The Liberal Party follows Gough Whitlam

Whatever impression you have got about Fraser Anning from reading about him this is indeed a cracker of an article thanks to Behind Enemy Lines.

As I attempted to outline in my maiden speech, which very few of my critics appear to have actually read, the political consensus on identity, values and so many other vital issues which existed between the major parties of the left and right up until 1972 was shifted radically to the left by the Whitlam government and has never recovered.

However perhaps a better way of expressing the problem is to frame it in terms of the Overton window concept.

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31 Responses to The Liberal Party follows Gough Whitlam

  1. cohenite

    The resident troll no doubt will have something to say about Anning’s brown shirt supporters.

  2. OldOzzie

    Behind Enemy Lines
    #2921981, posted on January 31, 2019 at 8:19 am

    Sorry about the thread hijack, Rafe, but there was a cracker of an article published this morning under Senator Fraser Anning’s name. It probably won’t get much news traction, but is certainly of interest to many Cat readers.

    Excellent Article

    What stood out

    And sadly, I see no evidence that this “Labor-lite” approach to politics has changed at all under Mr. Turnbull’s successor, whose elevation by a Liberal government sailing towards electoral judgment has amounted to little more than the re-arrangement of the deck chairs on the Titanic.

    However, it has to be said that the Morrison government is very difficult to differentiate from Labor on many issues and if not driving, is at least enabling left-wing cultural change by refusing to undo left-wing Labor initiatives.

    Given its role in helping to push the Overton window in this country further to the left, apparently deeming formerly Marxist policies acceptable but the policies of Menzies “extreme right,” a Morrison-led Liberal Government does not deserve the vote of conservatives.

  3. Bushkid

    The more I hear from Fraser Anning, the more I like him. He seems to be one of the few sensible voices left in either House.
    He may have arrived in the Senate in the haphazard manner that seems to be the fashion of late, but I’m glad he’s there.
    The media, the left and pseudo-centre or -right will vilify him of course, just because he’s speaking some unpalatable truths.

  4. OldOzzie

    Where is the Liberal party under ScoMo Hammering this?

    Bowen brushes off the votes of thrifty retirees

    The Australian Editorial

    Opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen’s hubristic goading of older Australians who have saved enough during their working lives to be self-supporting in retirement was worse than a political or economic brain snap. Questioned on ABC radio yesterday about the cost of Labor’s crackdown on retirees’ dividend imputations, he retorted: “I say to your listener (who would be $5000 a year out of pocket): if they feel very strongly about this, if they feel that this is something which should impact on their vote, they are of course perfectly entitled to vote against us.” Too right. If the Coalition campaign team does its work well, that piece of advice should dog Mr Bowen all the way to polling day, with 50,000 voters across the 10 most marginal seats at risk of losing an average $2700 each.

    Mr Bowen’s outburst was patent nonsense economically. He asked the public to imagine a system where “every shareholder in the country was a retired person who did not pay income tax and we refunded all the company tax”. It beggared belief that an aspiring treasurer should resort to such a ridiculous hypothetical scenario.

    Far more seriously, Mr Bowen unwittingly revealed his disdain for a group of Australians who decent, competent leaders on both sides of the political divide should regard as model citizens and encourage today’s workers to emulate. Many of those who benefit from franking imputation credits are not wealthy — the ABC radio listener reportedly earns less than $62,500 a year from share-based superannuation. But they are self-starters by nature. They value their independence and have always tried to pay their own way. Welfare dependence would be anathema to them. Many of this cohort of citizens live frugally and spend their time productively — minding grandchildren, delivering meals on wheels, gardening, and supporting charities and their local communities. Most watch the pennies, a lifelong habit. After decades of hard work and thrift, most can afford to run a safe car and take an occasional holiday. Their dividend imputation refunds matter to their budgets. Some rely on them to catch up on power bills and restock the grocery cupboard.

