Monday Forum: January 28, 2019

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1,253 Responses to Monday Forum: January 28, 2019

  1. I was at a pub two nights ago, you swine.

    Two nights ago?
    Your language was more moderate than you use here – or your eyes wouldn’t yet be open enough to read the screen.

    Funny how you betas moderate your language when they’re within hitting distance of men.

  2. Careful Socrates, JC is a made guy.Was about to agree, then I read again more slowly, and your second from last word isn’t the one starting with “g” and ending in “y”.

  3. egg_

    By February 2018, Duterte was offering civilians a bounty for killing communists and urging soldiers to shoot female communists “in the vagina” to make them “useless.”

    I don’t know how he would deal with female demorats like Pelosi.

    Elephant gun?

  4. JC

    Funny how you betas moderate your language when they’re within hitting distance of men.

    Driller, I’m very nice to people who are nice. I’ also very courteous to people who are also courteous.

    On the other hand scumbags like you deserve no quarter, you weal astryan.

  5. mh

    By February 2018, Duterte was offering civilians a bounty for killing communists and urging soldiers to shoot female communists “in the vagina” to make them “useless.”

    I don’t wish that on AOC.

  6. Peter Greagg

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2920090, posted on January 28, 2019 at 7:51 pm

    Thanks Zulu.
    I saw a History Channel documentary on Jutland with significant input from Nicholas Jellicoe.
    And yes I got the clear impression that Beatty was worse than useless.

  7. JC tries to backpedal.
    I see your type every day. And every day I see them retreat.
    Or get their fucking lights punched out, after which they learn some manners.
    You haven’t the balls to speak to random men in a pub the way you do here.

    There is a word for this, that word is “Cowardice”

  8. bundyrum

    JC, I haven’t got a fat head, but one thing you sure as shit are not courteous.
    I reckon sinc told you to calm down on the rabid nastiness you have, but it can’t happen as you are a real grumble & grunt.

  9. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The number of children, aged between 3 and 18, being referred to gender identity clinics went from 314 in 2011 to 2,016 in 2016.

    Last year UK’s Equalities Minister Penny Mordaunt ordered an urgent investigation after it was revealed there had been a 4,415 per cent increase in the number of girls being referred for ‘transitioning’ treatment.

    However, the abnormal surge in gender confusion in young children is a non-issue according to UK Prime Minister Theresa May, who said she’s “determined to eradicate homophobic and transphobic bullying.”

    “We have set out plans to reform the Gender Recognition Act and streamline and de-medicalise the process for changing gender, because being trans is not an illness and it shouldn’t be treated as such”, she added.

  10. Has anybody told JC that an establishment named “The Happy Guy” that serves espresso beside the beer, and has hanging planter baskets in the room, plus no betting stubs or peanut shells on the floor, is not a pub?

  11. JC

    George

    You’re delusional.

    Drills

    The only point I was making is that you made an incoherent reference to Grace going through a name change and that you change your name plate every few months for a refresher.

    Calm down.

  12. Muddy

    Peter,
    The Trafalgar Roll is an interesting read, though it is NOT a narrative. It lists each English ship involved in the battle (and their weaponry), each ship’s primary officers and ensigns, and has biographical details of the careers and lives of some of the same.

    The link is to a hard back version, however I recently purchased a softcover of the same title for much less, so shop around if you are interested.

  13. bundyrum

    I just need to throw a Scooby snack.
    How is Sydney airport shares going you guru?

  14. bespoke

    JC
    #2920017, posted on January 28, 2019 at 6:33 pm

    Would you agree with this.

    Large corporate entities are much harder to dislodge because of increased regulations, IP and have more access politicians through lobbying.

  15. Eyrie

    JC is good on the markets and had moderated his behaviour recently. Check that you have been taking your meds , JC.

  16. DrBeauGan

    JC
    #2919930, posted on January 28, 2019 at 5:14 pm
    Doc

    What’s your view? Nassim Taleb, who wrote Black Swan and Skin in the Game reckons IQ tests are basically useless and psychologists are even more useless. I never realized it, but the sheer “noise” relating to the “science” backing a lot of this up, essentially invalidates most of the area. Taleb reckons the only worthwhile thing IQ tests are able to do is test for retardation.

    I’m not sure if I believe him, but it’s interesting all the same.

    https://medium.com/incerto/iq-is-largely-a-pseudoscientific-swindle-f131c101ba39

    The original definition of IQ was mental age divided by chronological age multiplied by 100. The mental age was determined by looking to see what class age they would fit into. So some ten year old kid who could keep up with the average fifteen year old class had an IQ of 150. This stops working past a certain age because past age fifteen the average person pretty much stops learning any new ideas. And of course it’s highly cultural dependent.

    Attempts have been made to construct culturally independent tests. A typical such test question gives you nine squares, eight of which contain coloured discs, squares and triangles, and a choice from five possibilities to fill in the last square. A westerner will see the coloured objects as abstract entities, an African might interpret a blue disc as a representation of a pool of water, a couloured triangle as some species of bird or fish, and a coloured square as a house. Once you go down that road, you will not usually get the same answer as the psychologist who set the test. So the cultural independence is delusory.
    Taleb is right to conclude that most psychologists are a lot dumber than he is, and that their grasp of statistics is pathetic and grossly inadequate. You will notice from his scatterplots that correlations are good for low values and collapse for high values. Hence is claim that IQ tests are good for assessing retardation and not much more. Their big defect is that they are compiled by psychologists who are not very smart. Hence my claim that it is impossible to assess the intelligence of someone who is smarter than the guy doing the assessment. They work on small children, up to a point, because even the smartest ten year old knows less about most things than the average adult psychologist. But don’t try this with kids from a different culture.

    The various kinds of intelligence posited tend to correlate highly, which led Speareman to propose a general intellectual ability, a property of brains, Spearman’s g. This has been seen as validating any dim psychologist manufacturing his own test.

    My position is that some people are smarter than others in particular areas, that the smarter ones do better at thinking about their culture than the dim ones, and that much past the age of ten this has very little to do with IQ tests, which mostly measure how similar you are in your thinking to the psychologist who devised the test.

    Doug Hofstadter once posed the question in a lecture at Cal tech ” 2,4,8, 16,32, what comes next?”

    Dick Feynman put his hand up. “Zero!”

    My IQ test question: Why did Feynman say that?

  17. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    And yes I got the clear impression that Beatty was worse than useless.

    Beatty “threw away” his two to one superiority in battle cruisers, and he failed utterly in his mission of locating, and reporting the location, of the German High Seas Fleet. However, he succeeded Jellicoe as CinC the Grand Fleet, and then as First Sea Lord, where he spent much of his time having the official accounts of the battle, re drafted to emphasize his own role.

  18. Tom

    I won’t buy disposable razors from the ladyboy poofters at Gillette again, but let me just say the reason they’re still trading is the incompetence of their main competition, Schick. No.Fucking.Idea what they’re selling and to whom. So tonight I bought a no-name brand (“Alpha” — ha ha; finally someone understands the market). I’m tipping they come out of the same Asian sweatshop as Gillette and are of the same technical quality, minus the marketing. I will report back.

  19. Muddy

    My IQ test question: Why did Feynman say that?

    Yellow.
    I’m suddenly feeling a bit insecure.

  20. rickw

    You are testing the ability to pass a particular examination … but there are infinity many possible examination questions that could be asked.

    Tel, go and have a look at some of the YouTube videos on early IQ testing across different races. Before it got all political. There’s one that I can’t find the link to that showed a couple of the questions. In this case it was patterns in square boxes and being able to recognise the odd one out or which sample would represent the next expected pattern in the series. All very non cultural and the data supported this. ie. The majority would get the question right, but on average more got it wrong than the Asian or European average.

    It should be remembered that the whole basis of the testing was to sort recruits for the US Military. Not much point building in cultural or educational biases give the range of cultures and education standards within the USA at the time.

  21. The only point I was making is that you made an incoherent reference to Grace going through a name change and that you change your name plate every few months for a refresher.

    Nope.
    Not only are you a coward, you’re a liar.
    Please list, in as much detail as you like, how any reference to Grace Kelly’s name change was incoherent.

    But you won’t, as you can’t.

    As usual, you’re wrong, and you’re lying. (Either that or you’re incredibly stupid, which isn’t out of the ballpark in your case.)

  22. Tel

    Naval Firepower: Battleship Guns and Gunnery in the Dreadnought Era by Norman Friedman is a slightly more technical and chunky read, but very interesting if you wish to know how those systems worked during that period.

    Those old electromechanical targeting computers were amazing.

    The Russians had a machine called “Shilka” which was a radar-locked self-propelled anti-aircraft heavy machine gun designed and built in the 1960’s. The targeting computer in that clunker is an evolution of the old naval design. I searched around and found some free documentation:

    https://docshare01.docshare.tips/files/18114/181141339.pdf

    The 180kg 1A7 SRP electro-mechanical fire solution calculator occupies all of the space before the Commander. It contains 60 electric motors driving 110 axles over different potentiometers, shafts, rods, cams, gears and linkages to mechanically calculate…

    – ammunition flight time till impact (Tu)
    – elevation lead angle ()
    – azimuth lead angle (u)

    … using the target parameters received from the 1RL33 RPK-2 (Gun Dish) radar (, , R, , , R), and the correction angle (Q, K) received from the GAG (gyroscope) unit.

    They don’t build them like that anymore. It went through a series of upgrades and still gets used in India and the Middle East. You can also disable the computer and fire it by eye (usually against ground-level targets or an extremely slow helicopter), and it has also found favour in hilly terrain where it can sit at a low point and cover a ridge line. Tanks coming over the ridge usually have softer underbelly armour and the Shilka in radar mode will usually shoot first and disable the tank that crosses the ridge line.

    It did 50 years of effective service, which isn’t too bad for any machine.

  23. Tel

    Naval Firepower: Battleship Guns and Gunnery in the Dreadnought Era by Norman Friedman is a slightly more technical and chunky read, but very interesting if you wish to know how those systems worked during that period.

    Those old electromechanical targeting computers were amazing.

    The Russians had a machine called “Shilka” which was a radar-locked self-p r o p e l l e d anti-aircraft heavy machine gun designed and built in the 1960’s. The targeting computer in that clunker is an evolution of the old naval design. I searched around and found some free documentation:

    https://docshare01.docshare.tips/files/18114/181141339.pdf

    The 180kg 1A7 SRP electro-mechanical fire solution calculator occupies all of the space before the Commander. It contains 60 electric motors driving 110 axles over different potentiometers, shafts, rods, cams, gears and linkages to mechanically calculate…

    – ammunition flight time till impact (Tu)
    – elevation lead angle ()
    – azimuth lead angle (u)

    … using the target parameters received from the 1RL33 RPK-2 (Gun Dish) radar (, , R, , , R), and the correction angle (Q, K) received from the GAG (gyroscope) unit.

    They don’t build them like that anymore. It went through a series of upgrades and still gets used in India and the Middle East. You can also disable the computer and fire it by eye (usually against ground-level targets or an extremely slow helicopter), and it has also found favour in hilly terrain where it can sit at a low point and cover a ridge line. Tanks coming over the ridge usually have softer underbelly armour and the Shilka in radar mode will usually shoot first and disable the tank that crosses the ridge line.

    It did 50 years of effective service, which isn’t too bad for any machine.

