Judith in the Oz

Fellow Cat Judith Sloan wrote an interesting piece in the Australian today about the wasted years of the “Liberal Government”:

Three wasted years since Abbott stopped the boats

Judith’s piece was sort of a review of the Liberal Government.  In closing, she wrote:

You know I’m a hard marker — you’ve got to be — but it’s easy to conclude that there hasn’t really been much point to the Coalition government, at least for the past three years or so.

Judith, you are a hard market.  But not hard enough.  You forgot a few things:

  • NBN.  Malcolm Turnbull’s gift that keeps on giving.  Not only a financial calamity, but as described today by the CEO of Optus, a customer failure.  And let’s not also forget the recent comments by the ACCC.
  • Gonski Mark II, another Malcolm Turnbull gift that will keep on giving.
  • Submarines and general defence procurement.  Put aside the costs.  What about the timing as Greg Sheridan has eloquently written.
  • 18C repeal or lack there of.
  • Bank tax.
  • Paris accord.
  • Great Barrier Reef Foundation.

Time is short and NBN bandwith not so great so TAFKAS won’t add more to this list.

All summed up, the performance of the Abbott/Turnbull/Morrisson governments warrant not just a fail, but also most likely, an expulsion.

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70 Responses to Judith in the Oz

  1. Arky

    Put all sitting members last when you vote.
    Vote the uniparty bums out, and keep voting them out.
    You can’t vote in someone you would want, but you can vote out an existing weasel.

  2. stackja

    TA stopped the boats.
    ALP/Greens stopped the budget.
    Later TA had the ‘support’ of MT.
    NBN was Kev 07.
    Scomo is still on training wheels.

  3. Rex Mango

    Don’t forget feminising the ADF.

  4. Karabar

    Not to mention the role played by Bishop and DFAT in the Russiagate dossier scandal.

    Eventually the Five Eyes involvement will surface.

  5. anonandon

    Yeah but gay marriage

  6. OldOzzie

    Judith,

    What has been the point of the ­Coalition government?

    That question might seem a bit brutal, but the point of government is not to provide the chosen few with inflated salaries, to be driven around in big white cars and to employ scads of young ­advisers on our dime.

    When it comes to assessing the achievements and failures of the Coalition government, it is necessary to be specific about the timelines. There is the Tony Abbott period between September 2013 and September 2015, and the rest. (There’s no point differentiating between the Turnbull and Morrison periods because the latter has been so short.)

    Let me foreshadow my conclusion: the successes of the Coalition government have been few and its failures both significant and wide-ranging. This does not imply that the continuation of a Labor government after 2013 would have produced better results.

    There were three important achievements of the Abbott ­Coalition government: the abolition of the mining tax, the abolition of the carbon pricing scheme, and stopping the boats.

    Were it not for the removal of the misconceived mining tax, it’s very unlikely we would be enjoying the benefits of what is in effect a second mining boom. With commodity prices high, resource companies’ profits are booming, along with company tax revenue.

    They stopped boats but regulated immigration has been open slather. The number of permanent migrants was set at 190,000 a year and remained at this level until this budget. The number of temporary migrants, particularly international students, has soared and no efforts have been made to restrict these uncapped programs.

    Indeed, the government has introduced new visa categories and relaxed the conditions that apply to others, particularly where there is a regional aspect.

    A new grandparents’ visa was introduced in the budget. As a result, the population has been growing at about 1.6 per cent a year, among the highest in developed countries, mostly by immigration.

    You know I’m a hard marker — you’ve got to be — but it’s easy to conclude that there hasn’t really been much point to the Coalition government, at least for the past three years or so.

    Of course, whether there would be much point to a future Labor government is another question altogether.

    At least Tony Abbott tried, but he was sabotaged by the Black Hand Gang and The Media and as a Warringah Voter I prefer to keep Tony Aboott in place than Zali Steggall – a Labor/Greens/Getup Loser

    Anyone who employs Tim Flannery as Environment Advisor i.e Zali Sreggall has to be as Thick as a Brick – Zero Brains

  7. Tim Neilson

    At least Tony Abbott tried,

    for about the first six months. After the debacle of Hockey’s first Budget Abbott seemed to lose almost all will to fight. He’d make a gesture towards doing something sensible, the grievance industry would shriek, the surrender monkeys in the party room would panic*, and Abbott would back down.

