Open Forum: April 20, 2019

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1,963 Responses to Open Forum: April 20, 2019

  1. struth

    KD
    He’s trying to push start his electric communist policy vehicle , and can’t work out why the engine won’t turn over.

  2. calli

    Why do people continue to perpetrate the ideas of Father Christmas and the Easter Bunny to their children knowing full well it is a lie?

    Why indeed. Why read them fairy tales and pretend that elves live in the bottom of the garden? Or that ducks can talk or elephants fly?

    Eventually those children grow up, and they know it’s fantasy. But their imaginations are sparked with a marvellous idea – not everything is as it seems. (Except the poor children of the Gradgrinds of this world – didn’t turn out too well for them).

  3. Leigh Lowe

    Gab

    #2992832, posted on April 20, 2019 at 10:45 am

    Sky writing happening over Melbourne now. A cross equals love, but written in symbols.

    Love it!

    No, wait it says … + = ♡
    It is an imcomplete maths equation.
    Ask a sciency STEM cat to decode.

  4. OldOzzie

    Infidel Tiger
    #2992827, posted on April 20, 2019 at 10:43 am

    BREAKING NEWS:
    Harry Trigoboff (Meriton) wins the competition to rebuild Notre Dame.

    In a righteous world Triguboff would be in jail for urban terrorism.

    Golden Rule in Life as a potential Buyer/Investor

    Don’t buy any Apartment built by Meriton/Harry Trigoboff

  5. feelthebern

    Actually, I should have said: The cross equals love.

    Gab that’s an ad for Tourism Sydney.
    It means The cross (kings cross) equals love (what Tourism Sydney thinks is love).

  6. miltonf

    The Patriarch by David Nasaw.

    Thanks!

  7. feelthebern

    Leigh Lowe is an imposter.
    He says he’s a white male, but posts an emoji.
    Let the shamening begin.
    Game of Thrones style.

  8. Farmer Gez

    True dinks, I sometimes chatted with Cardinal Pell (is George still a member?).

    Is Pell still a Qantas club member?
    Hmmm…would the wee twee leprechaun leader allow a chance to virtue signal go by without action?

    The answer is NO.

  9. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘What else are those in the trenches to do when their uniformed generals and civic leaders turn tail and run?’

    Spot on, areff.

    Oh, and btw the dude Quadrant so thoughtfully provided a photo of in the article is the brother of the burglar, thief and r#pist my friend had interaction with.

  10. Fisky

    Oh dear! Was Dolly Downer trying to interfere in the US election on behalf of the Deep State?

    George Papadopoulos
    @GeorgePapa19
    ·
    Apr 19
    Here is the incredible part, and why I can’t wait for the transcript of my meeting with Downer to be public, and show how Australia was spying on me and the Trump campaign. I never said the word “dirt” to the FBI or Mueller. Where did they get this term? Downer is very exposed

  11. Notafan

    Those people in the UK claiming there will be no food for their children should have thought twice about having them, all were born after the climate scam became fashionable.

    As for Gaia god Attenborough, the presenter was quite right to question his infallibility.

  12. feelthebern

    Yes Fisky.
    I can’t wait.

  13. feelthebern

    If I was Downer, I would actually be concerned.
    Anyone who can expose the Clinton Crime Cartel usually comes a cropper.

  14. Infidel Tiger

    Downer is too stupid to be the spy.

    I imagine he is the pasty.

    Going to be great when he is executed.

  15. Notafan

    Gab

    Some people must cling to their vincible ignorance and smug superiority.

    It’s how they get through the day.

  16. Leigh Lowe

    OldOzzie

    #2992804, posted on April 20, 2019 at 10:23 am

    An Actual Funny Article from Phillip Adams in The Australian

    Not really.
    For 50 years his shtick has remained unchanged and comprises two key elements : –
    1. Phatty Adams always portrays himself as being at the centre of Australian culture and politics. Besty to the great and good.
    2. Very badly constructed alliterations. Or, if you prefer, “pompous prognostications pepper and proliferate every pisspoor paragraph”

  17. Leigh Lowe

    Downer is too stupid to be the spy.

    I imagine he is the pasty

    I presume you meant “patsy”.
    Or maybe not.

  18. Gab

    There are plenty of scientists and ordinary folk who have concluded that the most rational conclusion is that God exists.

    Yeah but none were as smart as Dr BG.

  19. Knuckle Dragger

    ftb,

    Good spot. Emoji Watch still lives.

    If that’s the real LL that posted that, I will be totes devo.

  20. Ellie

    Calli, my favourite author when I was a child was Roald Dahl. What an imagination! Read every book more than once.

  21. Oh dear! Was Dolly Downer trying to interfere in the US election on behalf of the Deep State?

    Collusion! Busted hard drives broken with ball peen hammers and wiped, what with a cloth! 40 years of darkness! Earthquakes, volcanoes! : The dead rising from the grave! Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together, mass hysteria!

    I hear the plan to resurrect Hillary did not turn out just as planned!

  22. Leigh Lowe

    feelthebern

    #2992846, posted on April 20, 2019 at 10:55 am

    Leigh Lowe is an imposter.
    He says he’s a white male, but posts an emoji.

    I am transitioning as we speak.

    Let the shamening begin.
    Game of Thrones style.

    See above.
    Nothing to see on a naked stroll except bandages and catheters.

  23. Notafan

    Children love all that stuff, my nephew insisted dinosaurs were still alive, Pokemon were real, Harry Potter was a real boy and many more, the imaginary world is a magical part of childhood, that sadly is too soon grown out of.

    Father Christmas and the Easter bunny are not central to Christianity and children aren’t stupid.

  24. Knuckle Dragger

    If I was Pat Dodson I’d be treading vewy, vewy carefully right now.

    If Billy wins, Pat the Irish/Malaysian/Aboriginal will find himself in the position of being the Big Man of all the tribal Big Men, and with his grubby paws on $33 billion per year.

    Consequently, he will become ‘uncle’ not just to Shorten, but to each and every fauxboriginal in the country as well as the actual ones – all of whom will be banging on his doorstep with their hands out.

    Be careful what you wish for. Cuz.

  25. Knuckle Dragger

    Sorry.

    ‘Cuz’ is so 2000.

    Its bruss. Bruss.

