Overcoming educational disadvantage

An important Centre for Independent Studies event in Melbourne. Overcoming the Odds. A study of Australia’s top performing disadvantaged schools.

Groundbreaking new CIS research recently released has identified the common policies and practices leading to success in disadvantaged primary schools.

Join us for the research launch in Melbourne with report author CIS Research Fellow in education Blaise Joseph, who will be joined by renowned Melbourne school principals Kevin Mackay from Dandenong North Primary School and Victoria Golding from Lyndale Greens Primary School, as they discuss the reasons for why some disadvantaged schools manage to ‘overcome the odds’ and achieve excellent literacy and numeracy results. Moderated by Tom Switzer, CIS Executive Director.

Six common themes were found across the nine schools:

School discipline.
Direct and explicit instruction.
Experienced and autonomous school leadership.
Data-informed practice.
Teacher collaboration and professional learning.
Comprehensive early reading instruction.

These six consistent themes indicate how disadvantaged primary schools could potentially improve significantly, without necessarily requiring more taxpayer funding.

Roll up!

More about the project and other CIS publications.

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14 Responses to Overcoming educational disadvantage

  1. The Beer Whisperer

    Having a grandfather from deep working class Botany who wished to provide better opportunities to his children, he practiced these at home. When home values coincide with those in education, we get better outcomes.

  2. hzhousewife

    Sounds like great grandfather, whose student teacher, my grandmother, trained under and upheld the traditions. I cannot say however whether there was much in the way of ” data-informed practice” in the Buckland Valley in 1880’s, but I bet the kids who left school aged 12 and 13 back then were pretty well prepared for the lives they were about to lead.

  3. TBH

    When home values coincide with those in education, we get better outcomes.

    According to the research I’ve read, that’s bang on. We try very hard with our kids to provide the level of discipline and educational oversight to help them get the best out of themselves. All I ever ask of them is maximum effort and let the marks take care of themselves. My working class parents were the same with myself and my siblings and we turned out pretty well.

    We also provide some much needed counterpoint to some of the Marxist garbage that they get taught, even in the private schools they attend.

  4. Big_Nambas

    School discipline.

    Without doubt that is the most important reason. Most parents that I know say that there is no discipline in their children’s schools.

  5. Big_Nambas

    We also provide some much needed counterpoint to some of the Marxist garbage that they get taught, even in the private schools they attend.

    Where would private schools get non Marxist teachers, all teachers in Australia go through our university system and those systems are all Marxist
    The rot is well set in Australian education and will be very hard to fix, Shortarse and his mob will make it worse.

  6. rickw

    School discipline.
    Direct and explicit instruction.
    Experienced and autonomous school leadership.
    Data-informed practice.
    Teacher collaboration and professional learning.
    Comprehensive early reading instruction.

    Oh, so just like schools right up until about 1970?

  7. Bruce of Newcastle

    Actually teaching useful stuff probably helps too.
    Ditch LGBT propaganda, aboriginal mysticism and the incessant repeats of Gore’s movie.

  8. Mother Lode

    This may already be covered but the flip side to be made clear is how additional funding has not led to improvement. (If they are called ‘disadvantaged’ schools then we can be pretty sure there has been a steady train of ministers announcing increased funding over and over again.)

    I am near certain (something the CIS can verify) that increased funding has simply been used to do the same ineffective stuff in more expensive ways.

    Help to break the spell where people think spending more is the key to improved results – even if no one knows what the money will be used for.

  9. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    wrong fred

  10. yarpos

    “Lion Air pilots were scouring handbook in final moments before plane crashed”

    Not unusual that pilots would be using a manual to work through procedures during an incident

  11. John A

    As a number have implied already, what is not stated among those factors is
    Parental interest, involvement and support.

    It would be interesting to compare these results with Asian demographics where education is a highly valued social good.

  12. max

    Meeting with a group of Christians in Austin [Texas] on May 19, 1986, [Attorney General James] Mattox revealed his true colors when asked, “Is it true that the State of Texas owns Our children? ” Mattox retorted, “Yes, it is true… and not only your children, but you, too!”.

    John Swett the “Father of the California public school”:
    Parents have no remedy as against the teacher-As a general thing, the only persons who have a legal right to give orders to the teacher, are his employers–namely, the committee in some States, and in others the Director of Trustees. If his conduct is approved of by his employees, the parents have no remedy as against him or them …

  13. Shy Ted

    Go to school, kids. Work hard. You don’t want to end up like Wayne Swan do you?

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