Fresh air in a US classroom

Freeing kids from mediocrity and boredom.

A new video from Reason suggests that it is possible to liven up the classroom and in fact, is actually being done quite effectively. Host John Stossel found a school filled with kids who would likely be considered dysfunctional and troublemakers in the normal education system. Instead, Stossel found a group of thriving young adults, thinking intelligently and actively entering the real world as enterprising individuals.
Read all about it.

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10 Responses to Fresh air in a US classroom

  1. bespoke

    This would have helped me.

  2. Tel

    … thriving young adults, thinking intelligently and actively entering the real world as enterprising individuals.

    No wonder they were considered dysfunctional and troublemakers in the normal education system.

  3. Howard Hill

    These are not the drones they’re looking for.

  4. Old School Conservative

    Thanks Rafe. A great initiative.

  5. Chester Draws

    Anything can be made to work for a short time. Initially North Korea outpaced South Korea — full of initial revolutionary fervour, which faded as the disadvantages became rather too apparent. Let’s see this school keep it up for ten years.

    By then the extra work that the teachers put in to make it work will have worn them out. Who here would do hours and hours each week of extra work for not a cent more — yet thinks that teachers should? The dynamic principal that holds it all together will have moved on too. The first wave of kids, who felt they were special, will be replaced by those who just treat it as any other school. With the initial fervour gone, I’d place money that it’s failings will be all too apparent.

    And that’s assuming our reporter hasn’t seen a “Potemkin” school anyway. I’ve seen quite a few newspaper reports of awesome schools, that actually get grades — when tested by independent testers — that are lower than they were getting in other schools. The kids love the new school, but they love it because it isn’t hard and it isn’t teaching them as much. It’s no good rushing kids on to higher levels if the foundations aren’t there — no matter how much they love being told they are special.

    If fixing education was this easy, it would have been done long ago. Readers here usually treat “it’s too good to be true” with the scepticism it deserves. Apparently they lose that when it comes to education.

  6. Freeing kids from mediocrity and boredom.

    OK, a school where the students were bored too much of the time would be bad.

    But I think a school should teach its students to stick at dull tasks till the tasks are completed thoroughly, and that means teaching the students to cope with boredom.

    A school where everything was designed to be entertaining would be terrible preparation for the real world.

  7. Strong had a blog for a short period of time more than 5 years ago and this is his bio. https://thepurposeofeducation.wordpress.com/about-michael-strong/

    Reason pushing this school, however, which is clearly using the cybernetic, integrated conceptual neural net template is fascinating, but not particularly surprising. The Kochs’ previous philanthropy has pushed Project-Based Learning models in the schools with the Whole Child, internalized mental models template.

    It fits with a hypothesis I have been developing for a while that there are variations in the sales pitches for K-12 schools now, but under the surface they are pushing the same model grounded in systems science.

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