  24. Socrates replies to JC about Grace Collier name change and it results in the usual crap and insults from JC.

    I nominate JC for the most tiresome and repetitive forum member.

    Next thing you know he will be accusing others of a “pile on” because he fails to acknowledge he is the common denominator in the great majority of unpleasant disputes on this forum.

  25. Top Ender

    Peter Greagg….“Can you recommend a good book on Nelson?”

    Peter Hore: Nelson’s Band of Brothers. (interesting insights into the man)

  26. Muddy

    You are an enigma, Tel. I had you half-pegged as some make-love-not-war hippy.

  27. feelthebern

    Tom from the looks of it, Schick shaving systems are a lot cheaper than Gillette.
    Im thinking about giving them a try once my current razors run out.

  28. vlad

    I know that Feynman annoyed Douglas Hofstadter with his answers and interjections in what was probably the same lecture. DH asked a puzzle question about who was England’s equivalent of the “First Lady” and Feynman said “My wife” (who was English).

    My guess is Feynman didn’t like the guy and thought his questions and ideas – and lecture – were a waste of time; he definitely had it in for professional philosophers.

  29. JC … the most tiresome and repetitive forum member.

    Fact check status: True

  30. dover_beach

    The number of children, aged between 3 and 18, being referred to gender identity clinics went from 314 in 2011 to 2,016 in 2016.

    Hmm, it’s a complete mystery what might have happened during that period.

  31. Muddy

    Socrates, BrettW et al,

    Please don’t take this the wrong way, chaps, but how is it that after all this time, you haven’t figured out a method of dealing with J.C., who puts the ‘predict’ in ‘predictable?’ I’m somewhat astounded that he gets as much out of you as he does.

  32. vlad

    And Feynman would have known that you can fit a polynomial curve to any finite series of numbers, including “2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 0”, ie construct an f(x) to have those values for x = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

  33. DrBeauGan

    Tel, go and have a look at some of the YouTube videos on early IQ testing across different races. Before it got all political. There’s one that I can’t find the link to that showed a couple of the questions. In this case it was patterns in square boxes and being able to recognise the odd one out or which sample would represent the next expected pattern in the series. All very non cultural and the data supported this. ie. The majority would get the question right, but on average more got it wrong than the Asian or European average.

    Rick, I don’t think those questions are culturally independent. They depend on assumptions about geometry.

  34. Tel

    My IQ test question: Why did Feynman say that?

    The answer was caused by an unhealthy amount of time spent using a PDP-8.

  35. jupes

    Doug Hofstadter once posed the question in a lecture at Cal tech ” 2,4,8, 16,32, what comes next?”

    Dick Feynman put his hand up. “Zero!”

    My IQ test question: Why did Feynman say that?

    Do tell Beaugy.

  36. Leigh Lowe

    Tuscany is the home of bistecca alla Fiorentina, globally called a
    T-bone steak and considered one of the finest cuts of beef available.

    I love it cooked that way. I’m heading to Sydney this month and will try it out. Definitely, bistecca Florentine is the only way to eat a hunk of meat.

    Too right.
    We shared one in Montepulciano a few years back.
    Why share?
    Well, it was 1.5kg raw weight (bone, meat and fat).

    The restaurant we were in had the massive side sitting on the block up the back.
    It goes like this …
    You order your steak.
    It gets hacked from the side with a monster cleaver.
    They pour olive oil on it.
    They apply salt.
    And then some more salt.
    And, as a final preparation, a touch more salt.
    Then it goes in the woodfired oven on a wire rack at a thousand degrees C for not very long.
    They flip it once.
    When it comes out of the oven they rest it, but not for long (maybe five minutes).
    And it is magnificent … charred to a crisp on the outside and beautifully rare (but not bloody) about 1/4″ in.
    From memory, it cost us EUR30 to EUR40 which is super cheap compared with what a share steak (800 grams max) costs here.
    Tip … when they ask how you want it cooked just say “Cook it how you would eat it.”
    The Yanks next to us copped a rounded up price for ordering it well done.

  37. Tel

    You are an enigma, Tel. I had you half-pegged as some make-love-not-war hippy.

    Are you saying that a person who understands a little bit about guns, therefore wants to go killing people?

    That’s not very nice. You sound like one of those people who believes that gun grabbing will reduce the crime rate.

  38. DrBeauGan

    vlad
    #2920120, posted on January 28, 2019 at 8:30 pm
    I know that Feynman annoyed Douglas Hofstadter with his answers and interjections in what was probably the same lecture. DH asked a puzzle question about who was England’s equivalent of the “First Lady” and Feynman said “My wife” (who was English).

    My guess is Feynman didn’t like the guy and thought his questions and ideas – and lecture – were a waste of time; he definitely had it in for professional philosophers.

    And the psychologists. With good reason. Hofstadter was a very shallow thinker, and Feynman would have been bored pretty quickly.

  39. bespoke

    The number of children, aged between 3 and 18, being referred to gender identity clinics went from 314 in 2011 to 2,016 in 2016.

    A kindy has gender reveal party, the kid is the centre of attention other kids think “I wont some of that”.

  40. Peter Greagg

    Top Ender
    #2920117, posted on January 28, 2019 at 8:25 pm
    Peter Greagg….“Can you recommend a good book on Nelson?”

    Peter Hore: Nelson’s Band of Brothers. (interesting insights into the man)

    Thanks Top Ender.

  41. Muddy

    Tel,
    No.
    I based my assumption on your past comments regarding history’s most recent conflicts in the Middle East and the involvement of ‘Western’ powers.

    It was not intended as a criticism or an attack, by the way. That is rarely my style. Note that I wrote ‘I HAD you …’ meaning that I was acknowledging my incorrect assumptions. I appreciate you putting forward that information related to one of comments.

  42. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    However, the abnormal surge in gender confusion in young children is a non-issue according to UK Prime Minister Theresa May, who said she’s “determined to eradicate homophobic and transphobic bullying.”

    “We have set out plans to reform the Gender Recognition Act and streamline and de-medicalise the process for changing gender, because being trans is not an illness and it shouldn’t be treated as such”, she added.

    The long march through the institutions has reached the highest level of the Torries.

  43. Bruce of Newcastle

    Why did Feynman say that?

    That’s a 64 dollar question. 😀

  44. DrBeauGan

    jupes
    #2920129, posted on January 28, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Doug Hofstadter once posed the question in a lecture at Cal tech ” 2,4,8, 16,32, what comes next?”

    Dick Feynman put his hand up. “Zero!”

    My IQ test question: Why did Feynman say that?

    Do tell Beaugy.

    The question 2,4,8,16,3#, What comes next expects you to notice that there is a simple rule for generating the serkes, namely, double the number to get its successor. The remarkable human ability to extract rules from data is called grammatical inference. A small child who says “Mummy, yesterday I seed two mans in the garden”, has worked out that you denote past tense by putting d or ed at the end of the verb, and plurality by putting an s at the end of the noun. Nobody told it, it inferred the rule from samples.

    As vlad points out, there is an infinite number of rules for extending the sequence 2,4,8,16,32. So the question becomes, why should you choose one rule over another? The usual answer is that the intelligent thing to do is choose the simplest rule. But what does simplest mean? Is the rule double the preceding answer actually simpler than choosing to make them all zero from now on? Or choosing the first number that comes into your head? Until you can answer that question you don’t understand grammatical inference and you don’t understand human intelligence.

    That was Feynman’s point. He was saying that Hofstadter was skirting all the important stuff.

  45. stackja

    Muddy
    #2920125, posted on January 28, 2019 at 8:33 pm

    JC
    #2907438, posted on January 15, 2019 at 12:14 am
    Furthermore, you need to try and focus on other subjects other than me. I’m boring and not very nice. Just forget about me.

  46. Muddy

    Thanks stackja, JC doesn’t worry me though.

  47. JC

    Muddy
    #2920125, posted on January 28, 2019 at 8:33 pm

    Socrates, BrettW et al,

    Please don’t take this the wrong way, chaps, but how is it that after all this time, you haven’t figured out a method of dealing with J.C., who puts the ‘predict’ in ‘predictable?’ I’m somewhat astounded that he gets as much out of you as he does.

    Muddy , as the self-anointed evaluator, evaluate Rooster to the blog. This one puts Rooster at 88.5% of his comments directed to me.

    BrettW
    #2920116, posted on January 28, 2019 at 8:24 pm

    Socrates replies to JC about Grace Collier name change and it results in the usual crap and insults from JC.

    I nominate JC for the most tiresome and repetitive forum member.

    Next thing you know he will be accusing others of a “pile on” because he fails to acknowledge he is the common denominator in the great majority of unpleasant disputes on this forum.

    Regarding Driller, the problem with Driller is that since I kicked out of him that nasty habit of narcissistic pubbling here, the only value add he offers is plussing other people’s work. From narcissistic pubbler he’s now become the site’s plusser.

    You’re not giving me enough credence. 🙂

  48. Boambee John

    Tel at 2019

    The Russians had a machine called “Shilka” which was a radar-locked self-p r o p e l l e d anti-aircraft heavy machine gun designed and built in the 1960’s.

    ZSU-23-4? A quad 23mm self-propelled AA system. Bit more than a heavy MG, I wonder how much the US quad .50in (12.7mm) influenced the design.

    The US also had a twin 40mm AA gun system. Guess what? The Russians produced the ZSU-57-2, a twin 57mm self-propelled AA gun system. Typically Russian, take a good idea and make it bigger?

  49. Tel

    I based my assumption on your past comments regarding history’s most recent conflicts in the Middle East and the involvement of ‘Western’ powers.

    The Western powers have good quality weapons, I never said otherwise. The Russians also have good weapons, although their evolutionary path has been different and I think they are still a little bit behind but catching up. The recent conflict in Syria has awarded a point to the Russians at both the strategic and tactical level, but they had the advantage that they were in support of the status quo which generally is easier than regime change.

    Be that as it may, merely because you have better weapons than some smaller and weaker regime doesn’t make a good reason to go smash them… especially if you intend to leave troops behind with some muddle headed nation building project which they weren’t trained for and which we have consistently proven bad at.

    I’ve never put forward the position that Australia should be weak or pacifist. Nor have I suggested that ignorance is a good plan for the future. Like our Constitution says, we should have a defense force, and it should be used for defensive purposes. To me it sounds like a simple enough proposition, and yet I almost every day run into people who either cannot understand the concept, or behave as if they don’t understand, or even if they do understand they down-rate the importance. It’s a difficult thing to keep generations of warriors ready to fight at a moment’s notice without ever actually fighting. I don’t have a clever answer to that … but I don’t want to see a war either … if there’s ways to avoid it.

  50. 132andBush

    JC

    #2919930, posted on January 28, 2019 at 5:14 pm

    Doc

    What’s your view? Nassim Taleb, who wrote Black Swan and Skin in the Game reckons IQ tests are basically useless and psychologists are even more useless. I never realized it, but the sheer “noise” relating to the “science” backing a lot of this up, essentially invalidates most of the area. Taleb reckons the only worthwhile thing IQ tests are able to do is test for retardation.

    JC,
    If you can stand him Stefan Molyneux is an interesting listen here

  51. Boambee John

    Trapped by the spaminator!

    Tel at 2019

    The Russians had a machine called “Shilka” which was a radar-locked self-p r o p e l l e d anti-aircraft heavy machine gun designed and built in the 1960’s.