    #wherethehellistestpattern

  26. Bruce of Newcastle

    The fun thing is that when Barr indicts Downer and requests extradition it will be PM Shorten who has to make the decision whether to defy Barr or send a very senior Lib off to jail. Tough choice…

  27. Leigh Lowe

    I🤬🥔.
    He is a🥜.
    He also dobbed on 🚔.
    🖕and burn in🔥.

  28. Bruce of Newcastle

    Children love all that stuff, my nephew insisted dinosaurs were still alive

    They are! I have one as my gravatar. 😀

  29. Overburdened

    Surely it would not be too much to ask for the clown who constantly demonstrates his stupid rot for the purpose of aggravating the participants on this site to just roll up into a ball and expire.

    I am happy to debate and for people to disagree with my admittedly skewed view on topics.

    As a rule I refuse to waste time on fuckwits.

    I have had the pleasure of meeting many annoying people over the journey, taking the opportunity to practically demonstrate to them the error of their ways whenever possible.

    I think an extended period of therapy would do the resident clown no good, however the therapist would feel greatly rewarded.

  30. miltonf

    Downer signed us up to the ICC in 2002. Not really on the side of everyman at all

  31. Gab

    CL, that De Mattei article is superb!

  32. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Books are better than most of the easily accessible internet links to pagan/Christian iconographic melding. I can’t think of any one scholarly article that easily covers the whole field. There is an awful lot of New Age dross on the internet about it all which is best avoided.

    Plenty of good stuff in these two books:
    Christianity and Paganism in the Fourth to Eighth Centuries, Ramsay Macmullen, Yale UP, 1997
    The Barbarian Conversion: from Paganism to Christianity, Richard Fletcher, Henry Holt & Co, 1998

    Two good accounts of folkloric beliefs, collected some times ago, are:
    In Search of Lost Gods: a guide to British folklore, Ralph Whitlock, Phaedon, 1979
    Albion, A Guide to Legendary Britain, Jennifer Westwood, Granada Publishing, 1985

    Very useful too, especially for its contextual chapters 1-6, including ch 5 on Calendar Feasts is:

    Myths and Legends of the Celts, James MacKillop, Penguin 2005 – for about $25 worth purchasing as a comprehensive guide to the Hiberno-British traditions.

  33. Leigh Lowe

    Good spot. Emoji Watch still lives.

    If that’s the real LL that posted that, I will be totes devo.

    I don’t think a chap who says “totes devo” can be in any way critical of another chap (or sheila-in-waiting) who posts emojis.
    🖕

  34. lotocoti

    After post Roman Britannia got a bit of a mention in the Fred Gargantua, I did a little grazing on the amusing 10 minute series (plenty of famines and worthies getting slightly murdered/succumbing to knife related accidents).
    The biggest takeaways: The importance of secure borders and the mechanisation of agriculture.
    Neither of which seem particularly popular these days.

  35. Ellie

    Poor James in James and the Giant Peach. His parents were eaten by a rhinoceros that had escaped from the zoo. He then had to live with his abusive aunts, Spiker and Sponge. He befriends a whole lot of talking bugs inside a peach, which ends up rolling over Spiker and Sponge, killing them. Loved it!

  36. miltonf

    JC you are absolutely right. Romney is bad rubbish.

  37. calli

    children aren’t stupid.

    Ahhhhh…but they’re very crafty. They lure their parents into perpetuating presents and chocolates.

    Why, my three (plus the three extras) get their Lindt bunnies well into their late 30’s. No gifts from Santa, but. I drew the line.

  38. miltonf

    Can’t believe Utah sent him to DC as a senator.

  39. calli

    JRR Tolkien wrote a beaut essay, “On Fairy Stories”. It’s all about sub-creation and well worth reading. It’s usually published with another story, “Leaf by Niggle”, the end of which is every frazzled, time-poor creative person’s dream.

    This is serious stuff and not to be trifled with.

  40. Notafan

    BoN

    After my nephew’s wicked aunt addicted him to dinosaurs his parents took him to that Jurassic world exhibition.

    He insisted they were all real.

    Much fun for everyone.

    Children give us much joy and that ability to live in their imaginations is an important part of it.

  41. Notafan

    Lindt bunnies for all mine too Calli.

  42. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Of course, you can always read Dan Brown’s ‘The Da Vinci Code’ for a popular take on these traditions and give numerous scholars conniptions. However, when the character of Langdon (a ‘symbologist’) gives an account of some of the parallel similarities in traditions and belief systems of pagans and Christians you do get a thumbnail sketch of some of the main ones: the dying and rising ‘seasonal’ gods, the dates of the Spring and Winter festivals, the survival of Halloween and its ‘ghost’ pumpkins, the trident symbol of the sea king and the devil, the goddess and her son (Isis and Horus) and melded gods, such as Serapis, a mix of the Egyptian Osiris and Apis, a Greek god favoured by the Ptolemies.

  43. OldOzzie

    Leigh Lowe
    #2992855, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:01 am

    2. Very badly constructed alliterations. Or, if you prefer, “pompous prognostications pepper and proliferate every piss poor paragraph”

    I like that – hope you don’t mind if I use in the future

  44. mh

    Mitt Romney is the offspring of swamp creatures.

    So glad Obummer beat him.

  45. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Lindt bunnies are definitely the go. Especially after they reduce down from $5.50 to $4.5o as they always do three days before Good Friday. It’s a tradition in itself!

  46. Gab

    yesterday was also the feast of Saint Ælfheah the Martyr: Anglo-Saxon nobleman, Benedictine monk, Abbot of Bath, Bishop of Winchester, Metropolitan Archbishop of Canterbury, and liturgical reformer—abducted by Vikings and murdered April 19 in AD 1012, after refusing to be ransomed.

  47. Notafan

    What happened to the Monday forum? Was going to read the tail end.

  48. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    If I was Pat Dodson I’d be treading vewy, vewy carefully right now.

    If Billy wins, Pat the Irish/Malaysian/Aboriginal will find himself in the position of being the Big Man of all the tribal Big Men, and with his grubby paws on $33 billion per year.

    Consequently, he will become ‘uncle’ not just to Shorten, but to each and every fauxboriginal in the country as well as the actual ones – all of whom will be banging on his doorstep with their hands out.

    The resulting welter of corruption and misappropriation will make the Borgia Popes look angelic, by comparison.

  49. Fisky

    Wow, just saw an interview with Norman Podheretz. Even he’s on the Trump Train now. Must be getting lonely for Bill Kristol and his shrinking band of losers!

