Monday Forum: April 15, 2019

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3,210 Responses to Monday Forum: April 15, 2019

  1. bespoke

    Rowe is one creepy bloke.

  2. DrBeauGan

    Rowe is one creepy bloke.

    Yes, he is. A great argument against being a lefty.

    Thanks Tom.

  3. Oh come on

    So Notre Dame’s spire and its roof have collapsed. No problem! Rebuild with minarets, as was done with the Hagia Sophia. It is conquered territory, after all. I’m sure the Saudis will bankroll the rebuilding effort.

  4. Leigh Lowe

    Oh come on

    #2988919, posted on April 16, 2019 at 4:34 am

    So Notre Dame’s spire and its roof have collapsed. 

    It was struck by a metaphor.

  5. Baldrick

    Thanks for the toons Tom. Too good to leave on the page turn …

    Tom
    #2988906, posted on April 16, 2019 at 4:04 am
    Chris “Roy” Taylor.

  6. Leigh Lowe

    Baldrick

    #2988923, posted on April 16, 2019 at 5:03 am

    Thanks for the toons Tom. Too good to leave on the page turn …

    It never bodes well when the cartoons sit twixt the page turn.
    That’s what the elders, past, present and emerging always say, anyway.

  7. Leigh Lowe

    Looks like Notre Dame cathedral is gone.

  8. Tintarella di Luna

    Paris was gone long before the collapse of Notre Dame cathedral. A metaphor of the collapse of Western Civilisation eroded from within.

  9. OldOzzie

    candy
    #2988545, posted on April 15, 2019 at 8:27 pm

    I’ve never had or seen dripping or lard used anywhere. I thought margarine was around soon after the end of WWII.

    candy,

    we had lard and dripping in our household in the late 40s, early 50s and I used to love scaping the burnt top of the dripping with a spoon and eating it.

  10. OldOzzie

    Thanks Tom,

    Paul Zanetti today – describes Bill ShortPants and the Labor Party perfectly

  11. OldOzzie

    Who do Cat Bloggers think this person might be?

    and is this his theme song?

    Jubilation T. Cornpone


    When we fought the Yankees and annihilation was near,
    Who was there to lead the charge that took us safe to the rear?
    Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone;
    Old “Toot your own horn – pone.”
    Jubilation T. Cornpone, a man who knew no fear!

    When we almost had ’em but the issue still was in doubt,
    Who suggested the retreat that turned it into a rout?
    Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone;
    Old “Tattered and torn – pone.”
    Jubilation T. Cornpone, he kept us hidin’ out!

    With our ammunition gone and faced with utter defeat,
    Who was it that burned the crops and left us nothing to eat?
    Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone;
    Old “September Morn – pone.”
    Jubilation T. Cornpone, the pants blown off his seat!

    HURRAY!

    When it seemed like our brave boys would keep on fighting for months,
    Who took pity on them and ca-pit-u-lated at once?
    Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone; Unshaven and shorn – pone.
    Jubilation T. Cornpone, he weren’t nobody’s dunce!

    Who went re-con-noiter-ing to flank the enemy’s rear,
    Circled through the piney woods, and disappeared for a year?
    Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone;
    Old “Treat ’em with scorn – pone.”
    Jubilation T. Cornpone, the missing mountaineer!

    Who became so famous with a reputation so great,
    That he ran for president and didn’t carry a state?
    Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone;
    Old “Wouldn’t be sworn – pone.”
    Jubilation T. Cornpone, he made the country wait!

    Stonewall Jackson got his name by standing firm in the fray.
    Who was known to all his men as good ol’ “Paper Mache?”
    Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone;

    Jubilation T. Cornpone, he really saved the day!

  12. hzhousewife

    “Don’t it always seem to go
    That you don’t know what you’ve got

    Till it’s gone”

    Awful.

  13. Notafan

    Notre Dame survived the French revolution.

    One can’t help but be suspicious.

    The first time I saw her, walking along the Seine I was thrilled to bits, a lifetime desire finally achieved.
    Terrible news.

  14. OldOzzie

    Actually poorly phrased by me above

    Should have been

    Who do Cat Bloggers think Joe Btfsplk would be in the Cat Blog

    and is this his theme song?

    Jubilation T. Cornpone

    Joe Btfsplk was a character in the satirical comic strip Li’l Abner by cartoonist Al Capp (1909–1979). He is the world’s worst jinx, bringing disastrous misfortune to everyone around him. A small, dark rain cloud perpetually hovers over his head to symbolize his bad luck. Hapless Btfsplk and his ever-present cloud became one of the most iconic images in Li’l Abner.

  15. Notafan

    You would hardly know it, though they are still not quite finished, and some of the stained glass is modern

    Reims cathedral was martyred in world war one and rebuilt.

  16. A Lurker

    Paris was gone long before the collapse of Notre Dame cathedral. A metaphor of the collapse of Western Civilisation eroded from within.

    Exactly!

    They say the fire was accidental.
    I don’t think so.
    In France twelve other churches have been attacked this month.

  17. calli

    Arrive for the first time in Paris, bleary eyed, jet lagged and it’s only two in the afternoon. Ditch the bags in the hotel room, cold water on the face and a smear of lippy and it’s off down the Boulevard St Michel. Past Cluny, that can wait, past the cafe on the corner…later. Cross the bridge, lurching along in a plane coma, look up – Conciergerie. Bother. Misread the map – gone too far. Look left…

    And there she is. Heart kick starts, the feet pick up pace.

    Stumble across a few side streets and the forecourt opens before my tired, bloodshot eyes. The building crouches and soars, the buttresses look like they’re holding her down to earth as she tries to take off into the leaden Paris sky. A quick hello to great…great…many greats Uncle Charlie and in I go. A world of stone and glass and glory to God.

    She’s still as alive as any building on earth. Probably more so, now that she’s open to the heavens.

  18. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Paris was gone long before the collapse of Notre Dame cathedral. A metaphor of the collapse of Western Civilisation eroded from within.

    My thoughts exactly.

  19. Bruce of Newcastle

    In France twelve other churches have been attacked this month.

    That makes it a slow month.

    In France, two churches are desecrated every day on average. According to PI-News, a German news site, 1,063 attacks on Christian churches or symbols (crucifixes, icons, statues) were registered in France in 2018. This represents a 17% increase compared to the previous year (2017), when 878 attacks were registered — meaning that such attacks are only going from bad to worse.

    Similar reports are coming out of Germany. Four separate churches were vandalized and/or torched in March alone. “In this country,” PI-News explained, “there is a creeping war against everything that symbolizes Christianity: attacks on mountain-summit crosses, on sacred statues by the wayside, on churches… and recently also on cemeteries.”

    If you are wondering who is doing this, read the next para in the report.

    European Churches: Vandalized, Defecated On, and Torched “Every Day” (14 Apr)

  20. Rockdoctor

    will
    #2988903, posted on April 16, 2019 at 3:49 am

    Add on to that plastic bag ban that now costs more to buy them plus bin liners lining the supermarkets pockets while their CEO’s can virtue signal or the container deposit scheme that we all get slugged with an administration fee for some ticket clipping third party (Most probably connected) plus GST. Oh do I mention renewables inflating power prices? I do my part with debunking this stuff but it is hard as all the above is being pushed hard by multinational NGO’s, like p#[email protected]&*% into the wind…

    Been an hour & half since I turned the news on, I have not seen a shred on news yet for the same 5 minute info bite on the Notre Dame fire. Significant as it is, is there nothing else happening, like a Federal Election?

  21. Indonesia having 6 Modern Submarines by 2026, 12(?) total by 2035

    It was came as a surprise last Friday that Indonesia with DSME had signed a contract for 3 additional submarines by 2026.

    This is on top of the 3 submarines already received (2017, 2018 and KRI Alugoro 405 (launched April 11, 2019)).

    All 6 submarines are known as Improved Chang Bogo, Type 209/1400s.

    All do/will rely on good German engineering via South Korean, DSME, efficiency.

    The prospect of Indonesia owning 6 new submarines by 2026 while Australia’s 6 Collins age will make our actual sailors quietly nervous while quill-drivers retire.

    Also, some Indonesian leaders and admirals are also interested in acquiring an additional 6 submarines, which may be South Korean DSME designed Type 214s (with formidable fuel cell AIP) – all adding up to 12.

    If Indonesia has 12 fairly new submarines compared to 6 old Collins BEFORE Australia’s first Attack-class sub is commissioned in 2035 maybe – then this may represent a balance of power problem for Australia.

    Have our intelligence sleuths under the marvelous Bishop and Payne known about this for ages?

    Has our foreign aid to Indonesia paid for their subs while Turncoat and Pyne dithered with undesigned French ones for us?

    Has plastic Morrison ordered white flags for all ADF units yet?

  22. Gab

    Calli, do be careful in Paris.

    I am stunned they set fire to Notre-Dame.

  23. struth

    Good Moaning.

    Fornicating, Thieving, getting drunk, adultery, running around nude etc, have been totally banned by Rugby Australia when their teams go out at night……………………why?

    Israel’s problem is not that he calls out the sinning, it’s that he offended the gods of Rugby Australia, who will have no other gods before them.

  24. Bruce of Newcastle

    Getting closer and closer to the centre of the web:

    Hillary Clinton loyalists fed the FBI’s upper echelon an assortment of anti-Donald Trump criminal accusations during the 2016 campaign and his presidency, according to a string of interview transcripts released in recent weeks.

    James A. Baker, former FBI general counsel who participated on the receiving end, testified that the situation was “horrible” and “highly unusual.”

    At least 10 of Mrs. Clinton’s supporters directly or via middlemen told the bureau tales about Russia-Trump conspiracies. It appears to be an unprecedented effort by a presidential campaign and the party in power to count on the FBI to knock out the other party’s candidate and president.

    “Whatever it takes” eh Richo?

    ‘Horrible’: Clinton loyalists exploited Obama’s FBI to spread Russia conspiracy stories about Trump

  25. Notafan

    The Huegenots destroyed hundreds of French churches including the cathedral in Orleans, the French revolutionaries destroyed two out of every three that were left.

    The French government have been demolishing excess churches for years.

    The damage done by mueslis so far is trifling in comparison.

    It is too early to know if Notre Dame is arson.

    She will be rebuilt, what France really needs is a return to the faith, that is her real tragedy.

  26. calli

    I was remembering, Gab.

    Everyone remembers their first day in Paris.

  27. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Cold weather to grip WORLD as solar minimum to DEEPEN, NASA says
    The last time a deep solar minimum was in effect was the Maunder minimum, which saw seven decades of freezing weather, began in 1645 and lasted through to 1715, and happened when sunspots were exceedingly rare.

  28. struth

    The socialist global elite burned down the Notre-Dame cathedral.
    They are wilfully destroying the west.
    It’s war and it seems the only people that get that are the yellow vest movement (who don’t exist according to a MSM paid for and controlled by the same elite)

  29. Gab

    Lots of videos on Twitter showing young people singing the Ave Maria and praying the Rosary as they watch Notre-Dame burn.

  30. calli

    In other news…

    Gosh. He was gorgeous.

    Don’t go into politics, handsome young men.

  31. Gab

    Oh, good. Glad you’re not in Paris today then, Calli.

  32. Notafan

    Gab that is what I like to hear.

    There may not have always been a huge crowd when I went to mass in France but the clear devotion of the young men and and women that were there, that was balm to the soul.

    Especially noticeable at weekday masses.

  33. Cassie of Sydney

    “She will be rebuilt, what France really needs is a return to the faith, that is her real tragedy.”

    I have just woken up to this awful news. I can’t help thinking that this is an omen….a terrible omen of what is the state of France in 2019 and what lies in wait for France in the near future.

    What is the point of an empty church/cathedral when the soul of France is dead? I was in the UK eighteen months ago and it is the same….the churches are empty….they are shells. What is needed are human souls to fill the churches.

    The decline, the rot and the demise of western Europe and the western world is due to the collapse of faith…..period.

  34. OldOzzie

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2988962, posted on April 16, 2019 at 7:18 am

    Cold weather to grip WORLD as solar minimum to DEEPEN, NASA says

    The last time a deep solar minimum was in effect was the Maunder minimum, which saw seven decades of freezing weather, began in 1645 and lasted through to 1715, and happened when sunspots were exceedingly rare.

    So much for Global Waring/Climate Change, NASA Below Bells the Cat with one Paragraph

    NASA explains on its website: “All weather on Earth, from the surface of the planet out into space, begins with the Sun.

    “Space weather and terrestrial weather (the weather we feel at the surface) are influenced by the small changes the Sun undergoes during its solar cycle.”

    The space agency adds on its Thermosphere Climate Index (TCI) “a weather metric that tells us how the top of Earth’s atmosphere (or ‘thermosphere’) is responding to solar activity” that “the top of Earth’s atmosphere is approximately 10 times cooler than it was during the record-setting Solar Max of 1957-58”.

  35. Spider

    The ABC chasing down Liberal candidate Liu for homophobic comments. They are no doubt scouring old school magazines; interrogating work colleagues and forensically analysing 10 year old Facebook posts for any more thought crimes.

    So basically anybody in the population who voted against same sex marriage (not me) has now basically committed a crime which demands that they lose their job and invalidates them from public office.

    Who needs the Stasi when you’ve got a sizeable proportion of the population happy to dob in fellow citizens to authorities on a whim.

    What a country. The novel 1984 is looking very much like a serious understatement every day.

  36. Gab

    Photo taken by drone of Notre Dame burning.

  37. Cassie of Sydney

    “Tintarella di Luna
    #2988932, posted on April 16, 2019 at 5:38 am
    Paris was gone long before the collapse of Notre Dame cathedral. A metaphor of the collapse of Western Civilisation eroded from within.”

    Yes.

  38. Spider

    Funny how the Guardian tape of Liberal candidate Liu has only now just emerged.

    Amazing timing,

  39. Nick

    Lol, the Left think that Liu will lose votes from her comments

  40. calli

    First the Islanders, now the Asians.

    Will this oppression of ethnic minorities by stale, pale Aussie Lefties ever end?

  41. Cassie of Sydney

    I wrote last week of T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land…..I think that no other poem better encapsulates the the collapse of the west, the shallow, sodomised, corrupt, venal, greedy society we have become…..I think that T. S. Eliot had the gift of prophesy.

    I’m sorry, it is a long poem…forgive me for posting……..but over the last few days it is all I have thought about….here it is….

    I. The Burial of the Dead

    April is the cruellest month, breeding
    Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
    Memory and desire, stirring
    Dull roots with spring rain.
    Winter kept us warm, covering
    Earth in forgetful snow, feeding
    A little life with dried tubers.
    Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee
    With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade,
    And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten,
    And drank coffee, and talked for an hour.
    Bin gar kine Russin, stamm’ aus Litauen, echt deutsch.
    And when we were children, staying at the archduke’s,
    My cousin’s, he took me out on a sled,
    And I was frightened. He said, Marie,
    Marie, hold on tight. And down we went.
    In the mountains, there you feel free.
    I read, much of the night, and go south in the winter.

    What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow
    Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man,
    You cannot say, or guess, for you know only
    A heap of broken images, where the sun beats,
    And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief,
    And the dry stone no sound of water. Only
    There is shadow under this red rock,
    (Come in under the shadow of this red rock),
    And I will show you something different from either
    Your shadow at morning striding behind you
    Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
    I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
    Frisch weht der Wind
    Der Heimat zu,
    Mein Irisch Kind,
    Wo weilest du?
    “You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    “They called me the hyacinth girl.”
    –Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.
    Oed’ und leer das Meer.

    Madame Sosostris, famous clairvoyante,
    Had a bad cold, nevertheless
    Is known to be the wisest woman in Europe,
    With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she,
    Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor,
    (Those are pearls that were his eyes. Look!)
    Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks,
    The lady of situations.
    Here is the man with three staves, and here the Wheel,
    And here is the one-eyed merchant, and this card
    Which is blank, is something he carries on his back,
    Which I am forbidden to see. I do not find
    The Hanged Man. Fear death by water.
    I see crowds of people, walking round in a ring.
    Thank you. If you see dear Mrs. Equitone,
    Tell her I bring the horoscope myself:
    One must be so careful these days.

    Unreal City,
    Under the brown fog of a winter dawn,
    A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many,
    I had not thought death had undone so many.
    Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled,
    And each man fixed his eyes before his feet.
    Flowed up the hill and down King William Street,
    To where Saint Mary Woolnoth kept the hours
    With a dead sound on the final stroke of nine.
    There I saw one I knew, and stopped him, crying: “Stetson!
    “You who were with me in the ships at Mylae!
    “That corpse you planted last year in your garden,
    “Has it begun to sprout? Will it bloom this year?
    “Or has the sudden frost disturbed its bed?
    “Oh keep the Dog far hence, that’s friend to men,
    “Or with his nails he’ll dig it up again!
    “You! hypocrite lecteur!—mon semblable—mon frère!”

    II. A Game of Chess

    The Chair she sat in, like a burnished throne,
    Glowed on the marble, where the glass
    Held up by standards wrought with fruited vines
    From which a golden Cupidon peeped out
    (Another hid his eyes behind his wing)
    Doubled the flames of seven branched candelabra
    Reflecting light upon the table as
    The glitter of her jewels rose to meet it,
    From satin cases poured in rich profusion;
    In vials of ivory and coloured glass
    Unstoppered, lurked her strange synthetic perfumes,
    Unguent, powdered, or liquid—troubled, confused
    And drowned the sense in odours; stirred by the air
    That freshened from the window, these ascended
    In fattening the prolonged candle-flames,
    Flung their smoke into the laquearia,
    Stirring the pattern on the coffered ceiling.
    Huge sea-wood-fed with copper
    Burned green and orange, framed by the coloured stone,
    In which sad light a carvèd dolphin swam.
    Above the antique mantel was displayed.
    As though a window gave upon the sylvan scene
    The change of Philomel, by the barbarous king
    So rudely forced; yet there the nightingale
    Filled all the desert with inviolable voice
    And still she cried, and still the world pursues,
    “Jug Jug” to dirty ears.
    And other withered stumps of time
    Were told upon the walls; staring forms
    Leaned out, leaning, hushing the room enclosed.
    Footsteps shuffled on the stair.
    Under the firelight, under the brush, her hair
    Spread out in fiery points
    Clawed into words, then would be savagely still.