    [Or in many cases the green/left fifth columnists would pretend to panic while secretly gloating.]

  8. Behind Enemy Lines

    For any independents willing and able to wade through the political sewer, this is the year to take a run at the Senate. Both parties are seriously on the nose and deserving of an electoral thrashing by an angry, unruly electorate. Just get your name on the ballot, and hope. At worst, you’re down a few hundred bucks. At best, you might fluke a seat and do some good. In either case you’ll help keep the majors out and perhaps send an incumbent to the unemployment queue.

  9. duncanm

    We’re at the point I’d much rather a government do nothing than what Tit’s has planned.

  10. Pyrmonter

    @ Tim Neilson, @Judith

    At least Abbott tried

    No he didn’t. He rejected his own Audit Commission’s perfectly sound proposals, having suppressed its report lest it upset the re-vote in Western Australia. He was, and remains, a big government interventionist whose opinions move around with the breeze; first for, then against, then for, then against, and now for climate change policy; agaisnt Brexit, then for it.

    There’s been a lot of disappointment; but the insistence that St Tony of Wharringah was in some sense either less disappointing or a martyr to the cause of good government requires a partisan reading of the events of the last 5 years that ill fits either of you.

    Do we need to remind you of works such as this? http://catallaxyfiles.com/2015/02/03/abbott-and-abetz-on-ir-weak-as-piss/comment-page-1/

  11. Dr Fred Lenin

    Arky ,we are pioneers in the sitting member last movement ,this might be Australias gilet jaunes moment .
    As I said the other day 26 or so seats are held by 5 percent or less making it much easier to turf 26 of them , .enouh to make a hell if adifference in career pollies thinking , and if we do it in this election it will be easier and more popular for voters to do it the one after that .
    Apart from putting the frighteners on the aparat ( establishment ) ,it will knock some of the arrogance out of them ,nothing like a lot of fear to get things done .

  12. John Bayley

    Pity that the Optus CEO in the linked AFR article again reinforces the refrain of the Laborites that the major problem with the NBN is the ‘mixed technology’ model.
    The major problem with the NBN is, in fact, the ‘national’ in its name.
    Crappy, overpriced service on the backbone of a government-mandated monopoly was always the inevitable outcome.
    Poor service delivery has by all accounts not been limited only to those on FTN connections.
    So let’s call a spade a spade, shall we?

  13. sabena

    The NBN is a Rudd failure.Turnbull didn’t help, but a lot of the damage was already done.

  14. Trax

    After, what is it, 11 years the NBN might be coming to inner city Brisbane *soon*, so I ditched the DSL and went straight to 4G, cheaper and no wires.

  15. a happy little debunker

    There is a reason that the MSM and progressives around Australia loath & fear Tony Abbott.

    They know he is an accomplished political performer who can rally the LNP base.

    Unfortunately, it is Morrison’s folly not to utilise that asset.

  16. Another very serious failure is the absence of
    Liquid fuel reserves for defence, farming, aviation, transport etc

    Meanwhile China is locking up seaplanes and building on Antarctica,
    as well as Pacific Islands.

    Frydenberg and his successor along with Turncoat, Payne and Pyne should’ve given permanent rooms in Goulburn for that!

    And NO visitors.

  17. Overburdened

    At the risk of being repetitive,

    The choice between proven failure and potential disaster.

    It may be that some of the people here cheering on the defeat of the Government aren’t interested in the wellbeing of the nation so much as barracking for a result that will give them more fodder to belly ache about.

  18. Overburdened

    Nothing sadder than people in the autumn of their life shakily standing at their wheelie walkers persistently shaking their fist at the sky when basically no one outside of the bubble cares about said oldies.

  19. Percy Popinjay

    The NBN is a Rudd failure.

    I remember a certain Nuclear Milkman being a less than peripheral figure in the birthing* of the National Brontosaurus Network concept.