    In an era when 400 Australians a day are turning 75 and the ageing of our population is accelerating, any policy that punishes thrift and self-reliance is the last thing Australia needs. Mr Bowen makes much of the fact that abolishing the franking imputation concession would save the budget $11.4 billion over the forward estimates and improve the budget bottom line by $55.7bn over the decade. In reality, if the tax slug ultimately leads to a bigger uptake of the Age Pension — which already costs $50bn a year and is rising every year — the savings from Labor’s policy would evaporate quickly. Mr Bowen’s argument that the commonwealth spends more on cash refunds for franking credits than on public schools and the Australian Federal Police was not persuasive. State schools are a state responsibility. Nor is there a logical justification for forcing retired shareholders and those with self-managed superannuation funds to miss out on franking credits for dividends from companies that have already paid tax on profits earned. The policy amounts to double taxation.

    Mr Bowen’s Labor predecessors were not so foolhardy. In 2000, Labor backed Peter Costello when he allowed taxpayers a cash refund if the value of their franking credits from dividends exceeded their tax liability. Simon Crean, Labor’s then Treasury spokesman, said the party had no difficulty with a reform that “improved the taxation situation faced by low-income investors, especially retired Australians”.

    Australian Taxation Office figures show the cohort that claimed the most from franking credits in 2015-16 was women aged 75 and older, who claimed $1.2bn, at an average of $6561. As former Reserve Bank of Australia board member Roger Corbett said on Friday’s front page, many of those affected by Labor’s policy are too old or not in a position to change their investment strategies. “Anything that changes the rules for existing players should have a moratorium on it so if you are retired and you have retired on a particular basis and you have budgeted to do so and are depending on that, then for the government to change the rules, that will have an adverse effect on tens of thousands of people,” he said.

    For investors tempted to change strategies, the policy could encourage them to abandon Australian equities and plunge their money into riskier assets such as property or overseas shares, as businessman Robert Millner warned in The Australian last week.

    Conveniently for Labor’s trade union masters, union-backed industry super funds and retail funds would be ­exempt from the crackdown, leaving retirees in self-managed super funds and individual investors to carry the burden. According to the Treasury, ATO data shows 900,000 individuals would be hit, including the holders of 200,000 self-managed super funds. Labor’s push to target one of our nation’s most productive and responsible generations of citizens for achieving self-sufficiency and relative prosperity is profoundly worrying. It smacks of a philosophy grounded in the dead hand of class warfare and a desire to penalise success. Over time, this would harm the national interest, as well as people who deserve better.

  5. Mark M

    It seemed to me that the guy in this video was doing an impersonation of John Cleese in Fawlty Towers silly walk/don’t mention the war- at the police:

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-07/fraser-anning-has-stood-by-his-decision-to-attend-protests/10688812

    John Cleese @1.15: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfl6Lu3xQW0

    Unlike Cleese, who mentioned the war once, and got away with it, he didn’t get away with it.

  6. lily

    Scott Morrison A happy clapper and also a false prophet.

  7. struth

    Yet look at the so called right wing types who shit themselves immediately upon seeing him at the rally against governments that have created African Gang violence.
    A very important point to make is that the protestors were not blaming the gangs or mussie terrorists, but the governments who imported them.

    The point I wish to make here, is the right wing types who fear he’s hanging around with the wrong people might like to go and stand in the opposing crowd and really get a taste of the wrong people.

    For God sake, look at the big picture, and support the fighters, you gutless shits.

    That lad from Bendigo has obviously been framed, we know that an ex girlfriend of his was playing up and he went around to sort the bloke out.
    Maybe not a smart move.
    Now ,how much are you told about the deep dark history of every antifa fascist on the opposing side?

    FMD.
    Is that as bad as Tits Shortens past?
    Maybe the next leader of the country, which is actively suppressed by the media, and the police refuse to act on.