    ZSU-23-4? A quad 23mm self-pro p e lled AA system. Bit more than a heavy MG, I wonder how much the US quad .50in (12.7mm) influenced the design.

    The US also had a twin 40mm AA gun system. Guess what? The Russians produced the ZSU-57-2, a twin 57mm self-pro p e lled AA gun system. Typically Russian, take a good idea and make it bigger?

  52. Confused Old Misfit

    Horatio Nelson
    Tom Pocock
    Brockhampton Press

  53. Peter Greagg

    Muddy, Top Ender, and Zulu
    Books ordered.
    BTW, after being impressed by Clint Eastwood’s films “Flags Of Our Fathers” and “Letters from Iwo Jima”, I have bought the books the films were based on.

  54. Infidel Tiger

    JC,
    If you can stand him Stefan Molyneux is an interesting listen here

    No.

    Molyneux is a creep.

  55. Peter Greagg

    Confused Old Misfit
    #2920153, posted on January 28, 2019 at 9:16 pm
    Horatio Nelson
    Tom Pocock
    Brockhampton Press

    I will check it out thanks.

  56. jupes

    Thanks Beaugy (I think).

  57. Confused Old Misfit

    Peter,
    See also:
    Victory – The Life of Lord Nelson
    Oliver Warner
    and
    Trafalgar
    Oliver Warner

  58. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Muddy, Top Ender, and Zulu
    Books ordered.

    Enjoy the reading. “Rules of the Game” can be heavy reading, but it goes a long way to explain the mindsets at Jutland.

  59. cohenite

    And Feynman would have known that you can fit a polynomial curve to any finite series of numbers, including “2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 0”, ie construct an f(x) to have those values for x = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

    It’s a geometric sequence. The answer should relate to the logic of the sequence. It’s not an Agatha Christie novel with the murderer being a polynomial.

    Same with IQ being the ability to perceive the logic of things.

  60. Boambee John

    Tel at 2112

    I’ve never put forward the position that Australia should be weak or pacifist. Nor have I suggested that ignorance is a good plan for the future. Like our Constitution says, we should have a defense force, and it should be used for defensive purposes. To me it sounds like a simple enough proposition, and yet I almost every day run into people who either cannot understand the concept, or behave as if they don’t understand, or even if they do understand they down-rate the importance. It’s a difficult thing to keep generations of warriors ready to fight at a moment’s notice without ever actually fighting. I don’t have a clever answer to that … but I don’t want to see a war either … if there’s ways to avoid it.

    Since federation, Australian defence policy has been a tussle between the nationalists, who had the running up until 1914, and the imperialists, who took over in 1914. The imperialists went into retreat in the 1920s/1930s, but gained ground between 1939 and 1972. The nationalists were in the ascendent until 2001, reaching their peak in the Beazley/Dibb era. The imperialists, now re-badged as the globalists, have pulled ahead, but are being rather too slowly overtaken now.

  61. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Typically Russian, take a good idea and make it bigger?

    Can’t remember the tile, but the book was on Soviet aircraft of the Cold War, and the author commented that the aim of Soviet technology, was building the world’s biggest microchip.

  62. Eyrie

    “It’s a difficult thing to keep generations of warriors ready to fight at a moment’s notice without ever actually fighting. I don’t have a clever answer to that … but I don’t want to see a war either … if there’s ways to avoid it.”
    See Switzerland. A population trained and armed to the teeth. I’ve always liked the Swiss model. The “porcupine” model if you like.

  63. Bruce of Newcastle

    Is the rule double the preceding answer actually simpler than choosing to make them all zero from now on?

    I like 63.
    See if you can work out how 63 is the answer.

  64. Eyrie

    Or to use another analogy “Don’t tread on me”. The Gadsden flag.

  65. Muddy

    Tel
    #2920149, posted on January 28, 2019 at 9:12 pm.

    I think we have slightly different philosophies in that regard, Tel. However, to go into detail would reveal my ignorance, so I’ll leave humiliation for another day.

    Thank you for taking the time to outline your thinking.

    I’m off for an early night.
    Take care, everyone.

  66. Boambee John:

    The US also had a twin 40mm AA gun system. Guess what? The Russians produced the ZSU-57-2, a twin 57mm self-propelled AA gun system. Typically Russian, take a good idea and make it bigger?

    Are you thinking of the Sergeant York AD System?
    Never got through the trials stage because it would shoot out the fans in nearby truck radiator cooling systems, or bathroom exhaust fans.
    Probably not a good idea.

  67. DrBeauGan

    Same with IQ being the ability to perceive the logic of things.

    Or as I tried to explain, the ability to extract rules from data.

  68. Shy Ted

    psychologists are even more useless. If psychology worked no-one would smoke, drink, fight, or repeat any infraction of the rules. These days they’re basically researchers trying to work out why they’ve failed to cure anyone of what ails them. It’s the go-to uni course for the sexually confused.

  69. MatrixTransform

    News.com.au is simply trash

    I remember a few years ago fairfax let go quite a few ‘journos’ and muzzled the yapping dog to some small degree.
    Daily Life fr instance had its new age edge blunted

    Id been looking at news.com.au for a while until then. At that point the recently sacked must have started submitting their gibber to news.com.au.

    after about 2 weeks I dropped it completely and never ever went back.

  70. Eyrie

    “Or as I tried to explain, the ability to extract rules from data.”
    aka the scientific method. Then try the rules with new data and see if the prediction matches the data.
    The rule of thumb is “simpler is better” for the rule so as a first cut 64 is the answer. .

  71. JC

    Same with IQ being the ability to perceive the logic of things.

    What does that mean with the criticisms Taleb is offering?

    Explain yourself, Cronkite.

  72. Top Ender

    “Can you recommend a good book on Nelson?”

    Apologies to others for the length of this, but it sort of sums up Nelson. I’ve used it for speeches on 21 October dinners etc. Some useful books at the end – Abebooks.com might be necessary for some though.

    Trafalgar Night

    By Top Ender

    Tonight an age-old tradition of the Royal Australian Navy will be observed. We will always do well to remember Horatio Nelson, the greatest fighting sailor who ever lived, and one who should serve as a model for naval people everywhere.

    Horatio Nelson, the victor of the Battle of Trafalgar, fought against his country’s enemies for much of his life. A short, thin man not blessed with good looks, he first entered the British navy as a midshipman at the age of 12 years and three months. His father was a parson and Nelson had behind him a boyhood that had not been characterised by anything except need. He was one of eight children; his mother had died when he was nine, and his prospects did not look hopeful. However, even at a young age Nelson had initiative – he persuaded an older brother to appeal to his father to arrange an entry to the Navy via the good graces of an uncle, who commanded the 64-gun Raisonable. Bending the rules which should have rated Nelson as a captain’s servant, his uncle made sure the boy was accepted.

    The British Navy in those days was the greatest in the world in terms of power, and also the most professional, with high standards both expected and met, and characterised by discipline and great ability from sailor and officer alike. With hundreds of years of tradition behind it, this was the Navy that had sailed the seven seas in exploration under great navigators such as James Cook and William Bligh, and defeated Britain’s enemies at sea in fleet and single ship action, often achieving victory against the odds. It was a harsh Navy too, with unrelenting discipline that often had to keep crews on its ships by force, which was often the way the sailors had arrived there in the first place – by being “pressed”. (The British sailor, for all his tremendous stamina, courage and resourcefulness, was also no fool, and often preferred a more comfortable and profitable existence ashore). Even for the most junior officer – midshipmen such as Nelson – the life was hard. These young officers lived in discomfort, often with poor food, were as disciplined as their sailors – they were often beaten in the gunroom rather than flogged at the gratings. They had a great deal to learn; from navigation to naval combat techniques along with all of the complex construction and handling of a wind-driven ship of war. And of course, there was always the prospect of being shot at with all of the horrors of combat in those days: chain shot, grape shot, musket fire and cannonball along with the cutlasses and pistols of the enemy; all combined to kill, maim or wound -with no recourse to attention under anaesthetic – the sailors of Nelson’s navy.

    Into this doubtful future in 1771 came the young midshipman, to his first ship. Despite being prone to sickness: “I have had all the diseases that are” he once said; he adapted well to the vigorous and often dangerous life that was the Navy. He volunteered early in his service for a two-ship voyage to the North Pole, where he and a fellow midshipman left the ice-bound ship in the middle of the night to hunt a polar bear. The two adventurers were later seen attacking a bear some distance from the ship; the signal was made for them to return; which they did reluctantly – Nelson’s excuse was that he wanted to send the bear’s skin to his father.

    Passing his Lieutenant’s examination in 1777, Nelson gained promotion to Post-Captain in the following year. His early commands were frigates, and he saw varied action: against privateers; river forts; on blockade. He married in 1787, but while he and his new wife were able to spend time together ashore in a comparatively peaceful period of Britain’s history, Nelson hankered after a new ship. With the beginning of the French Revolution war looked imminent, and the young captain, now 34, was given his first line-of-battle ship, the fourth rate 64-gun Agamemnon.

    Nelson employed in his leadership style something quite unusual for its day: the art of effective communication. One characteristic of this is to invite others to contribute their ideas for a campaign, or a battle, or a change of some sort; to educate his men and get them – and him – to know each others’ minds. Nelson embarked upon the Battle of the Nile in 1798 by letting his captains engage in individual fashion. The French fleet, anchored by the bows in a line in shallow coastal water, were engaged in ship to ship fashion by five British ships sailing inside the line and anchoring, and the rest engaging from outside. Thus the French were caught between two forces. At the end of hours of fighting, the French had lost 1, 700 men to the British loss of 200, and their fleet was largely pounded to pieces; Napoleon and his army stranded in Eygpt. Nelson had hoisted just two signals through the entire battle.

    For the autocratic manager this would have been disastrous – an authoritarian leader would not trust his subordinates to make momentous decisions and fight on their own. Nelson, however, trusted his individual captains. So too, in the long pursuit of the French, years later in 1805, which led to Trafalgar, he had regular meetings with his “Band of Brothers” – the name first applied to those who fought under him at the Nile. During the long chase the officers would pool their ideas for forthcoming battles; the best use of tactics; what a following ship would do when its fellow was sighted engaged and so on. Consequently even the necessity for signals within the ensuing battle was dispensed with; the captains knew each others’ minds.

    There are many other such examples of this attitude; Nelson detested a formal meeting but rather preferred informal sessions where his fellows could relax and speak their mind freely. Perhaps this is one of the many aspects of the man that inspired such loyalty from his peers: Hardy, who was with him when he died, Collingwood, whose battle line he enthusiastically raced to be first to engage at Trafalgar; Berry, who followed him from ship to ship; Hallowell, who after the Battle of the Nile made him a present of a coffin fashioned from the mainmast of the French ship L’Orient – Nelson kept it in his cabin for some time and was indeed buried in it.

    Nelson was the supreme naval tactician. He demonstrated this many times in battle; his earlier commands of frigates having given him an understanding of the advantages of maneuverability and speedy action which he later brought to bear against the more textbook examples of action such as the commitment of a fleet into line of battle order. One of his notable tactical decisions – typical of a frigate captain – was action in the 1797 battle of Cape St Vincent. Fighting against the Spanish fleet and commanding HMS Captain, Nelson without orders put his ship across the advancing line of Spanish warships – his two-decker of 74 guns facing a four-decker of 136 guns – then the biggest ship afloat – with three-deckers behind. In this way Nelson forced the Spanish ships to alter course, thus allowing others of the British van to join the battle. As historian Christopher Lloyd says: “Only a tactician of genius and a man totally without fear would have dared to do this on his own initiative”.