    *Term used advisedly.

  20. jupes

    Submarines and general defence procurement. Put aside the costs. What about the timing as Greg Sheridan has eloquently written.

    I’d rather read Top Ender on the subject.

  21. jupes

    NBN. Malcolm Turnbull’s gift that keeps on giving. Not only a financial calamity, but as described today by the CEO of Optus, a customer failure. And let’s not also forget the recent comments by the ACCC.
    Gonski Mark II, another Malcolm Turnbull gift that will keep on giving.
    Submarines and general defence procurement. Put aside the costs. What about the timing as Greg Sheridan has eloquently written.
    18C repeal or lack there of.
    Bank tax.
    Paris accord.
    Great Barrier Reef Foundation.

    You seem to have left off the continued and increased immigration of people who don’t like us very much.

  22. Art Vandelay

    There were three important achievements of the Abbott ­Coalition government: the abolition of the mining tax, the abolition of the carbon pricing scheme, and stopping the boats.

    Don’t forget that Abbott then allowed Hunt to develop a secret ETS (the Safeguards mechanism) to replace the carbon tax which applies to our biggest emitters.

    Shorten has promised to expand the Safeguards mechanism to many more businesses if elected which could lead to entire industries leaving Australia. This mirrors what happened with the RET when Rudd vastly expanded Howard’s modest renewable energy target.

    The Liberals are clueless morons. They continually capitulate to the Left’s strident demands by introducing modest socialist ‘compromise policies’ which they think will mute criticism from the ABC set (see also childcare subsidies). The ALP then gleefully expands these policies when they get into power.

  23. bollux

    And the magnificent Snowy 2.0.

  24. struth

    What’s wrong with calling “majors last”

    The Australian people are sick of Liberals and Labor, and the last 12 years have brought it to the boil.

    Australians will understand “independents First parties last” and be very happy to register a protest vote.

    I’m not on social media, but I’d love to hear something like that got a run.
    It doesn’t have to be said exactly like that and the message can be slightly different from different people, but an anti UNiparty protest vote by the nation, it could actually happen, it would be massive and it would be just what Australians are in the mood for.
    It would take off like wildfire.

  25. Percy Popinjay

    people here cheering on the defeat of the Government aren’t interested in the wellbeing of the nation

    Do you seriously think anyone in the abomination that is the current federal government has this nation’s interests or wellbeing at heart?

    And if you think I’m cheering on the election of an interminable utterly destructive labor/greenfilth goat rodeo you are “a sadly bad informed halfwit”*.

    *Paraphrasing a certain Fer’son bruvver.

  26. notafan

    Don’t forget that Abbott then allowed Hunt to develop a secret ETS (the Safeguards mechanism) to replace the carbon tax which applies to our biggest emitters.

    Wasn’t that an existing ETS that Howard introduced, and Abbott had to concede to get Clive Palmer to pass the carbon tax bill through the upper house,all so Clive could get his photo taken with Al Gore?

  27. jupes

    It may be that some of the people here cheering on the defeat of the Government aren’t interested in the wellbeing of the nation …

    Nor is the government you twit. They are implementing Green policies.

  28. Pyrmonter

    @ RobK

    Indeed, the RET. Which the Turnbull/Frydenberg NEG would have seen nixed. Had it been, that would have merited at least a half-hearted cheer. Instead, the anti-Turnbull obsessives insisted it had to go; and Turnbull, to his unending shame, ditched it days before his own departure. Now we’re stuck with policy formulated by the cheer squads on Sky after Dark. State owned power generation? Excellent!

    What did we do to deserve this mess? (Expressed as ‘we’, as Pyrmonter is a long suffering (almost 30 year-long) Liberal party member and activist)

  29. Art Vandelay

    Wasn’t that an existing ETS that Howard introduced, and Abbott had to concede to get Clive Palmer to pass the carbon tax bill through the upper house,all so Clive could get his photo taken with Al Gore?