  8. OldOzzie

    ALP goads seniors angry over franking credit crackdown: vote against us

    Scott Morrison says Bill Shorten will give the “two-fingered salute to retirees” if he becomes prime minister as the government ramps up its attack on Labor’s $55.7 billion dividend imputation crackdown.

    The Prime Minister leapt on comments from opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen, who said self-funded retirees upset with Labor’s plans to axe cash refunds for franking credits were “entitled to vote against us”.

    “This is the arrogance. They so think they are going to win the next election. They so think it that they just don’t care,” Mr Morrison told 2GB radio.

    “And they will change it all. They will basically just give the two fingered salute to retirees right across the country and they just dare them.”

    Mr Morrison said people were “turning up in droves” to committee hearings on the policy in Queensland, saying the rooms had to be expanded to fit in all the concerned self-funded retirees.

    He noted World Vision and the Cancer Council say the policy would reduce donations to charities.

    “(Mr Shorten) hasn’t just got his hands into retirees pockets he’s got his hands into the donations bucket at the train station,” Mr Morrison said.

    More than 50,000 voters across the nation’s 10 most marginal seats stand to lose up to $2700 a year under Labor’s policy.

    On the Opposition Leader’s negative gearing reforms, Mr Morrison claimed the policy would “take 30 per cent of buyers out of the housing market” and lead to a “price collapse”.

    “And if you get a shock to the housing market like this, then that will affect the economy because of consumer confidence. That’s when it runs onto jobs,” Mr Morrison said.

    “It is like when you buy a new car. The minute you drive it off the lot it falls in value. That is what Labor’s policy is going to do to the value of your home.”

    ALP goads seniors: vote against us

    Chris Bowen has told self-funded retirees upset with Labor’s $55.7 billion franking credit crackdown to “vote against us”, as new data reveals more than 50,000 voters across the nation’s 10 most marginal seats stand to lose up to $2700 a year on average under the opposition tax grab.

    Drawing battlelines months out from a May election, Bill Shorten’s Treasury spokesman yesterday appeared to pit older Australians against working families after dismissing the grievances of retirees concerned about losing their cash refunds for ­excess franking dividend credits.

    Josh Frydenberg last night told The Australian “Labor’s not listening; Labor doesn’t care”, and ­accused the opposition of “arrogantly” ignoring the concerns of self-funded retirees.

    “Bill Shorten is obsessed with class warfare and pitting one Australian against another for political gain,” the Treasurer said. “His retiree tax is designed to punish aspiration and those who have taken personal responsibility for their own retirement.”

    Mr Bowen’s remarks came as new analysis of tax data shows the policy, a key Labor measure set to raise $55.7bn in revenue over 10 years, would be a potential trigger issue at the election in May, with up to 8 per cent of voters claiming the refunds in the 10 most tightly held electorates.

    Confirming yesterday that Labor had no intention of modifying or delaying the election policy, despite admitting it would not be popular with many Australians, Mr Bowen said the refund scheme cost taxpayers almost as much as was spent by the commonwealth on public schools: “If they (voters) feel very strongly about this, if they feel that this is something which should impact on their vote, they are of course perfectly entitled to vote against us.”

    National Seniors Australia and the Self-Managed Super Fund Association yesterday hit back at Labor, warning that many people would simply restructure their ­affairs and go on to the pension.

    Mr Bowen later told The Australian that his remarks could in no way be construed as offensive as they were merely an expression of people’s democratic rights.

    “It’s a pretty unremarkable revelation that we live in a democracy and people are under no obligation to vote for a party if they don’t like its policies,” he said.

    Referring to Coalition claims of Labor arrogance, Mr Bowen said: “There’s nothing more arrogant than promising ‘no cuts to schools, to hospitals, to the ABC and SBS’ before the 2013 election and then delivering those cuts in the 2014 budget.”

