The daily battle to keep the lights on

The joy of unreliable energy just keeps coming. No surprise, the pattern is clear wherever statistics are available. Check out Switzerland and Germany (50,000 interventions in May).

The deterioration of the strength of the electricity network — most pronounced in South Australia — is also spreading to southwest NSW, northwest Victoria and north Queensland, adding to wholesale costs incurred by users.

SA’s electricity system is increasingly operating under the direct intervention of the grid operator, with last-ditch interventions reserved for emergencies becoming a default way of managing the network,…

“Systems with lots of non-synchronous generation like wind and solar are weaker and harder to control — raising the risk of cascading blackouts. Unprecedented in their breadth and scope, these trends put extraordinary pressure on the security and reliability of our power grid.” Investment in large-scale renewable energy doubled in 2018 to $20 billion, with one in five Australians now owning rooftop solar and electricity generated by clean energy accounting for 21 per cent of the overall power mix, Clean Energy Council data will show today.

That trend is also pressuring wholesale market prices, with the cost of keeping the system stable soaring to $270 million as of September 2018, while the cost of maintaining frequency control surged nearly tenfold to $220m in 2018 from $25m in 2012.

The worst is yet to come regardless of the party in government but just see what happens when the CFMEU party is in charge!

And a majority of Australians are climate sceptics depending how you put the questions.

And remember what Germany achieved from their Green Energy Transition. They spent a trillion euros, increased the cost of power by 50 or 100% (depending on the base date), destabilized the grid and did not reduce CO2 emissions from 2009 to the latest official report last year. The Trifecta of Failure.

This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

44 Responses to The daily battle to keep the lights on

  1. 2dogs

    ScoMo needs to run a nuclear vs renewables plebiscite at the next election if he wants get back in.

  2. Dr Faustus

    The worst is yet to come regardless of the party in government but just see what happens when the CFMEU party is in charge!

    The worst is yet to come because the Eastern Australian gas supply infrastructure will be unable to deliver the unscheduled volumes of gas required to run the gas turbines when AEMO calls them on.

    Hairy-chested directions to gas producers and gas turbine generators may sound wonderful in the Canberra bubble. But the fundamental physical and engineering problems of squirting an extra 20%, 30%, 40% of gas into the pipeline system and delivering it 1,000′ km’s away, on 5-minutes notice, will not be resolved by regulation and diktat.

    The NEM is now on the edge of falling over with only ~11% of large scale-renewables in the system.
    Nobody has any idea how 45% might work.

    Worse, outside of the upstream gas industry, nobody recognises this might be a problem.

  3. Shy Ted

    Dunno what kept the lights on here yesterday. Complete cloud cover and not a breath til 6pm.

  4. Herodotus

    We are so stuffed.

  5. Fred

    And Germans have French nuclear power to draw from

  6. PB

    One trillion euros, no doubt some massive loans to global banks in there, all repaid with interest by taxpayers. Maybe this is one reason why the Globally-minded are so concerned about Climate Change. The sheer scale of the infrastructure modification has to be paid for somehow.

    Of course it isn’t permissible to notice some things anymore.

  7. OldOzzie

    Renewable energy puts national power grid under stress

    Perry Williams
    Senior Business Writer

    Australia’s electricity grid is relying on emergency safety nets to keep the lights on, amid revelations the energy market operator stepped in more than 100 times last year to order South Australia’s gas generators to provide supply.

    This has prompted the nation’s energy rule maker to launch an investigation as the transition to renewables from coal ratchets up costs and places “extraordinary pressures” on the power system.

    SA’s electricity system is increasingly operating under the direct intervention of the grid operator, with last-ditch interventions reserved for emergencies becoming a default way of managing the network, as slabs of solar generation test the system’s strength, the Australian Energy Market Commission will warn today.

    The deterioration of the strength of the electricity network — most pronounced in South Australia — is also spreading to southwest NSW, northwest Victoria and north Queensland, adding to wholesale costs incurred by users.

    “The power system is experiencing more stress as it transitions to more renewables,” AEMC chief executive Anne Pearson writes in The Australian today.