    As far as I know, the policy itself was developed by Hunt under Abbott (with his approval) well after Howard’s time. It was then hurried quietly through Parliament under Turnbull:

    In fact, the idea of a cap-and-trade scheme has been part of the Coalition’s climate policy since well before Greg Hunt went from shadow minister to Minister for the Environment in 2013. He made it a condition of his appointment by Tony Abbott that the science of climate change would be accepted and the emissions reduction target would not change.

    Within that, he and Abbott constructed a policy position that could more or less credibly be argued as achieving the abatement targets, while at the same time satisfying three requirements: differentiating their policy from the ALP, not increasing electricity prices and not upsetting the far right of the Coalition.

    When Malcolm Turnbull became leader and Prime Minister last year, amazingly, he did not fully understand his party’s climate policy, and in particular the inclusion of a cap and trade ETS, because Hunt had never discussed it in Cabinet. Apparently, he was pleasantly surprised, but decided to maintain radio silence, as part of his broader efforts to keep the conservatives onside.

  30. struth

    They know he is an accomplished political performer who can rally the LNP base.

    He’s absolutely useless.

    He didn’t win against Labor.
    He wasn’t brilliant in opposition.
    He’s a gutless Moron.

    Labor lost the election to Tony Abbott.
    The would have lost the election against Mr Squiggle.
    Let’s not forget how ruinous they were.
    The left call Abbott brilliant as an opposition leader to blur the fact labor were so absolutely despised by the nation.

    He is part of the problem, not part of the cure.

  31. notafan

    So true

    Malcolm Turnbull with his me too policies would have landslided in exactly the same way at Abbott

  32. candy

    Morrison would prefer to win with Abbott and Dutton losing their seats so he can go his own way.
    A strong possibility. He gives them no support.
    Lol, he is probably praying for them to lose their seats so he can run a centrist government, the end of conservatism that a lot of Libs think are holdimg them back.

  33. max

    He is part of the problem, not part of the cure.

    He is loathed by many. The ABC, the Greens,the Opposition, Get Up. He can’t be all bad.

  34. mh

    Morrison would prefer to win with Abbott and Dutton losing their seats so he can go his own way.
    A strong possibility. He gives them no support.
    Lol, he is probably praying for them to lose their seats so he can run a centrist government, the end of conservatism that a lot of Libs think are holdimg them back.

    Candy, lock away that crack pipe.

  35. max

    On the other hand the Melbourne Comedy Festival would be f**ked without Tony Abbott. So, yes, he’s got a lot to answer for.

  36. Ben

    Abbott: Sydney airport decision?

  37. jo

    From day 1 Abbott was useless as PM. First 5 minutes Martin Parkinson gone. NBN gone. Any alp appointments gone. He is a fighter not a lover. As PM he wanted his opponents to like him. He ended standing for nothing very quickley.

  38. Overburdened

    Percy

    If it’s a battle of wits I’ve got it half one already.

    Hopefully you have too.

  39. Linden

    Struth, to true, my partner asked me if I thought Palmer will get any votes, I said I would not be surprised if he did. Those adds have been running for a fair while now, and for your reasons he just may well. Going to be interesting to see if there is a big protest vote against the traditional LNP/Labor . I hope so, I would like to know from the pollies where they stand on vegan terrorism, who is who in the political zoo on this issue, and it has become a massive one now. For sure the average Australian has a gut full of being told what to think what you’re allowed to say, what we must accept on the latest social engineering dogma or being harangued in general by every bleeding heart do-gooder; and now we are being told what we must eat by vegan anarchists or else!. One feels it is almost illegal to be an old fashioned Australian any more, yeah we are sick of it! I hope both Labor and Liberals/Nationals get whacked good and proper, bring on the Palmers et~all to teach ’em a lesson and lets get a real three ring circus, oh what fun!

  40. Overburdened

    In regard to your issue of the state of the Parliament, IMO not many of them are worth 2 knobs of goat shit.

    The ones that could have been good get absorbed into the machine and become fuckwits.

    The issue is which side best enables the most successful outcome in the prevailing global fiscal regime.

