A message from Viv Forbes

HOW TO BREAK THE BACKBONE OF AUSTRALIA

Short version.

Since the days of the gold rushes and the wool booms, Australia has always relied heavily on its great primary industries – mining, farming, forestry and fishing and their supporting transport, energy and processing industries.

Every one of these primary industries must have three things – secure access to resource-rich land; reliable low-cost energy for production, extraction, processing and transport; and reliable water supply. These are the three things most threatened by today’s Chicken Littles.

Every day, vested interests, toxic environmentalists and green alarmists (often foreign-funded or tax-exempted) are using every worry they can discover or invent to break the backbone of Australia – global warming, species extinction, pollution, UN dictates, and land rights for everyone except those currently making productive use of the land.

They close-the-gate to explorers, use death-by-delay to stop projects they disapprove of, throttle foresters and fishermen with ever increasing no-go zones, while sacred serpents or the “just three mines” policy smothers every uranium deposit discovered. They re-define natural gases as “pollution” to be taxed, and now are driving whole industries offshore by forcing reckless conversion to high-cost, unpredictable intermittent green energy. While politicians babble about dream-time electric cars, our huge transport fleet relies on imports of petrol and diesel refined overseas – Australia now has under 30 days of petrol and diesel supplies here.

As jobs disappear or migrate, welfare booms, and national bankruptcy beckons.

Australia is a poorly defended storehouse of under-utilised resources beside the teeming millions of Asia. Our un-appreciated assets include:

• aluminium, nickel and cobalt in laterites from Greenvale to Cape York, to Mitchell Plateau, to Kalgoorlie;
• rutile, zircon, ilmenite, monazite, silica sand and rare earths in coastal sands from Bathurst Island to Bunbury, in the Murray Basin and along the Sunshine Coast;
• oil shales from Julia Creek to Gladstone to Mt Coolon and in most other states (not one shale deposit in Australia has yet been tested by fracking);
• un-tested off-shore resources of oil, gas and methane hydrates in sediments on our vast continental shelf;
• massive coal deposits in the Galilee, Surat, Bowen, Laura and Sydney Basins (all under green sabotage);
• uranium deposits from Coronation Hill in NT, to South Australia and in the Harvey Range in Queensland;
• vast fresh-water resources that regularly flood from coastal hills into the seas from the Gulf of Carpentaria to the Northern Rivers of NSW and down the Murray-Darling Rivers;
• huge resources of free-range protein in mobs of wild rabbits, pigs, kangaroos and camels;
• a wide continental shelf of marine life for harvesting or marine farm development.
Today, our Asian neighbours come as tourists and diligent observers to marvel at the backbone resources we have sterilised or neglected.

What will they come as tomorrow?

SEE THE FULL VERSION AND FURTHER READING

This entry was posted in Australian Story, Guest Post. Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to A message from Viv Forbes

  1. John Constantine

    The old Adelaide energy permit in the Cooper basin was tested a decade ago by Beach energy with a tens of millions spend on a deep well with laterals and fracturing.

    Indicated a Cooper basin wide resource, uneconomic at the cost of unconventional gas tech back then.

    American fracturing tech doesn’t translate directly to Australia’s rocks, but is an indication of what is possible.

    The Cooper basin has existing infrastructure everywhere, existing access and is so remote a protesting bongo bus would never make it out there.

    Perfect place for fracturing.

  2. vlad

    One billion dollars (easily) going to waste in Coronation Hill alone.

    To say nothing of Antarctica.

  3. Pedro the Ignorant

    After a lifetime of working in the gold mining game you would not believe the amount of time I have spent battling the ubiquitous “sacred site” that pops up a week after an exploration company releases drill core results or the miraculously re-discovered extinct animals or insects that exist nowhere except the site of the proposed mine site.

    Conservatively over a million dollars pissed up against the wall fighting chancers and money grubbers who see an opportunity to profit from another’s risk and effort.

    Not helped by government shiny bums who see their mission as helping the pore and downtrodden bludgers shut down or hinder a new operation instead of adding to the nation’s wealth.

    I am so glad all that is behind me. Let someone else shed the tears of rage and empty their bank accounts fighting these fools.

  4. Rex Mango

    Not to worry, in around thirty years we will have a fleet of retro fitted diesel submarines and half a dozen battalions of mixed gender infantry thanks to the current Coalition government and their foresight.

  5. Roger

    We now look back fondly on the good old days when the nation’s interests were guarded and guided somewhat ineptly by Donald Horne’s second rate leaders.

    But we were so divinely blessed, both through nature and human ingenuity, that their ineptitude couldn’t forestall our progress to near universal prosperity.

    Now we have a political class that touts treachery as a virtue under the guise of the Paris Agreement, which effectively imposes a c. 25% tax on all productive sectors of the economy, agriculture included, although that sector is yet to feel the full impact of the new regime.

