends) out to shareholders because there is no point in sitting on those if the rules shift,’’ he said. The dividend will be paid this financial year to get ahead of any policy changes implemented by a Labor government from July 1.

    “Under what is being proposed, we would probably have to reassess the way we look at these decisions, because the share buybacks are a way of getting franked dividends, [and] profits back to shareholders,” Mr Freeman said.

    Mr Freeman said the ALP plans meant a conservative long-term investor like AFIC had to consider its own equities holdings and selling down shares if that meant it could safeguard franking credits for its own investors, many of whom were retirees that relied on these credits to pay for the necessities of life.

    The comments came as AFIC released half-year results which showed that its net profit rose 75.4 per cent to $239.8 million as its investment income increased 62.5 per cent to $250.3 million. The strong leap in income was partly driven by recognition of share buybacks from Rio Tinto and BHP and the booking of a dividend from the demerger of Coles from Wesfarmers.

    The company declared an interim dividend of 10 cents per share fully franked, flat against last year, as well as the special dividend of 8 cents per share. Both dividends will paid on 25 February.

    Australian Foundation Investment Co is the largest investment company on the ASX and was founded in 1928. Its board is responsible for a $7 billion equities portfolio dominated by Australian. companies. It has more than 130,000 shareholders, many of whom are retirees and pensioners.

    Last week the $360 million Mirrabooka fund, which is also part of the Australian Foundation Investment Co stable, announced it would pay its traditional end-of-year special dividend more than six months early to get ahead of Labor’s promise to scrap the cash rebates investors receive on franking credits.

    Last year, Labor leader Bill Shorten unveiled a policy to claw back nearly $60 billion over 10 years by abolishing cash refunds for excess dividend imputation credits.

    Mirrabooka was the first listed fund to alter its dividend policy in the face of the looming federal election that, which Labor is widely tipped to win.

    Other Australian public companies, which together are sitting on an estimated total of $45 billion in franking credits, could also be considering how the change in policy could hurt shareholders/

    Investors and the business community have hit out at the policy. In November Australia’s most successful retailer, billionaire businessman Solomon Lew, labelling the Labor policy as “unfair”, saying it would that will touch every member of the workforce as well as rattle shares held in Australia’s $2.7 trillion superannuation system.

    In November deputy chair of a standing committee investigating the ALP policy and Labor parliamentary party member Matt Thistlethwaite told The Australian the policy was fair.

    It would help repair the federal budget and ultimately be of benefit to retirees, as the money saved from the initiative paid for healthcare and aged care,” he said.

    “We believe the policy strikes the right balance. According to the Parliamentary Budget Office, overwhelmingly those affected have asset balances in their self-managed super funds above $1 million,’’ he said.

    According to an analysis of the proposal by the independent Parliamentary Budget Office released this week, funds with more than $1m claimed 82 per cent of the franking credits, worth $2.1bn a year.

  180. Infidel Tiger

    My wife loves grill’d

    Terrible judgment.

  181. OldOzzie

    The Yellow Vest Movement Has Gone Global

    Turns out high taxes and mass migration aren’t going over so well…

  182. Cassie of Sydney

    “Khan’s London: Acid Gang Sentenced after ‘Homophobic’ Attacks”

    Intersectionality at work….interesting how homophobic attacks are dealt with quickly (this only happened recently) but if you are a 10 year old girl from Rotherham or Telford who has been raped by a gang whose members are all of a certain “religious persuasion” then the police are quite happy to turn a blind eye to it….for years.

  183. Stimpson J. Cat

    Grill’d

    Pretentious Misspelled Hipster Degeneracy Masquerading as Artisanal Achievement.

    Absolutely Haram.

  184. struth

    Peter Campion.
    When I was a little boy in 1973 my father took us on a working holiday around Australia for a couple of years.
    I did schooling by correspondence, and the love of Australia and travelling that trip bred in me, ruined me for life!!!
    However, dad stopped and worked here and there.
    We lived in Port Douglas before it was even really known.
    Dad drove sugar cane trucks out of the Mosman sugar mill, and dad would take me out into the Daintree swamp mud crabbing, but as a little boy I shit myself in the spooky mud and swamp………………..
    Your stories reminded me of this.