  41. Dr Fred Lenin

    Further to Arkys “sitting member last on the ballot paper” plan ,no fewer than 53 seats are held by a margin of 5 or less percent after prefences . So it figures that a fairly small number of people following the Arky plan could unseat a large number of existing MPS, destroying their carefully crafted careers , 53 new rookie MPS would put a huge strsin on the aparat .
    Sonds like a gilet jaune moment with bells on it . Lets go for it have some fun watching them scrabbling about like a tin of worms .

  42. Overburdened

    Jupes

    I have fond memories of my mum frothing about politicians and slapping it on with a broad trowel.

    When she stated that she should be the Prime Minister, I reminded her that she knew nothing about micro or macroeconomic policy, had no skills in business or administration, had no understanding of the legislative process, the complexities of writing laws and wouldn’t want to miss her favourite television programs.

    Without drawing breath she roared at me, ‘Don’t give me any of your smartarse bullshit’.

    She also authoritatively declared she wouldn’t vote for bob hawke because she didn’t like his eyebrows.

    Your welcome.

  43. Pedro the Ignorant

    Look at moi, look at moi.

    I’ve got one word for you.

    Submarines.

  44. Overburdened

    Btw you know nothing about me.

    Get fucked

  45. DaveR

    The failures of Abbott pale into insignificance when you consider Turnbull’s.

    Had he acted on the findings of the Royal Commission into Unions, instead of refusing to touch anything to do with Abbott, there would have been a number of completed prosecutions by now, and much more evidence connected to Shorten, the AWU and GetUp.

    That would have created a significant electoral theme for the current election and a major point of difference.

    Richo was right from day 1, Turnbull did not have a political bone in his body.

  46. John A

    John Bayley #2983190, posted on April 9, 2019, at 12:39 pm

    Pity that the Optus CEO in the linked AFR article again reinforces the refrain of the Laborites that the major problem with the NBN is the ‘mixed technology’ model.
    The major problem with the NBN is, in fact, the ‘national’ in its name.
    Crappy, overpriced service on the backbone of a government-mandated monopoly was always the inevitable outcome.
    Poor service delivery has by all accounts not been limited only to those on FTN connections.
    So let’s call a spade a spade, shall we?

    The major problem with the NBN is that it exists.

    Time for the Coalition to devise a better privatisation strategy for NBN and the telecomms backbone network.

    Treat it like roads. Owned by government but with access freely available to all comers at the same price per Mb, as long as they meet the neutral technical requirements for transmitting across the wires/airwaves.

    If they want they can nationalise the satellites and mobile phone towers, and likewise provide neutral equal access to all mobile and data operators who wish to connect.

  47. DaveR

    And I’m not completely happy with Morrison either.

    With the party having finally dumped Turnbull, Morrison had the immediate opportunity to reset policy for this election.

    Instead he:

    . failed to restate Liberal traditions and explain Liberal principles to the electorate (and why Turnbull had to go);

    . failed to firmly reset policy to reflect all views in the Party room;

    . failed to take positive actions to shore up the fractured conservative right of the Party

    . failed to bury Frydenberg’s Socialist NEG policy

    Its funny how the NSW state election has all of a sudden woken Morrison up to the real implication of the loss of support from the conservative right. The variable preference flow from One Nation and United Australia Party may well decide the election if it is close. Contrast that with the comments from the defective Pyne that disaffected conservatives “had nowhere else to go” except the Coalition.

  48. Amadeus

    And in the midst of it all, the ABC is still a living and breathing parasite. And in a moment of utter madness, Morrison hands it another $40 million. The Coalition is not just dumb and stupid, it gives the Labor/Greens media machine another go at attacking the Government.
    Trying to think, where on earth can the missus and I go where government is not only competent but has gonads….not too many options that live up to our standards. If Trump feels like going around again, maybe the US…at least POTUS has gonads and is actually draining the swamp.
    Meanwhile, back here, we just gave a section of the swamp a blood transfusion.
    God help us….

  49. Dr Faustus

    The failures of Abbott pale into insignificance when you consider Turnbull’s.

    Fair comment.
    The tragedy is that even conservative-leaning commentators are reduced to discussing six years of Coalition government in terms of comparative failure. Five years of flipping the base, flopping around like a fish on a hot deck, and standing for nothing is not really an impressive record of success.