    “My nerves are bad to-night. Yes, bad. Stay with me.
    “Speak to me. Why do you never speak. Speak.
    “What are you thinking of? What thinking? What?
    “I never know what you are thinking. Think.”

    I think we are in rats’ alley
    Where the dead men lost their bones.

    “What is that noise?”
    The wind under the door.
    “What is that noise now? What is the wind doing?”
    Nothing again nothing.
    “Do
    “You know nothing? Do you see nothing? Do you remember
    “Nothing?”

    I remember
    Those are pearls that were his eyes.
    “Are you alive, or not? Is there nothing in your head?”
    But

    O O O O that Shakespearean Rag—
    It’s so elegant
    So intelligent
    “What shall I do now? What shall I do?”
    “I shall rush out as I am, and walk the street
    “With my hair down, so. What shall we do to-morrow?
    “What shall we ever do?”
    The hot water at ten.
    And if it rains, a closed car at four.
    And we shall play a game of chess,
    Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door.

    When Lil’s husband got demobbed, I said—
    I didn’t mince my words, I said to her myself,
    HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME
    Now Albert’s coming back, make yourself a bit smart.
    He’ll want to know what you done with that money he gave you
    To get yourself some teeth. He did, I was there.
    You have them all out, Lil, and get a nice set,
    He said, I swear, I can’t bear to look at you.
    And no more can’t I, I said, and think of poor Albert,
    He’s been in the army four years, he wants a good time,
    And if you don’t give it him, there’s others will, I said.
    Oh is there, she said. Something o’ that, I said.
    Then I’ll know who to thank, she said, and give me a straight look.
    HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME
    If you don’t like it you can get on with it, I said,
    Others can pick and choose if you can’t.
    But if Albert makes off, it won’t be for lack of telling.
    You ought to be ashamed, I said, to look so antique.
    (And her only thirty-one.)
    I can’t help it, she said, pulling a long face,
    It’s them pills I took, to bring it off, she said.
    (She’s had five already, and nearly died of young George.)
    The chemist said it would be alright, but I’ve never been the same.
    You are a proper fool, I said.
    Well, if Albert won’t leave you alone, there it is, I said,
    What you get married for if you don’t want children?
    HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME
    Well, that Sunday Albert was home, they had a hot gammon,
    And they asked me in to dinner, to get the beauty of it hot—
    HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME
    HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME
    Goodnight Bill. Goodnight Lou. Goodnight May. Goodnight.
    Ta ta. Goodnight. Goodnight.
    Good night, ladies, good night, sweet ladies, good night, good night.

    III. The Fire Sermon
    The river’s tent is broken: the last fingers of leaf
    Clutch and sink into the wet bank. The wind
    Crosses the brown land, unheard. The nymphs are departed.
    Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song.
    The river bears no empty bottles, sandwich papers,
    Silk handkerchiefs, cardboard boxes, cigarette ends
    Or other testimony of summer nights. The nymphs are departed.
    And their friends, the loitering heirs of city directors;
    Departed, have left no addresses.
    By the waters of Leman I sat down and wept. . .
    Sweet Thames, run softly till I end my song,
    Sweet Thames, run softly, for I speak not loud or long.
    But at my back in a cold blast I hear
    The rattle of the bones, and chuckle spread from ear to ear.
    A rat crept softly through the vegetation
    Dragging its slimy belly on the bank
    While I was fishing in the dull canal
    On a winter evening round behind the gashouse
    Musing upon the king my brother’s wreck
    And on the king my father’s death before him.
    White bodies naked on the low damp ground
    And bones cast in a little low dry garret,
    Rattled by the rat’s foot only, year to year.
    But at my back from time to time I hear
    The sound of horns and motors, which shall bring
    Sweeney to Mrs. Porter in the spring.
    O the moon shone bright on Mrs. Porter
    And on her daughter
    They wash their feet in soda water
    Et O ces voix d’enfants, chantant dans la coupole!

    Twit twit twit
    Jug jug jug jug jug jug
    So rudely forc’d.
    Tereu

    Unreal City
    Under the brown fog of a winter noon
    Mr. Eugenides, the Smyrna merchant
    Unshaven, with a pocket full of currants
    C.i.f. London: documents at sight,
    Asked me in demotic French
    To luncheon at the Cannon Street Hotel
    Followed by a weekend at the Metropole.

    At the violet hour, when the eyes and back
    Turn upward from the desk, when the human engine waits
    Like a taxi throbbing waiting,
    I Tiresias, though blind, throbbing between two lives,
    Old man with wrinkled female breasts, can see
    At the violet hour, the evening hour that strives
    Homeward, and brings the sailor home from sea,
    The typist home at teatime, clears her breakfast, lights
    Her stove, and lays out food in tins.
    Out of the window perilously spread
    Her drying combinations touched by the sun’s last rays,
    On the divan are piled (at night her bed)
    Stockings, slippers, camisoles, and stays.
    I Tiresias, old man with wrinkled dugs
    Perceived the scene, and foretold the rest—
    I too awaited the expected guest.
    He, the young man carbuncular, arrives,
    A small house agent’s clerk, with one bold stare,
    One of the low on whom assurance sits
    As a silk hat on a Bradford millionaire,
    The time is now propitious, as he guesses,
    The meal is ended, she is bored and tired,
    Endeavours to engage her in caresses
    Which still are unreproved, if undesired.
    Flushed and decided, he assaults at once;
    Exploring hands encounter no defence;
    His vanity requires no response,
    And makes a welcome of indifference.
    (And I Tiresias have foresuffered all
    Enacted on this same divan or bed;
    I who have sat by Thebes below the wall
    And walked among the lowest of the dead.)
    Bestows one final patronising kiss,
    And gropes his way, finding the stairs unlit. . .

    She turns and looks a moment in the glass,
    Hardly aware of her departed lover;
    Her brain allows one half-formed thought to pass:
    “Well now that’s done: and I’m glad it’s over.”
    When lovely woman stoops to folly and
    Paces about her room again, alone,
    She smoothes her hair with automatic hand,
    And puts a record on the gramophone.

    “This music crept by me upon the waters”
    And along the Strand, up Queen Victoria Street.
    O City city, I can sometimes hear
    Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street,
    The pleasant whining of a mandoline
    And a clatter and a chatter from within
    Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the walls
    Of Magnus Martyr hold
    Inexplicable splendour of Ionian white and gold.

    The river sweats
    Oil and tar
    The barges drift
    With the turning tide
    Red sails
    Wide
    To leeward, swing on the heavy spar.
    The barges wash
    Drifting logs
    Down Greenwich reach
    Past the Isle of Dogs,
    Weialala leia
    Wallala leialala

    Elizabeth and Leicester
    Beating oars
    The stern was formed
    A gilded shell
    Red and gold
    The brisk swell
    Rippled both shores
    Southwest wind
    Carried down stream
    The peal of bells
    White towers
    Weialala leia
    Wallala leialala

    “Trams and dusty trees.
    Highbury bore me. “Richmond and Kew
    Undid me. By Richmond I raised my knees
    Supine on the floor of a narrow canoe.”

    “My feet are at Moorgate, and my heart
    Under my feet. After the event
    He wept. He promised ‘a new start.’
    I made no comment. What should I resent?”

    “On Margate Sands.
    I can connect
    Nothing with nothing.
    The broken fingernails of dirty hands.
    My people humble people who expect
    Nothing.”
    la la

    To Carthage then I came

    Burning burning burning burning
    O Lord Thou pluckest me out
    O Lord Thou pluckest

    burning

    IV. Death by Water

    Phlebas the Phoenician, a fortnight dead,
    Forgot the cry of gulls, and the deep sea swell
    And the profit and loss.
    A current under sea
    Picked his bones in whispers. As he rose and fell
    He passed the stages of his age and youth
    Entering the whirlpool.
    Gentile or Jew
    O you who turn the wheel and look to windward,
    Consider Phlebas, who was once handsome and tall as you.

    V. What the Thunder Said

    After the torchlight red on sweaty faces
    After the frosty silence in the gardens
    After the agony in stony places
    The shouting and the crying
    Prison and palace and reverberation
    Of thunder of spring over distant mountains
    He who was living is now dead
    We who were living are now dying
    With a little patience

    Here is no water but only rock
    Rock and no water and the sandy road
    The road winding above among the mountains
    Which are mountains of rock without water
    If there were water we should stop and drink
    Amongst the rock one cannot stop or think
    Sweat is dry and feet are in the sand
    If there were only water amongst the rock
    Dead mountain mouth of carious teeth that cannot spit
    Here one can neither stand nor lie nor sit
    There is not even silence in the mountains
    But dry sterile thunder without rain
    There is not even solitude in the mountains
    But red sullen faces sneer and snarl
    From doors of mudcracked houses
    If there were water
    And no rock
    If there were rock
    And also water
    And water
    A spring
    A pool among the rock
    If there were the sound of water only
    Not the cicada
    And dry grass singing
    But sound of water over a rock
    Where the hermit-thrush sings in the pine trees
    Drip drop drip drop drop drop drop
    But there is no water

    Who is the third who walks always beside you?
    When I count, there are only you and I together
    But when I look ahead up the white road
    There is always another one walking beside you
    Gliding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded
    I do not know whether a man or a woman
    —But who is that on the other side of you?

    What is that sound high in the air
    Murmur of maternal lamentation
    Who are those hooded hordes swarming
    Over endless plains, stumbling in cracked earth
    Ringed by the flat horizon only
    What is the city over the mountains
    Cracks and reforms and bursts in the violet air
    Falling towers Jerusalem Athens Alexandria
    Vienna London
    Unreal

    A woman drew her long black hair out tight
    And fiddled whisper music on those strings
    And bats with baby faces in the violet light
    Whistled, and beat their wings
    And crawled head downward down a blackened wall
    And upside down in air were towers
    Tolling reminiscent bells, that kept the hours
    And voices singing out of empty cisterns and exhausted wells.

    In this decayed hole among the mountains
    In the faint moonlight, the grass is singing
    Over the tumbled graves, about the chapel
    There is the empty chapel, only the wind’s home
    It has no windows, and the door swings,
    Dry bones can harm no one.
    Only a cock stood on the rooftree
    Co co rico co co rico
    In a flash of lightning. Then a damp gust
    Bringing rain

    Ganga was sunken, and the limp leaves
    Waited for rain, while the black clouds
    Gathered far distant, over Himavant.
    The jungle crouched, humped in silence,
    Then spoke the thunder
    DA
    Datta: what have we given?
    My friend, blood shaking my heart
    The awful daring of a moment’s surrender
    Which an age of prudence can never retract
    By this, and this only, we have existed
    Which is not to be found in our obituaries
    Or in memories draped by the beneficent spider
    Or under seals broken by the lean solicitor
    In our empty rooms
    DA
    Dayadhvam: I have heard the key
    Turn in the door once and turn once only
    We think of the key, each in his prison
    Thinking of the key, each confirms a prison
    Only at nightfall, aethereal rumours
    Revive for a moment a broken Coriolanus
    DA
    Damyata: The boat responded
    Gaily, to the hand expert with sail and oar
    The sea was calm, your heart would have responded
    Gaily, when invited, beating obedient
    To controlling hands

    I sat upon the shore
    Fishing, with the arid plain behind me
    Shall I at least set my lands in order?
    London Bridge is falling down falling down falling down
    Poi s’ascose nel foco che gli affina
    Quando fiam uti chelidon—O swallow swallow
    Le Prince d’Aquitaine à la tour abolie
    These fragments I have shored against my ruins
    Why then Ile fit you. Hieronymo’s mad againe.
    Datta. Dayadhvam. Damyata.
    Shantih shantih shantih”

    Good night France. Good night Europe. Good night the west.

  42. Notafan

    Cassie

    France is not quite dead to faith. There is a small but strong beating heart

    I’ve been to mass in the crypt of Saint Martin of Tours, in the chapel in Nevers where St Bernadette of Lourdes body lies.

    Overflowing with worshippers.

    Prayed the rosary with the people of Bayonne and with hundreds of pilgrims in Lourdes

    The monastery at Mont Saint Michel has been reopened with new vocations. Ash Wednesday mass there was a joy, I’d lost track of days and hadn’t realised.

    It is not over, I don’t think it ever will be.

  43. Notafan

    MV says we can’t vote for Liu.

    I think I can

  44. areff

    In proclaiming the young Josh F. gorgeous, Calli demonstrates yet again the unknowable subjectivity of the female mind.

    Gorgeous? I just don’t get it. He looks nothing like me.

  45. calli

    Looking at the ruin that was once Notre Dame de Paris, and reading the comments here, I couldn’t help but think of what the Lord said to Ezekiel all those years ago.

    I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.

    This is my hope for France.

  46. Cassie of Sydney

    I wrote last week of T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land…..I think that no other poem better encapsulates the the collapse of the west, the shallow, sodomised, corrupt, venal, greedy society we have become…..I think that T. S. Eliot had the gift of prophesy.

    Here is some of the poem….

    I. The Burial of the Dead

    April is the cruellest month, breeding
    Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
    Memory and desire, stirring
    Dull roots with spring rain.
    Winter kept us warm, covering
    Earth in forgetful snow, feeding
    A little life with dried tubers.
    Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee
    With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade,
    And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten,
    And drank coffee, and talked for an hour.
    Bin gar kine Russin, stamm’ aus Litauen, echt deutsch.
    And when we were children, staying at the archduke’s,
    My cousin’s, he took me out on a sled,
    And I was frightened. He said, Marie,
    Marie, hold on tight. And down we went.
    In the mountains, there you feel free.
    I read, much of the night, and go south in the winter.

    What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow
    Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man,
    You cannot say, or guess, for you know only
    A heap of broken images, where the sun beats,
    And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief,
    And the dry stone no sound of water. Only
    There is shadow under this red rock,
    (Come in under the shadow of this red rock),
    And I will show you something different from either
    Your shadow at morning striding behind you
    Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
    I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
    Frisch weht der Wind
    Der Heimat zu,
    Mein Irisch Kind,
    Wo weilest du?
    “You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    “They called me the hyacinth girl.”
    –Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.
    Oed’ und leer das Meer.

    Madame Sosostris, famous clairvoyante,
    Had a bad cold, nevertheless
    Is known to be the wisest woman in Europe,
    With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she,
    Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor,
    (Those are pearls that were his eyes. Look!)
    Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks,
    The lady of situations.
    Here is the man with three staves, and here the Wheel,
    And here is the one-eyed merchant, and this card
    Which is blank, is something he carries on his back,
    Which I am forbidden to see. I do not find
    The Hanged Man. Fear death by water.
    I see crowds of people, walking round in a ring.
    Thank you. If you see dear Mrs. Equitone,
    Tell her I bring the horoscope myself:
    One must be so careful these days.”

    The souls are gone from Europe……good night France, good night Europe, good night the west.

  47. Cassie of Sydney

    Who needs the Stasi when you’ve got the ABC….funded by us.

  48. Elle

    After 30 years of listening to 2UE then 2GB I’ve changed channels. Get up early, go to the gym, feel fab, then listen to nothing but depressing politics by opinionated egomaniacs – the fab feeling gone. Stressed and depressed before I get to work. Over it. Tried the ABC – worse. Tried morning tele – vomit inducing. Tried FM radio. Nup. Finally found a station that is all about sport – nothing but sport – Mcquarie sports radio. Mark Levy and Mark Riddell in the morning (on a break at the moment) are an absolute hoot. Still get the news on the hour. They cover all sport local and around the world. Learning a lot. A much calmer start to the day. 🙂

  49. calli

    Lol. It’s that dark, curly mop of hair that does it to me every time.

    I have to pull out old photos of the Beloved to refresh my memory occasionally. Naturally, I look exactly as I did at 19. In my imagination.

  50. OldOzzie

    Free blood tests: Labor raises health pressure

    Simon Benson
    NATIONAL AFFAIRS EDITOR


    Bill Shorten will promise to fund $200 million worth of free blood tests for cancer patients and older Australians as he moves to ­reignite the bitter clash over pathology bulk billing that erupted during the 2016 Labor Medicare scare campaign.

    As Labor strives to make health a hot-button issue for voters, the Opposition Leader will today confirm an extension to his signature $2.3 billion cancer care package after being forced to deny it was underfunded by $5.8bn.

    It will be Labor’s fifth health announcement since the election was called last Thursday.

    Labor will promise to guarantee the three million free pathology tests a year needed by cancer ­patients. The package will also fund 20 million pathology tests used by older Australians each year. Larger pathology businesses have warned they need more taxpayer funds to ensure bulk billing is maintained for blood tests.

    Scott Morrison yesterday ­accused Mr Shorten of being ­incapable of managing money after questions over the costings of Labor’s cancer care package.

    Mr Shorten rejected the claims and will today double down on the policy by announcing its ­expansion.

    Returning to the battleground that almost cost Malcolm Turnbull the 2016 election, Mr Shorten will also revive Labor’s discredited scare campaign over Medicare by accusing the Coalition of presiding over “savage cuts”.

    A senior Labor source said last night the ALP was succeeding in dragging the Coalition into its preferred territory of health, hospitals and Medicare.

    Labor also promised yesterday to increase to 50 per cent the ­commonwealth’s share of funding to the states for public hospitals, a commitment worth $2.8bn.

    But it conceded to Sky News that the 50 per cent target would not be achieved until the end of the next hospital funding deal which runs from 2020 to 2025.