    “Systems with lots of non-synchronous generation like wind and solar are weaker and harder to control — raising the risk of cascading blackouts. Unprecedented in their breadth and scope, these trends put extraordinary pressure on the security and reliability of our power grid.” Investment in large-scale renewable energy doubled in 2018 to $20 billion, with one in five Australians now owning rooftop solar and electricity generated by clean energy accounting for 21 per cent of the overall power mix, Clean Energy Council data will show today.

    But the unprecedented surge in renewables has also upended the nation’s transmission system, much of which is decades old and was largely designed to cater for coal, which still supplies about 70 per cent of electricity in the system.

    Now thousands of smaller generators, including variable renewable supply, are connected to the grid, raising new pressures on the grid operator to ensure voltage and frequency — the nuts and bolts of a power system — are maintained to keep the lights on.

    The exit in 2017 of the Hazelwood coal-fired power plant in Victoria has contributed to network issues and unstable voltage in the state, while the impending retirement of facilities like AGL Energy’s Liddell unit in NSW also loom as pressure points for the system.
    “The grid is holding up but only because the system operator is intervening on a daily basis to keep the lights on,”

    Ms Pearson said. “It’s a power system under increasing pressure.”

    South Australia required 100 separate interventions in the 2017-18 year for gas generators to provide supply and keep its system stable, compared with just eight in the previous year, Australian Energy Market Operator data provided to the AEMC shows.

    It appears to be a trend picking up pace, with South Australia’s generators in total receiving 210 directions since June 30, 2017, a number which the AEMC describes as an “unprecedented use of this intervention mechanism”. And for the first time last year, a Victorian generator was ordered to keep the lights on.

    That trend is also pressuring wholesale market prices, with the cost of keeping the system stable soaring to $270 million as of September 2018, while the cost of maintaining frequency control surged nearly tenfold to $220m in 2018 from $25m in 2012.

    The Reliability and Emergency Reserve Trader was also used twice, at a cost of $52m, in 2017-18 after never having been activated before — with costs paid by Victorian and South Australian businesses.

    “In the face of unprecedented change we see the power system still meeting consumers’ needs but only because the market operator, AEMO, is using the power system’s built-in safety-nets on a daily basis to keep the lights on,” the AEMC says.

    “The system’s emergency mechanisms are working well to help AEMO keep the lights on. However these safety nets will not deliver targeted, least-cost solutions to the challenges we are seeing. These emergency, expensive ‘stopgap’ measures are not meant to be used all the time.”

    The AEMC said its findings have prompted it to undertake an extensive investigation of intervention mechanisms and system strength.

    “In the short term, the aim is to minimise the cost of directions and support lower-cost alternatives,” the AEMC says in its annual market performance review released today.

    The AEMC’s warnings underline the fast-changing nature of the grid, but may also be seized upon by political leaders as proof that more needs to be done to ensure the reliability and integrity of the electricity system.

    The Coalition has made lower power prices and system reliability two of the central planks of its energy policy in the lead-up to a May federal ­election, while Labor has pledged to deliver 50 per cent renewables in the nation’s power mix by 2030.

    Wind and Solar Share of Total Output in the NEM

    As Australia under Liberals/Labor/Greens will soon become Venezuela

    https://news.yahoo.com/venezuelas-maduro-replaces-electricity-minister-amid-blackouts-005716137.html

    In an address on state television, Maduro said he named Igor Gavidia, a 65-year-old electrical engineer who was previously president of state power generator Electrificacion del Caroni, to replace Electricity Minister Luis Motta.

    The change came as Maduro reiterated plans for a 30-day “load administration” plan, which he first mentioned last week and which Venezuelans widely assume will be a way to ration electricity.

    “Every time the power goes out, or we do not have water, or we do not have gas, guess what we are going to do?” he said at an earlier rally at the country’s Catholic University. “We are going to protest, we are going to make demands, we are going to take to the streets of Venezuela, because it is our right.”