    Observation suggests that participants in the agricultural sector have no idea of the regime which is about to be imposed upon them. Our future as a sovereign nation may well depend upon what their reaction to such a regime is.

  6. Beachcomber

    vested interests, toxic environmentalists and green alarmists (often foreign-funded or tax-exempted)

    A lot of them are actually funded by the Australian Government; directly or through Universities etc. The Marxist anti-western establishment are using our taxes to destroy our prosperity and freedom. We are forked.

  7. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    After a lifetime of working in the gold mining game you would not believe the amount of time I have spent battling the ubiquitous “sacred site” that pops up a week after an exploration company releases drill core results

    I’ll spare you the old chestnut about “How do you locate a sacred site? Use a metal detector.” shall I?

  8. Davefromweewaa

    Where do they think the money comes from?
    Even socialists should be in favor of productivity.
    You can’t redistribute what is not produced.

  9. RobK

    You can’t redistribute what is not produced.
    Use it or lose it.

  10. John Constantine

    https://finfeed.com/stock-of-the-week/emerging-syngas-producer-leigh-creek-delivers/

    The production process is in-situ gasification (ISG), also known as underground coal gasification (UCG), a process that converts coal from its solid state into a gaseous form, resulting in the generation of synthesis gas (syngas) containing methane, hydrogen and other valuable components.

    Bear in mind this is completely different to the coal seam gas process, where fracking and other parts of the operation have come under scrutiny.

    The syngas can be used to produce electricity directly or further refined into a variety of products including synthetic methane and ammonia.

    For the ISG reactions to commence, air is introduced through the inlet well and an initiation device is used to create very high temperatures. As the temperature and oxygen concentration reach optimum levels, a series of reactions convert the solid fuel into syngas, which is then extracted through the outlet well.

    The ISG process is a chemical conversion from solid coal to gas rather than a combustible conversion (‘burning’) which would create heat and carbon dioxide rather than syngas.

    As indicated below, the area in the coal seam where the gasification takes place is referred to as the gasifier chamber, and the reactions that form syngas typically occur at temperatures of between 900°C and 1200°C.

    Had money in syngas ages ago, not now. Their left’s hatred of fracturing looks almost sane compared with the hysteria they turn upon syngas.

    Comrades.

  11. John Constantine

    2010 Beach Energy drill Encounter 1, the first well to test the Roseneath-Epsilon-Murteree shale gas play in the Cooper Basin.
    PIRSA establish an Industry-Government LNG Roundtable to examine options for infrastructure and technologies for potential future South Australian LNG exports.
    2011 Beach Energy completed a 7 stage fracture stimulation of Holdfast 1, which then flowed gas at up to 2 MMscf/d.

  12. Pedro the Ignorant

    Somebody else’s metal detector, Zulu.

    Story time.

    Not too many years ago, a famous prospector found a fabulously wealthy “show” in the Eastern Goldfields of WA. Gold nuggets literally lying around on the ground, called “sunbathers” in the game.

    Being smarter than the average bear, he filed the claim, scooped up all the sunbathers he could find and went to town to cash in the booty. Came in at several hundred thousand dollars of 90% pure. Never dug more than 10cm down or took out more than the “samples” allowed under the Mines Act for a prospector. He then filed for an exploration licence at the Mines Dept. allowing serious drilling and excavation.

    Right on cue, the sacred site claims hit the courts, greenies came out of the woodwork claiming several previously unknown bush rats or something were under threat, despite the site being in seriously hardcore desert country where the only living things were flies and ants.

    University blokes and blokettes, aboriginal “elders” and various other chancers hit the area for months looking for artifacts and signs of the elusive bush rats (or whatever).

    After several months of suspended operations and a multitude of court cases, at a hearing held in a remote Goldfields town that shall remain nameless, the University mob presented a table of full of oddly shaped rocks, claiming this was a “treasure trove” of aboriginal tools as evidence of the sacred site claim.

    The learned judge retired to consider the claims, came back the next day and found in favour of the prospector who initially filed the claim. The site is now producing thousands of ounces of fine gold annually.

    I just happened to overhear Hizonner at dinner that night in the local pub say to one of his offsiders “that tableful of artefacts and tools looked like a shovelful of gravel to me. I doubt it would sell too well at Bunnings”

    Much mirth ensued. Hizonner and his crew did not have to pay for their refreshments I might add. Local hospitality. 🙂

  13. John Constantine

    A timeline to show what was done, what was important, where fortunes were made and where fortunes were squandered.

    All the oil and gas ever produced from south australia would never pay for the ndis and nbn.

    We are now a services economy.

    Debt funded.