    If we had stayed, and dad was seriously thinking about it, we would be bloody wealthy now.
    Back then there was nothing to Port Douglas.
    We stayed in the Pandanas Caravan Park, we treck through the jungle to the beach as kids and now that’s all resorts, and the caravan park managers used to take our orders and do a once a week shop down in Cairns.
    Then everyone in the park had a Barby and a sing a long that night.
    We only left because the union came in and demanded all join.
    Dad wouldn’t join the union, so off we went to Darwin.
    The left were rooting me way back then as well.

  185. Stimpson J. Cat

    Grill’d

    Pretentious Missp$lled Hipster Degeneracy Masquerading as Artisanal Achievement.

    Absolutely Haram.

  186. Mother Lode

    Looks like the Cat’s various nicknames for Joyce could be moving mainstream.

    Barnyard?

    Bananaby?

    Baanaby?

    I suppose he should be glad Peter didn’t mention ‘The Beetroot’, what with the imminent Thermageddon type weather and all.

  187. struth

    We don’t have “Grilld” out here in these here back woods, yall.
    Never heard of it, (spits ‘baccy, scratches nuts)

  188. OldOzzie

    Soon to be South Africa

    “It Feels Apocalyptic” – A Letter From Zimbabwe, Where The Country Remains In Total Shutdown

    Zimbabwe is once again at the brink of economic collapse, making a mockery of President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s claim that the country is open for business.

    As Bloomberg reports, many shops and factories have shut their doors because of a lack of customers and those that continue to trade are open to haggling over prices to secure hard currency. At an appliance shop in the capital, Harare, a salesman whispers that a Whirlpool Corp. washing machine priced at about $5,000 if paid for electronically will sell for $1,500 in cash, while at a nearby electrical warehouse, a $600 invoice is whittled down to $145 for payment in dollar bills.

    But, as OilPrice.com’s Tsvetana Paraskova reports, Zimbabwe is on a three-day nationwide strike and protests are erupting in the streets after the government of the southern African country doubled fuel prices, making gasoline sold in Zimbabwe the most expensive gasoline in the world.

  189. Mother Lode

    I drank Artesian water once?

  190. OldOzzie

    China Set to Announce Weakest Economic Growth in Almost 30 Years….

    BEIJING (Reuters) – China is expected to report on Monday that economic growth cooled to its slowest in 28 years in 2018 amid weakening domestic demand and bruising U.S. tariffs, adding pressure on Beijing to roll out more support measures to avert a sharper slowdown.

    Growing signs of weakness in China — which has generated nearly a third of global growth in the past decade — are stoking worries about risks to the world economy and are weighing on profits for firms ranging from Apple to big carmakers.

    Chinese policymakers have pledged more support for the economy this year to reduce the risk of massive job losses, but they have ruled out a “flood” of stimulus like that which Beijing has unleashed in the past, which quickly juiced growth rates but left a mountain of debt. (read more)

  191. mh

    You get the feeling that it wasn’t the acid attack but the homophobia that had them locked up, lol.

    Yes, most likely. But in Khan’s London who knows. In the future the homophobia angle could see the sentences reduced, or the cases just get sent to Sharia Law courts.

  192. dover_beach

    A must read from the boy who was attacked by the rancid mob:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/jaketapper/status/1087137470670663680/photo/1

    Read the thread that follows it. If you don’t think that Western societies aren’t heading towards open internal conflict you are in for a nasty surprise.

  193. Stimpson J. Cat

    Just had the Doctor compliment me on my exemplary health, reflective head, and all round just great guyness.
    Sys 115
    Dia 75
    Pul 52

    She was actually surprised when I informed her that Van Halen and denim shorts have dramatic health benefits, but she said she would be sure to pass it on to her other patients.
    She wanted to make sure my medication still working for some reason.
    😎

  194. JC

    Stimson

    IT how does McDonalds Corporatism play into your eternal battle for Artisanal recognition and reconciliation?
    Must the Artisan option always Trump cheap affordable food for the punters?
    We need some guidelines.

    It’s amusing watching Artie push Artisnal. He’s actually right in a way and I mentioned this a while ago. I think it’s one of the biggest wave movements to hit consumerism in a long time.