    During the 2016 election campaign, the Coalition was forced into a hasty retreat after Labor sided with large pathology labs, ­including those run by multi­national healthcare providers, to oppose the removal of $650m in bulk-billing incentives.

    Mr Shorten was accused of ­siding with the multinational companies after it was revealed pathology giant Sonic Healthcare had donated to the Labor election campaign.

    The government ditched the bulk-billing plan and, in the 2017 budget, pledged more funds to keep the incentive payments in order to retain high levels of bulk billing on pathology services.

    “A Shorten Labor government will ensure vital blood tests are protected from Scott Morrison’s health cuts — investing $200m to keep pathology tests free for older Australians and Australians with cancer,” Mr Shorten will say today.

    “Blood tests are the frontline of treatment for cancer and serious diseases. They are critical not only for diagnosis, but to track whether a treatment is working or not.

    “Bulk billing for blood tests is at breaking point — cancer patients will either have to pay, or there will be a reduction in services.”

    Labor health spokeswoman Catherine King yesterday accused Health Minister Greg Hunt, who was campaigning at a cancer ­research centre in Melbourne, of a “desperate attempt to discredit our plan”.

    Health Department analysis of cancer-related Medicare items suggests that if Labor promised to fund all existing cancer care ­including diagnostic, consultation and treatment over the next four years, it would end up $5.8bn short. Ms King said she had ­written to Health Department secretary Glenys Beauchamp who confirmed the department had not costed Labor’s policy, despite having provided analysis to the minister’s office based on what Labor had suggested its policy would be.

    And The Comments Point out the Bleeding Obvious

    – Ray
    2 minutes ago
    Simon as an award winning journalist have you actually researched what Shorten is saying rather than just repeating his words.

    I have constant blood tests due to cancer and have never paid for them.
    What does it take to call out Labor lies by the media.

    What I can glean from the article is a threat by Big Pathology for a need to increase the cost of these tests. More Mediscare.

    – Calvin
    6 minutes ago
    A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on. Winston Churchill

    – TrustMe
    8 minutes ago
    What rubbish.
    Blood tests for cancer are already free and readily available at any time.

  51. struth

    The homophobia definition is the fear, hatred, discomfort with, or mistrust of people who are lesbian, gay, or bisexual.

    A fairly broad group of feelings encompassed by “homophobia”

    Is it homophobia to just be bored shitless talking about pillow biters?

    Fuck ’em……………………..so to speak.

  52. struth

    Do I have to like all gays ?
    Do gays like all gays?

    And who gives a fried fritter?

  53. Dr Faustus

    There is no place in modern Australia for a closed ethnic community, that is critical of SSM, fails to embrace gender diversity, and tends to vote for the Liberal Party.

    LG&TBI: love it, or leave.

  54. calli

    I’ve never paid for a blood test yet.

    Shorter Shorten – a lying liar who lies

  55. Zatara

    Elle

    Sometimes a few more choice can help.

    I like a site called Radio Garden. You can tune in to stations around the world and find all sorts of interesting stuff.

  56. OldOzzie

    Rugby throwing devout Christian Israel Folau to the lions

    ALAN JONES – 12:00AM April 16, 2019

    The so-called Israel Folau affair, if we dismantle the humbug, can be summed up quite simply.

    If the young man is not free to state his religious views, let alone Christian views, then we are all in trouble.

    It would be helpful if people analysed what he said before condemning him to rugby oblivion.

    He issued a warning to “drunks, homosexuals, adulterers, liars, fornicators, thieves, atheists, idolaters, hell awaits you, repent, only Jesus saves”.

    “Jesus Christ loves you and has given you time to turn away from your sin and come to him.”

    For this he faces, it appears, the termination of his playing career.

    Of course, the fools who run Australian Rugby, and I use the word advisedly, because on so many other fronts, they have proven their foolishness — are preaching breach of contract while at the same time demonstrably being in breach of their own procedures.

    Before proclaiming Folau’s guilt, one would have thought he is entitled to the deliberation of a tribunal. And perhaps, just perhaps, Israel might be given a chance to defend himself.

    No, none of that. We have read that his contract is to be ripped up and he will never play again.

    And in an edict reminiscent of a Romanian or Soviet dictator, he has been banned from joining his teammates in training and is not welcome at team functions.

    As former federal MP Wilson Tuckey wrote at the weekend, “In the days of the Roman Empire, to stand up in public to espouse your Christianity was most likely to result in a trip to the Colosseum for a brief meeting with a couple of hungry lions for the entertainment of the masses. The Israel Folau case indicates that little has changed in today’s ‘progressive empire’.’’

    Those arguing for the prosecution of the young man preach about terms of his contract and the “values of the game”. If the “values” of the game involve censorship or, what’s worse, termination for articulating Christian values that are as old as Christianity itself, then it is Rugby Australia that needs to change not Folau.

    Of course, Rugby Australia wants to parade as guardians of morality yet this has got nothing to do with morality and everything to do with money.

    Qantas presumably has threatened to pull its sponsorship. It has played this game before. The Qantas CEO Alan Joyce has tried this on in the past.

    He is entitled to his view even though, apparently, Israel is not. But surely he cannot appropriate his view to the whole Qantas family. Alan Joyce apparently does not agree with Israel, but there are thousands in the Qantas family who do not agree with Alan Joyce.

    Israel Folau is from a devoutly religious Polynesian family. He has not sought to impose his views on anybody. He has merely repeated, as one correspondent wrote at the weekend, “what his religion has held for thousands of years. Whether you choose to believe it is up to you. And if you don’t, then probably you don’t believe in hell either. I suspect that had Folau been a Muslim stating exactly the same religious beliefs that, in the unlikely event he was dismissed, it would have led to calls of Islamophobia”.

    We have come to the turning point in a long road.

    This has been going on for too long and the whingers, the whiners and the self-appointed victims have tried to shut people up on a variety of fronts.

    They have not succeeded in shutting up Israel Folau so the demand is for punishment, banishment and termination.

    It’s interesting that the drunks and the liars and the thieves and the fornicators and the atheists are not complaining. Those who are, are the ones who expect tolerance towards themselves and their views but won’t extend that tolerance to others.

    And let’s face it. People who differ in their views from Israel Folau, and there are many, have the same opportunity as he has to put their views on social media; and are free to criticise him. But they don’t want that. ­Minorities know that in today’s world you can shut anyone up if you complain and whinge loudly enough.

    Here is a young man, a dedicated Christian expressing a legitimate view based on biblical teaching and he has been made a pariah.

    Put simply, Christians around the world are under siege. It appears that sanctions of the most draconian kind are now being imposed on Christians here who dare to proclaim their faith.

    It is interesting to note that ­Israel’s post was “liked” by several of his teammates.

    Consistency has never been the long suit of the discredited ­administrators of Australian rugby. But if they are to be consistent here, they surely must sack his teammates.

    But there are a lot of Pacific ­island players around the world, also deeply religious, who support Israel Folau.

    Is not Qantas in partnership with a national airline whose government imposes laws infinitely more damaging to homosexuals than Israel’s utterance of his biblical beliefs?

    But without the Qantas money, I hear it argued, rugby goes broke and Israel has destroyed the game.

    This is fanciful nonsense.

    Rugby Australia has proven unable to adequately manage the game and its finances to such an extent that it now has to go cap in hand to Qantas and, shamefully, do its bidding.

    What is the old saying? We’ll jump, just tell us how high.

    Interestingly, the federal government recently appointed an eminent former High Court judge, Robert French, to investigate the denial of free speech in universities.

    Among other things, French argued that the perception of a free speech crisis is enough to create a chilling effect on the flow of ideas.

    In a 300-page report, the former High Court chief justice recommends that universities adopt a model code that states that staff and students have a right to enjoy freedom of speech.

    Rugby Australia should adopt a similar model code and be done with the hypocrites who demand tolerance and approval which they won’t extend to others.

    Not for the first time, Israel Folau has shown a rare degree of moral courage.

    It is in this, even beyond his rugby skills, that the example lies for young people who have been his supporters. Rugby has joined a battle in the minds of the vast ­majority of the rugby public that it cannot win.

  57. Farmer Gez

    The first port of call in cancer treatment is diagnosis and that usually starts with a GP.
    There are 850 unfilled places for doctors in regional Australia.

  58. stackja

    Dr Faustus
    #2988996, posted on April 16, 2019 at 7:57 am
    There is no place in modern Australia for a closed ethnic community, that is critical of SSM, fails to embrace gender diversity, and tends to vote for the Liberal Party.

    LG&TBI: love it, or leave.

    ‘Winston loved Big Brother’

  59. OldOzzie

    Rugby throwing devout Christian Israel Folau to the lions

    ALAN JONES – 12:00AM April 16, 2019

    The so-called Israel Folau affair, if we dismantle the humbug, can be summed up quite simply.

    If the young man is not free to state his religious views, let alone Christian views, then we are all in trouble.

    It would be helpful if people analysed what he said before condemning him to rugby oblivion.

    He issued a warning to “drunks, h#mosexuals, adulterers, liars, fornicators, thieves, atheists, idolaters, hell awaits you, repent, only Jesus saves”.

    “Jesus Christ loves you and has given you time to turn away from your sin and come to him.”

    For this he faces, it appears, the termination of his playing career.

    Of course, the fools who run Australian Rugby, and I use the word advisedly, because on so many other fronts, they have proven their foolishness — are preaching breach of contract while at the same time demonstrably being in breach of their own procedures.

    Before proclaiming Folau’s guilt, one would have thought he is entitled to the deliberation of a tribunal. And perhaps, just perhaps, Israel might be given a chance to defend himself.

    No, none of that. We have read that his contract is to be ripped up and he will never play again.

    And in an edict reminiscent of a Romanian or Soviet dictator, he has been banned from joining his teammates in training and is not welcome at team functions.

    As former federal MP Wilson Tuckey wrote at the weekend, “In the days of the Roman Empire, to stand up in public to espouse your Christianity was most likely to result in a trip to the Colosseum for a brief meeting with a couple of hungry lions for the entertainment of the masses. The Israel Folau case indicates that little has changed in today’s ‘progressive empire’.’’

    Those arguing for the prosecution of the young man preach about terms of his contract and the “values of the game”. If the “values” of the game involve censorship or, what’s worse, termination for articulating Christian values that are as old as Christianity itself, then it is Rugby Australia that needs to change not Folau.

    Of course, Rugby Australia wants to parade as guardians of morality yet this has got nothing to do with morality and everything to do with money.

    Qantas presumably has threatened to pull its sponsorship. It has played this game before. The Qantas CEO Alan Joyce has tried this on in the past.

    He is entitled to his view even though, apparently, Israel is not. But surely he cannot appropriate his view to the whole Qantas family. Alan Joyce apparently does not agree with Israel, but there are thousands in the Qantas family who do not agree with Alan Joyce.

    Israel Folau is from a devoutly religious Polynesian family. He has not sought to impose his views on anybody. He has merely repeated, as one correspondent wrote at the weekend, “what his religion has held for thousands of years. Whether you choose to believe it is up to you. And if you don’t, then probably you don’t believe in hell either. I suspect that had Folau been a Muslim stating exactly the same religious beliefs that, in the unlikely event he was dismissed, it would have led to calls of Islam#phobia”.

    We have come to the turning point in a long road.

    This has been going on for too long and the whingers, the whiners and the self-appointed victims have tried to shut people up on a variety of fronts.

    They have not succeeded in shutting up Israel Folau so the demand is for punishment, banishment and termination.

    It’s interesting that the drunks and the liars and the thieves and the f#rnicators and the atheists are not complaining. Those who are, are the ones who expect tolerance towards themselves and their views but won’t extend that tolerance to others.

    And let’s face it. People who differ in their views from Israel Folau, and there are many, have the same opportunity as he has to put their views on social media; and are free to criticise him. But they don’t want that. ­Minorities know that in today’s world you can shut anyone up if you complain and whinge loudly enough.

    Here is a young man, a dedicated Christian expressing a legitimate view based on biblical teaching and he has been made a pariah.

    Put simply, Christians around the world are under siege. It appears that sanctions of the most draconian kind are now being imposed on Christians here who dare to proclaim their faith.

    It is interesting to note that ­Israel’s post was “liked” by several of his teammates.

    Consistency has never been the long suit of the discredited ­administrators of Australian rugby. But if they are to be consistent here, they surely must sack his teammates.

    But there are a lot of Pacific ­island players around the world, also deeply religious, who support Israel Folau.

    Is not Qantas in partnership with a national airline whose government imposes laws infinitely more damaging to h#mosexuals than Israel’s utterance of his biblical beliefs?

    But without the Qantas money, I hear it argued, rugby goes broke and Israel has destroyed the game.

    This is fanciful nonsense.

    Rugby Australia has proven unable to adequately manage the game and its finances to such an extent that it now has to go cap in hand to Qantas and, shamefully, do its bidding.

    What is the old saying? We’ll jump, just tell us how high.

    Interestingly, the federal government recently appointed an eminent former High Court judge, Robert French, to investigate the denial of free speech in universities.

    Among other things, French argued that the perception of a free speech crisis is enough to create a chilling effect on the flow of ideas.

    In a 300-page report, the former High Court chief justice recommends that universities adopt a model code that states that staff and students have a right to enjoy freedom of speech.

    Rugby Australia should adopt a similar model code and be done with the hypocrites who demand tolerance and approval which they won’t extend to others.

    Not for the first time, Israel Folau has shown a rare degree of moral courage.

    It is in this, even beyond his rugby skills, that the example lies for young people who have been his supporters. Rugby has joined a battle in the minds of the vast ­majority of the rugby public that it cannot win.

  60. Mater

    I’ve never paid for a blood test yet.

    Me either. It’s a policy strawman.
    The upside is that this is probably the only Labor election promise which won’t have a negative impact on current expenditure.

  61. C.L.

    Paris was gone long before the collapse of Notre Dame cathedral. A metaphor of the collapse of Western Civilisation eroded from within.

    My sentiments exactly. Macron says it is part of “us” (meaning the French).
    But Notre Dame is simply an edifice. The faith is what should be part of them but they burned down that living culture a long time ago.

  62. OldOzzie

    Kim Carr’s ‘electric mythology’ line defies party goal

    Ben Packham
    Political Reporter

    Kim Carr, Bill Shorten’s industry spokesman, last year warned that electric vehicles posed serious ­social ­issues and would require a one-third expansion in electricity ­production.

    Senator Carr, who has a long history of supporting the domestic auto industry dominated by traditional carmakers Ford, Holden and Toyota, urged a Senate committee to consider “the reality versus the mythology” of electric vehicles, just six months before standing alongside Mr Shorten to launch Labor’s signature electric car policy.

    The left-wing powerbroker has also strongly argued against “pumping up the tyres” of imported electric vehicles, batting away calls from the Electric Vehicle Council last year for up to $7000 worth of subsidies for every EV sold.

    Senator Carr, who will head Labor’s electric vehicle-led bid to rejuvenate Australia’s car industry, last year expressed scepticism over the suitability of the cars outside major cities, and questioned whether they could be used as “batteries on wheels” — as claimed by advocates — to manage peaks in energy use.

    The Victorian senator told the Senate’s electric vehicle inquiry, chaired by independent senator Tim Storer, that the high cost of electric vehicles would put them beyond everyday drivers. “The electrification issue does pose really serious social (issues). There’s an in-built demographic question there about people who can afford the Tesla, versus some of these smaller vehicles,” he told the committee last September.

    “And if you’re away from a ­regional centre of any size then the capacity to actually use these vehicles is somewhat limited. So I think that needs to be clear when we’re talking about the reality versus the mythology.”

    Senator Carr tackled the head of the Fast Cities consortium during the inquiry, questioning his suggestion that electric vehicles would stabilise the energy network without the need for a one-third expansion in energy output. “What evidence do you have for this?” he asked Fast Cities head of corporate development Paul Fox. “No one else is telling us that this is going to be able to be done without an expansion in the capacity of the grid.”

    Senator Carr said more batteries were “not the answer to our ­energy problems”, declaring: “If you put a one-third increase in ­demand on the energy system, we’re going to actually need to ­increase our generation capacity.”

    He said yesterday he stood by his comments, arguing regulatory changes were needed before electric car batteries could be used to feed back energy into the grid to ensure car warranties were not voided. “We have to change the regulations, we have to change the building codes,” he said. “This is one of the theories that is constantly put forward, but it needs to be put into context with the regulatory changes that are required.”

    He said the government had offered “no policy direction” on the introduction of electric vehicles, which Labor wants to increase to 50 per cent of new vehicles sold by 2030. The government estimates they will make up 25 per cent to ­­50 per cent of new car sales by 2030.

    Labor plans to offer assistance to electric vehicle carmakers in Australia through its proposed $1 billion advanced manufacturing fund. “I would like to see us make electric cars in Australia because Australians are top-class manufacturers when you have a government who supports them,” Mr Shorten said last week.

    Senator Carr’s comments came as a photograph emerged on social media of Josh Frydenberg’s ­election campaign vehicle, a plug-in hybrid Mitsubishi Outlander.

    The Treasurer is a big supporter of rechargeable cars, declaring last year there would be a million on Australian roads, up from about 8500, by 2030.

    The Senate’s electric vehicle inquiry found electric vehicle uptake in Australia lagged behind comparable countries due to “a relative absence of overarching policy direction” from the government.

    “In the committee’s view, widespread use of EVs in the Australian transportation fleet would deliver significant economic, environmental and health benefits to Australian consumers and society,” the inquiry found.

    “It would also create new opportunities for Australian industry.”

    Energy Minister Angus Taylor said the Coalition was concerned that Labor’s plan to cut carbon emissions from transport would hit everyday voters.

    From the Comments

    – Thomas
    18 minutes ago

    No doubt some carpetbagger would persuade a Labor government to plunge billions of dollars of taxpayers’ money into subsidising electric car manufacture. It would be a very costly mistake.

    – Glencoe
    29 minutes ago

    The name Electricity Bill has never been more apt.