  8. OldOzzie

    What kind of society switches off the lives of its poorest people? – The Liberal /Nationals Party?????

    BARNABY JOYCE – Look in the Mirror

    There is something morally wrong when a widower cannot pay an electricity bill in a nation that once boasted the cheapest power in the Western world but now delivers the most expensive, despite the $30 billion taxpayers have invested in renewables.

    This is a person who has never asked for favours, and in many cases does not nominate for access to hardship programs — but their children may come home to a house without power. The hardship program, even if you can wait to get on it, does not write off the bill. It assumes you can afford the payment plan. If you do not pay it’s listed as a bad debt on your credit record. This may haunt you for years.

    For the family there is the humil­iation and hardship that you live in a house without a fridge, without an electric stove, without a washing machine, without a toaster. No television, no hot water, no electric lights.

    On the ABC’s Insiders last Sunday, political journalist Malcolm Farr scoffed about “electricity as a human rights issue”. We have become so cynical about the most vulnerable. They are an acceptable casualty in our quest to “do our part” to cool the planet, even though our action achieves nothing away from worship of parliament’s boarding-school zeitgeist.

    Labor has shown complete ignorance of the almost 128,000 households that have been disconnected and those living in poverty as a result. It now says their car is politically incorrect and must be electric to be charged from a source they don’t have, with money they don’t have. Labor has arrived at the inner-suburban wealth of the 2020s while leaving the roots and compassion of its heritage far behind. Instead it complies with the edicts of Australia’s wealthiest constituency, the Greens.

    Where do a great number of those who cannot afford power live? They live in the left-behind towns and villages that orbit our major regional centres. They live in a humble house and have made the decision that groceries trump power bills. They live where there is no public transport and a second-hand car is the only transport from home to town, where the store, doctor or chemist is.

    Why is Australia so blind to this national disgrace? Why is the Labor Party so beholden to a stratum of society that is so removed from the leaden monkey that sits on the back of those at the bottom of the social stack?

    In the regional towns on the back of drought and a new world of internet purchases, small business can no longer afford the power bill, nor can services or small industry, and big businesses are forced to take their production overseas.

    Electricity is the food stock of the standard of living and the effects of exorbitant prices compound in regional areas and undermine any chance of relief in the cost of living.

    I do not believe coal is a holy rock that will save humanity, but it is the source of power for so many in our Southeast Asian region who face a similar dilemma of power costs. Many confront it with our coal that travels in giant trains that snake through the towns and vil­lages where our people live in a poverty of unaffordable electricity. Those who live without power or who cannot afford today’s prices cannot wait for promises of cheaper, renewable power. To them it is a cruel hoax. Theories are debunked by their reality.

    People who cannot pay their power bills now, and who remember paying more affordable power prices in the past, are understandably cynical about the renewable power plan. We export uranium, which becomes acceptable only after it has crossed oceans on its way to power stations in other countries. Nuclear power with zero carbon emissions — isn’t this what we want? Market exploitation of those who cannot pay their power bills remains as Labor and others did not support divestiture powers that could have been used to threaten major power companies into fair conduct towards customers. State poles-and-wire costs are exorbitant.

    Even talking about the issue of power is proscribed. It will break the “truce”. But what truce is there for the person living in privation? Why would you settle to stay in the misery you are in? What truce is there if their standard of living is being placed beyond their capacity to pay for it? Relaying the truth of the situation of those who cannot pay their power bill will come at a price of rebuke by those who believe all reference to the nation’s biggest income earner is anathema. Who represents those without power when this is the Greens’ agenda and Labor relies on the Greens? Who represents them when inner suburbs have the idle income to cover increased power prices and renewable subsidies to install solar panels on their own inner-city house?

    The Nationals are the only hope in fighting if not for common sense, then at least for justice. BULL

  9. CameronH

    Time to buy a generator backup.

  10. Dr Fred Lenin

    Rafe , I have visions of bright engineers trying to keep the lights on while a bunch of know nothing career politicians worrying about gangrene preferences , sabotage their efforts endlessly . Be like trying to juggle with kids poking you with sticks . The bolsheviks had a cure for sabotage ,Cheka an acronym with sabotage one of the words .

