Open Forum: April 6, 2019

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1,285 Responses to Open Forum: April 6, 2019

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  1. Roger

    The rule of thumb for the usefulness of EVs should be emergency vehicles. There’s not a chance in hell that an ambulance or fire truck will be electric.

    Volvo is already developing an electric fire truck.

  2. Percy Popinjay

    ABC news infomercial – Hip things to do while waiting ten minutes for your EV to charge:

    Order a soy skim decaf lattecino
    Restyle your manbun
    Wax your beard
    Groom your underarm hair (feminayzees only)
    Post a comment on twatter about the AbbottMonster
    Like Julius Sideburn AO QC on Spacechook
    Make a donation to GetUp

    etc, etc, etc.

  3. feelthebern

    At some stage the anti ALP, anti Green comments here will have to be toned down.
    The last thing we want is Tony Burke calling for an enquiry into the Cat because they “have questions to answer”.

  4. DrBeauGan

    “Is Bill Shorten the sexiest man alive?”

    No. I am.

  5. Percy Popinjay

    The last thing we want is Tony Burke calling for an enquiry into the Cat because they “have questions to answer”

    Or Plibbers questioning the role of Tony Abbott in generating the Cat’s cacophony of unrelenting negativity.

  6. notafan

    We have many more questions to which we would like an answer

    how many cars does your household run Mr Burke and what kind are they?

  7. DrBeauGan

    Well, I’m certainly much sexier than bs.

  8. struth

    EV cars will be built in Adelaide

    The factory will be powered by unicorn farts and they’ll be transported by flying pigs to be initially charged, interstate.

  9. OldOzzie

    China’s Antarctic march raises fears of creeping expansionism

    By Bernard Lagan

    A windswept corner of Antarctica where six of Robert Falcon Scott’s doomed explorers spent a miserable winter in 1912 is about to be colonised by the Chinese.

    Near the ice cave on Inexpressible Island where Scott’s men sheltered for months China is erecting its fifth base on the continent, a move that some observers liken to its creeping occupation of the South China Sea.

    Some even fear that China’s activity, nearly 9000 miles (14,484km) from Beijing, harbours an undeclared military objective banned by the Antarctic Treaty. They claim that it has placed missile guidance systems on the ice, powerful radar and telescopes capable of tracking the West’s satellites, missiles and drones. Others speculate that China is merely there to get its hands on the riches beneath the ice.

    A study by two US-based academics, one of whom is Leigh Foster, of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, believes that China has both military and economic objectives. “The use of this suite of technology means that in any future dispute, the targeting of Antarctic bases could be a reality, even if the conflict is not in the continent,” the authors say.

    They note, however, that “there are signs that in Antarctica, a South China Sea scenario could unfold where China is propelled by resource nationalism”.

    The Polar Research Institute of China estimates that there are huge reserves of oil and natural gas under the continent, the authors say in the their study, published by The Diplomat, an online foreign affairs journal.

    Antarctica is a continent that has no government. At a small office in Buenos Aires, behind a wooden door marked Secretariat of the Antarctic Treaty, a small team administers the seventh continent on behalf of the seven nations that claim territory there: Britain, New Zealand, France, Norway, Australia, Chile and Argentina. Scores of other nations operate permanent research stations on the world’s last pristine land mass that, aside from its energy reserves, contains the world’s largest stock of fresh water.

    Three of China’s five bases are on territory claimed by Australia.

    China cannot make a claim on Antarctic territory while the treaty remains in force but its rapidly expanding presence on the ice ensures a seat at the table when, in 29 years, the treaty provides for nations to reconsider the ban on mining there.

    Anne-Marie Brady, an expert on Chinese and polar politics, likens the bases that China has built across Antarctica to those built by the Soviet Union in the Cold War era. Professor Brady said: “It seems very much like the Soviet approach of putting your bases all around, because once a country has a base there is a customary law — no one’s going to put a base on top of you; that’s yours. That’s your property.”