    The development of “the Nelson touch” – that singular appreciation of the battle to come and the right actions to take – was part of his tactical repertoire time and again. For example, we may look at his pursuit in the van of the British fleet to capture the 84 gun Ca Ira in 1796. In the ship to ship encounter Nelson’s maneuvering allowed him to inflict damage on the French ship repeatedly while avoiding damage himself. The French ship looked like being relieved when one of her peers arrived to help, but then both surrendered to Nelson. He was even capable of showing brilliance in land assaults, as he did at the siege of Bastia in Corsica, taking command of 12,000 troops and 300 seamen, bringing the town to capitulation. But innovative tactics did not prevent Nelson from understanding the brute force necessary for naval battles of the day; at the peak of his success he was to declare: “No captain can do very wrong if he places his ship alongside that of an enemy”.

    Nelson was master of naval strategy. He demonstrated this repeatedly. He was recognised by one of the great Admirals of the age, Sir John Jervis, later to be Lord St Vincent, to be “more an associate than a subordinate officer” as Nelson wrote to his wife, and Jervis made him a Commodore. An occasional diplomat, Nelson never lost sight of the “Big Picture” of victory against Napoleon Bonaparte, and was always one to rise against personal rivalry with fellow officers, and the inter-service rivalry which then as now was a pestilence upon campaigns. Nelson, for example, was the commander of the force at the Bastia siege, while his Army equivalent, the famous Colonel Sir John Moore, “sulked in his tent” as Lloyd put it. Before the battle of Cape St. Vincent Nelson was to write: “A victory is very essential to England at this moment”. He was truly an instrument of his nation rather than himself.

    Nelson knew also when to fight and when to seek peace. Having fought the Danish fleet into a standstill at Copenhagen, he negotiated with Denmark’s Prince Royal afterwards, seeking to stop the Prince’s country from moving towards Bonaparte. A successful armistice of 14 weeks was concluded by Nelson, demonstrating his mastery of statesmanship and strategy; a vote of thanks in the House of Commons commented: “that Lord Nelson had shown himself as wise as he was brave, and proved that there may be united in the same person the talents of the Warrior and the Statesman”.

    Nelson was a leader, who demonstrated ruthlessness when necessary: he sacked his secretary after the Battle of the Nile, when that man broke down at the sight of his leader’s wound and failed to carry out Nelson’s orders. But he also demonstrated a willingness to learn, to change bad old ways for new better ones, and he was always willing to take advice, from anyone of any rank. Nelson learnt from Admiral Jervis, for example, of the importance of cleanliness on board ship to prevent typhus, and the necessity of lemon juice to ward off scurvy. But he also looked for greatness in his juniors, having Edward Berry, his First Lieutenant in Agamemnon, promoted to Captain because “he is an officer of talents, great courage and laudable ambition”. The biographer Southey observed: “He could electrify all within his atmosphere” while St. Vincent, not a man who was prone to flattery, said that Nelson: “…possessed the magic art of infusing the same spirit into others which inspired their own actions”.

    Nelson was a man of courage, honour and action who we would do well to emulate. This is the sailor who lost an eye when an enemy shell, exploding during the siege of Calvi in Corsica, drove splinters and dust and rock fragments into his face. He suffered most terribly and often from wounds, paradoxically being not so much a man who loved combat as one who stood back as demanded of a senior commanding officer crucial to the course of battle. His wounds resulted from being quite willing to lead from the front if that was what it took to win an action. His right arm was amputated after the battle of Santa Cruz in Teneriffe due to his being hit by grapeshot. On the way back to the ship – at that time the Theseus – Nelson was lying in the bottom of the boat with a tourniquet around his arm, half conscious from loss of blood. When they reached the ship, he was half-hauled on board, clinging to the rope with one arm while he climbed up the ship’s side. Once on board he gave orders for the surgeon to be called immediately, saying: “for I know I must lose my arm, and the sooner it is off the better.”

    During the battle of Cape St Vincent – we recall Nelson had thrown Captain in the path of the vastly superior 136 gun Santissiama Trinidada – this man of courage and action himself led the charge up the side of the Spanish 80 gun San Nicolas, followed by “my old Agamemnons” – a detachment of the Sixty-Ninth Regiment of Foot. Together they stormed the ship, Nelson leading with a cry of “Westminster Abbey or Glorious Victory” and if that was not enough, when fired upon by the San Josef, which had collided with her sister ship, he led the way aboard her too. Together the men from CAPTAIN took this ship as well. By the end of the action Captain had to be towed away, but the British fleet – outmanned and outgunned – had won the day, thanks to Jervis’s training and discipline of his men and Nelson’s initiative; celebrated in the public’s acclaim as “Nelson’s Patent Bridge for Boarding First Rates”. Nelson himself was immediately promoted to Rear Admiral. His wife meanwhile, begged him to “leave boarding to Captains”.

    This too is the man who had the courage of his own convictions, who could often have left off and blamed superiors for failure, but instead the man who chose to advance when he knew defeat was attainable and essential. At the Battle of Copenhagen, walking the deck while the guns roared their broadsides, and deadly splinters whistled about his ears, this is the man who confided to Colonel Stewart, commander of infantry, who was with him on the quarterdeck, that he would not be “elsewhere for thousands”. And when his uncertain superior, Admiral Parker, made the signal to leave off the action, Nelson refused to see it, putting his telescope to his blind eye and exclaiming: “I really do not see the signal”. The British won the battle.

    However, Nelson was never one to be less than magnanimous in victory and brave in defeat. He once took on with his own two frigates two ships of equal size belonging to the Spanish. Before the fight began, the following dialogue took place between the lead ships across the water.

    “This is an English frigate. If you do not surrender, I will fire.”
    “This is a Spanish frigate. You may begin as soon as you please.”

    A fierce fight then took place, and the English began to get the better of things. Called upon several times to surrender, the senior Spanish officer, Don Jacobo Stuart, replied with: “No sir, not whilst I have the means of fighting left”. When the Spanish eventually struck, Don Jacobo was most generously treated, and Nelson wrote personally to the captain general to whom was given the prisoners, and asked that they be looked after, saying: “It becomes great nations to act with generosity to each other, and to soften the horrors of war”.

    Nelson was a Humanitarian ahead of his times. Although he served in a time when naval discipline was harsh indeed, he was never one to flog a fleet into shape, as even some of the more intelligent naval commanders were wont to do: Admiral Sir John Jervis, for example, although Jervis attained a reputation as harsh but very fair. While the famous naval mutinies of Spithead and the Nore raged, Nelson’s ships remained aloof from the dispute, although the stories had leaked through. Perhaps it is significant that when the Theseus, a ship implicated in the mutinies, was sent to join Nelson’s ships, a scrap of paper was casually dropped on her quarterdeck a fortnight later. It read:

    Success attend Admiral Nelson! God bless Captain Miller! We thank them for the officers they have placed over us. We are happy and comfortable, and will shed every drop of blood in our veins to support them, and the name of the Theseus shall be immortalized as high as the Captain’s – Ship’s Company.

    This was the commander, who even before his fame grew to its eventual immense proportions, who had men petition to serve under him, and who often took a personal interest in their welfare. Although we might think such interest as being perfectly normal, this was a hard and savage era of history, with the “mob” below and leaders such as Nelson far above. Nelson, unusually for the age, while not rubbing shoulders on all occasions with his men, saw them as being humans and worth his time. On one of the many occasions he was wounded, Nelson refused to allow attention to be paid to him before the others of the ship’s crew awaiting the surgeon’s attention. On another occasion, after the Battle of Copenhagen, and again unusually for the age, he visited the hospital in which his men lay wounded even before visiting Emma Hamilton, and took especial interest in them, giving their nurses a guinea each as a mark of especial encouragement in their duties.

    On the 21st of October 1805 the British fleet, after months of pursuit, met the French and Spanish forces under Admiral Villeneuve at sea off Cape Trafalgar. The British, in two lines according to Nelson’s instructions, raced to intersect the enemy’s line of battle. In the late morning Nelson directed his famous signal be hoisted. The flag lieutenant suggested a more economical hoist of 12 flags, and therefore the word “confides” was changed to “expects”. The rolled flags raced to the masthead of Victory and snapped open: “England expects every man will do his duty”. At 11.45 the battle was joined. In Victory the band played “Rule Britannia” and “Britons Strike Home” as followed by Temeraire and Neptune she opened fire. The French and Spanish fought well but the British, ruling the seas after years of battle, were their master, and the fleet action, now joined on all sides, began to go against Villeneuve.

    At 1.35 Nelson, pacing his quarterdeck amidst the crash of the broadsides, calm amidst the smoke that wreathed Victory, was giving his orders quietly and firmly, as always. A French sharpshooter, stationed in the rigging of the Redoutable, took aim at the distinctively-uniformed slight figure and fired.

    The shot, from only 15 metres, was a sure one, and the Admiral fell. He was carried below, and while the battle raged, he lay dying in Victory’s cockpit. He was at last brought the news of the British triumph. His last words were as follows: “Take care of poor Lady Hamilton. Kiss me, Hardy. Now I am satisfied. Thank God, I have done my duty”. The ship’s log records. “Partial firing continued until 4.30, when a victory having been reported to the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Nelson KB and Commander in Chief, he then died of his wound.”

    While Australia is perhaps taking new directions, we must remember the origins of the Royal Australian Navy, born before World War I and initiated in fire and blood under the aegis of the Royal Navy. We have inherited its uniforms, its ranks, its tactics and techniques. Although we now learn from and teach other forces, and our ships are a mixture of our own design and the best from around the world, surely we must take the most from our history as we continue. Nelson is part of our tradition; part of our past, and he and all that was his should never be forgotten. The Tradition of Trafalgar Night and its toast – “To the Immortal Memory” should always be part of the Royal Australian Navy and its traditions.

    -o-o-O-o-o-

    References:

    Fenwick, Kenneth. HMAS Victory. London: Cassell, 1960.
    Ireland, Bernard. Naval Warfare in the Age of Sail. London: Harper Collins, 2000.
    Lloyd, Christopher. Nelson and Sea Power. London: English Universities Press, 1973.
    Padfield, Peter. Broke and the Shannon. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1968.
    Southey, Robert. The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson. London: JM Dent, 1906.
    Thursfield, James R. Nelson and other Naval Studies. London: John Murray, 1920.
    Winton, John. Hurrah for the Life of a Sailor. London: Michael Joseph, 1977.

  73. JC

    Bush

    Dude, each to his own, but I have never been able to stomach molyneux. He’s fake.

  74. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    As vlad points out, there is an infinite number of rules for extending the sequence 2,4,8,16,32. So the question becomes, why should you choose one rule over another? The usual answer is that the intelligent thing to do is choose the simplest rule. But what does simplest mean? Is the rule double the preceding answer actually simpler than choosing to make them all zero from now on? Or choosing the first number that comes into your head? Until you can answer that question you don’t understand grammatical inference and you don’t understand human intelligence.