  11. hzhousewife

    Worse, outside of the upstream gas industry, nobody recognises this might be a problem.

    These blokes are going to get BLAMED in the long run, why are they not speaking up themselves, NOW ?
    Or, not being Australians, they don’t care?

  12. Mark M

    German power lobby sees shortfalls due to coal, nuclear phase-out

    “In theory, Germany’s renewable power capacity from wind and sunshine has separately reached a level of around 118,000 MW, which alone could meet 100 percent of expected demand, but this is highly dependent on weather conditions.

    If the conditions are unfavorable, green power could completely evaporate.

    https://burnmorecoal.com/2019/04/01/german-power-lobby-sees-shortfalls-due-to-coal-nuclear-phase-out/

  13. Diogenes

    coMo needs to run a nuclear vs renewables plebiscite at the next election if he wants get back in.

    Not going to work… https://dilbert.com/ scroll down

  14. Tim Neilson

    Hairy-chested directions to gas producers and gas turbine generators may sound wonderful in the Canberra bubble. But the fundamental physical and engineering problems of squirting an extra 20%, 30%, 40% of gas into the pipeline system and delivering it 1,000′ km’s away, on 5-minutes notice, will not be resolved by regulation and diktat.

    When I first read “Atlas Shrugged” I thought it was considerably exaggerated.

    But more and more I’ve seen governments, unions, crony capitalists and low information voters behave exactly as Ayn Rand described.

    What Dr F is pointing out is just like the steam train scene in Atlas Shrugged where a catastrophe was caused by politicians insisting that the train could safely go through the tunnel because they WANTED it to and they ORDERED it to.

    “First as tragedy, then as farce” may in this case instead be “first as (fictional) farce, then as tragedy”.

  15. Today:

    Lights out, trains stalled, traffic in chaos in northern Melbourne power outage
    IMPACTS
    5000 properties without power
    14 sets of traffic lights were out in the area, including busy Bell St and Plenty Rd
    Metro Trains reported delays of about 20 minutes on the Mernda line
    Drivers told Ross and John at least three sets of boom gates were stuck down

    “It’s a bit of a nightmare,” caller Janine said.

    https://www.3aw.com.au/lights-out-trains-stalled-traffic-in-chaos-in-northern-melbourne-power-outage/

  16. Roger

    The NEM is now on the edge of falling over with only ~11% of large scale-renewables in the system.
    Nobody has any idea how 45% might work.

    Or not work, rather.

    Venezuela, here we come!

  17. OldOzzie

    Australia’s demand for fuel growing as uptake of electric vehicles lags

    Primrose Riordan
    Political Reporter

    As of December 2018 Australia has 18 days worth of petrol supplies.

    Australia’s demand for fuel is growing faster than other nations while the country’s uptake of electric vehicles and alternative fuels in lagging behind creating fuel security concerns, a new report has suggested.

    Energy Minister Angus Taylor released the interim fuel security report today ahead of the expected federal election and vowed to deliver fuel security without costing consumers.

    “The Government will enact these and future changes in a manner that does not impact the price of petrol at the pump and put more pressure on household budgets,” Mr Taylor said.

    “This measured approach stands in stark contrast to Labor’s reckless policy which will cost Australians between $10 and $20 billion and will hit consumers at the bowser.”

    The report does not include any recommendations, and there will be a public consultation process before a final report is released laying out how to fix Australia’s fuel security problems.

    The energy department said in the report that Australia falls behind other OECD nations with fuel supply challenges in terms of the rates of increased vehicle fuel efficiencies and the uptake of new vehicle technologies.

    “Other countries with similar reliance on imports and low domestic production are taking steps to reduce demand,” the department said.

    “For example, (South Korea) and Japan are both almost 100 per cent reliant on oil imports…Both countries have targeted and ambitious plans to reduce demand by transitioning some sectors away from reliance on oil imports.