    No one really knows what goes on at China’s Antarctic bases. While, under the Antarctic Treaty, Australia has the right to inspect China’s bases on territory it claims, it has done so only twice in the past 30 years. The last time was nearly 15 years ago, a spokeswoman for the Australian government’s Antarctic Division said, while emphasising that the deep co-operation between Australia and China in Antarctica included using each other’s ships and aircraft to travel to and around the continent.

    It is a benign portrait of China’s activities that is not shared by Professor Brady, who warned Australian MPs at a hearing last year that China had “undeclared military activities” in Antarctica and was building its case for a territorial claim should the treaty collapse.

  10. Farmer Gez

    Volvo is already developing an electric fire truck.

    Should be handy when deployed on the fire ground as trucks stay and the crews are changed. We’re going to need lots of trucks or long long extension cords. What’s running the pumps?

  11. stackja

    TB catches electric train?
    Will all the EVs cause problems with the entire electricity supplies?
    No trains, except diesel?

  12. Dr Faustus

    ABC now pretending that EV cars will be built in Adelaide thanks to wee Bill’s policy.
    The car making scene is ripe for entrepreneurs, we are told.

    Truth telling. Wannabe Australian bespoke EV makers will be climaxing in their underwear at the unbearable ripeness of Shorten’s EV subsidies.

    Next Up: Import taxes on foreign EV’s to protect the Australian Electrical P76 construction industry and the associated “high paying jobs“.

  13. John Constantine

    Update: Police have confirmed that 12 vegan protesters withdrew from the Westside Meats abattoir in Bacchus Marsh after negotiating with the owners.

    They agreed to give the protesters one lamb.

    The protesters had been blocking the driveway of the business since 5am.

    Earlier: Police have just confirmed 38 people in Melbourne’s CBD have so far been arrested as a result of today’s protests.

    Hope they didn’t give the fuckers one with my eartag in.

    [It is illegal to take an eartag out and transfer ownership.]

  14. bespoke

    DrBeauGan
    #2982365, posted on April 8, 2019 at 1:54 pm
    “Is Bill Shorten the sexiest man alive?”

    No. I am.

    Incel confirmed.

  15. OldOzzie

    ABC’s Twitter meltdown

    Chris Kenny

    As Twitter meltdowns go, it was instructive. The sharing of a newspaper article by the ABC has exposed a level of tendentiousness and jaundiced expectations that a hundred critiques from people like me could never demonstrate.

    In this episode a single and simple act that was very much in keeping with the national broadcaster’s charter obligations for diversity and objectivity happened to unleash a reaction that proved how rare such an approach has become. The ABC audience, including people who have had their hands on the levers of power in this nation, was outraged that Aunty’s social media feed could promulgate anything that didn’t keep undying faith with the usual green Left agenda.

    The tweet was from the official Q&A account, which regularly retweets articles by upcoming panellists or other relevant pieces to stimulate discussion, grab the attention of prospective audience members or prompt questions for the show. On this occasion, in preparation for tonight’s edition with Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, the Q&A twitter account shared a news piece by this newspaper’s national affairs editor, Simon Benson, which carried balanced reporting of the Coalition’s and Labor’s main budget arguments.

    Above the article, the tweet posed this question including the wording from the Coalition in quotation marks: “Can Labor deliver on its pre-election promises despite ‘a record of financial and economic mismanagement’?” When it hit social media streams late on Friday afternoon all hell broke loose.

    Can Labor deliver on its pre-election promises despite “a record of financial and economic mismanagement”? via @australian #QandA https://t.co/7z60DxMwwb
    — ABC Q&A (@QandA) April 5, 2019

    “Has the ABC been hacked,” came one response. “What. The. Actual. Is ABC doing. Peddling propaganda,” was another. “This is not my ABC. What the heck!” and on they went.

    It was fully unhinged. “Was Rupert Murdoch now running the ABC?” “Why was the ABC promoting Murdoch’s interests?” “Shame on the ABC.” “Jeez Ita.” “That’s disgusting.” “Can we have our ABC back, Ms Buttrose?” “Liberal shills telling lies is not news.”