    However, the problem for Artie, as endearing as he is, is that he doesn’t seem to understand the ramifications. There is an artisinal movement in the world and it’s big. The 1% are going for it in a huge way. In the US and even here now, you can buy food such as meat and vegetables tagged from the farm it comes from (along with the farmer’s bio). Look to pay double.

    How about clothes? You sure can buy artisinally made clothes. Regular men’s shoes will cost around $2000, shirts around $600 and you can imagine what an artisan is asking for a suit… don’t expect much change from $5,000.

    This is the where we are.

    The benefits of large corporations is scaling, or rather economies of scale allowing for such costs like fixed expenses to be spread across large output. Artisans can never achieve this magic, which is why big is beautiful in terms of clothing and feeding the masses.

    There most certainly is an artisinal movement and it’s big. Unfortunately though, only the top say 2% of the world population is able to afford it.

  195. Des Deskperson

    ‘The annual reports of Our Watch are totally opaque about the breakdown of funding received from government and private sources.’

    The annual reports of OW are interesting all round:

    https://www.ourwatch.org.au/getmedia/9e5f7ceb-56ef-4896-a605-beef8b28334b/OurWatch_2016-17_Digital-AA.pdf.aspx

    The latest is for FY 2016-17. There is no report yet for FY 2017-18, a bit slack.

    A former Director -ceased office on 10 August 2017 – was Ms Yassmin Abdel-Magied

    Of the $6,965,434 it received in ‘contributions’ for the FY, $6,658,639 appears to to be ‘government grants’. Which of all the Australian jurisdictions that gave money gave what and how it was used isn’t stated.

    Our watch “Ambassadors’ at 30 June 2017 included Mr Charlie Pickering Ms Chloe Shorten Ms Lucy Turnbull AO and Ms Julia Zemiro

    Only two of the employees listed in the 2016-17 Annual Report are still with the organisation. One of them – the Director Corporate Services, was formerly Executive Director, Finance and Services, Wodonga TAFE.

    Prima facie, a slackly-administerd ‘charity’, mostly funded by the taxpayer and involving many of the usual virtue-signalling mediocrities

  196. Snoopy

    There most certainly is an artisinal movement and it’s big. Unfortunately though, only the top say 2% of the world population is able to afford it.

    And the bottom 20% (peasant farmers).

  197. struth

    It’s the free range egg nonsense.
    I can feed you a caged egg or a free range egg and you won’t be able to tell the difference.

    In Alice I once put cheap wine in some expensive bottles and Mrs Struth’s girlfriends all came around and loved it.

    Wankers the lot

  198. Confused Old Misfit

    There most certainly is an artisinal movement and it’s big. Unfortunately though, only the top say 2% of the world population is able to afford it.

    If the other 98% could afford it then it would be mainstream and no longer “artisinal”.

  199. Helen

    Struth, you have proabably got your song list together now, but Bec Cole’s Poster Girl is a great song.

  200. struth

    If the other 98% could afford it then it would be mainstream and no longer “artisinal”.

    But many of those 98 percent would still not waste their money just because they can.

    This artisan shit is firmly sold with the feminine socially competitive mindset at the fore.

  201. OldOzzie

    China 2018 GDP Growth Slows To Weakest In 28 Years

    Update: Not wanting to bury the lead, here is some context for the mixed bag tonight from China. China’s annual GDP growth in 2018 was +6.6% – that is the weakest annual GDP growth since 1990…

  202. woolfe

    Yep Zim in a terrible state, protestors getting shot in the street with door to do beating Maninfuckface was the architect of the Matabele massacres in the early 80’s were 20k or so were murdered.

    One Man. One Vote. Once.

  203. Stimpson J. Cat

    Dominik Tarczyński
    Dominik Tarczyński
    @D_Tarczynski
    Member of Parliament, Poland 🇵🇱. Vice President of European Conservatives in Council of Europe. Chairman – Subcommittee on TTIP.
    ·
    Dear Covington Catholic students,
    I’d like to invite You to the Polish Parliament
    After watching this video, I Am now standing up for these wrongfully accused young men and all of You!
    You are very welcome to come and speak out what You believe in!
    🇵🇱🇺🇸🤝

    #StandWithCovington

  204. Stimpson J. Cat

    OK this is epic.