    According to the most recent available tax data, but factoring in the redrawn electoral boundaries for the next election, more than 4000 voters in the north Queensland seat of Herbert — held by Labor on a margin of 0.02 per cent — claim an average of $2295 in cash refunds annually. In the Liberal-held regional Victorian seat of Corangamite, now notionally Labor on a margin of 0.03 per cent, almost 9000 voters claim an average of $2036 a year in cash refunds. The highest refunds were claimed by 5000 people in the ­regional Queensland seat of Flynn, held by the Coalition on a margin of just 1 per cent.

    While Labor is unlikely to lose seats on the back of the policy, senior party sources have admitted it could have an impact in seats it is targeting to take from the Coalition.

    National Seniors Australia chief advocate Ian Henschke said he had received no guidance from Labor about whether older Australians who had restructured their finances to receive the Age Pension would be exempt from the crackdown.

    Within weeks of announcing its original dividend imputation policy last March, Labor backtracked under pressure from ­seniors groups, setting up a pensioner guarantee that quarantined those on government pensions or allowances with individual ­shareholdings.

    “We have members who tell us that they are just sitting outside the pension at the moment,” Mr Henschke said.

    “They are not pensioners, but they could adjust their affairs to get the pension so they can get the franking credits … we wonder whether the full amount that Labor says it will get from this is going to eventuate.”

    SMSF Association head of policy Jordan George questioned whether the Labor policy would claw back the forecast $55.7bn in revenue over the decade. He said some SMSF trustees with assets under the part Age Pension assets limit of $848,000 could choose to hold their Australian shares in their own name instead of in an SMSF. This would allow them to qualify for the pensioner guarantee and retain their refundable franking credits, given that Labor imposed a cut-off date of March 28, 2018, under which SMSFs with at least one pensioner would be exempt from its crackdown.

    “This is another example of how taxpayers can move assets around to avoid the application of Labor’s franking credit policy,” Mr George said. “The type of behavioural change will undermine Labor’s anticipated revenue gain.”

    Mr Frydenberg accused Mr Bowen of arrogance. “Labor has arrogantly told over one million Australians to vote against Labor: people who have simply saved for their own retirement, people who are not necessarily rich, people who have taken personal responsibility to save for their retirement,” the Treasurer said.

    “Australians’ retirement savings should be protected, not raided, as Labor is promising to do.”

    Mr Frydenberg described Mr Bowen’s claim that the cash refund scheme cost taxpayers almost as much as was spent by the commonwealth on schools as a mistruth. “The truth is that Labor’s retirees tax on their own numbers raises $55bn over a decade while government spending on schools is over $307bn for the same ­period,” he said.

    In response to questions from Labor MP Matt Thistlethwaite, the Parliamentary Budget Office, which costed the opposition’s policy, made clear in November that it had considered the possibility that some people might reduce their assets so that they were eligible for the Age Pension and therefore no longer subject to Labor’s policy. “The PBO’s assessment is that under current policy settings, there are already strong incentives for individuals to reduce their assets in order to qualify for the Age Pension, particularly for those with assets just above the threshold for the Age Pension asset test,” the PBO said.

    “While a small number of individuals may choose to reduce their assets and qualify for the Age Pension as a result of the proposal, this would be unlikely to materially ­affect the costing.”

    ATO data for 2015-16 shows the value of claimed franking credits peaks for both men and women over the age of 75 years. While the ATO measured the full value of franking credits claimed — not just those that were refunded in cash — it reveals that the demographic group that most benefits from them are older ­females.

    The ATO figures show that 170,614 women aged 75 and over claimed $1.2bn in franking credits worth an average of $6561. This compares to the 159,380 men aged 75 and over who claimed $955,109 in franking credits over the same period worth an average $5993.

  9. struth

    I said early on in the piece, Sco Mo will actually be worse than Malcom.
    Malcom could not hide his contempt for the lower classes, and was purely a corrupt globalist.