    This was a thing of beauty. The most vociferous defenders of the ABC were demonstrating to the world their jaundice and their expectations of the public broadcaster. So rarely, it seems, do they see the ABC air any balanced political reporting that they were frothing at the mouth about a mere retweet of The Australian’s coverage.

    Most, of course, never would have read the actual article. It has long been clear that most twitter responses to videos and articles come from people who haven’t watched or read them, reacting instead to the summary in the tweet or the headline. This is exacerbated when it comes to paywalled content such as The Australian’s.

    The combative hordes of ABC fans were decrying the fact it would share a News Corp article, let alone one that carried some criticism of Labor’s economic record. The program found itself on the defensive and tweeted a general reply the next day: “Hey Twitter. You’re getting all SHOUTY again. We share and quote a very wide range of opinions. We don’t endorse the opinions, we just make them available to encourage public discussion. That’s the#QandA project. Guess it’s working.”

    Full marks to Q&A for standing firm and explaining a solid rationale. That is entirely the right attitude, although the reaction perhaps suggests they haven’t been bold enough in the past.

    Still, even more alarming than the reaction from anonymous fans were those from some political heavyweights. Former treasurer Wayne Swan, whose legacy was on the line, chimed in with characteristic overreach: “This anti Labor propaganda from Q&A is a disgrace & requires an immediate retraction.”

    This anti Labor propaganda from Q&A is a disgrace & requires an immediate retraction. #auspol https://t.co/GH64nlqYvl
    — Wayne Swan (@SwannyQLD) April 5, 2019

    ACTU boss Sally McManus went full militant too: “Why is the ABC sharing Murdoch propaganda lines?”

    Why is the ABC sharing Murdoch propaganda lines? https://t.co/rpZCIUpbvX
    — Sally McManus (@sallymcmanus) April 5, 2019

    And Labor’s Workplace Relations spokesman Brendan O’Connor attacked the ABC: “Extraordinary that an ABC platform would lift the entire News Ltd anti Labor narrative and loaded assertions so readily. Where’s the independent reporting and balance we’d expect of our national public broadcaster?”

    Extraordinary that an abc platform would lift the entire News Ltd anti Labor narrative and loaded assertions so readily. Where’s the independent reporting and balance we’d expect of our national public broadcaster? https://t.co/f8rSBZeDM0
    — Brendan O’Connor (@BOConnorMP) April 5, 2019

    None of this gives us a lot of confidence about ABC independence under a prospective Shorten Labor government. If it is this bad now, we might only imagine how much worse it could get.

    The polarisation of our media continues apace. The public-funded behemoth is becoming increasingly entrenched ideologically, and its funding will run as a third-order election issue, openly linking Aunty’s future to a Labor victory. Awkward.

    After seeing all the ABC paranoia and outrage generated by one uncontentious tweet, we know worse is to come. One anonymous tweep, @_rebase, shared a insightful last word on this episode: “We should spare a thought for the (Q&A) social media operator who now eats alone in the ABC canteen.”

    we should spare a thought for the social media operator who now eats alone in the ABC canteen https://t.co/BrHLZRBNMe
    — trebase (@_rebase) April 6, 2019

  16. Farmer Gez

    They agreed to give the protestors one lamb.

    That lambs going to have its diet changed. They really do love animals you know.

  17. EvilElvis

    We’re going to need lots of trucks or long long extension cords. What’s running the pumps?

    That’s the beauty of this rubbish, Farmer Gez. It’s the next wave of infrastructure to cater for essential services. Every water source or hydrant will have to have a significant power supply next to it. It will keep the union bruvvers in work for years installing it all.

  18. Confused Old Misfit

    New FRED.

  19. DrBeauGan

    Incel confirmed.

    I quite understand your envy, bespoke. Sigh. So many share it. Bill Short’un for starters.