    Elizabeth Warren
    @SenWarren
    Omaha elder and Vietnam War veteran Nathan Phillips endured hateful taunts with dignity and strength, then urged us all to do better.

  205. C.L.

    Funnily enough, today was burger day for me. Aussie B from HJ.
    The best a man can scoff.

  206. Rhodesia -> Zimbabwe

    So what do reckon they will call Australia as we head down the same path?

  207. Confused Old Misfit

    Our Watch

    Progressive elites.
    Come the revolution…

  208. Memoryvault

    It’s the free range egg nonsense. I can feed you a caged egg or a free range egg and you won’t be able to tell the difference.

    Struth, if you’re ever in our corner of SE QLD drop in sometime, and I’ll knock you up some bacon and eggs. Three eggs – one caged, one “free range” (bought), and one from our chooks.

    If you can’t tell the difference between the bought ones and our home-grown one, you need your eyes checked. And that’s for starters, before you even taste them.

  209. Come the revolution…

    Selecting the first tumbril load is a difficult task.
    It will be crowded.

  210. Dr Fred Lenin

    I see some Republican senators want a law stopping the wages of decromat congresscomrades while the shutdown is on . This is getting serious ,they are not allowed taxpayer funded junkets and getting their wages cut,dammned Trump ! Destroying the oerks that make career politics attractive .
    Rumour has it Pelosi actuallyl paid to fly away and ignore the crisis with her own money? Dont believe that probaly soros paid for it ,h e hates Trump ,who is preventing him from becomming Fuhrer of the world with the help of the decromats and u.n. He bought .

  211. struth

    Yeah Helen.
    Thank you very much.
    Appreciate the suggestion.
    Is that Beccy Cole trying to revive her career now she’s come out as a lesso, using the But, but, but, I’m patriotic line?
    Don’t stop buying my records just because I outed myself, because I sing songs for our troops.

    I could be wrong.

    I’ve had a bit to do with the country music breed in Australia, and they’re no different in their carry on to any other part of the industry.
    At least the Dixie Chicks said “I won’t back down”, after upsetting their base.

    Not trying to be nasty, and I do appreciate your suggestion, but that one won’t be getting a run.
    Neither will Solid Rock or anything by the walking roll on deodorant and his band of sons of suction.

  212. C.L.

    I doubt whether the world’s Catholic bishops have ever been so cowardly.
    Ever.

    In a joint statement issued later in the day, the Diocese of Covington and Covington Catholic High said they “condemn the actions of Covington Catholic High School students.”

    “This behavior is opposed to the Church’s teachings on the dignity and respect of the human person. The matter is being investigated and we will take appropriate action, up to and including expulsion. We know this incident also has tainted the entire witness of the March for Life and express our most sincere apologies to all those who attended the March and all those who support the pro-life movement,” the statement continued.

    Parents and Students Demand Apology From Diocese.

  213. struth

    Struth, if you’re ever in our corner of SE QLD drop in sometime, and I’ll knock you up some bacon and eggs. Three eggs – one caged, one “free range” (bought), and one from our chooks.

    I’ve had chooks before as well MV.
    Colour of the egg, size of the egg etc.
    But I’ll wager once cracked and cooked and sitting on top a steak, not many could tell the difference.
    Not enough for it to matter.
    I often have these sort of tassles with the Mrs Struth who tends to go off on the irrational foody bullshit.
    Paying dollars extra for a slightly better taste is ridiculous in my opinion and bordering on gluttony .
    I’m not explaining myself well there and now need to go.
    Hopefully you’ll get my point.

  214. zyconoclast

    stackja
    #2912957, posted on January 21, 2019 at 9:23 am
    Our Watch Who we are

    Our patrons and ambassadors include:
    The Honourable Quentin Bryce AD CVO Patron
    Rosie Batty Ambassador
    Lucy Turnbull AO Ambassador

    The stench of Durian* fruit will pervade the thread till Wednesday lunchtime.

    *smell like “turpentine and onions, garnished with a gym sock”

  215. Memoryvault

    I’m not explaining myself well there and now need to go.
    Hopefully you’ll get my point.

    Not really. But that’s okay.
    Enjoy your muck and bacon – I’ll stick with the real thing.