    People loathed him.
    Sco Mo, a corrupt globalist, tries everyday to “go the sharks” be one of them and will sucker a few votes, giving us the same traitorous global socialist UN governance (he is very , very, straight forward with WE WILL NOT PULL OUT OF PARIS) yet can’t make a decision in anything else.
    Only people with no conviction or ethos to live by, can be this way.
    So far, he has proved the only conviction he holds is to keep us under UN screws and try to put out spot fires agreeing with everyone, especially the left, culturally.

    The Liberal party must die.

    And it’s now getting to the stage where people are starting to notice the votes away from the Libs aren’t going to Labor, but “others”and are leaving in such large numbers, they may end up in minorities like AC or ON gaining seats.

  10. hzhousewife

    ALP goads seniors angry over franking credit crackdown: vote against us

    We sure will !

  11. Papachango

    Can someone explain how the left got so into the whole LGBTIQA++++ / radical gender thing? The original commies such as Marx and Engels thought ‘sodomy’ was an ‘abomination’?

  12. Behind Enemy Lines

    Bushkid
    #2922032, posted on January 31, 2019 at 9:25 am
    The more I hear from Fraser Anning, the more I like him. He seems to be one of the few sensible voices left in either House. He may have arrived in the Senate in the haphazard manner that seems to be the fashion of late, but I’m glad he’s there.

    struth
    #2922065, posted on January 31, 2019 at 9:52 am
    . . . it’s now getting to the stage where people are starting to notice the votes away from the Libs aren’t going to Labor, but “others” and are leaving in such large numbers, they may end up in minorities like AC or ON gaining seats.

    At this point, haphazard and minority party reps seem to be the only thing standing between us and permanent uniparty rule.

  13. Can someone explain how the left got so into the whole LGBTIQA++++ / radical gender thing? The original commies such as Marx and Engels thought ‘sodomy’ was an ‘abomination’?

    You just have to understand that the Nazis were actually into all that stuff and good Greenies to boot. The Nazis were the ‘other’ Left, as opposed to the Soviet Left. While the modern day Left decries everyone opposing them as being Nazis, they in fact are espousing everything that the Nazis represented.

  14. Speedbox

    It is in fact the Liberal Party, not Labor that has enabled ratchet socialism to gradually overtake our nation and has shifted the Overton window to the far left.

    The only thing that changed in recent years under former Prime Minister Turnbull, was that instead of spending a few years in faux opposition to Labor’s radical left wing agenda before later adopting it surreptitiously, Turnbull’s enthusiasm for the left-wing agenda brought the Liberal party into lock-step with it in real-time!

    Fact check = True.

  15. OldOzzie

    Chris Bowen caught fibbing on franking credits

    Robert Gottliebsen

    Suddenly cracks are appearing in the veneer that supports the ALP’s proposed retirement and pensioner tax. Under pressure on talkback radio, shadow treasurer Chris Bowen took an incredible risk. He conveyed a deliberate untruth, gambling that his interviewer, Melbourne 3AW drive host Tom Elliott had not done his research and would not catch him out. Bowen’s judgment was right, and Elliott did not pick it up.

    But the tense drama took on a surprise twist. Assistant treasurer, Stuart Robert was listening to Bowen in a car and, after the interview, rang Elliott to tell his listeners how Bowen had misled them.

    Bowen had told Elliott’s audience that pensioners would receive their cash franking credit entitlement. That was simply not right. Whether a pensioner is taxed via the loss of franking credits depends on when they registered for the pension. If they registered on or before March 28, 2018 then they will receive their franking credits. If they registered after March 28, they lose their cash franking credits and so suffer the RPT.

    Now that Elliott knows the truth Bowen and Bill Shorten are going to have to come up with a new set of lines that justify what to ordinary Australians is indefensible: levying a tax not on the basis of whether a person is entitled to be a pensioner, but rather when they registered for the pension.

    And remember we are talking about cutting income from people who are on the government pension and who are not rich. Moreover, a big proportion are widows.

    I am glad I am not an ALP candidate in the upcoming election trying to defend that action

    But Bowen and his leader Bill Shorten face a further risk.