    That was Feynman’s point. He was saying that Hofstadter was skirting all the important stuff.

    It’s not the simplest but the most obvious. Since we don’t know how to quantify simplicity for rules how can we tell which is the simplest?

    Obviously any test requires some context, however no one said that intelligence exists without any contextual background. Having previously been exposed to a certain class of patterns obviously will boost your ability to deal with them again. Nevertheless some people can manipulate them quicker and easier than others.

    There seems to be some sort of egalitarian creep into the debate that everyone is equally intelligent, or could be equally intelligent if given the right something or other or that everyone is intelligent in one way or another as much as anyone else. The reality is that view is complete bullshit. Clearly there is a distribution amongst people, in what I would call processing power and to suggest that you can’t possibly measure that difference is ridiculous.

  75. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Is the rule double the preceding answer actually simpler than choosing to make them all zero from now on?

    expressing it as a turing machine, doubling would be simpler.

    I like 63.
    See if you can work out how 63 is the answer.

    IQ test don’t test what you like, it tests what would be obvious or what could be obviously deduced, there is nothing obvious about 63 in relation to the sequence. A normal person would regard that as a trick question.

  76. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Newspoll: Coalition in new year bounce

    Simon Benson
    The Australian
    9:45PM January 28, 2019

    Scott Morrison has received an electoral boost months out from an expected May federal election with the Coalition returning to its highest poll ratings since the removal of Malcolm Turnbull.

    The first Newspoll of 2019, conducted exclusively for The Australian, reveals a five point turnaround in popular support for the two major parties since December with the Coalition’s primary vote lifting two points to 37 per cent and Labor falling three points to 38 per cent.

    While Labor still commands a significant election winning two-party preferred lead of 53/47, the Coalition has clawed back ground after slumping to 55/45 in the final poll of 2018. The 2PP and primary vote results were the best for the Morrison government since its post-coup peak in October last year

    The summer poll bounce, based on a survey of 1634 voters across the nation between January 24-27, comes on the back of the government ramping up its attack on Labor’s tax and spend agenda.

    Mr Morrison, who has been forced to deal with a series of ministers announcing they would quit politics at the federal election, maintained his lead over Labor leader Bill Shorten as better prime minister 43 to 36 per cent.

    From the Oz.

  77. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Newspoll: Coalition in new year bounce

    Simon Benson
    The Australian
    9:45PM January 28, 2019

    Scott Morrison has received an electoral boost months out from an expected May federal election with the Coalition returning to its highest poll ratings since the removal of Malcolm Turnbull.

    The first Newspoll of 2019, conducted exclusively for The Australian, reveals a five point turnaround in popular support for the two major parties since December with the Coalition’s primary vote lifting two points to 37 per cent and Labor falling three points to 38 per cent.

    While Labor still commands a significant election winning two-party preferred lead of 53/47, the Coalition has clawed back ground after slumping to 55/45 in the final poll of 2018. The 2PP and primary vote results were the best for the Morrison government since its post-coup peak in October last year

    The summer poll bounce, based on a survey of 1634 voters across the nation between January 24-27, comes on the back of the government ramping up its attack on Labor’s tax and spend agenda.

    Mr Morrison, who has been forced to deal with a series of ministers announcing they would quit politics at the federal election, maintained his lead over Labor leader Bill Shorten as better prime minister 43 to 36 per cent.

    From the Oz.

  78. JC

    There seems to be some sort of egalitarian creep into the debate that everyone is equally intelligent, or could be equally intelligent if given the right something or other or that everyone is intelligent in one way or another….

    Or to follow the more obvious line of logical sequence, intelligence is really hard to measure and a great deal of the so-called science is innumerate bullshit.

    What do you find wrong with Taleb’s comment?

  79. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Newspoll: Coalition in new year bounce

    Simon Benson
    National Affairs Editor
    @simonbenson
    3 minutes ago January 28, 2019
    No Comments

    Scott Morrison has received an electoral boost months out from an expected May federal election with the Coalition returning to its highest poll ratings since the removal of Malcolm Turnbull.

    The first Newspoll of 2019, conducted exclusively for The Australian, reveals a five point turnaround in popular support for the two major parties since December with the Coalition’s primary vote lifting two points to 37 per cent and Labor falling three points to 38 per cent.

    While Labor still commands a significant election winning two-party preferred lead of 53/47, the Coalition has clawed back ground after slumping to 55/45 in the final poll of 2018. The 2PP and primary vote results were the best for the Morrison government since its post-coup peak in October last year

  80. Tel

    Since federation, Australian defence policy has been a tussle between the nationalists, who had the running up until 1914, and the imperialists, who took over in 1914.

    Yeah, there’s a problem with a small country like Australia that contains resources worth stealing.

    We cannot realistically stand alone, but it’s also ineffective to be handing everything over to some big empire and saying “Oh those guys do all the work; we mostly spend money on helicopter ships and Gallipoli re-enactment”. I thought that our over the horizon radar project was worthwhile, because it gives us a valuable capability that we can use to improve our bargaining position. I cannot see Australia fighting tough wars of attrition… we have to be looking to avoid that.

  81. DrBeauGan

    expressing it as a turing machine, doubling would be simpler.

    Nope. It would depend critically on the representation..

  82. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Newspoll: Coalition in new year bounce

    Simon Benson
    National Affairs Editor
    @simonbenson
    8 minutes ago January 28, 2019
    No Comments

    Scott Morrison has received an electoral boost months out from an expected May federal election with the Coalition returning to its highest poll ratings since the removal of Malcolm Turnbull.

    The first Newspoll of 2019, conducted exclusively for The Australian, reveals a five point turnaround in popular support for the two major parties since December with the Coalition’s primary vote lifting two points to 37 per cent and Labor falling three points to 38 per cent.

    While Labor still commands a significant election winning two-party preferred lead of 53/47, the Coalition has clawed back ground after slumping to 55/45 in the final poll of 2018. The 2PP and primary vote results were the best for the Morrison government since its post-coup peak in October last year

    The summer poll bounce, based on a survey of 1634 voters across the nation between January 24-27, comes on the back of the government ramping up its attack on Labor’s tax and spend agenda.

    Mr Morrison, who has been forced to deal with a series of ministers announcing they would quit politics at the federal election, maintained his lead over Labor leader Bill Shorten as better prime minister 43 to 36 per cent.

  83. cohenite

    IQ doesn’t predict motivation and therefore success at anything by a person particularly at above average levels but it does better than anything else.

  84. MatrixTransform

    Like Tel says (prick beat me to it)

  85. 132andBush

    Dude, each to his own, but I have never been able to stomach molyneux. He’s fake.

    I tend to agree and must admit to being relatively new to the IQ debate and still learning.

    Some of Molyneuxs’ stuff on people like Marx and Che Guevara and other historical scumbags isn’t bad.

  86. DrBeauGan

    In binary, the doubling rule is copy the last number into the space and append zero. This isn’t simpler than the rule: write zero in the next space.

  87. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Speaking of idiots nassim is being rather disingenuous to suggest IQ does not fit mathematically with fat tails. Clearly anyone can see that IQ has absolutely no fat tail and why one would suggest it’s mathematics is relevant is just bizarre . He is just trying to make himself sound smarter. I am not going to watch the rest, nassim seems to projecting a tad too hard. The guy is a leb and I haven’t met too many bright ones, in fact I have never met a bright leb, although I pretty sure there must be some.

  88. 132andBush

    The ADF have a form of IQ test for recruits.

  89. Leigh Lowe

    Apologies to others for the length of this, but it sort of sums up Nelson. I’ve used it for speeches on 21 October dinners etc.

    Battle of Trafalgar 21st October 1805.
    Famous naval date.
    The USS Constitution was launched exactly eight years earlier on 21st October 1797.
    Went on to give the Poms a belting in 1812.

  90. Pedro the Ignorant

    Great read from Top Ender about Nelson.

    It seems that even glorious military actions tend to be forgotten after a hundred years or so, but the memory of Nelson and the victory at Trafalgar have lived on for over two hundred years.

    Prompted to dig out my Horatio Hornblower Omnibus which I haven’t read for years.

    I have never set foot on board a ship of any description, but I do enjoy a good Napoleonic era Royal Navy yarn.

    Keep the dictionary handy for nautical things like the “mizzen topgallant”, “catharpings” “orlop” etc.

  91. Tel

    Zippy #2920191,
    IQ tests are artificially fitted to a bell curve, because the presumption is that intelligence is created by many small independent factors and therefore it’s legitimate to adjust the raw scores to fit a conceptual curve. Trouble is that if you don’t know what you are measuring, and you already presume a certain result, you have no idea what sort of tail you are looking at.

  92. dopey

    Farmers Insurance Open.
    Players putting with the flag in. Have the rules of golf changed?

  93. Infidel Tiger

    . The guy is a leb and I haven’t met too many bright ones, in fact I have never met a bright leb, although I pretty sure there must be some.

    Jeez Louise.

    Pig ignorance.

    You love the IQ fraud because it correlates with your race theories.

  94. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Keep the dictionary handy for nautical things like the “mizzen topgallant”, “catharpings” “orlop” etc.

    “Rum, sodomy and the lash.”

  95. DrBeauGan

    Went on to give the Poms a belting in 1812.

    Yeah. The poms went on to burn Washington. Seppos don’t talk about the war of 1812. Cos they lost.

  96. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    In binary, the doubling rule is copy the last number into the space and append zero. This isn’t simpler than the rule: write zero in the next space.

    no it’s not because you have to have to keep track of where you are in the sequence to know when to stop returning a double and return a zero. that’s quite a few more instructions than just add previous number to itself and return.

  97. Infidel Tiger

    The ADF have a form of IQ test for recruits.

    Yes and look who ends up in the leadership positions.

    Hmmm…

  98. Bruce of Newcastle

    there is nothing obvious about 63 in relation to the sequence. A normal person would regard that as a trick question.

    Not true.
    Base 9.
    There’s nothing in the series that says it isn’t in base 9.

    Zero is correct in base 4 using a 3 byte register, since 64 is 1000 base 4, but because you only have three bytes to keep it in you get zero. A Y2K bug for aliens with three fingers and four toes.

    I’m actually backing up Dr Beau’s comment. 😀

  99. Infidel Tiger

    Yeah. The poms went on to burn Washington. Seppos don’t talk about the war of 1812. Cos they lost.

    Without the French interfering the ungrateful Americans would still be Her Majesty’s loyal subjects.

    Would have been a better world too.

  100. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Newspoll: hidden messages as year gets off to surprising startSIMON BENSONFollow @simonbenson

    1 minute ago January 28, 2019
    No Comments

    Scott Morrison has begun the unofficial election campaign with an improvement in Newspoll that neither he nor his colleagues had been expecting.

    For the past two years the Coalition has been the living embodiment of Sod’s Law, which loosely states that anything that can go wrong will go wrong and at the worst possible time with the worst of consequences.

    This has naturally fed into a communal belief, shared even by Liberal MPs and officials, that the government was in for a hiding come May.

    The first Newspoll of 2019, however, gives the Prime Minister reason to believe that all is not lost yet.

    Not that anyone of lucid thought on the Coalition side could get overly excited.

    The improvement represents the theoretical difference between losing 21 seats and 14 seats, which if averaged over the past year would appear to be business as usual for the Coalition.

    But there is an underlying message in the results for Bill Shorten as well: it is a warning against complacency.