  50. calli

    A story about two writers of Fairy Tales and a curious idea – what if there was a true myth?

  51. Knuckle Dragger

    Apologies, LL.

    An error of judgment was made.

    You are, as always, amazeballs.

  52. calli

    Nota, the Monday Forum shape-shifted its way into oblivion.

    Mercifully.

  53. Notafan

    Now I’ll never know 🙂

  54. Leigh Lowe

    I like that – hope you don’t mind if I use in the future

    Feel free.
    Once something is released onto the pages of the Cat it is an open access, free range, royalty free licence for anyone to use at will.

  55. calli

    It’s so far back it’s in the archives.

    RIP

  56. Infidel Tiger

    Obama’s only legacy is saving us from Mccain and Romney.

    Imagine how much treasure and blood those monsters would have lost for the evil
    Neo-con cause.

  57. Stimpson J. Cat

    Father Christmas and the Easter bunny are not central to Christianity and children aren’t stupid.

    I didn’t say Father Christmas and the Easter were central to Christianity.
    I also didn’t say children were stupid.

    What I will say is this:

    Only the madman is absolutely sure.
    And I am a madman and I am not sure.

  58. Notafan

    And I didn’t say you did.

  59. Gab

    Notafan
    #2992898, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:37 am
    Now I’ll never know 🙂

    Trust me when I say there wasn’t much on there worth knowing.

  60. Leigh Lowe

    JC

    #2992873, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:17 am

    You know what, it’s a good thing Obama won in 2012. The country missed a bullet.

    Romney is a turd.
    Much pontificating about Trump “debasing the office of President” by asking his staff to defend him against an illegal investigation based on Hilarious’s bought and paid for “piss dossier”.
    No mention of The Magic Negro mobilising security forces to nobble an opponent’s campaign.
    .
    PS … Shouldn’t you be Passovering or something today JC?

  61. Knuckle Dragger

    In its wisdom, the Yarra City Council has come up with a solution for the gigantic shit magnet the North Richmond safe injecting rooms have predictably become.

    They’ll extend its opening times by three hours, every day.

    Well done, dickheads. You make Numbers look like Stephen Hawking.

  62. OldOzzie

    Election the first skirmish of a long generational war

    Bernard Salt

    It would seem that the upcoming election is to be fought along generational lines. This is the first skirmish in what is likely to be a series of pitched battles that will be fought throughout the 2020s.

    The losers will be the baby boomers; the winners will be their children’s generation (the millennials). Whether the upcoming election delivers a decisive victory to the millennials over the boomers remains to be seen. But even if they are not successful this time, there will be ample opportunity for the millennials down the track to finish off the straggling, retreating, retiring baby-boomer army.

    And here is why this generational war will not cease until the baby-boomer life form has finally ceased to exist. It is because the Australian people cannot afford to fund baby boomers in retirement in the manner to which they have become accustomed. They are too big of a group to start with; and they simply will not die off in sufficient numbers before they consume vast resources in the form of pensions and healthcare support. That is the blunt truth.

    The solution from a baby-boomer point of view is to be self-supporting; to make sacrifices during your working life so as to be fully independent of government support.

    The problem is that any pile of savings, no matter how legitimately accumulated by the rules of the day in one decade can be reinterpreted as illegitimate (even greedy) through a different lens in a subsequent decade. There is no defence because the objective is to clip pools of savings from people unlikely or unable to defend that pool.

    What the next generation of taxpayers needs right now is a narrative that attaches fault — such as “they’re greedy” or “they had it easy” — to the baby boomers so as to rationalise the redirection of resources to other parts of the economy.

    But is this a smart approach at this election?

    Did you know that by the time of the upcoming election there will be 7.3 million millennials aged 18-37 and who are naturally enough quite concerned about their ability to access to the housing market in their preferred ­location?

    So surely this is a young-people versus an old-people battle?

    Baby boomers, on the other hand, now aged 58-77, comprise just 4.8 million Australians. It is true that there’s another 1.3 million pre-boomers aged 78 and older, but I doubt that they’re as incensed, or as motivated, as are active-retiree baby boomers.

    The boomers believe they have a window within which to enjoy the retirement that they have worked for, planned for, made sacrifices for, and which ­extends from the early 60s to the late 70s. This is the active retirement stage of the life cycle that ­requires some level of funding for cruises, for golf clubs, for gardening makeovers, and for the wicked and wanton indulgence of their grandchildren.

    New policies reducing retirement incomes of active retirees would reshape retirement dreams. Boomers fear that much of what they thought they could enjoy in their retirement years will be swept away by a change of rules, by what the economists call a manifestation of sovereign risk. Boomers feel that they’ve been dudded on the social contract that has underpinned their retirement planning.

    But here’s the thing. Boomers can feel duped, dudded, done-over, betrayed all they like, and it won’t change the long-term outcome because the narrative says that they built their retirement dreams on a false logic that is only now being corrected. Whether this is true, or even fair, is not the point. The point is, will this narrative work at the next election?

    Because I think it will work.

    Oh, and do not think, my baby-boomer friends, that acquiescing on this issue at this election will cause demands for intergenerational wealth transfers to cease and desist in the future. If the proponents of these generationally targeted policies are rewarded in May, you can be assured that political strategists at the state level, and at every future federal election, will come knocking on retirees’ doors demanding more.

    The development of a rationalising narrative is simple: you lot had it easy when you were our age … we’re doing it tough. I’m surprised there’s no #boomerprivilege hashtag trending as yet.

    And here is why this battle will continue during the 2020s. It’s the irresistible weight of numbers: the voting potency of boomers will weaken as they approach the great abyss. When politicians understand that there is no significant voter backlash in taking funds from one group and delivering to another, they’ll be pursuing the concept of intergenerational fairness at every future election.

    Welcome to retirement, boomers.

    There’s a couple of defences that could be deployed by the boomer forces.

    The property industry could be harnessed to predict a disastrous effect on property values. The problem is that the millennials will say, “you beauty, we can now afford an apartment in Sydney’s Surry Hills as opposed to Homebush”.

    What if boomers got their millennial kids to support the status quo? I’m not sure that boomers would ask this of their children and, besides, the millennials might say “sure thing Mum and Dad”, and then vote for the changes anyway.