    Comrades

  14. Dr Fred Lenin

    Viv , some of us here are advocating putting every sitting member last on the ballot paper ,there are 53 whose margin is 5 per cent or less , should be able to knock a few off , pour encourager les autres . What do you think ? Want to help spread this around ?

  15. NB

    While I have every sympathy for the frustration expressed in the article and comments, it all comes back to voters.
    Why does the electorate vote as it does?
    What can be done about it?
    Who will do it?

  16. Entropy

    The production process is in-situ gasification (ISG), also known as underground coal gasification (UCG), a process that converts coal from its solid state into a gaseous form, resulting in the generation of synthesis gas (syngas) containing methane, hydrogen and other valuable components.

    Bear in mind this is completely different to the coal seam gas process, where fracking and other parts of the operation have come under scrutiny.

    That is an incredibly amusing spot of wording there, John.

    All you need to know:
    USG the hydraulic pressure gradient is away from the underground combustion, exacerbated as you pump in water to bring up the volatiles.
    CSG the hydraulic pressure gradient is towards the well as the water is extracted. Including in fracked wells.

    CSG in Qld has proven harmless. The two Qld USG trials proved polluting.

  17. Nob

    Beach Energy complete the acquisition of Lattice Energy from Origin Energy and receive a $11 million SA government grant to remain headquartered in Adelaide

    That’s almost funny.

    They are drilling mostly in Victoria or Victorian waters – one or two across the Tassie line.

    Last I heard they were having trouble attracting good drilling engineers because Adelaide.
    Things have picked up enough that the good guys and gals aren’t desperate.

    I didn’t know about the $11 million until I read JohnCon’s link.

    That’s not a subsidy to fossil fuels, it’s a subsidy to Adelaide.

    Otherwise they might have gone to Melbourne.

    Origin already had a floor or two of drilling engineering department in their Exhibition St building and there is still a reservoir (geddit?) of oilfield people living in and around Melbourne.

  18. Nob

    Pedro,

    In drilling, the lawyers usually demand the directional profile.

    That way, even a well from an existing brownfield site, with a wellhead you wouldn’t see until you tripped over it, can be deemed violating a sacred site.

    Apparently some earth spirits exist further under the ground than indigenous inhabitants even knew was possible before Evil Colonialism.

    Had this happen in NZ with a well drilled shore-to-sea, 3500mTVD x 3000m horizontal reach, total measured depth 5100m. Maori lawyers in Auckland refused to say where any earth spirits were until they saw the directional plan. Second well in this location , but the first one was below their radar.

    Everyone, on both sides ,was laughing at the cynicism of it, but one side was laughing all the way to the bank.

  19. jupes

    Australia.

    Too. Stupid. To. Survive.

  20. Nob

    At that stage, in NZ, money would be paid to the indij, and job would go ahead, with some token changes to the directional plan, which further enriched us technical service people.

    Now the greens have got more militant and they try to stop things from ever happening.

    Too stupid to realise they are killing the host which sustains them.

  21. Pedro the Ignorant

    Too stupid to realise they are killing the host which sustains them.

    Preach it, Brother.

    Australia has immense amounts of mineral wealth, most of it in remote areas rarely seen by the urban Australian bugmen, yet they howl like demented loons if somebody wants to dig it up and enrich the country.

    WTF is wrong with these people?

  22. Perth Trader

    Until the PRRT [petroleum resources rent tax ], implemented by Hawke and Keating is changed leave it all in the ground. Under the PRRT energy companies can get a 200% tax deduction over 5 years for the costs of excavation of gas or oil. No political party dares to take on the energy sector.

  23. Nob

    PRRT energy companies can get a 200% tax deduction over 5 years for the costs of excavation of gas or oil.

    It’s a profits-based tax which only applies when a threshold of profit is reached, deductible against income tax, which is reasonable.
    read more here:
    https://www.appea.com.au/industry-in-depth/policy/tax-and-commercial/petroleum-resource-rent-tax-prrt/

    The forward investment by companies is huge, as is the ultimate tax and royalty take by governments, not to mention the thousands of costly petty impositions and compliances by various authorities.

  24. Nob

    Whoa! Reverse quote italics!

  25. Over 200 years ago foreigners came to this grossly underutilised land and made it great with the riches that it provided. Who is to say that can’t be repeated as Australia once again becomes a grossly underutilised land with great riches?

  26. Perth Trader

    Nob…[.Other resource taxes and charges from a project (such as state and federal royalties and production excise) are rebatable against a PRRT liability from the same project. This is to avoid double resource taxation for the same project.]
    Even Royalties are ‘tax deductible’….Aust gets less than $1bill. in royalties from our gas exports even tho we export as much as Qatar who receive $26bill.