  216. zyconoclast

    Amsterdam’s red-light district overcrowded with selfie-taking tourists, sex workers say

    Some sharia law will sort that out.

  217. Confused Old Misfit

    But I’ll wager once cracked and cooked and sitting on top a steak, not many could tell the difference.
    Not enough for it to matter.

    If the eggs are the same age, and have been stored under the same conditions for the same length of time you will not be able to tell them apart by taste.
    The yoke colour will likely vary depending on feed content.
    There are some who will say that the yoke colour is determined by the breed of the hen…BS.
    Shells yes.

  218. Hay Stockard

    Strut,
    I have spent more than a few moments perpending on your problem viz playlist for Australia Day. You should have:
    The shearer’s strike of 91
    Dave Warner’s Newcastle Somg
    Aunty Jack Simgs Wollongong
    Anything by TISM
    Your audience will go wild. Happy to help. Please do let us know how you get on. 👌🏻

  219. johanna

    Re pill testing – I await the first massive lawsuit from the family of some eejit who died after ingesting something declared to be safe, from an ill-assorted batch of who knows what.

    Not to worry – taxpayers will foot the bill.

    Sigh.

  220. Tom

    Jon Faine is stepping down
    I wonder if Clementine is looking for a job. You know, equality and all.

    Mark my words: Faine’s replacement will have a vagina you can see from the moon and an even bigger mouth. She will make Faine look like a conservative.

  221. Stimpson J. Cat

    I doubt whether the world’s Catholic bishops have ever been so cowardly.

    Imagine in 2019 thinking that Catholic Bishops actually care about defending children.
    You are hopelessly naive C.L.


    Reality check was missing at US bishops’ retreat.

  222. Memoryvault

    The yoke colour will likely vary depending on feed content.

    That used to be the case, Misfit. Now all commercial chooks – caged or “free range” – have additives in their feed that guarantees a uniform yellow colour.

    The biggest visual give-away is the size. Commercial eggs are in 600 gram packs of a dozen, or average weight of 50 grams each. Jumbo eggs come i in at around 65 to 70 grams each.

    If I get an egg under 90 grams I suspect a crook chook.

  223. Dr Faustus

    Also Maccas have these gourmet burgers now that are very artisan.

    I visit Maccas about once a decade. I notice that you now need a degree in computer science to compose and order one of these gourmet wonders.

    They have an artisanal 3D printer and Asian STEM graduates out the back making them.

  224. OldOzzie

    Homer’s Iliad: be aware of Greeks bearing great gifts

    MATTHEW WESTWOOD

    Homer in his great epic The Iliad sets out his theme in the opening line: the wrath of Achilles. Anger and other equally powerful emotions — pride, resentment, love, grief — are the motivational drivers of The Iliad’s 24 books, in episodes that describe swift-footed Achilles’s bitter dispute with King Agamemnon, and that drag us into the bloodiest, bone-crunching battles of the Trojan War.

    The Iliad is one of humanity’s oldest surviving texts, a cornerstone of the vast treasury of cultural achievements that we call civilisation. It’s a bit unfashionable these days to talk about self-improvement — away from the gym or Tidying Up — but this summer I have set myself the task of reading it. There was a gap in my cultural knowledge that needed filling.

    It’s no great hardship. On a trip to Greece some years ago, I loved reading The Odyssey while sailing — on a ferry, not quite like Odysseus — between the islands. In Turkey I’d read The Aeneid, Roman poet Virgil’s account of the Trojan War, while visiting the sacred grounds of Gallipoli and ancient Troy. These are virile, exciting stories, shimmering with the “glory that was Greece and the grandeur that was Rome”, to borrow Poe’s memorable words.

    I was inspired to take the Homeric exercise in anticipation of public readings of The Iliad that start this week at the Sydney Festival. Another prompt was the current debate about the teaching of classics in our universities, and ­especially the objectives of the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation. Given The Iliad is among the foundational texts of the Western canon, I reckon it’s something I should know.

    The Iliad’s antiquity is certainly reason to have familiarity with it: it’s a portal into the culture of ancient Greece in the 8th century BC. Indeed it can be forbiddingly strange, so distant are we from the poet, or poets, we call Homer. The gods who reside on Mount Olympus and meddle in human affairs, and glamorous figures such as Achilles and Hector, occupy a world so unlike our own. That is the nature of myth. And yet these characters, gods and men alike, are so recognisably human in their psychological makeup.