    The millennials might be persuaded to the view that retirees have a right to enjoy savings legitimately accumulated under rules that prevailed in the past and that should not be changed, because that would limit their ability to fund luxuries and cruises in retirement. You can try this logic, but I do not think it’s gonna fly.

    This is a demographic issue. A big concentrated chunk of young Australians (aged 18-37) galvanised over a single issue such as housing affordability, is more politically potent than a smaller group strung out over a broader slice of the life cycle, where only one in four (or five) has a sufficient savings pool to be at risk from the changes.

    Here is a case of a majority leveraging power over a minority in order to achieve an income redistribution.

    The narrative is important ­because without a credible rationale this looks like bullying.

    The problem for the proponents of rule changes affecting ­retirement incomes (for example, franking credits, negative gearing, capital gains) is that galvanised young people cluster in inner-city electorates — no doubt yearning for a piece of inner-city real estate — and so this policy may only enhance ­existing margins.

    The demographic strength that incensed, self-funded, one-in-four (or five) active-retiree baby boomers have is that they are scattered across middle and outer suburbia, including in swing seats like those on the edges of Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney.

    The proponents of intergenerational fairness need to connect with these swing-seat baby boomers on other issues such as health (includes cancer) and infrastructure, while defenders of the status quo must whip up a perfect storm of outer-suburban indignation at this egregious betrayal of hardworking older Australians.

    You get the picture.

    The battle lines are drawn.

    We’ll get a result of this first real intergenerational skirmish on Saturday, May 18, at around eight o’clock in the evening.

    The battle will play out in the swinging outer-suburbs of our biggest cities.

  63. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    In its wisdom, the Yarra City Council has come up with a solution for the gigantic shit magnet the North Richmond safe injecting rooms have predictably become.

    I’m remembering the story that emerged just after the first safe injecting rooms opened up, in Sydney.

    One of the first customers injected himself, then lit a cigarette.

    “I’m sorry” said the attendant.”This is a non – smoking area.”

  64. Stimpson J. Cat

    And I didn’t say you did.

    Didn’t you?
    My mistake.
    Lucky I wasn’t absolutely sure, isn’t it?

  65. Stimpson J. Cat

    See how easy it is to correct a mistaken belief?

  66. stackja

    Knuckle Dragger
    #2992907, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:48 am

    Councillors
    9 Councillors elected in October 2016.

    Langridge – Cr Stephen Jolly
    [Stephen Jolly is an Australian politician, socialist activist, author and construction worker. A councillor in the City of Yarra, he was the lead candidate for the Victorian Socialists electoral alliance at the 2018 state election. Wikipedia]
    Langridge – Cr Amanda Stone
    [Amanda Stone (@AmandaStoneGRN). Greens councillor in Yarra for a sustainable, well-designed, fair and creative city. Yarra.]
    Langridge – Cr Danae Bosler – Mayor

    Melba – Cr Mi-lin Chen Yi Mei

    Melba – Cr Daniel Nguyen

    Melba – Cr James Searle

    Nicholls – Cr Misha Coleman – Deputy Mayor
    [Misha Coleman. … Misha joined the Nossal Institute in 2016 and has held several CEO and leadership roles in global, animal and environmental health.]
    Nicholls – Cr Jackie Fristacky

    Nicholls – Cr Mike McEvoy

  67. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It is because the Australian people cannot afford to fund baby boomers in retirement in the manner to which they have become accustomed

    Well, keep your filthy paws off the assets of those of us, who are funding our own retirements, is that simple enough?

  68. Leigh Lowe

    miltonf

    #2992877, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:21 am

    JC you are absolutely right. Romney is bad rubbish.

    The trail of emotional scar tissue Trump has left on his opponents is awesome in it’s, well, awesome-acality.
    Hilarious and Romney in particular.
    They both drank their own bath-water about how much more qualified, smarter, experienced and, as Mary Poppins would say, “practically perfect in every way” they were and how much they were going to enjoy doing Trump over.
    Then WHAM!
    They wake up on their corner stool with the seconds administering smelling salts and fanning them with sweaty towels.
    They will never watch the replay, of course, but are convinced that Trump got them in the back of the neck with a rabbit punch.

  69. Knuckle Dragger

    You bet, Stack.

    Intellectual amoeba with the combined life experience of a dried palm frond.

  70. OldOzzie

    The Atlantic – Education

    The Disciplines Where No Black People Earn Ph.D.s

    In more than a dozen academic fields—largely STEM related—not a single black student earned a doctoral degree in 2017.

  71. feelthebern

    So which planet does Romney get when he passes over.

  72. cohenite

    His leadership has everything to do with divide and conquer, using fear instead of hope, hate instead of love, and greed instead of generosity.

    The troll manifests the defining characteristic of the fucking left: emotional conviction wrapped in impervious egocentricity. They are literally trapped, emotionally, in Piaget’s Preoperational stage. Facts, evidence, reason and rationality are irrelevant. Once they invest in a cause they invest their whole emotional being in it. It becomes a belief system, a religion. The examples of causes which the left invest in prove this:

    1 Trump is bad
    2 Obama and Clinton are good
    3 P.ll is a r.pist. Tits isn’t
    4 AGW is real
    5 I.lam is good, Christianity is bad
    6 Communism is good, Western democracy is bad

    And so on. Nothing will convince them otherwise. You could be Moses bringing down the word of God and they still would resist.

  73. Dr Faustus

    I’m enjoying the sight and sound of ‘Mediscare’ Bill Shorten, whining like a bitch that ALP policy has been misrepresented and demanding Facebook remove ‘fake news’ posts about false death tax plans.

    Everybody with a double digit IQ knows that Shorten would bend Australia over for the unlubricated insertion of the Greens Death Tax Pineapple quicker than you can say ‘Yarralumla’.

  74. mh

    Donald Trump Plays Golf with Rush Limbaugh in Florida After Release of Mueller Report

    The White House confirmed to reporters that Trump played golf with Limbaugh and a “couple friends.”

    Limbaugh did not host his radio show on Friday in the usual timeslot of 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. Eastern. Conservative author Mark Steyn guest-hosted the program.

    On Thursday, Limbaugh denounced the Robert Mueller report as “made to order for people who want to continue running this operation to get rid of Trump.”

    “This report could have been issued in one page: we found no evidence of collusion between the Russians and the Trump campaign, period, and we don’t have enough to say that there was any obstruction of justice,” he said.