  63. Spider

    Of course ABC now querying Josh FriedEggBurger about Lui’s alleged homophobic comment.

    This is when you want someone like Trump to comment. I could just imagine the bomb that he’d drop in response.

  64. stackja

    French Rugby unhappy with IF. Notre Dame in flames.

  65. John Constantine

    Easy to believe that Notre Dame was an accident.

    Also easy to believe from the frantic way that lefties on my social media are totally consumed with the need to preach that burning churches are not an excuse to stop believing in global and eternal tyrannical dystopia socialism:

    No matter what happens, the truth will never be allowed to interfere with the narrative.

    Go wash your plastics and put them in your recycle bin. This ritual will sooth you and reduce your anxiety that you aren’t doing enough for socialism.

    Comrades.

  66. Elle

    Thank you, Zatara. Excellent!

  67. C.L.

    Ace is right to call Michael Avenatti a psychopath. This gels with Tucker Carlson’s observation that in all his years of interviewing men in the news, he had never encountered a “darker” or more “menacing” individual. Naturally, the US media loved him and wanted him in the Oval Office.

    Supercut of the media’s fellatio (in which women figure prominently):

  68. OldOzzie

    Labor’s tax reforms are ‘a very grim picture for those trying to run a small business’

    Joe Kelly
    Political Reporter

    Labor’s $17 billion crackdown on trusts has come under attack from business groups and commercial finance brokers who have urged a rethink of the policy and warned the shake-up could punish about 350,000 small to medium enterprises.

    The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, CPA Australia, the Council of Small Business of Australia and Commercial Asset Finance Brokers Association are leading a pushback against Mr Shorten’s attack on trusts, demanding more detail on the overhaul.

    ACCI chief executive James Pearson said one of the key concerns raised with the business lobby was the crackdown on trusts, while COSBOA chief executive Peter Strong warned changes to penalty rates and the scrapping of refundable franking credits sent the wrong message to small businesses.

    Head of external affairs at CPA Australia Paul Drum said there were about 350,000 small business trusts, producing a median gross income of $61,634.

    “When one considers each of the Labor Party’s announced tax policies to date — taxing trust income at 30 per cent regardless of a person’s marginal rate, removing refundable franking credits, quarantining negative gearing, cutting the capital gains tax discount and capping the cost of getting professional advice — it paints a very grim picture for those trying to run a small business or invest,” he said.

    Speaking in the Victorian marginal Liberal-held seat of La Trobe yesterday, Mr Shorten was forced to defend his record on small business, under pressure over his pledge to reverse penalty rate cuts and cap deductions for use of tax professionals at $3000. Labor’s policy would affect the distribution of income from discretionary trusts, with all beneficiaries of a trust over 18 taxed at a minimum rate of 30 per cent — a level that is higher than the 25 per cent tax rate applying to small businesses with a turnover of up to $50 million from 2021-22.

    Mr Pearson said the higher rate of taxation in trusts had triggered concerns that Labor’s policy would have a “distortionary impact” and argued that further consultation was necessary to ensure it did not have “unintended consequences”.

    “Our small business members have expressed concern about the proposed changes to discretionary trusts proposed by Labor,” he said.

    “As Labor acknowledges in its policy statements, small businesses use discretionary trusts for a range of legitimate reasons, such as business succession and asset protection.

    “And the concern is that these legitimate purposes may be negatively impacted by the changes. In particular, family businesses use discretionary trusts to distribute income amongst the family. This reflects the reality that a family business is often a joint effort.”

    According to Australian Taxation Office data, there were 690,553 discretionary trusts in Australia out of a total of 874,874 trusts at the end of June 2017. Mr Drum argued that a small-business owner could pay themselves a salary to step around Labor’s proposed 30 per cent distributions tax, but suggested most would not be able to afford it and that it would tip them into further “complex compliance obligations”.

    “Under Labor’s proposals, where an individual receives income of $61,000 from a small business operated through a trust, they will have to pay $18,300 in income tax compared to $11,372 if they were taxed as a sole trader,” he said.

    He also warned that low-­income beneficiaries in trusts would be hit by other Labor tax policies, including the plan to scrap refundable tax credits on shares, limit negative gearing to new dwellings and halve the capital gains tax discount.

    Mr Drum said the 350,000 small business trusts generated $217bn in economic activity.

    But Labor Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen argued that Labor’s reforms to the taxation of discretionary trusts was targeted at reducing tax minimisation and income splitting. He said the overhaul would not affect 98 per cent of taxpayers.

    “If a sole trader is running a business through a discretionary trust, he can pay himself a wage and avoid the minimum 30 per cent distributions tax rate,” he said.

    “Small businesses can pay wages to employees in the normal way. What Labor’s reforms will do is make it more difficult for family trusts to make distributions to those not engaged in the business, by cracking down on income splitting.

    “Many of these self-classifying discretionary trusts will be not be ‘active’ businesses — rather, many will be doctors, lawyers, surgeons, builders, accountants and investment bankers who are income-splitting income through their trust to beneficiaries.’’

    Mr Strong said the crackdown on trusts was accompanied by Labor plans to reverse penalty rate cuts for workers in retail, fast food, pharmacy and hospital sectors as well as the scrapping of refundable franking credits.

    “It doesn’t send a message to the people who have done the right thing,” he said. “The issue about the trusts from our point of view is that trusts are used by 95 per cent of people for the right reasons. It’s used to protect assets and distribute income.’’

    Mr Shorten yesterday said that Labor was committed to small business, arguing it would support a reduction in the corporate rate to 25 per cent for companies with a turnover of up to $50m and allow businesses to deduct 20 per cent of any new eligible asset worth more than $20,000.

    “We’ve got a lot of good news for small business,” he said. “I get that small business is hearing all sorts of, you know, scary and mad things from the government. But I just want to reassure small business — we’re the equal on tax; we’re better on the deductibility for investment. And when it comes to wages, we get that you have to implement these things in a modest and meaningful way.”

    Commercial Asset Finance Brokers Association president David Gandolfo yesterday warned that Labor’s discretionary trust overhaul amounted to a “massive tax hike”.

    “There would be people in the business who would ultimately fall below the tax threshold or who would be on the lowest tax rate so their total tax rate wouldn’t be 30 per cent,’’ he said. “By taxing them at a headline 30 per cent, you are giving them a massive tax increase … higher than the tax rate that should apply.’’

  69. Nick

    Watching the media’s complicity in bringing the Sharrouf kids ‘home’ is quite interesting, more so in the questions they aren’t asking. It’s strange how having a sex slave or beheading gets brushed, yet perhaps if the kids had tweeted something about gays and Hell, the result would have been outrage.

  70. Tom

    After 30 years of listening to 2UE then 2GB I’ve changed channels. Get up early, go to the gym, feel fab, then listen to nothing but depressing politics by opinionated egomaniacs – the fab feeling gone. Stressed and depressed before I get to work. Over it. Tried the ABC – worse. Tried morning tele – vomit inducing. Tried FM radio. Nup. Finally found a station that is all about sport – nothing but sport – Mcquarie sports radio. Mark Levy and Mark Riddell in the morning (on a break at the moment) are an absolute hoot. Still get the news on the hour. They cover all sport local and around the world. Learning a lot. A much calmer start to the day. 🙂

    Elle, that’s exactly how I escape from politics — sports radio most of the day, with a high-quality dollop of Tucker Carlson of Fox News in the middle (between 10 and 11am).

    Macquarie Sports Radio picked up Ox and Marko (disgracefully sacked by SEN in Melbourne, even though they had one of the station’s best slot ratings — politics of a management takeover), who now do the Drive shift (3pm-7pm) nationally. Ox (David Schwartz) is an ex-AFL ruckman and Marko Allen is an ex-pro golfer, who I did some work with on his golf SEN golf show at the time that I (briefly) covered the US PGA tour. Give them a try. They don’t rate that highly in Sydney, but they’re great fun and they’re not AFL-centric — they do lots of league.

  71. stackja

    Nick
    #2989022, posted on April 16, 2019 at 8:28 am

    MSM hypocrisy. I am shocked!

  72. OldOzzie

    Warringah candidate Zali Steggall attacked publicly by ex-husband David Cameron and his wife

    Jack Houghton, Exclusive, The Daily Telegraph

    Warringah independent candidate Zali Steggall has been the subject of an extraordinary public attack by her ex-husband and his new wife.

    Olympic rowing champion David Cameron and his new partner, high-profile Sydney barrister Bridie Nolan, have lashed out at the former champion skier, accusing her of being “opportunistic” and lacking the “temperament of a leader”.

    The couple took issue with Ms Steggall’s use of the Christchurch massacre to promote her bid to unseat Liberal opponent Tony Abbott.

    n a condolence tweet to the victims of the massacre on March 15 she linked the shooting to hate speech and ended the post with the hashtag “Warringah votes”.

    “Such a stark and horrific reminder of where extreme ideology hate and divisive speech leads. My deepest condolences to the families. #warringahvotes #auspol,” Ms Steggall wrote at the time

    Mr Cameron, whose marriage to Ms Steggall lasted four years and produced two children, called his ex-wife an “idiot” for promoting the election off the back of the tragedy.

    “What sort of opportunistic person puts a promotional hashtag in a tweet intended for the condolences of a grieving nation? Idiot,” he wrote in reply to Ms Steggall’s tweet, which has since been deleted.

    A second tweet from Ms Steggall about the Christchurch shooting later attacked Mr Abbott and his “far right cohort” comparing him unfavourably with NZ PM Jacinda Ardern.

    Ms Nolan, who married Ms Steggall’s ex-husband in 2012, called on her to quit as a candidate, writing: “You are showing you do not have what it takes. Withdraw now before you embarrass your family further. This and your tweet from Friday really are disgraceful.”

    On Monday, Ms Nolan told The Daily Telegraph she was “appalled” at the aspiring politician’s actions.

    “Both my husband and I were appalled that Zali considered it appropriate to tweet in an opportunistic fashion not once, but twice about the Christchurch tragedy, in the manner and tone in which she did. Unfortunately, neither he nor I was surprised. We both know personally how opportunistic Zali is.

    “My children’s family, with whom I am personally very close and connected, all live there. I know well how the tragedy affected that nation. It was not a time for political point scoring, in my view, or condemnation of any kind. I thought it publicly demonstrated Zali’s unsuitability for the nuances of leadership.”

    Ms Nolan, who describes herself as “a devastatingly experienced barrister and arbitrator”, said that Ms Steggall, also a barrister, should not have given reporters interviews after the Lindt Cafe siege in 2014.

    “Our friends and colleagues were among those trapped in the cafe, and one, Katrina Dawson, tragically died,” Ms Nolan said.

    “No one at the Bar spoke about their experience that day, except Zali. We closed ranks out of respect for our colleagues, their families and those affected. It was not the approach taken by Zali.”

    Ms Steggall was quoted at the time as saying it was “horrendous” for victims caught in the “wrong place at the wrong time”.

    Ms Steggall declined to comment to The Daily Telegraph on Monday about Mr Cameron and Ms Nolan’s criticisms of her.

  73. Percy Popinjay

    So basically anybody in the population who voted against same sex marriage (not me) has now basically committed a crime which demands that they lose their job and invalidates them from public office.

    Yes, the giveaway was a “ballot” paper prominently adorned with a barcode. Consequently I binned it, knowing full well it could be used against me in future by a totalitarian government only too happy to be in possession of such irrefutable evidence of wrongthink. For that stinking half baked farce alone, Waffles Turnbuckle should be subjected to a lengthy public flogging immediately prior to being hanged. Slowly.

  74. Dr Faustus

    Bill ‘Popular as Arse Cancer’ Shorten lays out his wares to the international car-makers:

    Labor plans to offer assistance to electric vehicle carmakers in Australia through its proposed $1 billion advanced manufacturing fund. I would like to see us make electric cars in Australia because Australians are top-class manufacturers when you have a government who supports them, Mr Shorten said last week.

    The last time Australia had “a government who supports them” the results were less than stellar:

    …it’s important to note that the unit cost of Australian-made models is four times that of Asia and twice that of Europe, according to Ford Australia’s comparisons with its international manufacturing costs.

    Even with Kim il-Carr on the job once again, it will cost more that the smell of a few multipurpose billions to attract major car makers back to Australia and the waiting arms of the AMWU.

  75. Tel

    Rowe is one creepy bloke.

    He has one joke only … draw people naked and looking awkward. Thing is, that was Pickering’s joke and at least when Pickering drew naked people there was something impish and cheeky about his style.

    Rowe is Pickering on bad acid.

  76. Tom

    [David] Rowe is Pickering on bad acid.

    — Tel

    Liberty quote!

  77. Percy Popinjay

    Imbeciles at the Oz about to cop a very loud blast while being informed that my ten year subscription is being brought a long overdue end.

    foxtel is next, once the current series of GoT ends.

  78. Elle

    Agree, Tom. It’s a brilliant escape from politics. Am learning who the commentators are. Mainly listen in the morning, evening and if I’m home on weekends.
    Ahh, you’re a golfer. You wouldn’t happen to hit the ball around a particular course in Melbourne, with an old journo. The world isn’t that small, is it.

  79. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Labor’s $17 billion crackdown on trusts has come under attack from business groups and commercial finance brokers who have urged a rethink of the policy and warned the shake-up could punish about 350,000 small to medium enterprises.

    that’s a feature not a bug

  80. struth

    “Such a stark and horrific reminder of where extreme ideology hate and divisive blowing up, decapitating, burning alive, and throwing off buildings and running over of infidels leads. My deepest condolences to the families. #warringahvotes #auspol,” Ms Steggall wrote at the time

    Fixed it for her.

    Gutless bitch.
    Describing talking about it as hate speech is called , officially, total and utter surrender, the likes of which has rarely happened in the history of the world.
    But never have women had so much power…………………….
    Most surrendered peoples MAKE UP atrocities, not deny they ever happened to them.

    And in that no way justifies Chistchurch……….it’s a surrender in so much that I should even feel I have to point that out, as it’s the bleeding obvious.

  81. calli

    You have to point it out struth.

    Or they will keep lying until it becomes “true”.

  82. Tom

    Elle, areff and I are good mates, but, despite repeated threats, we haven’t yet managed to play golf together, as I am a country boy down on the Victoriastani coast — we live 100 kms apart.

  83. OldOzzie

    Tom
    #2989040, posted on April 16, 2019 at 8:49 am

    [David] Rowe is Pickering on bad acid.

    — Tel

    Liberty quote!

    Much Like Salvador Dali who having visited his Figueres Museum

    was definitely on something when he did his time series

  84. Dr Faustus

    ‘Frank and Honest’ Shorten does explaining to stupid, slack-jawed small business owners:

    “We’ve got a lot of good news for small business,” he said. “I get that small business is hearing all sorts of, you know, scary and mad things from the government. But I just want to reassure small business — we’re the equal on tax; we’re better on the deductibility for investment. And when it comes to wages, we get that you have to implement these things in a modest and meaningful way.”

    News, Fuckhead: We don’t work 7 days, with our entire family wealth on the line, to earn minimum wage and act as a milch cow for the 1000-year Shortenreich. You can manage the unintended consequences when it turns out that many of us are smarter and better advised than you and won’t simply go gentle into that good night.

  85. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    After 30 years of listening to 2UE then 2GB I’ve changed channels. Get up early, go to the gym, feel fab, then listen to nothing but depressing politics by opinionated egomaniacs – the fab feeling gone. Stressed and depressed before I get to work. Over it. Tried the ABC – worse. Tried morning tele – vomit inducing. Tried FM radio. Nup. Finally found a station that is all about sport – nothing but sport – Mcquarie sports radio. Mark Levy and Mark Riddell in the morning (on a break at the moment) are an absolute hoot. Still get the news on the hour. They cover all sport local and around the world. Learning a lot. A much calmer start to the day. 🙂

    Elle, there’s this you-beaut thing call internet radio. Last I looked there are 1000s of radio stations on it.

  86. Robber Baron

    I’ve just clipped my toe nails. Do I throw them in the garden? Do I put them in the green waste bin? Do I put them in the normal bin?

    Can any greenie/socialist/vegan/totalitarian/Marxist out there help me? So many decisions!

  87. Des Deskperson

    ‘[David] Rowe is Pickering on bad acid.’

    As a comic draughtsman, Rowe is streets ahead of Pickering, who was just an old fifties tabloid style plodder who should have given up when it turned out he couldn’t draw Bob Hawke.

    But as a caricaturist, Rowe is still pretty hit and miss. Look at today’s stuff. Any political cartoonist who has to label his subjects so we know who they are has failed.

  88. John Constantine

    Do what shorten does with his nail clippings, store them in an airtight container for posterity, so they can be worshipped as relics of the man that cured cancer.

    Comrades.

  89. OldOzzie

    calli
    #2989059, posted on April 16, 2019 at 9:08 am

    I like The Persistence of Breakfast

    I like that one too

    An Australian Artist I like who does work in a similar vein

    Cel Pallas-Hones – Cel Artworks – Beatles Series

    although her web site does not show some of her previous Dali Style Paintings like Tempus Fugit

  90. stackja

    vr
    #2989052, posted on April 16, 2019 at 9:02 am
    Here is the twitter account. Notre-Dame Cathedral

    The White Crucifix!

  91. struth

    Friends of mine worked all Saturday night and made 500 bucks loss so they could stick their burger van on council land and feed people and pay the council and other parasites for the privilege.
    When will these young go getters realise they’ve been got?
    About the same time the next generation of go getters start getting screwed.

    You don’t have to fool all the people all the time.
    People don’t live that long.
    Politics 101

    Slavery. We think of whips and torture and being owned.
    Working for your owner’s profit.
    Even in the days of old, slaves had to be fed to keep them making a profit for you.