    The three-point slide in Labor’s primary vote will be of some concern to Shorten as the government ramps up its attack on Labor’s negative gearing and dividend imputation policies.

  101. Leigh Lowe

    Went on to give the Poms a belting in 1812.

    Yeah. The poms went on to burn Washington. Seppos don’t talk about the war of 1812. Cos they lost.

    The subject was naval battles, not terrestial arson.

  102. Leigh Lowe

    Without the French interfering the ungrateful Americans would still be Her Majesty’s loyal subjects.

    Would have been a better world too.

    Wule Bwitannia.
    Bwittania wules the waves.

  103. Leigh Lowe

    Farmers Insurance Open.
    Players putting with the flag in. Have the rules of golf changed?

    You can do what you like.
    But if you are putting from on the green and the ball goes in aided by hitting the flagstick, that is four faults and a 50 metre penalty.

  104. 132andBush

    Yes and look who ends up in the leadership positions.

    Hmmm…

    LOL

    Yep, the academic class.

  105. cohenite

    On cultural comparisons and the superiority of Western values, Molyneux is pretty good. His selection of Southern as a touring partner also shows considerable insight.

  106. pete m

    dopey, there have been many rule changes to speedup play.

  107. Mark A

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2920204, posted on January 28, 2019 at 10:12 pm

    there is nothing obvious about 63 in relation to the sequence. A normal person would regard that as a trick question.

    Not true.
    Base 9.
    There’s nothing in the series that says it isn’t in base 9.

    Zero is correct in base 4 using a 3 byte register, since 64 is 1000 base 4, but because you only have three bytes to keep it in you get zero. A Y2K bug for aliens with three fingers and four toes.

    I’m actually backing up Dr Beau’s comment. 😀

    Well for me you just proved the IQ testing is a dud.
    If you can make up your own rules as you go along doing the test, then there is no consistency.

    With your method everyone would have to write an explanation after the test, why they arrived at whatever they did arrived at and the most innovative or outlandish claim wins.

    Imagination rules.

  108. DrBeauGan

    no it’s not because you have to have to keep track of where you are in the sequence to know when to stop returning a double and return a zero. that’s quite a few more instructions than just add previous number to itself and return.

    Which makes writing zero in the next free space even more attractive.

    Much depends on how you opt to represent things. You can leave some squares on the tape blank as a separator and allow writing zero or one in each tape place as a way of representing an integer. Or you can regard that as outside the scope of a turing machine and allow only a single mark or its absence. Which gives you one obvious way of representing an integer, and a number of unobvious ways. Still, doubling a previous number is going to mean a lot of toing and froing. Simply ignoring all previous numbers and writing zero is much simpler.

  109. The USS Constitution was launched exactly eight years earlier on 21st October 1797.
    Went on to give the Poms a belting in 1812.

    The One Naval battle engagement I’ve put some effort into. There’s been a painting of that engagement on my office wall for the past 25 years.

    The poms caught the Constitution with her pants down.
    So the poms agreed to not get stuck into them until the Yankees were ready.
    This took hours.
    It was close to land, people gathered on the cliff tops to watch the coming battle.
    The Constitution got the upper hand, the poms surrendered.

    I’ve no idea if the R.N. skipper sought political asylum in the USA, but he should have.
    While being a gentleman & allowing the enemy time to get prepared may have been “good form”..
    … throwing in the towel rather than “engage the enemy” was not.

  110. DrBeauGan

    Imagination rules.

    You say that as though it’s a bad thing.

  111. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    IQ tests are artificially fitted to a bell curve, because the presumption is that intelligence is created by many small independent factors and therefore it’s legitimate to adjust the raw scores to fit a conceptual curve. Trouble is that if you don’t know what you are measuring, and you already presume a certain result, you have no idea what sort of tail you are looking at.

    IQ tests are standardised for comparisons they are not forced into a normal curve. a fat tail would stick out like dogs balls.

  112. Top Ender

    USS Constitution and HMS Victory, both well preserved, are definitely worth visiting to gain an insight into wooden ship and iron men.

    I think I’ve told this story before.

    When serving at the RAN College in 2002, the Training Commander summonsed me to his office, and wanted a suggestion as to a suitable “flag hoist” – flags spelling out words – to be hoisted permanently over the heads of the midshipmen in training dining below. (Midshipmen are the most junior officers there are.)

    I checked a few sources and duly suggested “Engage the enemy more closely”, Nelson’s hoist of Trafalgar, after the previous one prefacing that battle had been struck. It had read “England expects every man to do his duty.” One of the RAN’s heroes, the redoubtable Hec Waller – for me the best naval officer Australia ever produced – had also flown it at the Battle of Matapan in the Mediterranean in 1941.

    The good Commander reflected, and then told me it was too aggressive. He had the five new “Navy values” words hoisted instead.

  113. JC

    The guy is a leb and I haven’t met too many bright ones, in fact I have never met a bright leb, although I pretty sure there must be some.

    Fuck me.

    Steve Jobs was half Syrian. Carlos Ghosn whose run Nissan Renault and at one stage was considered the best auto exec in the world. Carlos Slim one of the wealthiest people in the world is also a leb.

    Zipperhead, I bet you’re a 45K a year office schlepp.

  114. Steve trickler

    You just know that second pilot had a grin from ear to ear.



  115. Leigh Lowe

    The Yanks tell the Constitution story a little differently.

  116. Arky

    Here yiz go:
    Rear axle in, bit of a milestone. I will post when the engine is going too.
    https://youtu.be/gRnX1dZQX58

  117. Empire 5:5

    Would have been a better world too.

    Half of the planet’s nuclear arsenal would be on lease back from a Sino-Saudi petroarms conglomerate and Theresa May would have the launch codes.

    What a wonderful world.

  118. I’m now digging out notes given me by the US Navy when I was aboard USS Constitution.
    There’s quite some discrepancy between the version they initially gave – and the wikipedia account of the action.
    Actually “quite some discrepancy” is an understatement.

  119. The Yanks tell the Constitution story a little differently.

    Was quoting the version the US told me.

  120. Mark A

    DrBeauGan
    #2920217, posted on January 28, 2019 at 10:33 pm

    Imagination rules.

    You say that as though it’s a bad thing.

    Not at all, what gave you that impression?

    I value imagination highly, I can design a piece of machinery in great detail without the need to make a single sketch.

    Drawings are only needed for the manufacturing process.

  121. JC

    cohenite
    #2920187, posted on January 28, 2019 at 9:57 pm

    IQ doesn’t predict motivation and therefore success at anything by a person particularly at above average levels but it does better than anything else.

    It does, does it.

    East Asians supposedly have the highest IQ in the world, so why have they been at the bottom of the heap until about 40 years ago. If your theory is correct, then they should have ruled the world since the beginning of recorded time, but they haven’t.
    You’re a fraud Cronkers, but I’m reminding you of something you already know.

  122. Leigh Lowe

    The Yanks tell the Constitution story a little differently.

    Was quoting the version the US told me.

    I heard a US version recounted aboard the Constitution in Bawston in 2017.

  123. JC

    On cultural comparisons and the superiority of Western values, Molyneux is pretty good. His selection of Southern as a touring partner also shows considerable insight.

    Is he, does she? Why? Explain yourself occasionally, Cronkite.

  124. Mark A

    IQ doesn’t predict motivation

    Motivation is the answer in there.
    You can have an IQ 0f a 1000 and be a lazy basket do nothing with it.

    Sitting on you backside won’t get you world domination.

  125. Infidel Tiger

    Hey, remember how much everyone loved Mike Sandwich in 2016? I had some criticisms… let’s see now:

    Mike Cernovich 🌹🦍🇺🇸
    @Cernovich
    Christianity has given us a country where 11 year olds dance for adult men who throw dollars on the stage.

    Christianity gave us a church that molested children and sold out their flock (Covington) to the left.

    A moderated form of Islam is probably the West’s only hope.

  126. JC

    What better way to assess race/ethnicity/income IQ thingi than this chart Taleb has put up. The best way to judge is to put different ethnic groups in the same swimming pool and see how that fair. In this case Taleb has a chart that breaks down earnings by ethnicity of people living in the US ( the swimming pool I was talking about). This is great because places everyone in the same pool and we see how they fair income wise.

    It’s pretty revealing in the sense that it basically shows the Molyneaux theory is bullshit. He’s a huckster or really fucking dumb.

    Here:
    https://mobile.twitter.com/nntaleb/status/1082686260202930176/photo/1

    Race/income theory is invalidated.

    Next.

  127. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Which makes writing zero in the next free space even more attractive.

    Much depends on how you opt to represent things. You can leave some squares on the tape blank as a separator and allow writing zero or one in each tape place as a way of representing an integer. Or you can regard that as outside the scope of a turing machine and allow only a single mark or its absence. Which gives you one obvious way of representing an integer, and a number of unobvious ways. Still, doubling a previous number is going to mean a lot of toing and froing. Simply ignoring all previous numbers and writing zero is much simpler.

    that’s not how a turing machine works. a turing machine is not god, it can’t just ignore all the previous number without having some state to tell it where it is at, all that requires instructions. which is a lot more then grab a number and bitshift it 1 in binary return it. thats 2 fetches and a bitshift or mul operation and the return, 4 instructions.

    a turing machine can’t just return a series of defined numbers without those numbers being stored. so it needs a loop to lookup the stored sequence and the sequence itself is already bigger than the doubling code add to that the code required to look it up. then it can only return what is in the sequence. the sequence must be finite otherwise you need an infinite storage. the loop has a fetch, a counter that must be incremented which itself requires a fetch, increment and store and a return. and storage for your counter. The loop alone is more instructions than the obvious answer of doubling.

  128. JC

    Mark A
    #2920231, posted on January 28, 2019 at 10:48 pm

    IQ doesn’t predict motivation

    Motivation is the answer in there.
    You can have an IQ 0f a 1000 and be a lazy basket do nothing with it.

    Sitting on you backside won’t get you world domination.

    Maybe at the individual level, but at group level with a decent population size? I don’t think so.

  129. Infidel Tiger

    Would love to see the full chart, JC.

    Please track it down for me.

  130. cohenite

    Read what I said head prefect not what you think I said.

    You’re the perfect example of the distinction between IQ and motivation head prefect.

  131. cohenite

    Maybe at the individual level, but at group level with a decent population size? I don’t think so.

    You really are stupid.

  132. Fisky

    I am increasingly an IQ agnostic for the reason that I came down against constructivist education. IQ tests aim to measure “skills” rather than knowledge, but this is based on the fallacy that skills can be divorced from domain specific knowledge and assessed independently. Pretty much every curriculum designed along these lines has been a miserable failure because you essentially cannot assess “critical thinking outside the confines of a discipline – you ultimately have to know a lot about a subject.

    So it’s not clear what an IQ test is really measuring – probably a combination of working memory and general knowledge. Plus some bits and pieces of vocabulary, geometry, etc. It’s a weird test when you think about it.

  133. I heard a US version recounted aboard the Constitution in Bawston in 2017.

    They clearly changed it in the intervening years. Heck they even gave us printed versions to read later (for the slow of comprehension – and to beef up the bragging)
    I’d say the wikipedia version is closer to it than what the USN told me.