  20. Dr Faustus

    What’s running the pumps?

    Volvo is building the electric drivetrain for the Rosenbauer firetruck. The US version of the Rosenbauer uses a diesel engine to operate the pump.

    As you would, if you wanted a steady stream of water.

  21. Cardimona

    Practical relaxivism is a terrific hobby; just harvest the best ideas from the Sinc’s, Jo’s and Anthony’s blogs and sort them into a missive or two.
    Today’s letters submission to four Qld papers, with potential to be read by half a million or so voters….

    The Editor

    Electric car proponents, led by Bill Shorten, are playing fast and loose with the truth.

    We will not and cannot get to 50 percent electric cars by 2030. We don’t have that much electricity without building new coal or nukes.

    After Shorten’s “8 to 10 minutes to charge” gaffe, Lucy Turnbull (I know!) came out in support.

    She pointed to an experimental European 15-minute fast charger. It has a liquid-cooled high-voltage charging cables. What could possibly go wrong there?

    It consumes 2000 amperes at 220 volts AC. For comparison, a new house has a 32 ampere supply. Each electric car fast-charger will consume the power of 63 new houses.

    If electric cars were in any way achievable or desirable the free market would be doing it.

    Trying to force technological innovation via government edict just doesn’t work. Go to Wikipedia and search “Lysenkoism”.

    Forcing electric cars on us is Keynesian (demand-driven) economics – a faulty model.

    Nobody had to force us to buy smart phones because the technology matured independently of government.

    Voluntary mobile phone purchases are Austrian (supply-driven) economics – a model that works.

    Sadly, both branches of the Australian UNiparty subscribe to Keynesian economics, which is why we’re sinking ever deeper into debt and despair.

    But that won’t stop our technologically-ignorant, virtue-signalling polliemuppets destroying what our forebears built to advance ridiculous and unworkable populist nonsense to make themselves rich and powerful at all Australians’ expense.

    What can you do? Vote to clear them out. Put sitting members last and give the Lab-Grn-Lib UNiparty your last three preferences.

    Even slightly-honest independents would be better than the thoroughly-deluded lawyer-class we have now.

    (270 words)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysenkoism

  22. John Constantine

    If you ask a lefty how many bases the chicoms have buily on Australian territory, they firstly cannot think of Antarctica, then refuse to acknowledge the chicom peoples liberation army as controllers of the chicom territorial landshark colonialist grab, then the lefty will say australia should submit to chicom antarctic claims because pale stale males are evil and all artifacts of western industrial civilisation must be purged.

    Learnt that at school.

    Comrades.

  23. EvilElvis

    Just had a chat with a business neighbour who just so happens to have a farm as well, lifelong Liberal voter, ex shire councillor. Topic of conversation the coming federal election and what I think is the prospect of shit or even shittier. His response, “I’ll give Labor one thing, whenever they’re in there’s always money around and people spend it, I think we’ve been a little better off under Labor than Lib recently”… FMD.

  24. bespoke

    DrBeauGan
    #2982392, posted on April 8, 2019 at 2:10 pm
    Incel confirmed.

    I quite understand your envy, bespoke. Sigh. So many share it.

    Thought that would get you to pop up. No I don’t think I am but my wife tell’s me i’m the sexiest man alive.

  25. Overburdened

    No it’s not.

    You can think it is if you want.

  26. Overburdened

    Read the article re the Burmese Python takeover.

    There is an allegory there somewhere.

    I note the Guardian is panhandling for donations at the bottom of the page.

    The moral equivalence that allows the article to talk about environmentalists eradicating the snakes shows irony is not dead.

  27. Done Deal

    ABC news breaking news:
    “Is Bill Shorten the sexiest man alive?”

    Jesus, their Pravda really are jumping the shark…repeatedly. the Newspoll must have unnerved them

  28. OldOzzie

    Shy Ted
    #2982404, posted on April 8, 2019 at 2:19 pm

    Remind me to tell you about the 18-footer I once wrestled sometime.