    Achilles may be a great warrior and leader of the Myrmidons, but we also see him as vengeful and proud, stricken with grief at the death of his friend Patroclus, driven to terrible violence in his slaying of Hector, and finally capable of showing his enemy compassion.

    There are also The Iliad’s myriad literary qualities. Character-driven narrative, practically invented by Homer, is a technique in the toolbox of every popular novelist or screenwriter. The ­poetic images — the “wine-dark sea”, the “rosy-fingered dawn” — speak to us across millennia. As a channel for mythology, The Iliad’s legendary stories and archetypes continue to exert a powerful force.

    Two recent examples demonstrate our culture’s fascination with it. English poet Alice Oswald in 2011 produced her own poem based on The Iliad called Memorial, a kind of monument in verse that honours the 215 named warriors who die in the tale. It was adapted for the stage by Brink Productions’ Chris Drummond and given its premiere at last year’s Adelaide Festival — a performance with music, some 200 people on stage, and Helen Morse as the outstanding narrator.

    Another is Ransom, David Malouf’s novelistic treatment of The Iliad’s final episodes, in which King Priam comes to Achilles to beg the warrior to stop the desecration of his son Hector’s body, and to allow him to take the body home. It is difficult to think of an ending in all of literature that inspires greater pity, and Malouf in his version handles it with magisterial skill.

    William Zappa has spent the past seven years adapting The Iliad as a performable text, relying on 17 different versions, from the rhyming couplets of Alexander Pope to the modern retelling by Robert Fagles. The actor, who has Greek heritage — Zappa is his mother’s Greek family name — has absorbed these various translations to produce his own version in iambic hexameter, with lines assigned to different characters as in a play.

    In the slightly abridged readings that start on Wednesday — leading to an all-day reading on Sunday — Zappa takes the part of Zeus, lord of the dark clouds. Heather Mitchell is Zeus’s wife, the white-armed, queenly Hera, and Blazey Best and Socratis Otto play other roles.

    Zappa so far has adapted 22 of the 24 books, guided by Elizabeth Minchin at the Australian National University. When complete, he hopes his Iliad may be published as text to be used in schools.

    The Iliad is not without its detractors. In modern terms, we might describe the less edifying conduct of its male protagonists as symptomatic of toxic masculinity. Oswald, in her version, wanted to avoid the valorisation of bloodshed that she saw in Homer and often in the teaching of him. French philosopher and mystic Simone Weil — the subject of another performance at the Sydney Festival, Kaija Saariaho’s oratorio La Passion de Simone — considered the true theme of The Iliad to be “force employed by man, force that enslaves man, force before which man’s flesh shrinks away”.

    Even the notion of the Western canon — to which The Iliad and The Odyssey are integral — is bitterly contested, inasmuch as it is assumed to exclude other literary or narrative traditions. The controversy over the Ramsay Centre, a battle as fierce as any on the Trojan plain, is in part a rejection of so-called “European supremacism” or the white man’s view of history. Leaving aside questions of academic independence, the attack on the centre is also an attack on the Western tradition.

    Those who genuinely love literature and the wide world of books surely find this perplexing. With the canon we have a reliable guide to the best that Western literature has to offer, starting with Homer and the Greek dramatists. That doesn’t rule out as unworthy the achievements of other cultures, whether India’s Mahabharata or the creation mythology of Australia’s first peoples, custodians of the world’s oldest surviving culture.

    To shun Homer — and with him Plato, Sophocles, Aristophanes and the rest — as politically incorrect relics of long ago is to be blind to their glories. And why deny the pleasure and deep learning that is to be had in reading works such as The Iliad, even if only to add substance to a critique of its undeniably patriarchal, shockingly violent world?

    It may be time to brush up your Homer. For a writer some 2800 years old, he remains essential reading.

  225. Speedbox

    Struth – Good song for Australia Day that will get those assembled into sing-along mode:

    Shaddap you face by Joe Dolce.