    Our owners do not house us, feed us, but demand the profits from our labour.
    When we buy our own houses they demand payment.
    When we buy our food, they demand payment.
    When we cloth ourselves, they demand payment.
    And with many businesses they are demanding more than you can now make for them.
    I am sure there would have been many a household slave in Roman times who were on better wickets!

    The private sector are slaves to the tyrannical government and political elites.
    This is not an exaggeration.

  92. Leigh Lowe

    Rowe is one creepy bloke.

    He has one joke only … draw people naked and looking awkward. 

    Correct.
    His obsession with older men wearing bathtowels speaks volumes.
    And the drawing style is totally overwrought for newspaper cartooning.

  93. struth

    I’ve just clipped my toe nails. Do I throw them in the garden? Do I put them in the green waste bin? Do I put them in the normal bin?

    Can any greenie/socialist/vegan/totalitarian/Marxist out there help me? So many decisions!

    They don’t trim theirs, so no good asking them.
    Feed them to your dog.

  94. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    PM ‘mindful’ of IZIS kids

    Scott Morrison says national security “always comes first” as he comes under pressure to allow the children of dead torrorist Khaled Sharrouf into Australia.

    Mr Morrison said he was working behind the scenes to assess the orphans of Australian torrorists who are stuck on refugee camps in warzones in the Middle East.

    ABC’s Four Corners last night followed the plight of Karen Nettleton, the grandmother of Sharrouf’s children, who are without parents in a refugee camp in Syria.

    From the Oz. Australians should care what happens to these brats because?

  95. Elle

    I’ve just clipped my toe nails. Do I throw them in the garden? Do I put them in the green waste bin? Do I put them in the normal bin?

    Do what my ex did – leave them where they land. I use to find them on the coffee table, kitchen bench and in pot plants.

  96. Percy Popinjay

    Oz Subscription Cancelled.

  97. stackja

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2989078, posted on April 16, 2019 at 9:31 am

    Phelps/Burnside could offer to house the ‘urchins’ in luxury somewhere overseas?

  98. OldOzzie

    The Daily Telegraph editorial: Climate remedies target battlers and let the wealthy carry on

    A pattern is emerging. Overwhelmingly, actual and proposed climate remedies tend to target the less well-off while the wealthy carry on without hindrance.

    This is evident in such schemes as solar rebates, where average-income workers cover costs for those with enough spare capital to invest in solar.

    The Tesla electric car company has received enormous taxation grants from a number of governments. Those grants, again, are financed by the taxes paid by ordinary citizens. But few ordinary citizens can buy Teslas, which currently begin in Australia at $105,000 and top out at $250,000.

    Rich inner-city Greens voters adored the Gillard government’s carbon tax, in large part because they could very easily afford to pay it. For average families experiencing financial stress, however, the carbon tax was just another burden.

    And look at Australia’s huge power bills, driven sky-high by government policies favouring wind and solar renewables at the expense of cheaper coal-fired plants. The rich can deal with it. The poor will be lining up again this winter to pick up warm clothing from charities.

    As well, the wealthiest businesses can absorb higher power bills. But what of businesses just getting by, or under pressure from stockholders?

    They won’t be putting on new staff. More likely they will be examining possible relocations overseas.

    And now we have another example of climate change policy favouring those at the top end of the economic table.

    Suppose you are in the market for an entry-level Ford Ranger or Toyota Corolla. Under Labor’s plan to reduce emissions, you could be penalised because those models do not come in below Labor’s aggressive carbon dioxide emissions levels.

    But suppose you have a ton of spare cash and want to blow some of it on an Aston Martin, Rolls-Royce or Maserati. These high-end vehicles, too, fail Labor’s emissions test.

    Yet they are unlikely to attract any penalties due to exclusions for any car companies selling fewer than 2500 vehicles a year in Australia.

    That ruling would basically apply to just about every high-end car manufacturer. So, if you’re cashed-up, you yet again dodge any carbon punishment.

    Too bad if you’re a tradie, however. Or a mum in need of a reliable SUV. Then you pay

  99. Mother Lode

    Free blood tests: Labor raises health pressure

    If only the Libs had the intelligence and the recent track record to point out that they are not actually free, and point out to people they will be subsidising other peoples tests – and the great churning bowels of government administering the paperwork.

    Tell people that Shorten will take your money to bribe you to vote for him. Any takers for being that stupid?

    They won’t, of course. Stumbling to keep up with Labor they will try to pose as the party they gives you less free stuff.

    People will vote for more.

  100. Joanna

    Macquarie Sports Radio picked up Ox and Marko

    I was delighted that Macquarie put them on the drive slot. They’re great fun. Hopefully there is enough money behind MSR to get it through the first few years and allow it to establish itself. It will probably spell the end of SEN but, meh. I wouldn’t mind Mark Fine being given a gig at Macquarie. He’s not to everyones taste, but he is across many sports and isn’t afraid to voice an opinion.

  101. stackja

    Has Rowe ever drawn BS?

  102. John Constantine

    Disturbing, and you won’t hear it on their abc.

    https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/gridiron-gangster-how-a-vigilante-gambler-took-down-an-alleged-crime-boss-124227/

    According to court records, Hanson made the bulk of his drug money in Australia, importing over a ton of cocaine into the country and later boasting to an undercover F.B.I. agent that he sold kilos of coke there for $125,000, or more than triple the going rate in the U.S. In Cipriani, he apparently saw a means of solving the problem that has long confounded many successful criminal organizations: a surplus of dirty money, no easy way to clean it. By having Cipriani cash the drug profits into chips, gamble for a bit to avoid suspicion, and then take it back in the form of an easily-transportable casino check, Hanson was attempting to slyly turn the casino into a shell company for laundering money. Cipriani concedes that he was an ideal mark: “If you don’t have the reputation of being a high-roller and you try to walk into a casino with millions in cash, they’re gonna go, ‘Who the fuck is this guy?’ But because I’m this famed international gambler, they don’t think twice.”

  103. John Constantine

    The way Cipriani remembers it, he had heard about Hanson from a woman he dated years ago in L.A. “Mexican, smoking hot, used to being given $25,000 Hermès bags,” is Cipriani’s description. She mentioned, vaguely but intriguingly, that she knew a wealthy young American who did business in Australia

    https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/gridiron-gangster-how-a-vigilante-gambler-took-down-an-alleged-crime-boss-124227/

  104. Fisky

    Wow. NSW stamp duty receipts down by nearly 1/3. The property ponzi economy is collapsing! Morrison is doomed!

  105. OldOzzie

    Anzac Day for commemorating soldiers, not worrying about ourselves

    Ross Eastgate, The Daily Telegraph


    Who knows what the Diggers were thinking as they sat silently in their landing craft in the cold, pre-dawn dark off Gallipoli’s western shore on April 25, 1915.

    They were to be the covering force, meaning it was their role to seize the beachhead between Gaba Tepe and Ari Burnu so the Anzac main force could attack through later that morning after dawn.

    Their large, steel boats were being towed in packets from their transports towards shore by small steam launches piloted by beardless, teenage naval cadet midshipmen.

    A fearsome barrage from the accompanying warships was hammering the Turkish shore positions, alerting the defenders something major was happening.

    In response the Turks were raking the waters with machine gun and rifle fire, though in the darkness neither side really could really see what was happening.

    Of those who did not make it ashore, some were killed where they sat in their boats, others drowned when they leapt from the boats into waters over their depth, weighed down by their equipment and weapons.

    No hi-vis vests or life jackets.

    Occupational Health and Safety officials, even if they had been invented then, had no place in this enterprise.

    Others were killed as they charged across the beaches towards the heights, facing into a rising sun over Gallipoli’s ridges so they could not clearly see their foes.

    Meanwhile the boy sailors who survived turned their launches around to collect their next packets to tow them ashore to maintain the landing’s momentum.

    There were no lights, no luminous lane markers, no radios, just shouted commands and deafening rifle fire as the Diggers raced blindly towards the foe.

    Units became separated and mingled with unfamiliar others.

    They never hesitated.

    When after dawn the Anzac main force landed, the following Aussies and Kiwis were greeted with a scene of unimaginable horror. Dead Diggers sat or lay slumped in their boats or washed with the tide in the waters on the beach.

    The inshore waters were red with blood.

    Bodies littered the stones on the beach which is now known as Anzac Cove.

    Others who had managed to advance towards the heights had been cut down so that the way to the objective was also littered with dead and wounded.

    Among the first ashore were the Queensland field ambulance medics, who established a casualty clearing at Hell’s Spit on the southern end of Anzac Cove, now known as Queensland Point, bringing in the wounded for treatment and the dead for burial.

    They buried them there, including some weeks later one of their own, Jack Kirkpatrick Simpson, the man with the donkey.

    Australians and Kiwis gather in the pre-dawn each April 25 not to celebrate those brave soldiers’ achievements, but to commemorate their service and sacrifice.

    In the cold and dark it’s as close as we can get to what they experienced.

    In these days of illuminated pathways, hi-vis vests, smart phones with built-in torches and all the other night movement aids, some geniuses in the contemporary ADF have decided it’s too dangerous for formed bodies of uniformed personnel to march, lest they trip or suffer some other such calamity.

    A pox on their virtue signalling, political correctness.

    Australians gather each Anzac Day dawn to commemorate those who fell, not to express concern about those who might now merely stumble.

  106. None:

    Libertarians? What a libertarians done? Sweet FA.

    You expect a Libertarian to actually do stuff?
    Forget it.
    Libertarians are just blokes who want to get into the Libertarian Chickie Babe knickers but don’t have the guts to call themselves Socialists.
    All you’re going to get is moral preening in a body shirt.

  107. calli

    Rowe doesn’t portray Shorten too often, Stacks. He usually needs to label him.

    I think this is one.

  108. Elle

    Mh, I don’t listen to them because of their looks.
    Now … Andrew Bolt, on the other hand – looks and dulcet tones.

  109. calli

    Percy Popinjay
    #2989080, posted on April 16, 2019 at 9:34 am
    Oz Subscription Cancelled.

    Did it feel like picking off a scab? Not quite ready, but satisfying just the same?

  110. EvilElvis

    News, Fuckhead: We don’t work 7 days, with our entire family wealth on the line, to earn minimum wage and act as a milch cow for the 1000-year Shortenreich. You can manage the unintended consequences when it turns out that many of us are smarter and better advised than you and won’t simply go gentle into that good night.

    Hear, hear, Dr! (Sound of angle grinder in the background sharpening pitchfork…)

  111. bespoke

    Did it feel like picking off a scab?

    Sell it to IT.

  112. Fred

    Bernie Sanders released his income tax returns.

    He claims a tax deduction for interest on his mortgage.

    Don’t let Bill Shorten or Chris Bowen know!

  113. EvilElvis

    “We’ve got a lot of good news for small business,” he said. “I get that small business is hearing all sorts of, you know, scary and mad things from the government. But I just want to reassure small business — we’re the equal on tax; we’re better on the deductibility for investment. And when it comes to wages, we get that you have to implement these things in a modest and meaningful way.”

    I’ve started having vocal conversations with other business neighbours, intentionally within earshot of my staff, regarding wage boosts and a failing economy. It normally ends with “well, they can enjoy what the government tells us to give them and clap their hands for 5 minutes, but when I can’t afford them and cut their hours and lay them off what will they do then?”.

  114. OldOzzie

    The AFR View
    Australia must not take the European road

    The Financial Review’s take on the principles at stake in major domestic and global stories.


    The May 18 federal election confronts Australians with a choice over what to do about the slowdown in national income growth following the end of our biggest ever resources boom. Australians could vote to sharpen the incentives to generate a new phase of growth through higher productivity. A generation on, the economic opening up under Labor in the 1980s now leaves Australia well placed to exploit new opportunities. Faced with the choice, however, the very real risk is that Australians will vote instead to impose new burdens on the very process of wealth creation. There is a risk that Australians will opt to move down the higher-taxing, higher-cost, lower-growth and lower-ambition path of the old nations of western Europe. This could be a grave mistake.

    Australia is not yet a high-taxing country by European standards. Yet Australia now risks heading in that direction. Ironically, a Labor opposition that complains about weak wages growth itself seems content to take more out of ordinary workers’ pay packages through tax scale bracket creep. At the same time, the ACTU seeks to further replicate Europe’s inflexible labour markets that protect insiders and price out newcomers. Europe’s public finances confront a pensions time bomb. Australia with its envied super system does not. But the purpose of super risks being lost as union-dominated industry super funds eye off the honey pot for industrial and political purposes. The end result could be the imposition of European-style union reps on company boards.

    Despite the European Central Bank flooding the eurozone with printed money, over-regulated European commercial banks are too cautious to lend it for investments that might lift Europe’s stagnant productivity and wages. Similar worry was aired at last month’s Financial Review Banking & Wealth Summit in the wake of the Hayne royal commission: a push for more regulation by litigation and shifting the onus of risk from lenders to borrowers. And over-ambitious targets for reducing carbon emissions threaten to push Australia into European-style dependence on expensive subsidised renewable power that could send our heavy industries offshore.

    For all its protected rigidity, European politics lives in a crisis of unrealistic expectations as populist parties demand economic security for citizens, while refusing to accept any of the reform changes or the costs that go with creating new growth. How did that happen? It’s the product of long years of complacency, from post-war recovery to great prosperity and cradle-to-grave welfare states that end up supporting the elites the most. For those stuck in its slow lanes, from raging yellow jackets in declining regions, to a lost generation of unemployed, the continent offers its citizens too little of the economic growth that opens avenues and horizons.

    Is this the road that Australia wants to go down? If it is not, Australian complacency needs to be confronted. Two decades of productivity-enhancing economic liberalisation and then a fabulous China boom boosted per-capita living standards by two-thirds. But after money has fallen from the sky for years, it can be hard to keep focus when it stops.

    Rather than concentrating on entrenched disadvantage, government largesse and redistribution has expanded further into the voting middle. New handouts seem to have become the point of government. That’s now called “fairness”, although it’s really about answering envy. And because money for it all is not so easy to raise, Labor now targets and saddles the wealth-creators themselves — from business owners to aspirational workers — directly with more taxes. Australia may not yet tax as highly as some of the more sclerotic European countries, but our tax system loads a relatively high burden on income-generating work and profit.

    It would be a terrible mistake for Australia to carry on emulating big-government Europe, the result of a big-taxing, big-spending Labor win next month. But the Coalition government, too, has been guilty of anti-enterprise and anti-business political indulgence. Australia has something Europe does not: a resource-rich frontier economy with enormous new markets opening up in Asia – if only we have the purpose to grasp the opportunity.

  115. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Wow. NSW stamp duty receipts down by nearly 1/3. The property ponzi economy is collapsing! Morrison is doomed!

    Weren’t these supposed to go with GST, thanks for nothing Costello

  116. Boambee John

    Notafan
    #2988984, posted on April 16, 2019 at 7:46 am
    MV says we can’t vote for Liu.

    I think I can

    Our incumbent (Nationals) is retiring, but Oakesnot is running!

    Definitely not him, he fits into putting the (former) member last!

  117. calli

    Stamp Duty on property is levied by the states.

    Like Payroll Tax.

  118. Wow. NSW stamp duty receipts down by nearly 1/3.

    wow indeed.

  119. Leigh Lowe

    calli

    #2988961, posted on April 16, 2019 at 7:17 am

    I was remembering, Gab.

    Everyone remembers their first day in Paris.

    Indeed, calli.
    I remember mine well.
    We enjoyed a sumptuous lunch at Maxims. I wore the slinky black dress Hairy bought for me that morning from Dior which barely covered my perky …
    [That will be quite enough of that LL … Sinc]

  120. Leigh Lowe

    Wow. NSW stamp duty receipts down by nearly 1/3. The property ponzi economy is collapsing! Morrison is doomed!

    Weren’t these supposed to go with GST, thanks for nothing Costello

    Stamp Duty went on various transactions (leases, loans etc) but not the big ticket one …property transfers.

  121. calli

    🤣

    You are a very naughty man, LL.

    Can’t remember what I was wearing. Something crinkly and crunchy that I had slept in for sure.

  122. calli

    Mayfly, just copy the URL here and we’ll find it.

  123. Geriatric Mayfly

    Is this it, Mayfly?

    Very, very close Calli. There are a few of them about in various places. I just happened to chance upon this salute to the Aussies, while wandering around in the great cathedral. I went to Google to rustle it up again.
    We don’t ever get much of a mention in Europe.

  124. OldOzzie

    incoherent rambler
    #2989135, posted on April 16, 2019 at 10:24 am

    Wow. NSW stamp duty receipts down by nearly 1/3.

    wow indeed.

    However in the meantime

    Example from Victoria

    ‘Beware of land tax!’: Property owners face steep tax increases

    Investors were failing to factor in the potential for a steep rise in land tax when calculating the yield return of the property they were purchasing, he said.

    Landlords in Victoria cannot pass on land tax costs to tenants unless they are publicly listed companies.

  125. calli

    Sorry, my comment re tax was redundant.

    Gladys will have to rummage around in the bottom of the purse for some loose change.

  126. Ros

    Paris was gone long before the collapse of Notre Dame cathedral. A metaphor of the collapse of Western Civilisation eroded from within

    .

    “Mr Macron vowed “we will rebuild’’ and has set up an international fundraising campaign to help fund the reconstruction” We will rebuild, just as we were repairing, which was funded by an international fundraising campaign too. And whose generosity mattered.

    “Notre Dame has been threatened with collapse before. A New York Times report in 2017 stated that “experts say Notre-Dame, although not at risk of sudden collapse, has reached a tipping point — and an expensive one at that” and reported a $180 million price for appropriate repairs. Much of that money has gone to renovations come from American donors in love with French culture and how the cathedral embodied the nation.”

    There may he lunatics in the US Congress who speak of some people doing something, but it seems that the people of the USA are doing something that Europe seems incapable of doing, celebrating and preserving Western Civilisation.