    “(South Korea) has a target of 250,000 electric vehicles by 2020, which it hopes to achieve by incentives of US$12,000 for electric vehicles.

    “Japan has a long-term Hydrogen Strategy which focuses on development of fuel cell technology. Both countries have policies to promote biofuel production, particularly waste-to-fuel technology.”

    The department said in contrast to Australia, other countries had “government policies implementing specific electric vehicle targets and strict fuel efficiency standards combined with incentives for low- and zero-emission vehicles”.

    The energy department declared it was time to “rethink” Australia’s domestic fuel security and prepare for future disruptions.

    “Given the focus on electricity and gas for the past couple of years, it is prudent to rethink our domestic fuel security and ensure that we are prepared for any potential shocks,” the department said.

    “Australia may be left behind as the world moves away from oil-based fuels to other forms of transport energy such as electricity and hydrogen.”

    The department said it was “easy to become complacent” as Australia has experienced over 40 years of relatively stable supply.

    As of December 2018 Australia has 18 days of petrol consumption, 22 days of Diesel, 23 days of het fuel and 24 days of crude oil. Overall Australia has 53 days of fuel supply under the International Energy Agency’s calculation, which makes Australia the only non-compliant member.

    Australia is currently attempting to lobby the IEA to calculate Australia’s supply differently to bring the country up to 85 days.

    Australia has an increasing reliance on imports of liquid fuels, and our demand is growing higher than other western nations and expected to keep growing until 2030.

    “In the last 10 years, our demand for liquid fuel has grown by 1.5 per cent each year — marginally more than our population growth. This rate of growth is high — around three times faster than the United States and Canada.”

    Unlike with the National Electricity Market, there is no holistic accounting for Australia’s fuel supplies and the energy department is working on a new way to count Australia’s supplies.

    “Imports increase the complexity and length of supply chains and expose supplies to external geopolitical risks.”

    “Unlike the National Electricity Market, there is no organisation with a holistic view of the whole liquid fuel sector.”

    “The risk is that, with no real-time monitoring of supply and demand, a response to disruptions cannot be effectively coordinated and the individual actions of companies may have unintended consequences that may impact adversely on other parts of the supply chain.”

    The report also said extreme weather events “associated with climate change” are likely to become more severe and regular, impacting fuel security.

    “The increasing regularity and severity of these weather events needs to be considered, and this includes understanding what contingency planning industry has in place for managing the risks associated with climate change.”

    Global demand for liquid fuel is set to drop as new technologies, electric cars and alternative fuels become more competitive.

    Mr Taylor said the government, if elected, would work with key stakeholders to review the Liquid Fuel Emergency Act, improve transparency and oversight of the fuel industry and continue to lobby the IEA to change the calculation of Australia’s fuel supply.

    The report also said extreme weather events “associated with climate change” are likely to become more severe and regular, impacting fuel security.

    “The increasing regularity and severity of these weather events needs to be considered, and this includes understanding what contingency planning industry has in place for managing the risks associated with climate change.”

  18. Dr Faustus

    Worse, outside of the upstream gas industry, nobody recognises this might be a problem.

    These blokes are going to get BLAMED in the long run, why are they not speaking up themselves, NOW ?

    hzh: the production and pipeline industries have already politely explained the capacity issues at the highest possible levels of government – just exactly where the tedious, inconvenient technical details won’t be understood, and will be ignored.

    Now, having delivered the Gypsy’s warning, the major industry players are sitting back waiting for the rivers of gold that will flow when political desperation kicks in and, suddenly, amazingly, when it comes to keeping the lights on, money is no object.