  226. Just had the Doctor compliment me on my exemplary health, reflective head, and all round just great guyness.
    Sys 115
    Dia 75
    Pul 52

    The good lady doctor wasn’t that attractive then.
    Some dental assistants used to make my pulse race a bit.

  227. stackja

    Slain crime kingpin’s brother shot in assassination bid
    Mark Morri, Crime Editor, The Daily Telegraph
    10 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    The brother of slain underworld figure Hamad Assaad has been shot twice in western Sydney early today.

    Tarek Assaad took himself to Bankstown Hospital after being shot in the arm and shoulder around 2.15 this morning at Condell Park.

    Soon after police roped off an area at Dalton Avenue, Condell Park where a crime scene was established.

    His 29-year-old brother was gunned down in his driveway in November 2016 after a tit-for-tat war exploded on the streets of western Sydney with the murder of the Mr Big of Middle Eastern crime, Wally Ahmed.

  228. John Constantine

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJGvmBiNiDY

    TISM never be an old man river.

    They’re on the drug, they’re on the drug,

    They’re on the drug that killed venezuela

    [ repeat]

    They saw venezuela thrashing round

    They saw its house price going down

    Its economy in convulsive throes

    They said you now get one of those.

    Drank the slab, drank the slab

    Drank the slab that karl marx drunk

    [ repeat]

    They drank the slab that karl marx drunk

    Injected some of pol pot’s junk

    Booked a seat on the Davos plane

    Aussies never will be the same.

    Now they’re bribed

    Now they’re bribed

    Now they’re bribed, there’s no stopping

    Now they’re bribed

    Now they’re bribed

    Now they’re bribed and there’s no stopping.

    Comrades.

  229. Confused Old Misfit

    depending on feed content.

    Is that not what I said?
    What is put in to the feed influences the colour of the yoke.
    I did not reject the possibility of the use of a colouration additive.
    Although there are jurisdictions in which this practice is forbidden.

  230. stackja

    Oporto Broadway shuts down after rat infestation video emerges
    The Daily Telegraph
    January 21, 2019 9:40am
    Subscriber only

    Popular chicken burger outlet Oporto has been forced to shut down one of its stores after a video emerged of cat-sized rats invading their shop.

    The one minute clip posted on Facebook reveals at least four large rats scurrying around the fast-food outlet, with one rodent leaping onto the counter and disappearing into the kitchen.

  231. stackja

    Warning for Geelong, western suburbs motorists after police pursue Commodore
    Mark Buttler, Herald Sun
    15 minutes ago

    Police are pursuing a vehicle involved in a chain of offences over several hours today.

    The Herald Sun understands the green Holden Commodore wagon has been chased or tracked since about 8am in between Geelong and Melbourne’s western suburbs.

    “We ask the community to be mindful and cautious on roads within the area,” a Victoria Police spokeswoman said.

    “Any motorists who see the vehicle are urged not to engage it or the occupants.”

    More to come

  232. stackja

    Herald Sun
    January 21, 2019 11:06am

    Roger Federer has weighed into the ongoing debate around equal prize money in tennis just days after Serena Williams called her male counterparts to do more to help.

    Last week Williams renewed calls for equal money in women’s tennis – outside of grand slams.

    “In order for change to really be made, men and women have to work together,” Williams said. “They have to have the same message; they have to support each other.”

    What Williams neglected to make clear was that tennis prize money is not decided by the same governing body.

    The WTA looks after the women, the ATP the men.

    The ATP has done significantly more work in recent years to look after their players particularly in the lower levels of competition in order to assist the next generation.

    The WTA has been a little slow to keep up as Roger Federer pointed out after his fourth round defeat to Stefanos Tsitsipas.

    “They (women) deserve it. They also deserve it on the other tour, on the WTA Tour,” Federer said. “I know they’re lagging a little bit. That would be nice to see it going up.

    “If we can help, great. Sometimes maybe the men’s game is a bit more popular, sometimes the women’s game. I think we should always help each other as players regardless of who’s more popular at the moment.”

  233. JC

    Stack

    Has QF 12 arrived yet?

  234. struth

    Hark!:

    Faine’s replacement will have a vagina you can see from the moon and an even bigger mouth.

    What, like how your glans penis protrudes from your shirt collar?

    What a vagina.

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