    Here we are, nearing an election likely to usher in an historically awful government and boot non-Left politics into the long grass for a decade, and there are no achievements to argue for the support of middle Australia. Stopping the boats was a 2014 thing, and shutting down two stupid ideological taxes, that actually meant SFA to most Australians, won’t cut it either.

    The rest of it has been Big Government running on indecision.

    History will eventually scald these two wastrels as the facilitators of the Shorten Clown Show.

  50. DaveR

    Any redesign of the NBN must have a significant writedown of the spent capital in it. Its the NBN requiring a commercial return on this significantly overspent capital that is driving the unhealthy retail price rises. That probably means people will abandon the NBN in droves in favour of 5G when it is introduced, as predicted.

    I am sure if the Coalition write it down it will be Kevin’s NBN; if Labor write it down it will be Malcolm’s NBN.

  51. FelixKruell

    Let’s not forget the ‘temporary deficit levy’ – never thought a Liberal government would actively increase my tax rate. Which Shorten now has political cover to make permanent.

  52. John Bayley

    Art Vandelay @ 1.43 PM:

    The Liberals are clueless morons. They continually capitulate to the Left’s strident demands by introducing modest socialist ‘compromise policies’ which they think will mute criticism from the ABC set (see also childcare subsidies). The ALP then gleefully expands these policies when they get into power.

    You’re being unfair. /s
    The Liberals in fact eagerly take on Labor’s big government policies and expand them further all of their own. The NDIS being one of the top examples.
    They are not only clueless, but also not centre-right.

    John A @ 3.24 PM:

    The major problem with the NBN is that it exists.

    That’s exactly what I meant.

    Time for the Coalition to devise a better privatisation strategy for NBN and the telecomms backbone network.

    Nobody will buy it (the NBN) in its present format.
    There is a reason why the private sector would not build it in the first place – namely that it was not a viable proposition.
    The high inter-connect charges, which have initially been put in place by Rudd to maintain the fiction that the project is somehow capable of producing a ‘commercial return’ are just one of the major reasons why a growing number of ISPs is now ceasing to offer NBN services and why the number of subscribers is nowhere near where they had expected it to be by now.
    With 5G wireless coming soon, the business ‘case’ only gets more grim.

  53. Tim Neilson

    Which Shorten now has political cover to make permanent.

    Not just individual tax rates.

    Increased taxes on super.

    New taxes on specific businesses (because eeeeebil!!!) e.g. bank levy.

    Whatever viciously psychotic headkicking Peanut Head wants to inflict on non-Labor voting demographics he’ll find cover from some Photios Party idiocy.

  54. Behind Enemy Lines

    struth
    #2983247, posted on April 9, 2019 at 1:45 pm
    What’s wrong with calling “majors last”

    The Australian people are sick of Liberals and Labor, and the last 12 years have brought it to the boil.

    Australians will understand “independents First parties last” and be very happy to register a protest vote.

    I’m not on social media, but I’d love to hear something like that got a run.
    It doesn’t have to be said exactly like that and the message can be slightly different from different people, but an anti UNiparty protest vote by the nation, it could actually happen, it would be massive and it would be just what Australians are in the mood for.
    It would take off like wildfire.

    I think you’re right. And this is why I also think that any of us who presently has the capacity to run, ought to do it. Could there ever be a better chance than the coming federal election?

    Me, I’m completely done with voting for the ‘less-worse’ party – the LibNats coalition. It detests and is energetically screwing people like us, along with what’s left of heritage Australia. All while pretending to represent us.

    Assuming we don’t have a revolt of independents and minors, there is nothing to vote for at the next election. The coming government of Australia (irrespective of whether it’s the LibNats coalition or the Bioleninist coalition) is going to be utter crap, ruinous for Australia. Voting one way or the other won’t change that (absent a welter of indie candidates).

    The way to change that is to give the Libs a savage and brutal electoral smashing, to stop them continuing to block a workable conservalternative [someone please bung that into the Cats Dictionary].

    Depending on one’s electorate, that seems to leave unhappy voters with the strategic combination of (a) good indies first, (b) current members last, and/or (c) major parties last.