    Still a first class painting. Trying to think who painted it. He mostly painted aviation art (Lancasters, Spitfires, that sort of thing)

  134. Mark A

    Maybe at the individual level, but at group level with a decent population size? I don’t think so.

    Culture is your answer. China had a great navy in the past and given it up.

  135. 132andBush

    Motivation is the answer in there.
    You can have an IQ 0f a 1000 and be a lazy basket do nothing with it.

    Initiative, zeal, go, zip, energy, ” A touch of dewwing-do.”
    Bloody hard thing to predict in a test and in my opinion can only be assessed on the ground.
    I would say contributes 30%+ to life’s outcome.

  136. DrBeauGan

    Sitting on you backside won’t get you world domination.

    My guess is that with an IQ quite a lot less than 1000, you’d be bright enough to work out that worlld dominator is not going to be much fun. My IQ isn’t anything like that high, but you wouldn’t catch me trying to dominate the world.

  137. JC

    Infidel Tiger
    #2920240, posted on January 28, 2019 at 11:00 pm

    Australians Americans are the second highest income earners:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ethnic_groups_in_the_United_States_by_household_income

    Funny as.

    I have a theory about that. If you’re looking to make a buck or two, the US is incredible. Australia is a tiny freaking market in almost everything. I recall how small the Aussie market was for clients to trade with you at the corp level. You’d go through the list in the first hour of the working day. You also can’t tell them to fuck off because you just can’t afford to lose even one.

    US the market for everything is fucking huge. Just enormous. You can tell a client, or could then, to fuck off because there are just so many.

    Here’s the wall though. Almost every Australian corp that’s tried to make a go of it in the US has basically failed.

  138. 132andBush

    Thanks , Arky.

    Strain that Armadillo you smashed the other day through some muslin and use for lubricant.
    Might get a bit of a whine from time to time but my bet is it’ll go the distance.

  139. JC

    Culture is your answer.

    Yep, that’s possibly the key to all.

  140. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    radio check, over.

  141. cohenite

    DrBeauGan

    #2920244, posted on January 28, 2019 at 11:07 pm

    Correct. Conversely for some of middling IQ dominating a thread is sufficient. Of course the human condition, as well as having IQ and motivation also is capable of producing wisdom.

  142. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Fuck me.

    Steve Jobs was half Syrian. Carlos Ghosn whose run Nissan Renault and at one stage was considered the best auto exec in the world. Carlos Slim one of the wealthiest people in the world is also a leb.

    Zipperhead, I bet you’re a 45K a year office schlepp.

    I didn’t say there are none.

    Must have saved furiously since I have about half a million in cars downstairs.

  143. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Newspoll: Coalition in new year bounce

    Simon Benson
    National Affairs Editor
    @simonbenson
    An hour ago January 28, 2019
    6 Comments

    Scott Morrison has received an electoral boost months out from an expected May federal election with the Coalition returning to its highest poll ratings since the removal of Malcolm Turnbull.

    The first Newspoll of 2019, conducted exclusively for The Australian, reveals a five point turnaround in popular support for the two major parties since December with the Coalition’s primary vote lifting two points to 37 per cent and Labor falling three points to 38 per cent.

    While Labor still commands a significant election winning two-party preferred lead of 53/47, the Coalition has clawed back ground after slumping to 55/45 in the final poll of 2018. The 2PP and primary vote results were the best for the Morrison government since its post-coup peak in October last year.

    The summer poll bounce, based on a survey of 1634 voters across the nation between January 24-27, comes on the back of the government ramping up its attack on Labor’s tax and spend agenda.

    Mr Morrison, who has been forced to deal with a series of ministers announcing they would quit politics at the federal election, maintained his lead over Labor leader Bill Shorten as better prime minister 43 to 36 per cent.

    There was little movement in the popularity contest between both leaders over the summer break according to the Newspoll despite Mr Morrison coming under almost immediate pressure on his return to work.

    From the Oz.

  144. Mark A

    DrBeauGan
    #2920244, posted on January 28, 2019 at 11:07 pm

    My guess is that with an IQ quite a lot less than 1000, you’d be bright enough to work out that worlld dominator is not going to be much fun. My IQ isn’t anything like that high, but you wouldn’t catch me trying to dominate the world.

    Nor do I wish to do so, my answer was to a proposition that with above avg. IQ South East Asians should have dominated the world.

    My point is that it takes a certain mindset to get up and do more than comfortably survive.

  145. feelthebern

    Here’s the wall though. Almost every Australian corp that’s tried to make a go of it in the US has basically failed.

    The reason is, most corporates who go to the US, don’t realise how hard most Americans work.
    Or should I say, how hard the Americans they are competing with work.

  146. Snoopy

    Trying to think who painted it. He mostly painted aviation art (Lancasters, Spitfires, that sort of thing)

    Barrie Clark?

  147. Mark A

    There area great many people whose IQs are in the stratosphere and live a humble life, yet a lot of low IQ but smart spivs amass fortunes.

  148. cohenite

    Must have saved furiously since I have about half a million in cars downstairs.

    Any E-types?

  149. feelthebern

    The secret to success in Oz is to compete your way to a duopoly, then use your clout to regulate disruptors out of existence.
    That works until someone with a bottomless pit of cash turns up.
    Aldi.
    Uber.
    Huawei.
    Amazon.

  150. JC

    I didn’t say there are none.

    Sure you did in your own unique way.

    Must have saved furiously since I have about half a million in cars downstairs.

    Zipperhead, these days the proof is in the pudding in the sense that we’re now from Missouri after the recent abortion with a poster here making a false claim about his personal net worth and caught out lying.

    Here’s a little advice for you. Cars these days are really passe. Fair dinkum, you have to have real lowrent to be yugely impressed by a fleet of cars.

  151. feelthebern

    Any Audi R8’s Zippy?

  152. Snoopy

    Must have saved furiously since I have about half a million in cars downstairs.

    9 or 10 Datsun 1600’s?

  153. feelthebern

    I saw an Audi R8 in the city the other day.
    I then realised a woman was driving.
    What an age we live in, when a woman drives an R8.

  154. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Any Audi R8’s Zippy?

    had a 5l f-type jag I just sold. great car but resale value is crap, wouldn’t buy another one.

  155. feelthebern

    Have any Cats sent their DNA off to Ancestry.com?
    I’m fascinated by it.

  156. feelthebern

    I’ve never been a Jag fan.
    The closest I’ve come to that old world type car are Aston Martins.

  157. Steve trickler

    You have to admit. It is a spectacular looking aircraft.



  158. Infidel Tiger

    The reason is, most corporates who go to the US, don’t realise how hard most Americans work.
    Or should I say, how hard the Americans they are competing with work.

    Rent seeking is different in each jurisdiction.

    Takes a while to bribe the right lobbyists.

  159. JC

    cohenite
    #2920237, posted on January 28, 2019 at 10:58 pm

    Read what I said head prefect not what you think I said.

    You’re the perfect example of the distinction between IQ and motivation head prefect.
    cohenite
    #2920238, posted on January 28, 2019 at 10:59 pm

    Maybe at the individual level, but at group level with a decent population size? I don’t think so.

    You really are stupid.

    I don’t want to be harsh on y0u all the time, Cronkite, but you really do measure up as a total fraud.

    You’re always looking for a safe space too frightened to stick your neck out even in broad open discussions such as this.

    “You’re stupid”, doesn’t qualify for an answer. It simply qualifies for empty abuse to disguise the lack of strong counter.

    Here’s your problem, Cronkite. If you believe the IQ/income correlation then you would have to be relatively stupid yourself by virtue of the fact that you just aren’t that wealthy. In fact, you measure up as a loser, which is why you’re so angry at the world.

  160. Hay Stockard

    Feelthebern,
    Sent mine in. Norsemen and Norman’s. And other Anglo Saxon types. Significant other mainly danish.
    Get it done. Just a spit in a tube.

  161. JC

    feelthebern
    #2920265, posted on January 28, 2019 at 11:23 pm

    Have any Cats sent their DNA off to Ancestry.com?
    I’m fascinated by it.

    I did. I have a little J’w in me which I believe is from ma’s side. Scared the hell out of me in case someone like Cronkite found out. You know what he’s like about stuff like this.

  162. Infidel Tiger

    I wonder how many families have found out mum’s a tart with those Ancestry checks?

  163. JC

    I wonder how many families have found out mum’s a tart with those Ancestry checks?

    You can’t unless both parents show there’s, right?

  164. feelthebern

    Thanks for the feedback.
    I saw a health food company in Melbourne is now tailoring diets to your DNA too.
    Bio shit like this is the next frontier.
    CRISPR fascinates me & scares the shit out of me.

  165. Barrie Clark?

    That’s not the name. I bluddee well should know it though, I’ve looked at it often enough. (mental block)
    He used to sell his paintings along the spiked picket fence beside Green Park.
    Thoroughly nice English gentleman.

  166. feelthebern

    Hay, do you yearn for the long boat & conquest?

  167. DrBeauGan

    Nor do I wish to do so, my answer was to a proposition that with above avg. IQ South East Asians should have dominated the world.

    Chinese were ahead of the rest of the world for millennia. They turned inwards for four or five centuries and the west went galloping past.

    They won’t make that mistake again.

  168. JC

    So just to end this race/income/ IQ bullshit. We’re done now right?

    Taleb’s chart placing lots of ethnic groups in one jurisdiction shows the race/income theory is totally bogus.

    There’s nothing more to add to this?

  169. Infidel Tiger

    You can’t unless both parents show there’s, right?

    Let’s say two brothers send their sample in and get different results… awkward.

  170. JC

    Let’s say two brothers send their sample in and get different results… awkward.

    That would do the trick. 🙂

  171. Hay Stockard

    Zippy,
    Don’t be a tease. What have you got? Any Morgans? A Bristol? GTHO?

  172. Hay Stockard

    Every time I have been to a Monastry or Stately Home I have to fight the urge to pillage. I am thankful I don’t find Nums attractive in a certain way.

  173. Makka

    The guy is a leb and I haven’t met too many bright ones, in fact I have never met a bright leb, although I pretty sure there must be some.

    Redneck rubbish.

  174. JC

    The leb destroyed Molyneaux. I don’t know how Stef can come back from that beating. To top it off, Taleb blocked the Mol… for being a fraud.

  175. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I’ve never been a Jag fan.
    The closest I’ve come to that old world type car are Aston Martins.

    would have been better off with an aston. the f-type R is really a fun drive though, but If you weren’t careful with the accelerator it had a tendency to go sideways.

  176. Notafan

    Interesting bits sbout Australia being a don’t bother travel destination.

    Europe has it all over home except for the persistence of beggars, one of whom thought it okay to give me a physical nudge this morning when I was trying to ignore him.

    I suppose they don’t realise how competitive the begging market is.

    I walked behind two beggars having a furious argument about I don’t know what yesterday, the smaller gypsy had a missing trouser leg all the better to show off his deformity, coping a long spray.

    And the guy on the train abusing and swearing in English, then switching to French and Portuguese didn’t seem to realise this was not a good marketing tactics.

    A minor irritation though.

    And Portugal is another country that needs to free itself from the tyranny of socialism.

    Most of the beggars then might get alternative employment.

  177. DrBeauGan

    Bruce, if you assume the sequence 2,4,8,16,32 is in base 9, the numbers translate to
    2,4,8,15, 29 in base 10. And 63 in base 9 is 57 in base 10. I don’t see your sequence rule.