    What if Tom Elliott, or any other talk show host, spend the time to really look at how the retirement and pensioners tax actually works? Elliott will discover that for the first time in Australia’s peacetime history the ALP plans to discriminate between people with the same assets and income.

    Chris Bowen has declared a policy that all Australians — apart from those who register for the pension before March 28 — should not receive cash franking credits. If he had implemented that policy and fixed the pension anomaly then, while I and many others would oppose the removal of cash franking credits, Bowen would be treating everyone the same. That’s a pillar of the Australian taxation system.

    But Bowen and Shorten are attempting to smash that pillar, creating the most dangerous taxation precedent imaginable: blatant discrimination. .

    Incredible as it might seem, the ALP has declared that if Australians have no taxable income but saved their money through an industry superannuation fund, or certain retail funds, then they are entitled to receive their cash franking credit refund entitlement “in full”.

    That’s a total reversal of the base ALP policy.

    The ALP policy only applies to those who have saved outside of superannuation or saved via some retail funds or most self-managed funds. Those people will not receive a cent of their franking cash refund entitlement. Remember we are dealing with people in exactly the same financial situation as those who receive their franking credits in full.

    As I have written before, this blatant discrimination is the most outrageous tax proposal by a major party since Harold Holt in November 1960, when he proposed withdrawing tax deductibility for interest.

    Shorten and Bowen defend their discrimination by saying that because the industry and big retail funds happened to have members who were salary earners and paid tax, those salary earners’ tax payments can be credited to the retirees so they can receive their corporate tax cash refunds.

    That’s an insult to the intelligence of ordinary Australians. To mix up the taxes paid by one Australian with the tax status of an entirely separate person breaks all the rules. It’s a complete nonsense.

    So, if the retirement and pensioner tax is to be fair it must apply to everyone in the same tax income/asset bracket and cannot exclude those in retail and industry funds. All must have their cash franking credit refunds blocked.

    The people affected by this are not the rich but ordinary salt of the earth Australians struggling to self-fund their retirement or lessen their reliance on the pension. To be fair to Tom Elliott, he really cornered the shadow treasurer on this issue. Elliott emphasised the fact that people have had their retirement plans in place for 20 years on the basis of cash franking credits. Elliott put so much social unfairness pressure on Bowen that he used a deliberate untruth to help his position.

    When Bill Shorten backed the cash franking credit ban, he thought the ALP was attacking the rich. Chris Bowen still maintains this is what will happen. I don’t agree.

    There is no doubt that those with large amounts in superannuation used cash franking credits in past years, but Scott Morrison blocked that with a change in the superannuation tax system tax. That leaves the million plus Australians who are not rich, led by many of Australia’s widows, as the targets. The best way for Bowen to get out his mess is to look at the total franking system. A short fix is to impose a limit of if say $15,000 on access to cash franking credits. The problem is that would mean that nothing like $55 billion would be raised.

  16. Behind Enemy Lines

    Papachango
    #2922082, posted on January 31, 2019 at 10:08 am
    Can someone explain how the left got so into the whole LGBTIQA++++ / radical gender thing? The original commies such as Marx and Engels thought ‘sodomy’ was an ‘abomination’?

    I find Spandrell’s explanation (BioLeninism) pretty compelling. Marx’s working class had a funny way of turning nationalist during wars, and capitalist during good times. That’s no good for the permanent revolution! Whereas the ‘LGBTIQA++++ / radical gender’ freak show gives the New Left a permanently disaffected coalition – that is, the various hard-core losers in society and in life’s genetic race. People who will be eternally loyal to a political philosophy that simultaneously elevates their social status while allowing them to vengefully crap on normalcy in every way imaginable. Bonus: getting to forcefully rat our pockets so they can officially promote and reward even more of the same.

    No wonder labour and the greens have kicked the working class overboard. The wonder is why the working class haven’t repaid the favour.