    Don’t tell anyone I told you…

  19. RobK

    Designing a grid for reliable renewable power is difficult and expensive. This has been known all along, well before, but reiterated by Finkel. Like Finkel’s report; if the initial political terms of reference are reduce co2 and no nukes, then you get to the trajectory we are on now. I believe Finkel misrepresented the costs because much of the details were bundled into new boards and advisory panels to adapt from old to new. Given that cost is a major component of a cost benefit analysis I think his report was a fail. He said costs would go up for sometime then come down. This is not proving to be a helpful conclusion.
    Weather dependent electricity is difficult to accommodate on all time scales from parts of a second to year-on-year periods. Just like rainfall, sun and wind are not the same from one year to the next. Every day weather derived energy surges around the grid as clouds randomly, block the sun, just momentarily, sometimes for days on end. Wind energy is proportional to the cubed function of wind speed so a gentle breeze of 10kph going to 20kph for a few minutes pushes 8 times the energy into the grid. If it went from 10kph to 40kph for a few minutes it pushes 64 times the energy into the grid….and every other supplier has to back-off very quickly. These are simple things but expensive to accommodate for many reasons.

  20. OldOzzie

    Sparks fly over ultra-high voltage power lines

    Celebrated as the answer to long-distance electricity transmission, China’s enthusiasm for UHV lines is weakening, writes Edmund Downie

    China is the global test bed for ultra-high voltage (UHV) transmission lines, a technology that can carry electricity across vast distances with much greater efficiency than the high voltage lines that you’re probably used to seeing.

    Since 2006, it’s built 19 of these multi-billion-dollar lines, stretching almost 30,000 kilometres and supplying 4% of national electricity demand. For comparison, no other country has a single UHV line in full commercial operation.

    But China’s enthusiasm for UHV is waning. The technology is beset by conflicts of interest between grid companies and central and local governments. The lines themselves are underperforming, and more recent projects are coming online amid a period of electricity generation overcapacity.

    This means that approvals for new lines have slowed, and grid companies are unlikely to meet their targets for new ones

    Sparks fly

    State Grid’s UHV plans suggested remarkable ambition, but did not always align with those of central and provincial policymakers.

    Central officials have clashed with State Grid planners on its backbone scheme, which envisions a lattice of six UHVAC lines to synchronise grids that are currently in State Grid’s territory. But officials worry about nationwide blackouts cascading across these interconnected grids. Analysts suggest that State Grid has shelved the backbone plan for now and is focusing on UHVAC lines within individual grids instead.

    Meanwhile, the economic case for new UHVDC lines from the interior has weakened amidst slowing growth in electricity demand.

    National demand growth averaged 11.7% from 2003-12 but fell to 4.5% in 2012-17, bottoming out at 0.5% in 2015. This drop has deepened overcapacity in China’s power sector, which according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance was 35% in 2016.

    Pervasive overcapacity means less need for new transmission projects.

  21. RobK

    The rate of change of frequency is called”droop”. It is normally only an issue in the design of a governor of a generator at its source. Today every larger renewables connection has a relay controller with a set point measuring not only the frequency but also the rate of change of the frequency. The storm induced blackout in SA occurred because these set points were at the normally accepted standard. That standard has been changed to increase the “ride-through”..as the grid flounders or the turbines yaw themselves out of the storm over a mater of minutes and feed a wandering grid. Technical specs are compromised to pander to renewables.
    Further; batteries can inject energy into the grid after a few hundreds of milli-seconds of applying an algorithm to identify the pattern of the cycles. From then on they are quick. So quick that the slower mechanical governor are thrown a curved-ball and various “hunting” situations are exacerbated until they are tracked down and dampened.
    Europe has a lot of HVDC connectors. HVDC is expensive and complex but doesnt have frequency issues.
    Australia had a rolls-royce power grid but they want a tesla powered by iphones. Industrial strength equipment is not the same as consumer goods. Costs skyrocket quickly. We were warned.

  22. 5000 properties without power.
    14 sets of traffic lights were out in the area, including busy Bell St and Plenty Rd
    Metro Trains reported delays of about 20 minutes on the Mernda line
    Drivers told Ross and John at least three sets of boom gates were stuck down

    Sounds like the Y2K that never happened.

  23. Bazinga

    If your exit strategy involves remaining in Australia, WA is a good option at present, NT and Tas might be OK too. Isolation has its advantages.