  55. Arky

    As I said the other day 26 or so seats are held by 5 percent or less making it much easier to turf 26 of them , .enouh to make a hell if adifference in career pollies thinking , and if we do it in this election it will be easier and more popular for voters to do it the one after that .

    ..
    Yes.
    I don’t think you would need to sway a great many people to make a huge difference.
    The problem with third parties is they are taking votes from both sides, so the majors don’t care that much.
    Target incumbency and watch them squeal.

  56. Arky

    We need to train third parties to consider their job done, not on senate seats or a percent of the vote, but on their ability to unseat existing uni-party stooges.

  57. Behind Enemy Lines

    Arky
    #2983395, posted on April 9, 2019 at 4:28 pm
    We need to train third parties to consider their job done, not on senate seats or a percent of the vote, but on their ability to unseat existing uni-party stooges.

    The challenge with that approach is the reality of political funding. Contesting an election costs money. In turn, winning a seats gives you a degree of leverage over government spending decisions, jobs for the boys and other opportunities for graft. Winning a certain per cent of the vote means you get federal funds.

  58. Behind Enemy Lines

    Following on my last point, the tremendous advantage the left has is that when the times dictate it, they can afford to have candidates lose over and over. Their candidates all have union or government jobs from which they’ll never be sacked, along with limitless opportunities to look after their maaaaaates, and of course free time and Other People’s Money to play at politics.

    If the LibNats had any political philosophy other than “me too, all four hooves in the trough”, they’d easily put a permanent crimp in the left-wing money pipeline.

  59. Paulo Nigrum Anatis

    You’re certainly being hard on Morrison by including him in the assessment of fails. He wasn’t PM for any of them; or is it simply by implication due to his presence in cabinet? Strange.

    Most of these ‘fails’ were done either by the Mad Monk or Fuck-up fairy Mal. You might lay the NBN at Rudd’s feet sure; but as Minister for Communication old FUF Mal ensured we had the worst possible outcome by retaining degenerative, obsolete copper.

    When Morrison became PM there was a refreshing shift from the decades long personality politics of ego-centric blood-letting for personal power at the expense of the national well-being.

    In quick time Morrison had the royal commission into aged care – finally something for the people instead of self interested one- upmanship that had become the mainstay of our politics; and given an ageing population, it was well directed. Now we have similar review into disability. The statesman-like defusing of a rabid Erdogan? Fails? I wouldn’t think so!

    Mark them down if you must, however there’s a growing perception out here in the pooliverse that Morrison seems to be a cut above the usual bottom feeders and ruled by a moral compass and a genuine desire to do something for the common good. He’ll make mistakes for sure; but that doesn’t detract from his seemingly positive motivation.

    Put the other bloke in, the one that put the capital “S” in “self-interest’ and the blood of 2 ALP PM’s on his hands in his quest for glory; and you can be assured of another decade like the last. His own poll driven mob will be baying for his blood within a year as he’ll inevitably prove as popular as a chunder on a birthday cake; and the nation will be again relentlessly subject to the inevitable instability we’ve had in spades.

    With Morrison we will at least get sorely needed stability, and some refreshing service to the electorate for once I’ll wager instead of the usual full focus on personal political survival that the journos love and the people despise.

  60. Rob

    It’s so sad that Judith Sloan has become an habitual whinger – lots of negative commentary but very few constructive suggestions.
    It’s also true that many people have short memories.
    Twelve years ago, “sensible” voters booted a commendable Australian government and plunged us into the unknown with Rudd Labor.
    It’s all been downhill since then, and that’s not least because of the influence of our ABC and the growing dominance of the left in our MSM. Social media is also in that mix with the grand result that more and more independents (particularly in the Senate) have rendered the nation ungovernable. Since the governing party is the one that can assemble the most votes in the parliament, what is presented for voter mandate is not what is subsequently delivered.
    The only way to return to sane and sensible government is for the nation to go all the way with either the Coalition or Labor – Senate majority and all. That way we ought get what we think we have mandated and if we don’t, well we can reverse that vote 3 years later.
    It’s simply not good enough to be judging one party (the current government) on its performance when so much of that performance has been down to the ratbags and ferals who run the Senate.