  17. calli

    They value their independence and have always tried to pay their own way. Welfare dependence would be anathema to them

    The Labor party has never sought the votes of these types of people. Why should they now?

    With any luck, the next generation will be totally dependent on welfare of one sort or another and, therefore, easily manipulated into accepting anything their government does, even the most evil.

    And then night will fall on the Great South Land. Enjoy the twilight while it lasts.

  18. The BigBlueCat

    When Bill Shorten backed the cash franking credit ban, he thought the ALP was attacking the rich. Chris Bowen still maintains this is what will happen. I don’t agree.

    There is no doubt that those with large amounts in superannuation used cash franking credits in past years, but Scott Morrison blocked that with a change in the superannuation tax system tax. That leaves the million plus Australians who are not rich, led by many of Australia’s widows, as the targets. The best way for Bowen to get out his mess is to look at the total franking system. A short fix is to impose a limit of if say $15,000 on access to cash franking credits. The problem is that would mean that nothing like $55 billion would be raised.

    But why limit the franking credit at all? This would still create a discriminatory tax system where some miss out on the full franking credit. I totally agree that Bowen has targetted self-funded retirees at the lower end of the dividend economy – the rich, his supposed target, will not be affected as they will have taxable income against which they will use their franking credits to the full. Just because he reckons they won’t vote Labor is enough to financially punish them?

    But pity the poor widow who might be receiving $25k – $30k in fully franked dividends who will miss out on $4k-$6k in tax refund because they don’t have any other taxable income. I hope Bown and Shorten can understand what they are proposing is theft – pure and simple – because if elected they will be in a position of power to withhold what currently lawfully belongs to the widows. I hope they realise the tax refund effectively keeps these widows away from the pension.

    If the ALP go ahead with their plan, I hope those caught by the change all apply for the aged pension if they are eligible. The ALP seek to rob and destroy ordinary Australian’s livelihoods. They always have, they always will.

  19. Behind Enemy Lines

    Papachango
    #2922082, posted on January 31, 2019 at 10:08 am
    Can someone explain how the left got so into the whole LGBTIQA++++ / radical gender thing? The original commies such as Marx and Engels thought ‘sodomy’ was an ‘abomination’?

    I find Spandrell’s explanation (BioLeninism) pretty compelling. Marx’s working class had a funny way of turning nationalist during wars, and capitalist during good times. That’s no good for the permanent revolution! Whereas the ‘LGBTIQA++++ / radical gender’ freak show gives the New Left a permanently disaffected coalition – that is, the various hard-core losers in society and in life’s genetic race. People who will be eternally loyal to a political philosophy that simultaneously elevates their social status while allowing them to vengefully crap on normalcy in every way imaginable. Bonus: getting to forcefully rat our pockets so they can officially promote and reward even more of the same.

    No wonder labour and the greens have kicked the working class overboard. The wonder is why the working class haven’t repaid the favour.

    Why the libs are playing along, that’s another good question.

  20. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    With any luck, the next generation will be totally dependent on welfare of one sort or another and, therefore, easily manipulated into accepting anything their government does, even the most evil.

    And then night will fall on the Great South Land. Enjoy the twilight while it lasts.

    Well said, calli.

  21. flyingduk

    Can someone explain how the left got so into the whole LGBTIQA++++ / radical gender thing? The original commies such as Marx and Engels thought ‘sodomy’ was an ‘abomination’?

    I see 2 motivations:
    1) The traditional family (and all other sources of social order) must be destroyed in order to leave the state all powerful
    2) Endlessly carving off ‘victim groups’ who can be farmed for votes

  22. MatrixTransform

    I hope those caught by the change all apply for the aged pension if they are eligible.

    They want us on the tit.
    servile, cap-in-hand

  23. Up The Workers!

    Hmmm…the “Overton Window Concept” is a new one on me, but I am very familiar with the old tried-and-tested Aussie concept of “defenestration”, which should be partaken of often in all Parties, in order to keep the powers-that-be, on their toes.