  127. OldOzzie

    Leigh Lowe
    #2989140, posted on April 16, 2019 at 10:26 am

    calli

    #2988961, posted on April 16, 2019 at 7:17 am

    I was remembering, Gab.

    Everyone remembers their first day in Paris.

    Indeed, calli.
    I remember mine well.
    We enjoyed a sumptuous lunch at Maxims. I wore the slinky black dress Hairy bought for me that morning from Dior which barely covered my perky …
    [That will be quite enough of that LL … Sinc]

    Is this what Sinc edited? (from cel artworks)

  128. Dr Faustus#2989058, posted on April 16, 2019 at 9:06 am
    ‘Frank and Honest’ Shorten does explaining to stupid, slack-jawed small business owners:

    “We’ve got a lot of good news for small business,” he said. “I get that small business is hearing all sorts of, you know, scary and mad things from the government. But I just want to reassure small business — we’re the equal on tax; we’re better on the deductibility for investment. And when it comes to wages, we get that you have to implement these things in a modest and meaningful way.”

    News, Fuckhead: We don’t work 7 days, with our entire family wealth on the line, to earn minimum wage and act as a milch cow for the 1000-year Shortenreich. You can manage the unintended consequences when it turns out that many of us are smarter and better advised than you and won’t simply go gentle into that good night.

    +1
    This from the party that will make accountancy fees no longer a tax deduction.
    I feel so reassured it isn’t funny.
    I don’t know which is worse, that Pieman will remove a legitimate tax deduction, or that he believes accountancy is simply a bit of tax minimising creative bookkeeping.

  129. Roger

    Paris was gone long before the collapse of Notre Dame cathedral. A metaphor of the collapse of Western Civilisation eroded from within.

    By the neglect of those responsible for it – politicians (Notre Dame is owned by the French government, not the Catholic Church).

  130. Geriatric Mayfly

    Surely someone has already photoshopped the Grand Mega Mosque de Paris which has risen in the ashes of infidel’s eyesore.

  131. EvilElvis

    This from the party that will make accountancy fees no longer a tax deduction.

    No accountancy deduction. Increased wages. Supercharged fairwork commission. An already biased and disgraceful workers compensation system. Casuals getting pushed into permanent roles. Extortionate taxing of trusts relating to small businesses.

    What’s not to love about Labor?

  132. EvilElvis

    Mind you, some on that list apply to the stupid fucking Libs as well.

  133. bespoke

    She’s still as alive as any building on earth. Probably more so, now that she’s open to the heavens.

    Beautiful. What ever they do it will remind people of what has been lost but only for a short time.

  134. Arky

    … how I escape from politics — sports radio most of the day…
    ..
    Macquarie Sports Radio picked up Ox and Marko (disgracefully sacked by SEN in Melbourne, even though they had one of the station’s best slot ratings…

    ..
    And yet the first thing you do is comment about the politics of it.

  135. Spider

    Robber Baron

    I’ve just clipped my toe nails. Do I throw them in the garden? Do I put them in the green waste bin? Do I put them in the normal bin?

    Put it in the recycling bin. They might end up in Malaysia.

  136. Stackja:

    ‘Winston loved Big Brother’

    That’s a horrible lie.

  137. Arky

    Wow. NSW stamp duty receipts down by nearly 1/3. The property ponzi economy is collapsing!

    ..
    Easy.
    Just more cops on the beat fining anyone touching a phone, driving in a bus lane or putting their elbow on the door sill.

  138. Geriatric Mayfly

    Last time I was there, the masonry on the South (sunny side) of the Cathedral had been restored and looked absolutely resplendent. The north side was in complete contrast. The damp was palatable. A patina of green scunge covering the stone work. Plastic PVC piping jutting out where gargoyles once gargled. The statuary effaced of detail and the fabric of the walls dank and crumbling. I first went there in 1968 and it was scaffolding season on one of the towers. Every visit since, the scaffolding had rolled on to a new location.

  139. Tel

    Landlords in Victoria cannot pass on land tax costs to tenants unless they are publicly listed companies.

    Load of 🎾⚾🏐⚽. Sez who they can’t?

  140. Roger

    I first went there in 1968 and it was scaffolding season on one of the towers. Every visit since, the scaffolding had rolled on to a new location.

    And they now imagine they can rebuild it!

    It will take decades, by which time France will be majority M u s lim.

  141. Landlords in Victoria cannot pass on land tax costs to tenants unless they are publicly listed companies.

    Cigarettes.
    When there is a price rise on cigarettes, the retailer is allowed to increase the retail price, however the margin is not allowed to be applied to that portion of the price which is tax.

  142. mh

    Macquarie Sports Radio currently have an expert on to advise whether Winx is the best Australian horse ever.

    Very convincing facts to suggest she is not.

  143. notafan

    GM

    I haven’t been inside for years but it was very dark and gloomy back in 2006/7. The queues are always too long and I prefer St Paul et St Louis.

    The French government was spending millions of euros according to the billboard on the side on restoration, now the generous Americans will find some more.

    Though it appears the internal walls had been cleaned looking at the pic of the destroyed altar.

    Victor Hugo saved it after the French Revolution when it was used as a hay barn

    I’m not getting any feeling for a terror attack, though sabotage is a possibility, as is an accident.

    But Calli and CL are correct what France really needs is a renewal of faith

    The 8% are marvelous but they are not enough.

  144. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I don’t know which is worse, that Pieman will remove a legitimate tax deduction, or that he believes accountancy is simply a bit of tax minimising creative bookkeeping.

    Whining William has one weapon – the politics of envy. If you have an income from shares and franking credits, if you use an accountant to do your tax return, you must be from the big end of town.

  145. Bruce of Newcastle

    It will take decades, by which time France will be majority M u s lim.

    And then it will be turned into a mosque like the Hagia Sophia.
    And if you don’t believe me…
    (Be warned, the above link might trigger our awesome lord and blogmaster.)

  146. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ScoMo raises spectre of death taxes

    Scott Morrison has questioned whether Bill Shorten would do a deal with the Greens to introduce death taxes if it wins government, after calls from unions for the policy.

    “It is important to say what the unions are proposing and what the Greens are proposing because that is where the Labor Party will take their cues in government,” Mr Morrison said.

    “I can tell you who Bill Shorten will be relying on to get his $387 billion worth of taxes … he will be relying on the Greens, Richard Di Natale, who not only support all of his taxes but more, including death tax

    From the Oz. No union member, of course will ever be affected, it will only be “the big end of town.”

  147. OldOzzie

    Rooftop solar saturation could overload substations

    Perry Williams
    Senior Business Writer

    The rapid take-up of rooftop solar across Australia’s electricity system will place more stress on the national grid sooner than expected, with a growing part of the network forecast to hit saturation point by 2025.

    Modelling by Energy Networks Australia and the Australian Energy Market Operator shows a substantial amount of Australia’s electricity substations will reach a 40 per cent threshold of rooftop solar much earlier than previously forecast. That penetration level is significant as it marks the point at which the flow of power may be reversed as the grid struggles to integrate large slabs of solar being fed back in.

    Nearly a quarter of all local electricity zone substations could hit the 40 per cent threshold by 2025 under a “fast uptake” ­scenario modelled by the energy bodies, with much of Queensland potentially in line to hit that level.

    Forecasts conducted in 2017 showed that while South Australia was most at risk of reverse power flows, other states on the eastern seaboard were not likely to hit that point until after 2030.

    “The enhancement of monitoring and control functionality required to manage the system when it goes into reverse demand will be required earlier for some sections of the network than previously thought,” Energy Networks Australia said this month.

    One in five Australians now has rooftop solar systems, and electricity generated by clean energy accounts for 21 per cent of the overall power mix, Clean Energy Council data shows.

    Rebates in Victoria and NSW, and plans by Labor leader Bill Shorten for renewables to achieve a 50 per cent share of the electricity market by 2030, have turbocharged a flight to solar by consumers stung with soaring retail power bills on the nation’s east coast over the past few years.

    But that explosive growth has up-ended the nation’s transmission system, much of which is decades old and was largely designed to cater for coal, which still supplies about 70 per cent of electricity in the system.

    The growth of distributed energy, which includes solar and batteries “behind the meter” in both households and businesses, has raised imminent challenges for the grid which the ENA and AEMO are looking to solve through their Open Energy ­Networks initiative. “Original electricity infrastructure did not intend for electricity to move in two directions,” the ENA said.

    “While it is not impossible for electricity to flow backwards, it is tricky for networks to manage the grid on a technological level, especially when there is a lot of distributed electricity feeding back into the grid in the same area.”

    Stability issues from significant solar levels being fed into the grid included voltage spikes on low voltage lines potentially causing damage to the network, and fault currents caused by reverse flows, the ENA said.

    Battery developer and manufacturer Redflow said falling storage costs would increasingly help to ease the issue.

    “Storage can ultimately absorb all that solar load,” Redflow chief deployment officer Tim MacTaggart told The Australian.

    “In a future world we’ll have a situation where power prices at peak times will be much more expensive than non-peak times,” he said.

    “That will force people to use solar or a battery to store energy during the day and consume it when they get home and that takes away the issue of putting too much solar into the network,” Mr MacTaggart said.

    “You simply absorb it.”

    The fast-growing solar industry has been buffeted by a range of challenges in the past few months including grid congestion, delays connecting to the electricity network and the uncertainty of federal government policy on clean energy.

    The growing pains of rampant renewables growth in Australia were underlined by an Australian Energy Market Commission report this month which warned of the dangers posed by deterioration of the strength of the electricity network.

    While the problem is most pronounced in South Australia, it is also spreading to southwest NSW, northwest Victoria and north Queensland, adding to wholesale costs incurred by users.

    A draft ruling on “marginal loss factors” in the network — representing the increasing losses incurred when electricity moves between power stations and market customers in remote parts of the grid — has also caused alarm within parts of the industry.

    The derating of some solar developments in the pipeline may mean owners struggle to give the investment green light to projects, consultancy Rystad says.

  148. C.L.

    Scott Morrison has questioned whether Bill Shorten would do a deal with the Greens to introduce death taxes if it wins government, after calls from unions for the policy.

    I can understand why. The Liberal Party would be liable for a huge payment.

  149. Whining William has one weapon – the politics of envy. If you have an income from shares and franking credits, if you use an accountant to do your tax return, you must be from the big end of town.

    Drink!
    (Shorten & “big end of town” in same paragraph – near enough for me)

  150. Knuckle Dragger

    Gab’s excellent pic via drone of Notre Dame burning raises some concerns.

    Of course, when a building is fully involved in fire at some point, everything ends up burnt to a crisp. Everyone’s seen, either with their own peepers or photos of bushfire-destroyed homes.

    The interesting bit is that this pic was taken during the PROCESS of burning, rather than the end. All ceilings and roofs were gone, yet most of the walls etc were still intact.

    Consider the shape of the cathedral, where the ends some distance apart are equally involved in fire. Sure, a fire could have spread through the roof and dropped down onto the other end – that’s nowhere near unheard of – but it would result in what’s called ‘drop burning’ where one end would be patchily involved in fire and the other end in full swing.

    There’s only one other thing that ordinarily would result in both ends and the centre of that particular building being equally involved in fire at the same time.

    And that is – multiple seats and sources of fire. Arson, in other words.

    Sure, it’s difficult to come to a definitive conclusion from one pic half a world away, but Gab’s drone captured the angle and the progress of the fire perfectly.

    I hope I’m wrong, but I don’t think so.

  151. Zatara

    I just heard something interesting. Apparently, under French law, the government owns Notre Dame Cathedral and allows Catholics to use it, but the Archdiocese of Paris is responsible for the upkeep.

    They could only come up with a small amount of the money to conduct the current renovation so they went to US charities for the money. A Friends of Notre Dame charitable organization was chartered and the IRS gave them tax-free status. In effect, the US taxpayer was funding the majority share of the renovations up ’till now.

    Notre Dame Cathedral Is Crumbling. Who Will Help Save It?

    So, while Macron is promising “we will rebuild” one wonders where he is going to get the funding to do so.

  152. Knuckle Dragger

    On another note – the boyman had his mate stay over here last night. In traditional fashion, they spent the evening calling each other gay and filming idiotic clips of themselves for YouTube or Instagram or something.

    They surfaced about 10 this morning.

    Cooked bacon and eggs. Yes, thank you for asking, I will have some. Ate said breakfast. They washed up. While I was out the back watching Sky the boyman came out and said would it be ok if we put some music on, and it would be quite loud.

    OK, I sighed, resigned to three hours of boppy unrecognisable shit.

    And then it came, bass notes thrumming under my feet.

    Stairway to Heaven. It’s still going now, on continuous loop.

    I’ve never been so proud. My son and heir, the sword in my right hand.

    There is hope for the future.

  153. OldOzzie

    Victoria Police to get military-style semi-automatic guns

    What would they do with them given this? Obviously not use them!

    Chilling moment armed ice addict drags woman from her car after police chase caught on camera

    Witnesses have recalled the frightening moments leading to a carjacking in Ivanhoe where a gun-wielding ice addict dragged a woman from her luxury car by her hair.

    Terrifying video footage from a police chase has been revealed in court, showing a man grabbing a woman by her hair and throwing her to the ground to steal her car.

    Patrick McMillan pleaded guilty to 17 charges including armed robbery, assault, assaulting a police officer and carjacking at the County Court last Tuesday.

    Speaking to the Leader after the footage was released, Steven Karantzoulis said he was leaving the train station with his fiance when he saw the carjacking.

    “There were people everywhere and I saw three elderly people, two of them on the ground. Everyone was standing around not doing a thing,” the 31-year-old said.

    “It did not look good so I parked my car in front of him because it was obvious he was trying to steal the car.

    “I tried to open the door on him to reach him and he was trying to pull the door shut and that’s when he pulled a gun out in my face and I instantly ducked and stepped back and let him continue stealing the car.

    Mr Karantzoulis said his fiance stood in front of the Jaguar to try and stop it taking off before McMillan pointed the gun in her face and she moved.

    “She was very shaken up. I wasn’t too bad,” he said.

    Ivanhoe resident Terry Roberts also saw the carjacking and said it was “shocking”.

    “We all exited the station and saw a car flying down the street and hit the brakes. He jumped out and pulled out a handgun and walked over to the red Jaguar where I think the woman was waiting to pick up her husband,” the 30-year-old said.

    “I was pretty shocked. At first I thought it was something targeted – that the person in the car was connected to the guy but then I saw how the woman was freaking out and realised it was a random nut.

    “I was shocked and amazed that something like that happened.”

    Mr Roberts said a “convoy” of police cars arrived about 15 seconds after McMillan took off.

    The court heard the McMillan told police he was on a three- to four-week bender using ice, GHB, cocaine and alcohol when he started a police chase through multiple Melbourne suburbs on November 24, 2017.

    The 34-year-old Adelaide man was driving through Greensborough in a stolen Holden sedan with licence plates that were stolen earlier that day in Essendon, when he was spotted by police.

    An off-duty police officer in plain clothes followed McMillan, and called triple-0.

    McMillan realised he was being tailed and pulled over in a Glenroy street.

    He accelerated and pulled up in front of the officer, got out of this car and pointed a handgun one metre from the officer’s head and yelled, “Why the f*** are you following me?”.

    The shaken police officer drove away and was followed by McMillan until McMillan veered off.

    McMillan was then chased by police through the northern and western suburbs for almost 90 minutes.

    Video footage from a police chopper showed McMillan weaving through traffic at speeds of more than 200kph, driving on the wrong side of the road and on the footpath, running red lights, and driving straight through train boom gates to evade police.

    He stopped near Ivanhoe train station about 5.40pm and ran towards a red Jaguar sedan wielding a handgun at the woman sitting in the car.

    The woman struggled with McMillan before he grabbed her by her hair and threw her to the ground.

    Others came to the woman’s aid but backed off when McMillan pointed the gun at them.

    McMillan drove at speeds of more than 200kmh in the emergency lane of the eastern freeway before abandoning the Jaguar in the underground carpark of Doncaster shopping centre where he stole a Mercedes.

    McMillan continued the chase until again ditching his car in the Chadstone Shopping Centre carpark and pointing the gun at the driver of a Nissan Skyline, yelling at him to get out.

    He eventually pulled into the driveway of 850 Pascoe Vale Rd and was arrested.

    The crimes were part of a string of offences committed by McMillan in late November 2017.

    He also pleaded guilty to aggravated armed robbery of a group of men who McMillan and another man chased in their car on November 22, 2017.

    McMillan hit one of the men in the head with a sawn-off shotgun.

    The court heard McMillan had a history of ice addiction.

  154. notafan

    I read that the fire at Notre Dame started at the spire

    sot it would appear

    How the Notre-Dame Cathedral Fire Spread

  155. stackja

    mh
    #2989202, posted on April 16, 2019 at 11:21 am
    Macquarie Sports Radio currently have an expert on to advise whether Winx is the best Australian horse ever.

    Very convincing facts to suggest she is not.

    Sky Racing last week had a discussion with Johnny Tapp, Ian Craig, Max Presnell and two others. They all agreed Winx was the greatest. Longevity was the main point. Other horses were great except for longevity and ease of winning.

  156. OldOzzie

    New government will have to deal with mass retrenchments

    Robert Gottliebsen
    Business Columnist

    The banks and BHP have fired the starters’ gun for the biggest white-collar mass retrenchment program in our history.

    Major Australian enterprises have been slow to embrace some newer technologies, but a series of events will trigger a catch-up program.

    The Australian’s Margin Call has revealed that both Commonwealth Bank and ANZ are planning major retrenchment programs. The other big banks will be doing the same thing and will need to move or their costs will become hopelessly out of line with their rivals.

    And the programs revealed by Margin Call indicate the initial steps being considered are up to 25 per cent of staff. That sounds big but unfortunately it’s only about half way. The technology people in the banks know that over the next decade staff levels will be halved.

