The Climate Pledge

Grover Norquist’s Americans for Tax Reform has a tax pledge they encourage people running for elected office to sign.  It is essentially a written promise by legislators and candidates for office that commits them to oppose tax increase.

The pledge for people running for national office asks the signer to promise to:

  1. oppose any and all efforts to increase the marginal income tax rates for individuals and/or businesses; and
  2. oppose any net reduction or elimination of deductions and credits, unless matched dollar for dollar by further reducing tax rates.

If only there was a similar pledge for Australian politicians …

TAFKAS would prefer the tax pledge, but as short term alternative, perhaps instead our political elite, specifically those to advocate for “climate action” take the Australian Climate Pledge.  The basis of this is that our political “leaders” should be prepared to make equivalent sacrifices that which they ask others to make.  Here are some ideas:

  1. Promise to never again eat meat and to never again purchase leather products.  Given that a major contributor to global emissions is from agricultural methane (cow farts), meat and leather goods consumption must be materially reduced.  If nothing else, it would be nice to never see Malcolm Turnbull in a leather jacket again.  Perhaps also Julie Banks can wear hemp sandals rather than Italian leather shoes while she is campaigning.
  2. Promise to never again fly business or first class.  Given that a major contribution to global emissions is airplane emissions, business class and first class travel must be stopped.  After all, the average emissions from a first class or business class seat are much higher than an economy seat.  This pledge would obviously also extend to the public service for their many domestic and international travels.
  3. Promise to never take transport in a CommCar (or state equivalent) and instead take a regular taxi/ride share or public transport.  Given that a major contribution to global emissions is from transport, this is a must.  An idling CommCar, with its very large engine, must definitely create a lot of emissions.
  4. Promise to never purchase a 4-wheel drive or SUV unless it is for farming purposes.  Again, given that a major contribution to global emissions is from transport, it is completely impractical for our political leaders to drive large cars in urban settings.  Landrovers, Rangerovers and Landcruisers are completely unnecessary for urban settings.

Come on climate change action advocates.  If your ideas are so good and virtuous, try applying them to yourself first.  Sacrifice starts at home.  If your ideas are so good, they don’t need to be implemented through force.

You know the corporate governance slogan – don’t tell me, show me.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to The Climate Pledge

  1. Percy Popinjay

    Promise never to use electrickery derived from fossil fuel sources, but solely from unreliables.

  2. max

    let save this idiocy for posterity:

    ANU climate tool identifies end of winter by 2050

    Dr Geoff Hinchliffe said in the release.

    “In 30 years’ time winter as we know it will be non-existent. It ceases to be everywhere apart from a few places in Tasmania,” he said.

    http://www.anu.edu.au/news/all-news/anu-climate-tool-identifies-end-of-winter-by-2050

  3. vlad

    Going to need a lot of hydrocarbons – ie oil, black gold, texas tea – to make all the plastic shoes.

  4. NB

    And: Politicians to voluntarily pay to power companies the same proportion of their discretionary income lost because of increased power costs as the poor must lose.
    If a poor person’s discretionary income is $100, and electricity goes up $50, that equals 50%.
    If a politician’s discretionary income is $100K, they get to pay $50K.
    This should particularly appeal to the left, especially communists (whoops, Greens) in parliament. Equality of outcome for all.

  5. Mark M

    “Promise to never again fly business or first class. ”

    How Far Can We Get Without Flying?

    When a climate scientist decided to stop flying to cut his carbon emissions, he caught a glimpse of the post-oil future.

    Hour for hour, there’s no better way to warm the planet than to fly in a plane.

    https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/life-after-oil/how-far-can-we-get-without-flying-20160211

  6. Aynsley Kellow

    I like the restriction on business class travel. I don’t travel to Canberra much these days, but it always amused me how the Qantas seat layout on flights to CBR always had about twice the business class capacity of jets flying elsewhere – all filled with politicians or state or commonwealth public servants.

    In contrast, i had some dealings with a large business some years ago. Their rule: economy class unless the journey exceeded 2 hours.

    In universities, they always insisted on economy for academics (those who actually did the teaching and research that earned the income) even when flying long-haul, while senior management went up the front end.

  7. Tekweni

    Well the last one would not get you too many votes over Easter on Fraser Island.

  8. Merry Poster

    Promise to never again fly business or first class.

    Why do any politicans ever need to fly again? Now that we have the NBN why can’t they just use Skype?

  9. Phill

    I would add one. They should promise to never breath out. That adds carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

  10. Fang

    Id adjust Phills requirements by carbon capture, all polys in an air tight room!

  11. Ubique

    ANU climate tool identifies end of winter by 2050

    The climate alarmists are wising up somewhat. They’re now avoiding predictions where the outcome can be determined in their working lifetimes.

    My favourite imbecilic AGW prediction in this respect was the “50 million climate refugees by 2010” though Al Gore’s “North Pole ice-free within five years” – a reckless and stupid prediction he made in 2008 – is certainly a contender.

  12. Nob

    Percy Popinjay
    #2957962, posted on March 14, 2019 at 12:56 pm
    Promise never to use electrickery derived from fossil fuel sources, but solely from unreliables.

    This requires one to disconnect from electricity grid, phone system and internet. Streetlights, ATMs, petrol pumps, van deliveries. All verboten. Hospitals, ambulances, fire brigades, police.

    Excellent!

  13. Nob

    Aynsley Kellow
    #2958176, posted on March 14, 2019 at 4:45 pm
    I like the restriction on business class travel.

    Business class travel keeps the major airlines going

    economy class unless the journey exceeded 2 hours.

    Pretty much every journey originating in Australia except up and down the east coast corridor.

    No SME could afford that. The multiplier for international business class to/from Australia is 3x-10x cheapest economy fare.

  14. Enyaw

    hmmm …Dr Jekyll…by the pic !

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.