    Shy Ted

    Did you mean wrestling an 18 Footer like this?

    18 foot skiff sailing on sydney harbour australia

  29. OldOzzie

    There was a large female Python about 5 M that used to sun itself in the Gardens of Pittwater YHA, Halls Wharf, Morning Bay (also known as Towler’s Bay), New South Wales 2105, Australia – Nice place to stay – cheap and excellent bush walks

    But as the Diary of a Family Stay points out – not easy to organise with small kids

    But I am pleased he did learn some of the history nearby

    There was a sense of intrigue to our holiday as well. I am incredibly interested in politics and was fascinated to hear, that just a 20 minute walk from the Youth Hostel, is one of the safe houses the Petrovs stayed in for the first 18 months after their defection from Russia. Apparently there were others in George St, Avalon and also one in Palm Beach.

    Anyway this, is one of the safe houses they stayed in immediately post their defection. The home is known as Towlers Bay Cottage and she’s an absolute beauty.

    She’s all Sydney sandstone and concrete, with beautiful French doors and a lovely NE facing terrace over looking Pittwater. What is completely criminal about this, is that the house was compulsorily acquired (prior to the Petrov Affair) when the area became a National Park and the policy of the day, was to extinguish private ownership in National Parks. Isn’t it ironic that this despotic behaviour was what the Petrovs were escaping. Ultimately the government didn’t resume many of the homes in this area, as they soon realised the expense involved for taxpayers.

    This resumption is a classic example of government policy being made on the run, and inevitably going horribly wrong. The house is now boarded up and is how the government treats our national history. They usually take the least expensive option, no matter the outcome. I mean why resume it, if subsequent governments are not going to look after it?

    The house was apparently occupied for state conferences and holidays by Neville Wran and other government dignitaries in the the 1970 and 1980′s, but I am told it was thought not to be a good look that the new rich were now taking advantage of the property, as it had been compulsorily acquired from private hands, so it was abandoned.

    There is a garage, even though there is no access via car to the area, apart from a fire trail, which is not open to the public. Perhaps those who built the house thought road access may come in the future. Apparently the National Parks once installed a care taker in the care taker’s cottage, who used to drive in via the road from West Head, much to the disgust of the residents who otherwise let their kids roam free and were worried about him running them over.

    The care taker’s cottage is falling down. It is such a terrible shame that governments allow this to happen. Why not put it out to private tender under lease for renovation, with perhaps some conditions about allowing some kind of public access, so the beautiful home and the history of her inhabitants can be preserved for future generations. It will only take one big bush fire to rage through the area for the whole thing to turn to ashes and it would have a much better chance of survival, if it was loved and cared for.

    Anyhow, with our 48 hours in paradise at and end and now being much more enlightened about our own backyard than when we embarked on this adventure, we wheeled our lighter trolley back down the hill.

    Hoisted the red flag to let the ferry know we wanted to be picked up.

    Great write up with excellent photos – brings back memories of departed lunch mate who lived at Towler’s Bay – many BBQ and Red Wine on the Lawns in front of the houose looking out over the water with convivial neighbours coming over to join us and help sharing the Reds

  30. rickw

    What’s running the pumps?

    Volvo is building the electric drivetrain for the Rosenbauer firetruck. The US version of the Rosenbauer uses a diesel engine to operate the pump.

    As you would, if you wanted a steady stream of water.

    Not an expert on fire trucks, but based on fuel trucks the engine does two duties, move the vehicle and then do the pumping. This heap of shit is so well engineered it needs two “engines”.

  31. rickw

    Some even fear that China’s activity, nearly 9000 miles (14,484km) from Beijing, harbours an undeclared military objective banned by the Antarctic Treaty. They claim that it has placed missile guidance systems on the ice, powerful radar and telescopes capable of tracking the West’s satellites, missiles and drones. Others speculate that China is merely there to get its hands on the riches beneath the ice.

    Well duh, of course they’re doing this, they’re not spending big $ to just play with penguins.

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