    As Bill Shorten and Scott Morrison canvass capital city electorates, they never mention the biggest employment problem the new government will face. Indeed it’s the biggest for a generation.

    The problem is that the new technologies revolutionise not just the banks, but the likes of BHP too. Telstra, accounting firms, law offices — almost the entire big organisation society. The biggest staff reduction potential is in the public service, but the public service unions will successfully fight it until the community simply cannot afford to pay administrative costs that are way out of line with the rest of society.

    But the flow on goes deeper. I recently had occasion to spend and extended time in a suburban Westpac branch. I was helping an Australian living overseas with his banking tangle. The branch had abundant space and well-appointed facilities. But there were token numbers of customers, and, as a result few staff. I had made an appointment and was well looked after.

    At one time the view was that these branches would be turned into investment advisory centres. Westpac, along with other banks are now exiting that business. So bank branches in suburban shopping centres will close in big numbers, thus further reducing property values for landlords and the lifestyles of those who own this type of real estate.

    The bank branch change is simply about people doing their banking online and the banks slashing the amount loan processing they undertake in branches in favour of mortgage brokers, who now have 60 or cent of the market. Of course brokers will need retail space, but at nowhere near the level established by banks.

    The brokers and the others are now moving into small business loans as the banks move from being massive retailers to providers of commodity products.

    Accordingly their costs must be razor sharp or they will go out of business. And that means that their back offices must embrace the very latest technology.

    And this technology will move from conventional systems into block chain.

    In turn, that means that the enormous number of white collar teams that collect and collate data and information in banks, law firms, for accountants, manufacturers and just about every business are no longer required. With the help of artificial intelligence the technology creates systems that are akin to the robots currently used in manufacturing and distribution

    At some time in the future (probably many years away) we will have driverless vehicles which will extend this white collar robot revolution into transportation.

    All of this has been widely predicted and I have devoted part of my journalism to preparing people for this revolution. There will still be many jobs in large organisations but a much higher proportion of our children and grandchildren will need to devise enterprises that generate value for the new society. We can’t tell them what those enterprises will be but we can help give them a better chance.

    And so in this context, arguably one of the greatest achievements of any government in the last decade was the small business tax tribunal because people in the Australian Taxation Office were trying to turn the clock back by refusing ABN numbers and using their enormous powers to destroy legitimate small businesses and decimate selected research efforts.

    The small business tax tribunal will be responsible to the court system (but will have limited lawyers) and not the ATO. We all have to hope that if the ALP wins government they will not be bullied into destroying it.

    Scott Morrison has rarely mentioned this great achievement, which shows how out of touch the politicians have become to what is happening in the real world.

    But thanks to small business minister Michaelia Cash and assistant treasurer Stuart Robert, the Coalition has also moved to enforce fair contracts and extend the rules to government, reducing payment times to 20 to 30 days and encouraging cash flow lending

    These are all actions required to create an environment for people to develop new ideas. We need many more.

    On the other side the ACTU wants to lift wages and provide greater job security. These are wonderful aims but in the current technology environment they just speed up the retrenchment process.

  157. KD, regards the progress of the fire in Notre Dame, this twitter thread may interest you.

  158. Infidel Tiger

    I just heard something interesting. Apparently, under French law, the government owns Notre Dame Cathedral and allows Catholics to use it, but the Archdiocese of Paris is responsible for the upkeep.

    The French Government owns all Churches in France.

    One of the dangers of revolutions is that nothing good ever comes from them.

  159. C.L.

    I just heard something interesting. Apparently, under French law, the government owns Notre Dame Cathedral and allows Catholics to use it, but the Archdiocese of Paris is responsible for the upkeep.

    Yes, that is true.

  160. Bruce of Newcastle

    The banks and BHP have fired the starters’ gun for the biggest white-collar mass retrenchment program in our history.

    So the politicians persecute banks with an RC and miners with CAGW and lesser spotted newts and everyone is surprised that those businesses are firing wukkas? Wow, Pavlov was an amateur compared to our pollies.

  161. Gab

    I’m reading that police have concluded that the fire was the result of arson and are now looking for possible suspects. Not sure how much truth there is in that though.

    In the meantime, Twelve French Churches Attacked, Vandalized in One Week

    https://www.breitbart.com/faith/2019/03/20/twelve-french-churches-attacked-vandalized-in-one-week/

  162. OldOzzie

    Why a Sequential Transmission Is So Much Faster Than a Dual-Clutch

    Dual-clutch transmissions are marketed as some of the quickest-shifting gearboxes on the planet. Here’s why they’re generally not used in race cars.

    Nate Vincent of FCP Euro put together a great video comparing his GTI TCR race car’s old DSG dual-clutch transmission to a new sequential transmission that his team will use for the 2019 season. The biggest difference is weight. Including the flywheel and clutch, the sequential weighs nearly 100 pounds less than the DSG, which is a huge amount for a race car. The sequential also has fewer gear shafts to spin—just two versus three for the dual-clutch. Paired with a lighter flywheel, that means less rotating mass for the engine to spin.

    Unlike a dual-clutch, which uses helical-style gears, a sequential has straight-cut gears, meaning less power loss traveling through the transmission into the axles. It also uses dog teeth connectors instead of synchronizers to get from one gear to another, forcing the gears together instead of smoothly transitioning from one to another. The downside is that it’s a lot less smooth, extremely loud, and requires the transmission to be rebuilt after just a few thousand miles. That’s why you don’t see many sequential gearboxes used in street cars.

    The full video goes into much more detail, so if you’ve got a few minutes to kill, it’s certainly worth a watch.

  163. notafan

    Fire started in the attic, arson is usually multi starting points and an acceleratant?

    picking the attic and hoping for the best seems way too clever for a ji hardy or even a run of the mill arsonist

    Arson, terrorism ruled out for now in Notre Dame fire, Paris prosecutors’ office says

  164. Gab

    I’ve heard reports the the Rose window exploded from the heat. I hope that’s not true.

  165. notafan

    Gab If you look at the photos on the twitter feed posted by SATP that definitely appears to be the case 🙁

  166. Infidel Tiger

    Fire started in the attic, arson is usually multi starting points and an acceleratant?

    picking the attic and hoping for the best seems way too clever for a ji hardy or even a run of the mill arsonist

    Arson, terrorism ruled out for now in Notre Dame fire, Paris prosecutors’ office says

    The roof has been under repair f0r 25 years due to lack of funding.

    Arson seems highly unlikely.

  167. notafan

    Notre Dame took 182 years to build.

    We moderns should not be bothered about a few decades to repair.

  168. Mater

    Scott Morrison has questioned whether Bill Shorten would do a deal with the Greens to introduce death taxes if it wins government, after calls from unions for the policy.

    If providing for your family’s welfare upon death is such an undesirable thing, are they going to tax life insurance payouts (including those provided by Industry Super Funds)?

    Perhaps I shouldn’t give them ideas.

  169. Knuckle Dragger

    Four days ago 16 statues were removed from atop the cathedral. 12 were of the Apostles, and four were gargoyles.

    The gargoyles were there to guard against fire.

  170. OldOzzie

    Forget the fat cats, Bowen has lower income earners in his sights

    Judith Sloan

    Illustration: Johannes Leak.

    I am coming to the conclusion that opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen is the Willie Sutton of Australian politics. You’ll remember Sutton for his reply to the question why did he rob banks: “That’s where the money is.”

    Bowen knows where the money is and, take it from me, it’s not in the hands of top-income earners. He wants you to think it’s only fat cats — to use a favourite expression of Bill Shorten — who will be hit by Labor’s plan to raise more tax revenue. But there are too few fat cats to generate the additional revenue Labor has in mind. Many of the opposition’s proposals to alter what it calls tax loopholes — overwhelmingly just legitimate tax concessions — will hurt low to middle-income earners, particularly retirees.

    And let me clear up the matter of Treasury’s costings of Labor’s policy proposals (think changes to negative gearing and capital gains tax, the taxation of trusts, removal of cash refunds for franking credits and so on). It is standard practice for the government to ask Treasury to estimate the cost of opposition polices. Bowen did it when he was treasurer. Josh Frydenberg has done it. When the request is made, no mention is made of the fact the policies to be costed are the opposition’s.

    This idea that Treasury has not added up the separate costings because the interaction between the policies has not been modelled is a laughable diversion. The Treasury, let alone the Parliamentary Budget Office, is not capable of doing so. The reality is that the costings across a decade are rough and ready, in part because the behavioural responses to the policy changes are essentially unknown.

    So let’s look at the impact of Labor’s higher tax measures and the groups in the community most adversely affected. Only 3 per cent of income earners fall into the top bracket of $180,000 a year or more. That’s about 400,000 people. Those 3 per cent pay 30 per cent of total income tax revenue, but their number is small — there are more than 13 million individual income taxpayers.

    Take Labor’s proposal to reinstate the temporary budget repair levy, which increases the top marginal tax rate to 49 per cent, including the Medicare levy. Labor intends to keep this higher rate until at least 2023. This will raise an additional $6.5 billion across a decade. But that’s small beer compared with the $57bn anticipated from the elimination of cash refunds for franking credits.

    And, as long as your taxable income is above $130,000 a year — this is where the average tax rate equals 30 per cent — you’ll be unaffected by this change. You’ll be able to make full use of the franking credits by lowering the amount of tax you pay.

    Only those on lower incomes are hit by this change. That’s if you’re not on the Age Pension, full or part, or have your retirement savings in a taxpaying superannuation fund. It’s an example of Bowen acting as Robin Hood in reverse — preserving the benefits of dividend imputation for those on high incomes while removing much-needed cash from the less well-off.

    As for describing these cash refunds as “gifts”, do Bowen and the Opposition Leader regard the tax refunds that many workers receive after the end of the financial year as gifts? These return tax that has been overpaid, as is the case for the cash refunds for franking credits. Does Labor intend to eliminate these refunds too? After all, some of the individuals who receive tax refunds pay no tax and many pay no net tax after taking into account transfer payments.

    Consider also Labor’s proposed change to the taxation of discretionary trusts that is expected to yield $27bn across a decade. Today, taxation is paid at the individual beneficiaries’ marginal tax rates. Under Labor, a minimum of 30 per cent tax will be levied on all beneficiaries.

    Again, for well-off folk, there will be no change. Beneficiaries who receive more than $130,000 a year in trust distributions will be unaffected. It will be only those with incomes below this level who’ll face higher tax bills, significantly so in many cases. Another example of Bowen acting as an anti-Robin Hood.

    And take the proposed change to negative gearing. Reference is often made to multiple property holders taking advantage of taxpayers by claiming their net rental losses as tax deductions. The problem with this analysis is that multiple property holders are thin on the ground — there are about 11,000 with six or more properties and about the same number with five properties. Overwhelmingly, the greatest number — almost a million — own one property.

    Of course, these multiple-property owners will generally have sufficient investment income to be untouched by Labor’s proposed policy change because it allows annual net rental losses to be deducted from overall investment income. It’s only the small investor — the nurse, the tradie, the ambo, the teacher — who will be affected by the removal of the scope to deduct net rental losses, including interest costs, from wage and salary income. For those who think grandfathering will work some sort of magic, bear in mind that the main way property investors secure an advantage is through capital gains. Eliminating negative gearing save for new properties and doubling the rate of capital gains tax will affect existing investors as well as new ones. And most of these investors hold one property and are on middle incomes.

    The conclusion to draw is that Willie Sutton and Bowen really have a lot in common: they both completely understand where the money is. For Bowen, the money is not really with the fat cats, the highest income earners, the wealthy — there aren’t enough of them — but with middle-income ordinary folk.

    It’s why Bowen has ruled out sensible adjustments to his various proposals, such as limiting the benefits of negative gearing to those with only one or two properties or placing a cap on cash refunds for franking credits. Both these changes would improve the fairness of the outcomes but would put a limit on the additional revenue achieved. Bowen just won’t have a bar of that.

    Contributing Economics Editor

    Judith Sloan is an economist and company director. She holds degrees from the University of Melbourne and the London School of Economics. She has held a number of government appointments, including Commissioner of the Productivity Commission; Commissioner of the Australian Fair Pay Commission; and Deputy Chairman of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

  171. Knuckle Dragger

    You won’t get a definitive cause for the fire for a few days yet. The place will still be too hot to be picked through properly.

  172. Roger

    Liberals begging for donations with the campaign already underway.

    I think they’ve discovered that the people who don’t matter do matter, quite a bit.

  173. Roger

    In the meantime, Twelve French Churches Attacked, Vandalized in One Week

    That’s par for the course, Gab.

    Just two days ago: In France, two churches are desecrated every day.

    Perps invariably suffering from “mental health issues”.

  174. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hello?
    My name is (pause) Brandon and I’m calling you about your Telstra/NBN internet connection, which is insecure.
    I’m with Optus.
    Ah sir but Optus just rents from Telstra!
    I’m on the NBN, Optus rents from the NBN.
    That’s that I told you sir! Optus rents from Telstra which uses the NBN!
    NBN Corporation is a government company, Optus rents from them. Telstra has nothing to do with them, they sold it to NBN.
    Yes sir that is what I said, NBN is a government company and you are with Optus! Your internet connection is insecure.
    Maybe you should have a talk with your supervisor, your script needs a bit of work…(I hang up).

    I do love Paki call centre people, they let absolutely nothing phase them.

  175. Leigh Lowe

    In effect, the US taxpayer was funding the majority share of the renovations up ’till now.

    US citizens, more correctly.
    OK, the treasury foregoes “lost” revenue due to deductibility, but I never hear of deductible contributions to Greenpeace, or WWF, or UNICEF characterised as “taxpayer funded”.

  176. Arky

    The court heard the McMillan told police he was on a three- to four-week bender using ice, GHB, cocaine and alcohol when he started a police chase through multiple Melbourne suburbs on November 24, 2017.

    ..
    Victimless crime.

  177. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Zatara,

    Thanks for introducing me to Radio.garden

    It is very interesting for learning more about the language of a region.
    For example, apparently Persian is spoken in Gothenburg. https://radio.garden/listen/gnf-nu-102-6-mhz/VguMCu9R
    Never would have guessed, but hey, there it is. Facts I didn’t know before.

  178. Percy Popinjay

    Did it feel like picking off a scab? Not quite ready, but satisfying just the same?

    Interestingly calli, I realised the subscription as well as being lousy value, was actually causing me intolerable irritation with every comment I lodged that the SJW imbeciles rejected. I told the woman on the phone when I rang to cancel (after she’d asked me why) that the Oz was now unacceptably laden with shoddy j’ism, puff pieces about z-grade slebritty nobodies as well as tiresome infuriating imbeciles such as Mavis Bramston, Bucket Guts, Perfesser von Wrongsolen, Nikki Gammell and the Nuclear Milkman (not to mention dinobores like Paul “is wrong, again” Kelly and Dillip Flabbams) and if they weren’t going to post my comments pointing out their idiocy as well as rebutting it, then there was no point in persisting with the subscription any longer.

    In fact I feel so liberated that I’ll be getting rid of Foxtel any day now as well. The sizable subsequent monthly savings will be whacked onto my mortgage instead.

  179. JC

    He’s giving fire fighting advice to the Frogs now.

    So horrible to watch the massive fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Perhaps flying water tankers could be used to put it out. Must act quickly!

    Trump is God.

  180. Percy Popinjay

    Stamp Duty on property is levied by the states.

    It is important to note that back when the GST was introduced, not a single state or territory made any kind of commitment (real or imagined) to phasing out stamp duty on property purchases. They did however (at least in NSW) phase out stamp duty on mortgages, which saved me some sizable amounts in the interim.

    They weren’t going to be butchering that golden goose any time soon.

  181. Roger

    I do love Paki call centre people, they let absolutely nothing phase them.

    “Good evening sir, I’m calling from the Commonwealth Bank in regard to your account.”

    “I don’t have an account with the Commonwealth Bank”.

    “NAB?”

    Click.

  182. jo

    Nick
    #2986608, posted on April 13, 2019 at 10:17 am

    Tell me, what position does this chap Joyce play?

    Tight end

    No wonder kiwis root sheep.

  183. Speedbox

    Anyone who has actually picked through the aftermath of a fire in their home or office will support that it is not just the flames that do the damage. Smoke and water can also be devastating.

  184. OldOzzie

    MEET YOUR GREENS
    Tim Blair, The Daily Telegraph

    Sadly, infantile Labor and Liberal antics and the intrusion of Alex Turnbull’s “They Done Ma Pappy Wrong” GetUp Vengeance Party have distracted the electorate from more pressing issues.

    And the most pressing of those issues is this.

    Which one of all the Greens lower house candidates is the most sanctimonious, bubble-headed and virtue-motivated, and therefore most likely to provide the best entertainment if accidentally elected?

    Following is a list of the finest Greens running for office in 2019. All information on these brilliant individuals is taken from their official campaign biographies. To ensure accuracy, each candidate has been rated according to the internationally-recognised Socialist Moralism Under Greens index, or SMUG.

    Jim Casey, Grayndler (NSW)

    Most of Jim’s friends and family are in Sydney’s inner west, where this firefighter, union activist and environmentalist wishes to celebrate his progressive and caring community by kicking out Labor’s Anthony Albanese.

    The first mention of climate change comes a middling 132 words into his biography, but Jim restores some SMUG points by talking rubbish about refugees.

    Quote: “We are a generous society, but our government still illegally detains asylum seekers in concentration camps.”

    Score: 5.2

    Emerald Moon, Bowman (QLD)

    If growing up around Byron Bay with a name like Emerald Moon wasn’t enough to send this kid Green, her time in the Australian Youth Climate Coalition sealed the deal.

    Impressively, Emerald doesn’t mention ever being employed at all, although she is passionate about gender equality. Also, injustices to our First Peoples make her sad.

    Quote: “I was raised with recycled everything, composting toilets and koalas in the backyard.”

    Her fascinating koala-composting hobby obviously boosts Emerald’s overall SMUG rating.