  178. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Don’t be a tease. What have you got? Any Morgans? A Bristol? GTHO?

    bentley continental GT V8 S. we also have a porsche cayenne and an audi Q7.

  179. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Europe has it all over home except for the persistence of beggars,

    Visited Dublin for the first time in 2007. For whatever reason, walked past the G.P.O. four mornings running. There were two Musso ladies, in the full disguise, alternating, begging on the steps, with a new born baby.

    Day Four, the Memsahib declared the infant to be the same baby…

  180. JC

    Dude.. You said you had a stable of cars worth 500K

    A Bentley costs over 450K in oz. The Porsche 200K and the Audi around 150K(?)

    That’s not 500K.

  181. mh

    This is the President’s take:

    Donald J. Trump
    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    1m
    Tariffs on the “dumping” of Steel in the United States have totally revived our Steel Industry. New and expanded plants are happening all over the U.S. We have not only saved this important industry, but created many jobs. Also, billions paid to our treasury. A BIG WIN FOR U.S.

  182. DrBeauGan

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2920292, posted on January 29, 2019 at 12:10 am
    Don’t be a tease. What have you got? Any Morgans? A Bristol? GTHO?

    bentley continental GT V8 S. we also have a porsche cayenne and an audi Q7.

    If you want to prove to JC that your IQ is higher than his, you need to own more houses, each more expensive than any of his, likewise cars, suits and watches. That would convince him.

    A prettier wife might help, too.

  183. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    That’s not 500K.

    the bentley is 2 yrs old, didn’t buy it new. the cayenne is brand new and was 145, the audi is probably worth closer to 60 now.

  184. JC

    Doc

    No, I’m not comparative like that. If zipperhead is worth multiples more than me or anyone here than good for him. I don’t begrudge any of that. The thing is that we have no proof to back up his claims and after a recent bunch of lies from a 24/7 commenter here, it’s hard to accept.

    I’m from Missouri means I’m from the show me state, in the sense I want to see some proof now after that abortion i described above.

  185. Infidel Tiger

    Why do you need a Cayenne and a Q7?

  186. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    If you want to prove to JC that your IQ is higher than his, you need to own more houses, each more expensive than any of his, likewise cars, suits and watches. That would convince him.

    A prettier wife might help, too.

    from the way he spends I would say he beats me on the net worth but the wife thing I have it all over him. mind you wife 1.0 took me for half.

  187. JC

    the bentley is 2 yrs old, didn’t buy it new. the cayenne is brand new and was 145, the audi is probably worth closer to 60 now.

    Zip, here’s the thing though. Who the fuck knows or even looks to see what their cars are worth as they age?

  188. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Why do you need a Cayenne and a Q7?

    ask the wife

  189. DrBeauGan

    Just teasing, JC.

    I’m from Missouri too, so I don’t believe anything. It’s why I’m an atheist. When I was seven I demanded to be shown evidence for the God theory, and nobody has ever provided anything convincing. I was told it needed faith. I’m from Missouri, we don’t do faith.

  190. JC

    Zip, if the Bentley is powder blue we’re having you deported back to Kazakhstan.

  191. Hay Stockard

    JC,
    You liked The Outlaw Josey Wells then? The book is Gone For Texas. Don’t recall who wrote it. Good of you to explain to those who may not be Clint fans.

  192. Steve trickler

    This is fun to to watch. A generation of people are now going back in time and discovering music from way back. It is all at their fingertips.



  193. JC

    from the way he spends I would say he beats me on the net worth but the wife thing I have it all over him. mind you wife 1.0 took me for half.

    Zip, I’m not really a yuge spender. I have a friend who spends $1 million a year on travel alone . He owns a mini here and a small Audi in London. He’s worth around $200 mill

    The big new thing for richies like you is expensive travel. Leave the Bentley to drug dealers and developers. Same thing.

  194. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Zip, if the Bentley is powder blue we’re having you deported back to Kazakhstan.

    It’s silver. I was looking for a black one, but the silver is actually really nice. the infotainment system is complete crap for a car thats $500k new.

  195. feelthebern

    No doubt the Q7 is better than the Cayenne.

  196. JC

    It’s silver. I was looking for a black one, but the silver is actually really nice. the infotainment system is complete crap for a car thats $500k new.

    You bought it new, right? You can choose whichever color you want. no?

  197. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    You bought it new, right? You can choose whichever color you want. no?

    you must be getting senile JC, already said I didn’t buy it new.

  198. JC

    I maybe senile, but you’re avoiding the point, zip. If you were looking for a NEW black one, how did you end up with a silver one?

  199. EvilElvis

    Took the old man to see ‘The Mule’ last night. Last movie night we had was ‘Avatar’, previous before that, ‘Gran Torino’. The Mule was a nice, solid flick. Took us the first 15 minutes for us to get out of, its Clint Eastwood, but not grumpy Gran Torino mode. Can’t go to the cinemas often nowadays and have a good story, start to finish in two hours and no sign of a sequel or spin off. Good stuff.

  200. EvilElvis

    Evidently it attracted a mature clientele.

  201. Armadillo

    Arky has a heap of scrap wood and metal stuff sitting on his garage floor. He occasionally goes and bangs a nail into a random part and makes a video about it.

    Can he join your “Car Club”?

  202. DrBeauGan

    BoN, try 4,9,19,39,…

    It was my first guess at how you got 63, but it goes wrong fast.

    You being a chemist and all.

  203. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    No doubt the Q7 is better than the Cayenne.

    Q7s a few years old. I don’t like the angular styling of the new Q7s.

    the new cayenne is really very good, a big step up from the previous model. The adaptive cruise control virtually drives the car and will completely stop the car and get it moving again. it’s a bit hair raising, when you’re doing 80 and the car in front stops, and I’m thinking fuck is it going to stop in time. but it does.

  204. Infidel Tiger

    Donald J. Trump
    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    21m
    Howard Schultz doesn’t have the “guts” to run for President! Watched him on
    @60Minutes
    last night and I agree with him that he is not the “smartest person.” Besides, America already has that! I only hope that Starbucks is still paying me their rent in Trump Tower!

  205. JC

    lol. Trump is the funniest prez ever.

  206. Armadillo

    BoN, try 4,9,19,39,… It was my first guess at how you got 63, but it goes wrong fast.

    FFS. Only at “The Cat”. The answer was obviously 63. Don’t be an idiot, Doc.

  207. DrBeauGan

    BoN, try 4,9,19,39,…

    Should have started with 2.

    2 ,4, 9 ,19, 39, 89,…

  208. DrBeauGan

    Go on ‘Dillo, you try.

  209. Armadillo

    The adaptive cruise control virtually drives the car and will completely stop the car and get it moving again. it’s a bit hair raising, when you’re doing 80 and the car in front stops, and I’m thinking fuck is it going to stop in time. but it does.

    A horse will do the same. Also quicker down Parramatta Road than any of your new “fangle dangle” technology.

  210. JC

    Go on ‘Dillo, you try.

    Can I?

    (2×4) +1 =9, (2×9) +1 =19, (2×19) +1 =39, (2×39) +1 =79

  211. Armadillo

    Go on ‘Dillo, you try.

    The answer is obviously 63. How about you just stop being stupid?

    FMD. Sinc, please ban Doc.

  212. Armadillo

    I’m not giving math tuition to anyone. Not for free.

  213. Armadillo

    Arky (if lurking) should watch the above video.

  214. DrBeauGan

    Can I?

    (2×4) +1 =9, (2×9) +1 =19, (2×19) +1 =39, (2×39) +1 =79

    Goes wrong at the beginning with 2,4..

    Also the next one is 227.

    It was for chemists. The numbers are rounded and aren’t integers. Each number is the atomic weight of the preceding atomic number. Except the first which doesn’t have a predecessor. It’s roughly doubling because the average nucleus contains about as many neutrons as protons, with one more for luck past a certain point, and more than one further down the table. We got to actinium, and I dont think we are close to an element with 227 protons, so the sequence stops there.

    It was very childish of me.

  215. Armadillo

    Apricot Boy, that’s what’s real cars look like. Not the piece of scrap/crap metal wood stuff on your garage floor.

  216. Steve trickler

    Nice work on the edit.



  217. Armadillo

    It was very childish of me.

    So was bonking “Spikey”. You did bonk her, I’m assuming?

    Or do you just go to movies and hold hands? Not that I’m prying into your personal life or anything.

    Just a curious Cat.

  218. JC

    Goes wrong at the beginning with 2,4..

    How so if 2 is used in all the sums? Also it’s not 227 for the next number. It would be 159.

  219. DrBeauGan

    It’s just occurred to me that I could find a use for two male sex robots. I’d only want the heads, actually, having no use for the rest of them. But I could put one on each shoulder and outdo Zaphod Beeblebrox. I could hold three conversations at once.

  220. DrBeauGan

    How so if 2 is used in all the sums? Also it’s not 227 for the next number. It would be 159.

    Because your rule is double the last number and add 1. So the number after 4is 9. But the number after 2 is 4, not 5, wbich is what ylur rule would make it.

    Your next number is 159. Mine is 227 because actinium has a lot of neutrons.

  221. JC

    2 is 4, not 5, wbich is what ylur rule would make it.

    I know that. But 2 is not the start of the sequence. 4 is.

  222. DrBeauGan

    Co.e to think of it, actinium has number 89. Twice 89 +1 is 179 not 159. One of us is drunk.

  223. Armadillo

    Doc, you would have three arms. Plenty of opportunity for wanking.

    Did you bonk spikey or not? It’s a pretty simple question.

    Obviously easier than working out that 63 was the correct answer.

    Concentrate. Think back. What happened?

  224. DrBeauGan

    And 2times 39 +1 = 79, and it should have been 89, so you went wrong at both ends.

  225. Armadillo

    Reminder. You were on a boat to Sri Lanka because you were to stingy to pay for a plane flight.

  226. DrBeauGan

    Did you bonk spikey or not? It’s a pretty simple question.

    Yes, it’s a very simple question.

  227. Armadillo

    Don’t make me go back to your blogging and whinging about insects or whatever it was.

  228. DrBeauGan

    Armadillo
    #2920343, posted on January 29, 2019 at 2:15 am
    Reminder. You were on a boat to Sri Lanka because you were to stingy to pay for a plane flight.

    It is very unkind of you to mock my poverty.

  229. Armadillo

    Why the fuck didn’t you just pay for a plane flight? Like normal people do.

  230. DrBeauGan

    Don’t make me go back to your blogging and whinging about insects or whatever it was.

    And to mock my distrust of centipedes. There was one in a James Bond book that I didn’t want to meet.

  231. DrBeauGan

    Armadillo
    #2920347, posted on January 29, 2019 at 2:21 am
    Why the fuck didn’t you just pay for a plane flight? Like normal people do.

    I don’t travel cattle class it’s against my religion.

  232. Armadillo

    Pretty hot Shelias on Air Lanka cabin crew. You choose hot and sweaty Latvian seamen drinking homemade Vodka.

    I’m questioning your judgement.

  233. DrBeauGan

    And it’s past my bedtime.

  234. Armadillo

    Even Arky wouldn’t have scuttled away like a cockroach.

    Oh wait. He did.

  235. Armadillo

    Arky might be dead. Too many laps of the park and ice water foot baths.

Comments are closed.