  27. Paulo Nigrum Anatis

    NB

    While I have every sympathy for the frustration expressed in the article and comments, it all comes back to voters.
    Why does the electorate vote as it does?
    What can be done about it?
    Who will do it?

    Some ideas why:
    People used to vote for the good of the nation, now it’s self interest.

    Inculcation by the media 24/7 to the point of being overwhelmed

    Frustration of the electorate with the mediocrity of the calibre and infighting and power plays of MP’s as their raison d’etre with running the nation coming a long second, and the media’s drooling and broadcasting thereby proliferating the soap opera it provides.

    The now dominance of reality insulated “Opinion’ journalists who don’t know shit from clay due to the ever present cloud effect of their ‘long lunches’ over objective reporting of the facts; and the development of the unhealthy so called ‘celebrity status’ and following that feeds their tripe and egos. ‘Sound authoritative and omniscient” = “keep a job” despite it all being bullshit. After all – for all their so called ‘sagacity’ – they are still only one voice.

    Allowing an electoral system that assists candidates with a handful of votes and no mandate to hold the balance of power thereby ensuring unstable government unable to plan for its nation’s future due to continual ‘negotiation and compromise’ and diminution of the people’s, the majority’s, mandate).

    The infiltration of minority interests and political correctness into the political agenda as the priority at the expense of the mainstream and needs of the majority of population, and the aiding and abetting of same by reflection of this in the media, such as the programming of the ABC and SBS to suggest this is the norm – not the exception – in society.

    What can be done about it and who will do it?

    Despite the left so called ‘winning’ in academia we all accept academia is the antithesis to the real world. Brainwashed millenials are still not in the majority. And it is in the real world that real decisions are made.

    If you are a student of history you will recognise that power swings between Left and Right like a pendulum over the decades/centuries.

    And it’s the Right’s turn. We’ve witnessed the end of the socialists in the USSR and the current parliamentary systems in the West (prime example Brussels) are increasingly failing their people and likely to go the same way as Russia’s socialist experiment as the looming potentially catastrophic (I’m thinking ‘overpopulation’; the diminution of the USA’s global influence; the emergence of China) appears clearer on the horizon.

    Brexit is a case in point here, underpinned by the actuality of ‘white flight’ from urban areas such as London where they are in a minority now and powerless to do anything about it unless they can extract themselves from Brussels.
    These corrupt, rattling institutions are fast becoming political anachronisms that – with communism – belong in the 20th century. We are on the cusp of a new order. What that is we are yet to see. Could be good; could be very bad! But the current systems of government are becoming increasingly unsustainable due to their continual failure to their people and the problems we face as a world in the coming decades are enormous.

    The die though has already been cast: the increasing build and amalgamation of right wing so called ‘populist’ parties are on the rise as we witness this week in Italy and Germany. Due to Merkel’s moronic release of the Kraken, ordinary European people are realising their very culture is under threat due to the migrant invasion of a people that will not accept or assimilate into western culture or respect its institutions; exacerbated by the simultaneous and relentless second front attack on the Patriarchy and the West by the Left.

    Since the promising start to the democratic path from the late 1800’s, Australia since always lags behind, its been a follower, not a leader. But the signs are here. If the nationalists here could find an articulate and lucid leadership it may be ‘game on’.

    With Hanson and Anning, don’t hold your breath though. As usual it looks like we await the changes offshore due to the usual apathy from voters’ sense of disempowerment, disillusion and disinterest; so it’s stubbies, meat pies and ‘go the ‘pies’ until perhaps one day we look around like the UK is now to see it’s too late.

  28. Percy Popinjay

    21st Century VenOztraliastan – sort of like the tale of the imbeciles who murdered the goose that laid the golden eggs, except we’ve stuck a great big cork up the goose’s fundament instead, so as to stop any Gaia troubling egg laying events.

  29. Rabid Koala

    After a lifetime of working in the gold mining game 

    How does gold mining compare to coal mining to work in?

  30. Squirrel

    “As jobs disappear or migrate, welfare booms, and national bankruptcy beckons.”

    And this idiocy will continue and grow worse when we have so very few politicians who are prepared to explain the economic facts of life to Australians – i.e. we are kept afloat by primary production, and so much of the supposed wealth generated by the cities derives from the land.

    When it comes to export earnings, our cities are giant black holes, and most city-dwellers (including the millions of virtue-signallers) would be living in much-reduced circumstances without all that primary production wealth laundered through the taxation and welfare system.

  31. LBLoveday

    “What will they come as tomorrow?”

    The Chinese armed forces recruitment vide0 “Peace behind me; war in front of me” is a clear indication of how China sees the future.

  32. LBLoveday

    “What will they come as tomorrow?”

    The Chinese armed forces recruitment vide0 “Peace behind me; war in front of me” is a clear indication of how China sees the future. Contrast it with Australia’s!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.