    Score: 7.6

    Caroline Perks, Perth (WA)

    Quote: “Once I left school, I studied musical theatre.” Naturally, that eventually led to a climate change gig with the federal government, where Caroline encountered terrible sexism.

    “As a female expert in the field of climate change policy, I have experienced first-hand gender inequality in the workplace,” Caroline claims.

    “I have had to fight against the systemic misogyny in the workplace, pushing back on not being taken seriously and being referred to as ‘sweetheart’.”

    Yet for some reason she wants to return to Canberra, our scandalous sweetheart-referring capital.

    Score: 6.3

    James Cruz, Kingsford-Smith (NSW

    He’s a 28-year-old librarian who wants “radical action on climate change by closing coal plants”. And there’s something else James would like you to know.

    Quote: “An avowed socialist, I believe the state should respect grassroots community decisions.”

    That’s not how socialism works, sunshine. You’d think after nine years in the rabid industrial hotbed that is the Sydney library system he might have read a book or two about it.

    Score: 4.1

    Anne Bourne, Mayo (SA)

    Psychologist Anne boasts of her “capacity for complex systemic thinking”, but her entire biography barely even mentions climate change. Perhaps, to her credit, she doesn’t think much about it.

    Quote: “My values and commitment closely reflect the core values of The Greens.”

    Except for climate stuff. Anne’s lack of effort sends her SMUG total to the floor.

    Score: 1.8

    Connor Parissis, Barton (NSW)

    Young Connor is frustrated by “years of inability to reach humane decisions about virtually anything and everything”, which covers a fair range of political territory.

    Quote: “I am a twenty-one-year-old left-wing activist, student and writer who believes in a better world.”

    He also believes Australia runs “refugee concentration camps” and that “it is our differences that make us beautiful”. This does not apply, however, if those differences involve voting for the “empty liberal populism of the ALP” or the “conservative, backward LNP”.

    Score: 5.9

    Emily Green, Dunkley (VIC)

    Café worker Emily is Green by name, Greens by nature and extremely green in terms of life experience.

    Quote: “This year, I finished my VCE Year 12 studies at Frankston Chisholm. This achievement was very important to me.”

    She is now qualified to demand that power generation be nationalised.

    Score: 5.4

    Matthew Thompson, Sydney (NSW)

    According to proud queer activist and TAFE graduate Matthew, “entire communities have been forced out” of Sydney. He doesn’t elaborate, so we are left to guess who these communities might be and where they’ve ended up.

    Haven’t seen too many Eskimos hanging around George St lately. Just a theory.

    Quote: “It was always clear to me that politics was never meant for people like my family.”

    Yet here Matthew is, asking for your vote so he can “eradicate poverty”. His self-pity and utopian notions generate a correspondingly high SMUG count.

    Score: 8.2

    Anne Jackson, Hinkler (QLD)

    From her vantage point as a “casual roadside attendant” up Bundaberg way, Anne seems unusually prone to directly observing local and international fatalities.

    Quote: “What drives me is witnessing climate disasters, first hand and all around the world, which kill people.”

    First hand? Seriously? This would drive me to stay well clear of Anne, who appears to be some kind of global mass-casualty magnet. Then again, she could be just what we need in Canberra, so her SMUG total is elevated accordingly.

    Score: 8.5

    Kristyn Glanville, Warringah (NSW)

    Besides being an environment and planning lawyer, Kristyn has an interesting legal sideline.

    Quote: “I have also acted pro bono for people experiencing homelessness and asylum seekers.”

    I once experienced asylum seekers. It didn’t end well for any of us, to be honest. Where was Krysten when I needed her? I’m marking her SMUG assessment down out of sheer spite.

    Score: 2.0

    Andrew Braddock, Fenner (ACT)

    Andrew isn’t the gloating type, but he cannot resist rubbing our faces in what he believes is his spectacular good fortune.

    Quote: “You could say that I live the Canberra dream. I’m a public servant.”

    One could also say that “dream” is not the term most Australians would call to mind in this circumstance. Still, at least Andrew is determined to give something back to the community that has given him so much flexitime.

    Score: 6.2

    Julian Burnside, Kooyong (Vic)

    Nobody has ever accused lawyer, human rights activist and $20 million property portfolio baron Burnside of insufficient self-regard.

    The first-time candidate is running not just for his area and not just for his country, but for “our planet”.

    Quote: “In my career, the cases I am proudest of are those where I have worked to protect people or remedy the injustice they’ve faced by attacks from big corporate interests or from cruel and craven government actions.”

    Additionally, Burnside represented tragic corporate and government victim Alan Bond. For so many reasons, including the fantastic vanity he displayed by including “AO” and “QC” on his election billboard, Burnside is the only Green to obtain 100 per cent SMUG approval.

    Score: 10.0

  185. Percy Popinjay

    I do love Paki call centre people, they let absolutely nothing phase them.

    Ah, the joys of no longer having a landline.

  186. Roger

    Andrew Braddock, Fenner (ACT) Quote: “You could say that I live the Canberra dream. I’m a public servant.”

    Holder of an office of profit under the Crown.

  187. notafan

    Next one I get I will call out for their shameful lying .

    Speaking of call centre scanners

    A dunderhead late 20s extremely leftie who incidentally holds a phd with whom, for some unknown reason, I am Facebook friends got a call from the ATO saying there was an arrest warrant out for him unless he coughed up x dollars pronto.

    The call purported to come from the local vicpol station (yes his narrative was rather garbled) so he drove there, so panicked he was to find it was all a scam and not the evil extreme right wing government about to throw him in gaol.

    A lengthy post to warn his friends with much angst and bad words at those horrid call centre people.

    Even my old mum wouldn’t fall for that one.

  188. Percy Popinjay

    composting toilets and koalas in the backyard

    LOL.

  189. Geriatric Mayfly

    Will wood carvers and stone masons be proved redundant? I imagine that computers will handle most of the tracery, woodwork and imagery that has been lost.

  190. notafan

    Living the Canberra dream is an oxymoron

  191. Leigh Lowe

    Roger

    #2989305, posted on April 16, 2019 at 1:31 pm

    Andrew Braddock, Fenner (ACT) Quote: “You could say that I live the Canberra dream. I’m a public servant.”

    Holder of an office of profit under the Crown.

    That was my point yesterday.
    A Lib candidate was turfed (along with 2 others) because she had a job at Australia Post. It was obviously a pre-planned ALP strategy in case of emergency and was deployed when the anti-Semite was rumbled in Perth.
    She was in an unwinnable seat so the SFLs just take it.
    Any suggestion of retaliation would draw a sharp intake of breath from the Phaggy Photios Phaction … “Golly. Gee. Attacking a Greens candidate won’t play well with younger voters.”

  192. thefrollickingmole

    Composted Koala would make a good band name.

    If you spelled it with a few extra letters and used gothic font it could be a metal band.

    KKKomposted KKKoala

  193. notafan

    Is numbers off gloating about the near destruction of an icon of Western civilization?

    probably carrying on about what crap builders those medievals were, not having thought ahead and met current fire safely standards.

    Trump’s idea would apparently have destroyed what was left of the cathedral but good on him for caring.

    What did jacinda and scott tweet?

  194. Morsie

    Retail Leases Act (Vic) prevents landlords of retail premises charging land tax to the tenant.Nothing to stop the landlord building it into the rent however so it basically meant that rents went up.

  195. stackja

    Speedbox
    #2989299, posted on April 16, 2019 at 1:24 pm
    Anyone who has actually picked through the aftermath of a fire in their home or office will support that it is not just the flames that do the damage. Smoke and water can also be devastating.

    The damp smell.

  196. rickw

    NZ Police shaking down commentators on a list they’ve been given. Given the competence and efficiency of Police, you can’t help but think that maybe the list pre-existed the Christchurch massacre.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mKeNsNw284c

  197. thefrollickingmole

    Satire at its best… or is it? (you knew i was going to add that.. or did you)?
    Could be numbers incarnate.
    https://babylonbee.com/news/man-still-clinging-to-outdated-belief-in-good-all-powerful-generous-loving-government

    NEW YORK, NY—Local man Ricky Quintana has taken criticism for what some call his “archaic” and “outdated” beliefs.

    While most people have matured enough to discard silly childish ideas, Quintana is still clinging to his faith in the existence of a good, all-powerful, generous, loving government.

    I just know that there are good people in Washington who are looking down on me,” he said. “I might not be able to see them or prove their existence, but I know they’re there. It’s like the wind: I can’t see it, but I can feel it.”

    The man prays while facing Washington, D.C. every day, asking his “magic government daddy” to bring him blessings. He reads articles in newspapers about how humanity just needs more good government to ascend to the next plane of utopia, a sort of “morning devotional.”

    The idea of a good, all-knowing, all-powerful government was popular hundreds of years ago, but enlightenment philosophies and millions of people killed by the government seemed to disprove this notion. Still, many worshipers of a benevolent government still cling to their faith.

    But as for Quintana and his household, they will stick to their faith. “If we would just surrender our lives to government, we will have abundant life.”

  198. rickw

    So horrible to watch the massive fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Perhaps flying water tankers could be used to put it out. Must act quickly!

    DJT is right, but would need to be done with helicopters at a good altitude.

    Elvis flattened a shed at Essendon Airport by dropping from insufficient altitude during a training run!

  199. NZ Police shaking down commentators on a list they’ve been given. Given the competence and efficiency of Police, you can’t help but think that maybe the list pre-existed the Christchurch massacre.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mKeNsNw284c

    Gee, didn’t he handle that well!
    Clearly recruiting standards in NZ police have lowered since I last paid attention to NZ Plod.
    Those two girlies aren’t exactly going to fill anybody with confidence.

  200. max

    It’s clear most of us see this as a catastrophe.

    But for others it will be confirmation of their destiny. Like a divine pat on the head. Greater than yours, na na na na naaaa !

  201. The Countess

    Someone from the office of the local Liberal candidate rang yesterday asking if they could put a sign in the front yard. They were told no. In no uncertain terms. I live in a marginal, formerly bellwether electorate.
    I wonder if I matter now?

  202. stackja

    Cathédrale Notre Dame Paris 22 minutes ago webcam

    Current Local Time in Paris: 06:33 – There is currently morning twilight (Sunrise: 06:58 – Sunset: 20:43)

  203. Des Deskperson

    ‘Andrew Braddock, Fenner (ACT) Quote: “You could say that I live the Canberra dream. I’m a public servant.”

    Holder of an office of profit under the Crown.’

    It should be ‘was a public servant’. APS employees must resign if they wish to contest an election to a Commonwealth or State House of Parliament or the Legislative Assembly of the ACT or Northern Territory.

    I assume he has done this, its pretty much a stardard part of any induction briefing and in any case he may have been directed to do so.

    Former APS employees who unsuccessfully stood for election are entitled to return to the service without a recruitment process.

    One hopes that Mr Braddock, while he was still an APS employee, did not use any Commonwealth resources -stationary, photocopying, IT – to support his personal political ambitions. That would have been a prima facie breach of s. 13(8) of the Public service Act 1999.

    a

  204. Mother Lode

    I received a test message supposedly from the ATO addressed to CON telling me to contact them about an ‘important matter’.

    No accent in the typing.

  205. Atoms for Peace

    Just think of all those gambling wins which are not taxed at present. Surely some rent seeking Rasputins must have whispered that in Labor’s ear by now.

  206. Knuckle Dragger

    The preposterously-named Sarrah Le Marquand has opined in the Tele.

    She states, with no hint of sarcasm or self-awareness, that she ‘along with millions of Australian women’ know better than Wigney J, who presided in that matter. Yes, really.

    This twit further said that the contradictory statements made throughout by young Norvill didn’t matter because vagina, and that the judge ‘chose to believe’ Rush. Downtrodden women everywhere, rah rah rah, and that there’s ‘no such thing as a trial by media’.

    No mention that it was Rush v Tele, not Rush v Norvill.

    No mention that Norvill didn’t want to testify but was coerced to by the Tele after the shitfight kicked off.

    Nope, just a sad day that women aren’t to be believed, and that they must be. What astounding arrogance.

    Unpredictably, though, she is being savaged in the comments by men and women alike. The only supporting punter was a lady named Edith, who simply said ‘No woman would do that’.

    I said something about vultures coming home to roost. This encapsulates it perfectly.

    Sorry ’bout that ladies. Thank your bearded, stinking, one eyed virtue signalling vagina parading femmo mates for the rabbits.

  207. struth

    Australia is not yet a high-taxing country by European standards. Yet Australia now risks heading in that direction

    Where do we get these morons?

    Do they just look at PAYG?

  208. Helen

    Remind me, how does bowen the magnificent do his franking credit wizdardry?

    Someone is telling pensioners are exempt, but I thought there was a cut off date, not widely advertised?

  209. EvilElvis

    Elvis flattened a shed at Essendon Airport by dropping from insufficient altitude during a training run!

    Those were the days. Good times!

  210. calli

    Thank you for the beautiful banner, Sinc.

  211. rickw

    Those two girlies aren’t exactly going to fill anybody with confidence.

    I didn’t notice if they were armed or not, if they were, what’s the point of gun control if The State is handing them out to people not qualified to collect garbage?

  212. dopey

    Donate to the Chris Bowen Notre Dame rebuilding fund. 86% tax, 13% union safety training.

  213. C.L.

    So horrible to watch the massive fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Perhaps flying water tankers could be used to put it out. Must act quickly!

    Parisian firemen have actually responded, pointing out that the force of water-bombing would endanger the structure. Trump meant well – and he has more expertise with buildings than most of his detractors (yes, he is already being condemned at far left-wing fake news site, news.com) – but this probably wasn’t a great idea.

  214. C.L.

    Quote: “I was raised with recycled everything, composting toilets and koalas in the backyard.”
    ——-
    Her fascinating koala-composting hobby obviously boosts Emerald’s overall SMUG rating.

    Ahahahahahahahaha.
    She probably thinks dangling participles are crystal earrings with healing properties.

  215. min

    Chloe tells us on Age front page that Bill is a feminist. Pity journos did not check with the Chiquita mushroom ladies or his ex wife who was given the flick at the footy as he had got then current mistress pregnant .
    Now how did that happen ? having unprotected sex ?. Just a reminder to voters, he has a history of screwing and leaving the screwed in the lurch, don’t let it be you .
    Unprotected sex seems to be his thing that could leave an STD a serious tax deficit. That’ s not the word I want butCats can put another in

  216. C.L.

    Caroline Perks

    “I have had to fight against the systemic misogyny in the workplace, pushing back on not being taken seriously and being referred to as ‘sweetheart’.”

    She has a healthy chest. Does she deserve a pass? Caroline Perks. I say yes.

  217. Mother Lode

    Is numbers off gloating about the near destruction of an icon of Western civilization?

    He would likely consider it as emblematic of his profound love people that he would prefer those grey drab concrete monstrosities with windows like lifeless sunken eyes and that seem to radiate desolation all around them, the sort of soulless inescapable blocks such as the communists used to build to pen in the proletariat, to cathedrals such as Notre Dame.

    I think there is not a single aspect of human existence where he would not opt to be the loose, leaking sphincter.

  218. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    MP Bill Shorten expecting child with Chloe Bryce

    LEADING Labor MP Bill Shorten has confirmed he’s expecting a child with girlfriend Chloe Bryce, the daughter of the Governor-General, as both battle messy divorces with their previous partners.
    August 16, 200911:43pm

    LEADING Labor MP Bill Shorten has confirmed he’s expecting a child with girlfriend Chloe Bryce, the daughter of the Governor-General, as both battle messy divorces with their previous partners.

    Mr Shorten, 42, and sometimes touted as a future Prime Minister, told The Sunday Telegraph the baby was due in January.

    Contacted to comment, Mr Shorten’s estranged wife, Debbie Beale, said, “You’re tempting me”, before declining to comment.

    Friends say Ms Beale has observed that it was “interesting that Mr Shorten and Ms Bryce are expecting a baby, while both remain married to other people”.

    Mr Shorten said it was obviously a happy event for the new couple, but he was not prepared to make any further comment.

    He said when it came to protecting his first child from the media, it was “best to start the way you intend to finish”.

    He said neither he nor Ms Bryce knew the sex of the baby.

    Mr Shorten, a former national secretary of the Australian Workers’ Union, became the face of the 2006 Beaconsfield mine disaster before entering Parliament at the 2007 election.

    The now Parliamentary Secretary for Disabilities left his wife, Ms Beale, for the daughter of Kevin Rudd’s newly appointed Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, around August last year.

    Ms Beale is the daughter of wealthy Melbourne investor and former Liberal frontbencher Julian Beale.

    Through her family connections, she was widely seen as assisting Mr Shorten’s acceptance by business – an acceptance widely likened to that given another former Melbourne union leader, Bob Hawke.

    They have no children.

    Ms Beale’s father, Julian, is also understood to have been deeply angered by Mr Shorten’s treatment of his daughter, telling friends, “She’ll never vote Labor again.” Mr Beale also declined to comment to The Sunday Telegraph.

    Labor insiders yesterday were surprised to hear of Mr Shorten’s news. A spokeswoman for the Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, said Ms Bryce had a firm policy of not talking about family matters.

    Mr Shorten is understood to have separated from Ms Beale after he told her at an AFL game at the MCG that he didn’t “think” he “wanted to be married any more”.

    Strange what you find on past news sites, isn’t it?

  219. Oh come on

    Convo’s dried up

  220. Oh come on

    Help me out here guys

  221. Knuckle Dragger

    Thanks.

    I’d forgotten about the Hero of Beaconsfield.

  222. jupes

    She has a healthy chest. Does she deserve a pass? Caroline Perks. I say yes.

    Could be the photo, but she also has a hint of a moustache. I say no.

  223. Knuckle Dragger

    Snowtown in SA about to go up in flames.

    Apparently decomposing bodies are highly combustible.

    I bet there’s a cheap energy source in there somewhere.

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