    Trump has a good relationship with Limbaugh and even phoned into the show to congratulate him on its 30th anniversary.

    “You’re a very special man, Rush, and you have people that love you. I’m one of them,” he said. “But you’re a very, very special guy. What you do for this country, people have no idea how important your voice is.

    Breitbart

  75. OldOzzie

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2992915, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:56 am

    It is because the Australian people cannot afford to fund baby boomers in retirement in the manner to which they have become accustomed

    Well, keep your filthy paws off the assets of those of us, who are funding our own retirements, is that simple enough?

    +1

  76. Leigh Lowe

    Did you know that by the time of the upcoming election there will be 7.3 million millennials aged 18-37 and who are naturally enough quite concerned about their ability to access to the housing market in their preferred ­location?

    Since when did a roof over your head “in your preferred location” become a basic human right?

  77. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2992908, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:49 am
    Election the first skirmish of a long generational war

    Bernard Salt

    I believe “aged care gulags” await the unwanted Baby Boomers. In 50 years it will be the Millennials.

  78. Mark A

    Notafan
    #2992898, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:37 am

    Now I’ll never know 🙂

    Despair not.

  79. Oh come on

    It’s sad what has happened to Romney. He went down in 2012 but at least came away looking like an honourable man. He’s trashed all that in his doomed vanity project – an ongoing attempt to create an opening to primary Trump.

    No, Romney. You are not the soul of the conservative movement. You’re a whiny RINO that no one likes.

  80. Knuckle Dragger

    Today, 20 April, is Hitler’s birthday.

    He spent his last birthday in 1945 snivelling in his bunker, as Soviet heavy artillery pulverised central Berlin from their positions east of the ruined city.

    I’m not 100% sure, but I think this is where the phrase ‘do not poke the bears’ comes from.

  81. stackja

    AFL announce Birds of Tokyo to perform at the MCG on Anzac Day
    James Mottershead and Aaron Langmaid, Herald Sun
    April 20, 2019 8:30am
    Subscriber only

    The AFL has come under fire after announcing Birds of Tokyo as next Thursday’s pre-game entertainment for the blockbuster Anzac Day clash between Collingwood and Essendon.

    The announcement has caused a stir with fans and footy identities, with many saying the decision is disrespectful to the occasion, while others have pointed out the pre-game entertainment is nothing new.

    Why not the LeMay Fire Birds?

  82. Knuckle Dragger

    Bloody hell, cohenite.

    All I was going to say is that Numbers’ preferred narrative of loving your enemies will get you burgled, r#aped, tortured and killed before your body’s fed through a woodchipper.

    Yours is much better.

  83. stackja

    BO was a success? Arab Spring?

  84. DrBeauGan

    All that is required is to believe Christ Jesus. Which sounds easy, but it is actually very hard to do as you yourself demonstrate. Eph 2:8-9:

    BoN, if faith were catching, I should probably have caught it off you. You are a good man, and it shows.

    I don’t feel any need for faith. I’m a happy person, I am content to pursue truth and have no need for the certainty of actually catching it. If anything the opposite; certainty as Stimpy said above is for the mad people. Doubt everything and stay relatively sane is my watchword.

    I think I have been put off religion mainly by religious people. I can see why so many need it, to fill a hole inside them. This is painfully apparent in the lefty religion of global warming catastrophism and feminism, with a side helping of pretending to care about trannies, poor devils. But I see it with the Abrahamic religions too. Religious doesn’t equal nice, in general.

    You do set a good example of Christianity, not everyone does.

    This doesn’t have much bearing on the truth of the various faiths, but it says something about why people have those faiths. Lefties are clearly often motivated by a need to demonstrate piety. Piety is a poor substitute for morality, but it’s as close as some get.

  85. C.L.

    Archbishop Freier also said Australia had become increasingly secularised, which meant Christianity was known by fewer people.

    That diminishing knowledge, especially among the young, presents churches with a major challenge. But regardless of our individual beliefs, Easter, or Passover, or a jolly good long weekend, offer the chance of a fresh start, relaxation and good times with family and friends. Happy Easter from The Weekend Australian.

    I’m reminded of this passage by Chesterton in St Thomas Aquinas:

    The Saint is a medicine because he is an antidote. Indeed that is why the saint is often a martyr; he is mistaken for a poison because he is an antidote. He will generally be found restoring the word to sanity by exaggerating whatever the world neglects, which is by no means always the same element in every age. Yet each generation seeks its saint by instinct; and he is not what people want, but rather what the people need… Therefore it is the paradox of history that each generation is converted by the saint who contradicts it most.

  86. stackja

    Knuckle Dragger
    #2992933, posted on April 20, 2019 at 12:08 pm

    NKVD used lumber camp buzz saws in gulags.

  87. Cactus

    France with an eye to the future should just rebuild Notre Dame as a Mosque. Hagia Sophia redux.

  88. Knuckle Dragger

    It’s very, very hard for the AFL’s ‘marketing’ department to come up with a bigger faux pas than hiring Birds of Tokyo for next week.

    Good band? Yep. Appropriate and fit for purpose? Yeah nah.

    Can’t wait for 2020. Apparently there’ll be a re-enactment of Japs beheading Australian soldiers in New Guinea with the Horst Wessel Song playing in the background.

  89. Gab

    Christianity was known by fewer people.

    That diminishing knowledge, especially among the young,

    The good Abp needs to trot along to a Latin Mass and see all the young people and young families attending the traditional Mass of the saints and martyrs. The numbers are amazing. Thankful for BXVI and his Summorum Pontificum encyclical.

    Once you go Latin Mass, you never go back.

  90. 1735099

    Beria could have learned some things……

    In case you’ve forgotten, Mueller is a lifelong Republican.
    This has nothing to do with Democrats/Republicans, and everything to do with probity.
    Trump is a spiv………

  91. Gab

    Once you go Traditional Latin Mass, you never go back to the norvus ordo missie

  92. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    He spent his last birthday in 1945 snivelling in his bunker, as Soviet heavy artillery pulverised central Berlin from their positions east of the ruined city.

    Napoleon’s ghost in the background, muttering “I told you, you should have stayed out of Russia..”

  93. Rafiki redux

    Li zzie at 11.16: thankyou.