  24. Dr FredLenin

    Incoherent rambler. We need lots of these situations to stir up the voters ,get them screaming at the polliewankers and union crims . Threaten the political “careers “of the timeservers in Spring street ,and watch them drop the gangrene Australian destruction scheme like a hot potato , then desparately look around for someone else to blame ,maybe throw andrews and a couple of others under the bus to try to pacify the voters so they can continue to build a luxurious future for themselves and loot taxpayers money.

  25. Chris

    I have just received my March quarter power bill for my house in South Australia, and compared it with my March quarter bill from 2004.

    The normal power supply went up from 19 cents per kilowatt hour in 2004 to 37.8 cents per kilowatt hour in 2009, an increase over 15 years of 198.5%.

    My off peak (night time for the hot water system) supply went from 6.4 cents per kilowatt hour in 2004 to 21.9 cents per kilowatt hour (now called controlled load) in 2019, an increase of 242.18%.

    My supply charge went from $34 for the quarter in 2004 to $78.85 for the quarter in 2019, an increase of 131.7%.

    The Adelaide CPI figure went up from 79.6 in December 2003 to 113 in December 2018, an increase of 41.9%.

    Shame on all of the politicians who have allowed these power bill increases to happen, shame, shame , shame.

  26. John Constantine

    Y2.02K.

    Little billy shorten is the Y2.02K Bug.

    This time it’s real.

    Comrades.

  27. John Constantine

    Their abc world today radio program lectures us that dissenters spent too many years squabbling about whether we were going to dynamite all our coal power or not, instead of preparing the grid for ruinables.

    We are going to blow all the coal up and build all ruinables, so get ready for it lectures their abc, the Y2.02K bug posing as a media organisation.

    Comrades.

  28. pbw

    Oldozzie,

    I’m interested in this truce that Barnaby is talking about. Has anyone else heard about this?

  29. Muddy

    Please excuse my medical ignorance, but would we classify a belief in gerbil worming (or whatever it’s called now) as viral or a bacterial infection? Which parts of the brain does it primarily affect? There must be some disconnect between the stimulus the brain receives & how that stimulus is interpreted. Might that part of the brain exhibit inflammation?

  30. Jock

    i notice that bolt has asked why no Labor or Green MP has an electric car. Perhaps some “journalistic” type can do an expose on what they do drive? i suspect there will be lots and lots of big SUVs. but i love hypocrisy stories.

  31. Vagabond

    Speaking of the horrors that await us…

    The Age published a letter from some lefty moron yesterday complaining that the use of gas to heat houses and apartments is destroying the environment and suggesting that it should be prohibited from 2025. No doubt they wouldn’t approve of electricity (but that won’t be available anyway), oil, coal or wood fired heating either.

    I’m told death from hypothermia is not too painful .

    A nuclear reactor in the basement is the only option left.

  32. John Constantine

    Bubonic plague, genetically modified to target the y chromosome.

    Comrades.

  33. Tator

    Oldozzie, that chart on the percentages of renewable power, is that total of name plate capacity or actual power generated because if its nameplate capacity, the output would be a lot lower than that.

  34. Dr Fred Lenin

    If the South Australians did a Gilets Jaunes on the government and lynched weathercock and his former ministers in the streets of Adelaide ,how long would it be before the other polliemuppets in Australia to renounce the climate scam ? Days? Hours ? Minutes ? Seconds ? wouldnt be long anyway .
    Question , would they pay back the bribes they took from the renewables carpetbaggers ?
    Would they regret the boardroom jobs they were going to get from the carpetbaggers when they left politics to spend more time with their families ?

  35. egg_

    Bubonic plague, genetically modified to target the y chromosome.

    Comrades.

    Target the Grunenfuhrers’ X chromosomes and you’d get the bulk/hardcore.
    /NADT

  36. egg_

    Muddy
    #2979288, posted on April 4, 2019 at 1:45 pm

    Cat ladies with Toxoplasma gondii?

  37. pbw

    Here’s Barnaby on the “truce.”

    Even talking about the issue of power is proscribed. It will break the “truce”.

    My guess is that the so-called truce boils down to telling everyone on the Coalition side to shut up about power before the election. There will be full and frank discussion in the post-election party-room, of course.