    If you are feeling in a particularly charitable mood, you might even consider opening the window before tossing the departing former Leader, through it.

    The trouble is that once a Party has lost many if not most of its decent members, there aren’t all that many remaining whom you can afford to “defenestrate”.

  24. Dr Fred Lenin

    There is a ring of truth about this the left left left union wing of the uniparty had whitlam and the left leftliberal wing of the uniparty had turnbull ,all we need now is for the left left left left gangrenes wing to get of christmas ,(di natale ) elected leader of the uniparty and continue the stuffing up of the former “greatest country in the world”.

  25. Biota

    Challenging pensioners to vote against labor is just another deplorables or Textor they don’t matter jab. I suspect that there is a network of individuals linked to these pensioners who have a vested interest in seeing them financially secure. Offspring not wanting the risk of needing to provide support, or interested in preserving the inheritance, or out of old fashioned compassion not wanting to see them struggle. So there might be a lot more votes against Labor than they arrogantly imagine.

  26. Up The Workers!

    Spot on, Biota.

    Over the course of the 20th century, approximately 190 million people were killed or murdered by Socialists around the world. Whether you call those Socialists Communist Socialists, Nationalist Socialists, Green Socialists or other Leftard Socialists, they all basically pee into the same pot.

    Dodgy Dan in Mogadishu-by-the-Yarra is now looking to bring in some form of abortion of the elderly, as most of them have acquired too much wisdom during their long lives, to willingly vote Labor.

    Miraculously though, the elderly famously vote exclusively Labor(sic), after they are dead and planted.

    In Australia, Labor(sic) are trying to maintain the population-limiting policies of their famous 20th century Socialist peers Joe Stalin, Mao Tse Tung, Pol Pot and Adolph Hitler, as their Abortion Abattoirs and human dismemberment Centres are all working overtime secateuring the limbs off non-anaesthetised babies, while Dodgy Dan is looking to increase his vote through ‘stiffing the codgers’, while their head-lopping, eyeball-plucking, knife-wielding and car-driving 6th century Musbyterian religious pals are attending to those remaining members of the Christian, Buddhist, and Atheist community in the repeatedly lethal killing fields of the A.L.P.’s Mogadishu-by-the-Yarra C.B.D.

    Vote 1 A.L.P. – endorsed by Undertakers, Morticians, Embalmers, Grave-Diggers, Body-Snatchers and Necrophiliacs, everywhere.

  27. Speedbox

    The Unions, assorted NGO’s with their hangers-on and every spiv in the country are all salivating at the thought of Labor regaining power.

    Shorten and Bowen have laid bare their policies and yet, I don’t see sufficient rising outrage in the broader community or the media. Sure, some sectors, but is it enough to make a difference? And besides, it is a relatively easy thing for Shorten to walk back from….’we have heard, we have listened and we will withdraw that proposal’ without lasting damage to their overall campaign. The Libs, if they had any sense or gumption, could eviscerate Labor. But they won’t.

    The rout of the Libs in the Reps will likely be overwhelming (and deserved). Labor will march into power on the backs of their traditional base, disaffected Libs, dopes who don’t know/don’t care, Green preferences and all to the marching band provided by a dishonest compliant media.

    The only hope is a Senate that is sufficiently large and obstructive to stop the worst of a Labor looting cartel. Remember that our Governments love tax – more the merrier – and, as seen many times, even obstructive politicians can often be coerced with silver trinkets and mirrors.

    I have no confidence in the future of this country and reiterate that we must all prepare/take the necessary steps to protect our families and our wealth.

    Calli is right ‘….And then night will fall on the Great South Land. Enjoy the twilight while it lasts.’

  28. jupes

    Fraser Manning is clearly the best and most moral politician in Australia at the minute.

    Let’s hope Queenslanders do the right thing and re-elect him.

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