  94. Fisky

    Lord Ahmed of Rotherham to face trial on child sex charges

    Yeah, it’s really difficult to figure out how the police and the P*ki community in Rotherham got the signal that it was ok to [email protected] white girls (or, in the case of the police, that being a [email protected] is far worse than being a [email protected], so shut up you bigots and enjoy your diversity).

  95. Oh come on

    In case you’ve forgotten, Mueller is a lifelong Republican

    Who, for some reason, staffed his investigation with a bunch of deeply partisan Democrats. Numpty clearly hasn’t heard of NeverTrump Republicans. What a dummy.

  96. Fisky

    Just wow. So many words in the article and the title will probably not pass moderation, so I’m just giving you the link –

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-south-yorkshire-47969220

  97. Oh great now Mueller is going to indict himself? Great work, Bob Bobby Bob.

  98. Fisky

    My favourite from the article linked – “Lord Ahmed of Rotherham”

    Good lord.

  99. OldOzzie

    LABOR FAIL: WOULD YOU BUY EVEN A TOASTER FROM SHORTEN?

    Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun

    Bill Shorten’s climate stance is all pain without gain

    Bill Shorten is conning you: he is selling you a massive global warming policy without saying what it would cost and what it would do.

    Huh? Would you consider buying even a toaster without knowing either the price or whether it works?

    So why risk buying the Labor leader’s scheme to radically change how we power our businesses and homes?

    Shorten’s con was exposed again this week, when Channel 10 journalist Jonathan Lea asked him five times to tell Australians the cost of his plan to slash the emissions Labor claims are heating the world dangerously.

    Labor says it will cut those emissions by 45 per cent by 2030 — and not just from power stations but from the whole economy.

    The costs will obviously be massive. Just the emissions cuts we’ve had so far have helped shut power stations and made your electricity expensive.

    So how much more will Labor’s cuts cost?

    Five times Shorten was asked on Tuesday and five times he refused to say. He was also asked several times on Wednesday and again wouldn’t answer.

    He instead offered two red herrings.

    The first is that “inaction on climate change is going to cost Australians in the future”.

    False. As the Chief Scientists admits, nothing Australia does — even scrapping every car and factory — could make any measurable difference to the temperature. We’re too small.

    So Labor’s plan won’t work.

    Indeed, I’ve asked him what difference his policy would make to the temperature and he refuses to say that, either. He does not want you to know it’s all pain for no gain.

    Shorten’s second fake answer on Wednesday was that the economy is “still going to grow” under Labor’s scheme.

    Sure, the economy may still grow, but it will definitely grow slower.

    Economist Brian Fisher of BAEconomics calculates in a peer-reviewed paper that Labor’s plan will cost the economy a cumulative $1000 billion by 2030, even with Labor allowing gassy Australian businesses to pay foreigners to cut their own emissions instead.

    Power prices would jump another 75 per cent. Your wages would rise even slower.

    That is a huge cost and all to make zero difference.

    Doubt me? Then why won’t Shorten tell you either the cost of Labor’s global warming policy or the difference it would make to the temperature?

    If you don’t know either the cost or the benefit, can you risk voting Labor?

    A question to pose to your Kids –

    Then why won’t Shorten tell you either the cost of Labor’s global warming policy or the difference it would make to the temperature?

    If you don’t know either the cost or the benefit, can you risk voting Labor?

  100. Knuckle Dragger

    If you were true to the beliefs you espouse, Crayon Eater, you would have preached some ‘love not hate’ to the Viet Cong. In a rare display of self awareness, you probably realised that you wouldn’t have liked bamboo cages or not having finger and toenails.

    It’s the same as your recent holiday to the US, thinly disguised as an attempt to get money from its residents for your incoherent scrawlings. And then bag half the country on your return, free from repercussions.

    Lofty piety is OK – when it suits you. When the rubber hits the road, however, and reality kicks in you retreat and hide like an Arctic swimmer’s dick.

  101. Fisky

    Lofty piety is OK – when it suits you. When the rubber hits the road, however, and reality kicks in you retreat and hide like an Arctic swimmer’s dick.

    Numbers has a huge contradiction at the heart of his existence – he was a far-left “anti-war” agitator who supported Hanoi’s conquest of S.Vietnam. Which also means, with 100% certainty, he opposed Australia’s welcoming of S.Vietnamese refugees after the war. It kind of means he’s a giant hypocrite when he attacks the federal government’s refugee policies.

  102. C.L.

    The good Abp needs to trot along to a Latin Mass and see all the young people and young families attending the traditional Mass of the saints and martyrs. The numbers are amazing. Thankful for BXVI and his Summorum Pontificum encyclical.

    Once you go Latin Mass, you never go back.

    Until the Church puts aside rancid pride and admits the New Order ‘mass’ was a mistake, things will not get better any time soon. The Catholic Leader (Brisbane”s archdiocesan paper of record) last week reported that an Australian Catholic Bishops Conference study has found the number of Catholics attending Mass has plummeted again; down to 11.8 percent.

  103. Knuckle Dragger

    Zulu,

    Yep.

    One of Adolf’s great mistakes was his belief, no doubt cemented by his successes of 1939 and 1940, that he was a much brighter military star than either Charles XII of Sweden or Napoleon.

    Had he curbed his desire for lebensraum to just Austria and Czechoslovakia, and then pulled his head in he may well have been seen today as equivalent to Frederick the Great or Bismarck.

    But no. Overreach, the classic trap for young players.

  104. rickw

    It’s very, very hard for the AFL’s ‘marketing’ department to come up with a bigger faux pas than hiring Birds of Tokyo for next week.

    Just hilarious, Bombers of Tokyo might have been a better choice.

  105. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Numbers has a huge contradiction at the heart of his existence – he was a far-left “anti-war” agitator who supported Hanoi’s conquest of S.Vietnam.

    The conquest that took place in violation of the Paris Peace Accords, and after the evil debbil debbil Yanks had withdrawn?

  106. feelthebern

    Catholics attending Mass has plummeted again; down to 11.8 percent.

    But Kochie said that Pope Francis would reinvigorate the Church!

  107. Farmer Gez

    I believe “aged care gulags” await the unwanted Baby Boomers. In 50 years it will be the Millennials.

    Far worse for the Millennials.
    At least Boomers made an attempt to personally raise their kids and most Boomer mums worked only part time or waited till the kids were at school.
    Millennial kids can rightly ask their parents why they should give time to them, now they’re old, when they were too busy to spend time with them when they were little children.