    If that is the case, it is clearly a victory for the Black Hands against affordable electricity.

  38. egg_

    the so-called truce boils down to telling everyone on the Coalition side to shut up about power before the election

    A SloMo-led nosedive.

  39. OldOzzie

    Electric vehicle rollout ‘threat to power grid’

    Ben Packham
    Political Reporter

    Labor’s electric vehicle plan could destabilise the nation’s power grid unless it is paired with major energ­y market reforms including “smart” network upgrades and a national rollout of time-of-use tariffs­ to ensure EV owners don’t charge their cars during peak deman­d periods.

    Energy Networks Australia warned in a submission to the Senate’s recent electric vehicle inquiry that growing numbers of EVs, combined with the nation’s flat energy pricing structure, could worsen energy peaks and exceed the capacity of low-voltage networks.

    “Australia’s distribution networks were not designed for any significant uptake of electric ­vehicles and the consequential demand­ for charging,” the peak energy network body said.

    “This raises concerns about ­potential impact of electric vehicle mass-charging events on energy security at a time when the system is susceptible to power outages during peak periods of energy demand­.”

    The energy network body said measures needed to be put in place to ensure the nation’s EV owners didn’t all plug in their cars to charge at the same time, especially on a hot summer day.

    “While prices and incentives for off-peak charging are a key first step, managed charging of electric vehicles will eventually need to be achieved through some level of orchestra­tion as vehicles begin to number in the millions,” it said.

    Infrastructure Partnerships Australia chief executive Adrian Dwyer said that with a smarter grid EVs could store cheap, off-peak renewable energy for use during periods of high energy deman­d. “It might be that you plug your car in and it starts drawing power from the grid or, potentially more likely, you plug your car in and it actually powers your house,” he said.

    Bill Shorten declared this week that, under Labor, EVs would make up 50 per cent of all vehicles sold by 2030. His environment spokesman, Mark Butler, said the impact of EVs on the grid was being considered by energy mar­ket­ agencies and the Council of Australian Governments Energy Council. “Labor will consult on agency and state views before making any decisions regarding these issues,” he said.

    Josh Frydenberg, who previously compared EVs to the advent­ of the iPhone and declared there would be one million of the cars on the road by 2030, said yesterday that Labor’s electric car policy was a case of “virtue signalling”.

    “What we have said is we will support the rollout of infrastructure with more stations where people can charge their electric vehicles­,” the Treasurer said.

    “And there are more vehicles coming onto the road. But effect­ively the Labor Party, when it comes to their energy policy, have not costed the impact of forcing such a change.”

    Mr Butler said the Treasurer, as the government’s biggest electric vehicle enthusiast, should get on board with Labor’s plan.

    “Now Labor has announced Australia’s first ever electric vehicl­e plan, Josh Frydenberg should hop in the car and support our plan instead of his own chaotic government, which has nothing to offer Australian motorists apart from a plan to have a plan and $500 higher petrol bills,” he said.

  40. Dan the Man

    Bazinga
    #2979254, posted on April 4, 2019 at 12:54 pm

    If your exit strategy involves remaining in Australia, WA is a good option at present, NT and Tas might be OK too. Isolation has its advantages.

    Once there is a second interconnector in Bass Strait you may take TAS off that list.

  41. Kneel

    “Once there is a second interconnector in Bass Strait you may take TAS off that list.”

    Yeah, nah.

    Those connectors are pitiful in the scheme of things – no way they could keep even Vic running, let alone NSW and QLD. Couple of hundred MW max – out of 18,000 – 27,000MW. Only short by 2 orders of magnitude or so. Still, I’m sure a pollie can legislate that it WILL carry more, which will, of course, fix the issue instantly.

  42. Dan the Man

    Accidentily the blackout in Melbourne this morning happened at the same time as the huge chemical fire brought out. I don’t know Melbourne but I realised the suburb Coburg was mentioned about both events.

    Could the blackout have caused some cooling to shut down, or could the fire have caused the blackout?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.