  61. Squirrel

    We now have a Coalition Government which has succumbed to the language of big government – with all spending now being described as “investment”, and with endless blather abour “delivering” this and “delivering” that etc. etc.

    This is playing on Labor’s ground, without any consistent and focused messaging about how, as a nation, we pay our way now and into the future.

  62. Tator

    John A,
    Best way to have done the NBN would have been just to buy the POTS conduits and exchanges from Telstra and then allowed the Telcos to rent space for whatever tech they wanted to install with minimum performance standards so no pair gaining of copper etc that provides zero ADSL coverage etc.
    This means whoever wanted to run fibre to the home could and as the Telco backbones all hooked up to the exchanges would have opened up more options for ISP’s to tap in as the NBN limiting the points of presences which were the ISP links is one of the huge increase in cost factors by not allowing smaller more agile companies to undercut the big telcos

  63. Colonel Crispin Berka

    We can only live one version of history and we really don’t know what “would have happened instead” if Rudd’s thought bubble had never made it further than the airline napkin. All the same, amidst all the NBN-bashing can we please not lose sight of the fact that back in 2012 from the free market alone a download speed of 5Mbps was the median Internet speed in Australia, which was barely enough for one decent quality video stream. These days it’s upwards of 15Mbps for less than $50/month. When was that ever going to happen from Telstra, Optus, or any other ISPs? All we know for sure is, it hadn’t happened by 2013.

    NBN. Malcolm Turnbull’s gift that keeps on giving. Not only a financial calamity, but as described today by the CEO of Optus, a customer failure.

    After the install had been done at my place, NBNCo required the ISP to give me an online survey form to give feedback about how good my experience had been.
    After saying my general opinion of NBN was bad, the next multi-choice question asked why I had a negative view.
    Honest to goodness, the only options I was allowed to pick from were:
    * Price was too high.
    * Performance was too slow.
    * Installation was unsatisfactory.
    * I don’t understand technology.

    Yes, because if you don’t like the NBN then you must be an idiot. That was the effect of the options they gave, which is why I remember it.
    Don’t like a communist-run government Internet backbone? Does not compute, no such option.

    All NBN news is good news, comrades!

  64. PeteD

    Suggesting the internet was free market alone in 2012 is a bit rich. The Feds had promised to overbuild all infrastructure with $50bn worth of cabling.

    So nobody invested in fixed line from some point in early 2009.

  65. Rayvic

    Not only did Malcolm Turnbull ratify the Paris Accord, but he did his best to stop the advancement of Australia by influencing the phasing out of coal-fired power, and misallocating some $12 billion of scarce capital on the unjustified part-time power from the Snowy Two scheme.

  66. John Bayley

    Colonel Crispin Berka @8.45 PM:

    All the same, amidst all the NBN-bashing can we please not lose sight of the fact that back in 2012 from the free market alone a download speed of 5Mbps was the median Internet speed in Australia, which was barely enough for one decent quality video stream.

    That may well be true, but then back in 2002 or so most people were on dial-up. The median speed increase over the next 10 years was not due to government edict, either.
    So how can you say what may have happened over the past 6 years should there have been no NBN?
    I happen to live in a medium sized regional city and have had only wireless (mobile) internet at home (via Optus) for the past 6 years. Over that time, the average speed I consistently get has increased from 5Mbs over 3G to about 150Mbs over LTE. The amount of included data, at 140GB for $70 per month, is more than I need.
    At work, we were forced to swap from ADSL to NBN when it became available, and it was so flaky, with frequent drop-outs, that after about 10 months I gave it up and the office is now also running solely over LTE (Vodafone). It has been rock solid and it is easily as fast as the NBN & for the amount of data we need, the price is very comparable. As a bonus, our VoIP, over the same LTE network, works better, too.
    Admittedly we are only a small outfit (5 people) but if we can do it now, imagine what will happen in the next few years with 5G being widely available.
    NBN = Not Bloody Needed

  67. Win

    Not forgetting the NDIS.Gillards two faced hypocrisy

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