  108. Knuckle Dragger

    Gawd. Captain Obvious alert.

    Without the Holocausty bits. Calm down, people.

  109. Steve trickler

    Another thought provoking ride on the Polly Train.

    Where this train ride ends up? Who knows.

    That picture of Michelle Obama sipping wine as Notre-Dame was burning, is a beauty.



  110. rickw

    I don’t feel any need for faith. I’m a happy person, I am content to pursue truth and have no need for the certainty of actually catching it. If anything the opposite; certainty as Stimpy said above is for the mad people. Doubt everything and stay relatively sane is my watchword.

    BG, hopefully your quest for Truth will get you there in the end!

    For some religion is definitely an exercise in hole filling, for many their Faith is the end result of their search for Truth.

  111. John Constantine

    https://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/news/victoria/51m-road-fix-failing-safety-barriers-undermine-princes-highway/news-story/e2d84858e92af29b848d34388956551d?fbclid=IwAR1H8QjIOAb5Syua3hCf9yfAv-JXeQyThyGI5lTPmR_UYh8BRKGeAxVsU8c

    The Weekly Times asked Victorian Roads Minister Jaala Pulford why SSRIP had ignored the warnings.

    Ms Pulford said Regional Roads Victoria had received no warnings on construction standards, but failed to mention if the SSRIP team had been warned.

    “Every one of these lifesaving road safety upgrades are designed by expert engineers who consider the findings of geotechnical investigations, the road’s topography, and the main types of traffic using the road,” Ms Pulford said.

    SSRIP was warned the old shoulder’s crushed rock base would need to be dug out and deepened to 450mm, given it would have thousands of cars and trucks travelling over it each day. But this fundamental warning was ignored.

    “They told us there was a policy of no improvements and just change (extend) the lane,” one expert, who did not wish to be named, said. “They’ve got a policy of only ‘bolting on’ safety infrastructure … not upgrading roads.”

    But without the upgrade the highway is already falling apart.

    East Gippsland MP Tim Bull said it was “staggering” that the government and its agency had not listened to the warnings.

    “If there was any doubt that these works are flawed, the proof is in the fact all motorists can see the road is failing. It’s made road safety worse,” Mr Bull said.

    Country roads die from the edge in, not the top down.

    Common to see cheap and nasty side work that only pushes out the danger and costs to the near term future, and condemns the legacy infastructure.

    Big Australia, once the Ponzi apartment scheme crashes and the voteherds have to be paid out simply will not be able to support the infrastructure needed for the proles to drive arouind and live free lives.

    Cars will have to be rationed.

    Comrades.

  112. Entropy

    Birds of Tokyo should just perform under a nom de plume for the day. Like Enola Gay.

  113. Rafiki redux

    There is much good sense in Salt’s piece, but much left out. How will ethnic bloc voting cut influence public policy? Take death duties, which tax the children and grandkids. If the Chinese and Indian communities have invested in resl estate, they may not like the idea of the tax.

  114. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’m enjoying the sight and sound of ‘Mediscare’ Bill Shorten, whining like a bitch that ALP policy has been misrepresented and demanding Facebook remove ‘fake news’ posts about false death tax plans.

    There will be no death tax under a government he leads?

  115. OldOzzie

    Fisky
    #2992962, posted on April 20, 2019 at 12:32 pm

    Lofty piety is OK – when it suits you. When the rubber hits the road, however, and reality kicks in you retreat and hide like an Arctic swimmer’s dick.

    Numbers has a huge contradiction at the heart of his existence – he was a far-left “anti-war” agitator who supported Hanoi’s conquest of S.Vietnam. Which also means, with 100% certainty, he opposed Australia’s welcoming of S.Vietnamese refugees after the war.

    Second Technical Employee in 1st Start-Up Company was South Vietnamese Refugee – excellent guy – we tried to get married to Ozzie but in the end went back to South Vitenam and married girl put forward by relatives – both great Ozzies now

    Again, Second Technical Employee in 2nd Company Start-Up, was Iranian Refugee who had graduated from Wollongong Uni – also tried to set up with Ozzie Girl, but went back to Iran and married beautiful girl, who the first thing she did when she got to OZ, was to throw away Hijab – he is about as Muslim as I am Catholic – Loves beer, Wine, Spirits and Bacon & Eggs.

    At 30 year celebration dinner this week, said his kids and wife make fun of him for his accent and his boys sound pure Ozzie as does his wife – was asking advice from him on where to visit in Iran next year in Spring

  116. Entropy

    Big Australia, once the Ponzi apartment scheme crashes and the voteherds have to be paid out simply will not be able to support the infrastructure needed for the proles to drive arouind and live free lives.

    Anybody that lives in country Australia and not drive a high clearance 4WD diesel is an idiot.

  117. DrBeauGan

    Alan Jones was impressive with his defence of Izzy. I agreed with it all.

    I think most people feel respect for anyone who stands up for a belief, whether we share the belief or not. Sometimes more if we don’t. And we instinctively despise anyone who just mouths the fashionable pieties with hypocrisy evident in every word. If it doesn’t make you squirm when a politician does it, you aren’t fully human.

  118. OldOzzie

    Fisky
    #2992962, posted on April 20, 2019 at 12:32 pm

    Lofty piety is OK – when it suits you. When the rubber hits the road, however, and reality kicks in you retreat and hide like an Arctic swimmer’s dick.

    Numbers has a huge contradiction at the heart of his existence – he was a far-left “anti-war” agitator who supported Hanoi’s conquest of S.Vietnam. Which also means, with 100% certainty, he opposed Australia’s welcoming of S.Vietnamese refugees after the war.

    Second Technical Employee in 1st Start-Up Company was S.Vietnamese Refugee – excellent guy – we tried to get married to Ozzie but in the end went back to S. Vietnam and married girl put forward by relatives – both great Ozzies now

    Again, Second Technical Employee in 2nd Company Start-Up, was Iranian Refugee who had graduated from Wollongong Uni – also tried to set up with Ozzie Girl, but went back to Iran and married beautiful girl, who the first thing she did when she got to OZ, was to throw away H#jab – he is about as M#slim as I am Catholic – Loves beer, Wine, Spirits and Bacon & Eggs.

    At 30 year celebration dinner this week, said his kids and wife make fun of him for his accent and his boys sound pure Ozzie as does his wife – was asking advice from him on where to visit in Iran next year in Spring

  119. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Plibersek keeps Labor’s peace

    exclusive
    Troy Bramston
    Senior Writer
    @TroyBramston
    12:00AM April 20, 2019
    13 Comments

    When Tanya Plibersek was elected Labor’s deputy leader in 2013, she set herself two tasks. First, work with Bill Shorten to heal the divisions within the federal party after the acrimonious Rudd-Gillard years. And second, ensure Labor developed a wide-ranging policy agenda for a new era.

    Five-and-a-half years on, Plibersek says these goals have been achieved. She is now setting her sights on being deputy prime minister, and education minister, should Labor win the May 18 election. Plibersek is modest, measured and methodical, and she will be a significant figure in a Labor government.

    “I’m very proud of managing to both support Bill in bringing people together, healing and improving relationships, and making sure that our policies are really clear and appealing to people,” Plibersek, 49, tells The Weekend Australian in an exclusive interview.

    “I’ve been in parliament for 20 years and I doubt there’s been a time when we’ve been more united and when the culture has been more inclusive. And I’m really pleased with the comprehensiveness of Labor’s policy agenda.”

    Plibersek is Labor’s longest serving deputy leader since Lionel Bowen, who held the job under Bill Hayden and Bob Hawke from 1977 to 1990.

    Shorten talks to Plibersek almost every day. She provides advice on strategy and policy formu­lation. Plibersek has provided critical support to Shorten when his leadership has been questioned by some in the party’s ranks, particularly those in the Left faction, though such talk is quelled now.

    Plibersek’s influence and authority stems from her intelligence, capability and loyalty. But Shorten and Plibersek are more than just leader and deputy leader. Shorten told The Weekend Australian last month that he valued Plibersek’s shrewd advice and regarded her as a friend. The feeling is mutual.

    From the Oz. Why is Lady Macbeth a comparison which springs to mind?

  120. Farmer Gez

    Country roads die from the edge in, not the top down.

    Common to see cheap and nasty side work that only pushes out the danger and costs to the near term future, and condemns the legacy infastructure.

    This has been going on for a long time.

    Lots of country roads were formed by boxing and compressing gravel to a narrow width. Regulation deemed these roads too narrow so the shoulders were merely scraped down a few inches and packed over with gravel and asphalt. That’s why you see big long dips at the edges which is made worse by water infiltration into the loose undersurface.

  121. Ellie

    Am in love with Tilba Tilba … and my man. Town is a bit touristy. Well, it is Easter and the Tilba festival is on, so people everywhere. Tilba cheeses and other nibbles bought. As pricey as the Queen Street Deli in Woollahra, I might add. Chocolates (not Cadbury), red wine (Petaluma shiraz) and port (Galway Pipe) – tick, tick and tick. Sorted for the afternoon and evening. Cheers!

  122. Knuckle Dragger

    Watching the LPGA event on Fox. By crikey there’s some lookers in the field.

    Unfortunately, they appear to be persisting with the lady golfers’ traditions of bickering among themselves, taking at least six hours to get through a round and constantly asking for rule decisions where none are necessary.

    Whoever let them become members of golf clubs needs their bum kicked. They should revert to their proper place as associates until they get their act together.

  123. OldOzzie

    Ellie
    #2992983, posted on April 20, 2019 at 12:55 pm

    Chocolates (not Cadbury), red wine (Petaluma shiraz) and port (Galway Pipe) – tick, tick and tick.

    Thanks for the reminder – a glass of Port and a good Red from the cellar tonight

  124. RobK

    Like Enola Gay.
    ….and Fat Man.

  125. John Constantine

    Plenty of secondary rural victorian roads now have ‘drop-offs’ where once you move the wheels off the edge of the bitumen, the gravel has worn away, sometimes inches lower. Trap for young drivers especially at night and in the wet.

    You have to move off the bitumen on these roads, as the seal is not wide enough for two cars side by side to both keep their wheels on the bitumen as they pass in opposite directions.

    Common to see tar simply spread over uncompacted gravel on roadsides as a cheap fix, but this crumbles under traffic and is soon chunky and worse than the original problem.

    Big Australia has made us such a wealthy country we can afford to let our legacy infrastructure roads erode.

  126. Which also means, with 100% certainty, he opposed Australia’s welcoming of S.Vietnamese refugees after the war.

    Wrong.
    Supported it to the point of teaching some boat kids English in the seventies.
    Interesting to observe what happens to Vietnamese boat people under the Coalition these days.

  127. Gab

    an Australian Catholic Bishops Conference study has found the number of Catholics attending Mass has plummeted again; down to 11.8 percent.

    But, but they told us the N.O. mass (actually a good accidental description) would have people flocking to the Church! Why some of the N.O masses are very short so there should be more people attending, no?. The priests in my parish church used to joke about how quickly they could “get through Mass”. I believe the winner was the one who “got though it” in 25 minutes.

    Needless to say, me and my money no longer frequent this parish and prefer to drive out of my way to attend a real Mass. Not that all N.O. masses are so disrespectful. I find the N.O. masses by the Capuchins or the Dominican monks very reverent. But these are far and few between.

  128. calli

    On the “hole filling” premise. I know there are plenty of fleas looking for a dog to latch onto. They don’t stay latched on for long. Something better always turns up for them.

    For the ones in it for the long term, it’s less of a case of spackfilla and more like a wrecking ball.

    “Imagine yourself as a living house. God comes in to rebuild that house. At first, perhaps, you can understand what He is doing. He is getting the drains right and stopping the leaks in the roof and so on; you knew that those jobs needed doing and so you are not surprised. But presently He starts knocking the house about in a way that hurts abominably and does not seem to make any sense. What on earth is He up to? The explanation is that He is building quite a different house from the one you thought of – throwing out a new wing here, putting on an extra floor there, running up towers, making courtyards. You thought you were being made into a decent little cottage: but He is building a palace. He intends to come and live in it Himself.”
    ― C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity

    It’s not nice and you won’t like it much.

  129. Gab

    I have got to read C.S. Lewis. I think I may learn much from him.

  130. Roger

    I have got to read C.S. Lewis. I think I may learn much from him.

    Careful Gab, he was an Anglican.

    😉

  131. Macbeth

    Thank you Lizzie for your Easter greetings. Very quiet few days. No chocolate eggs or bunnies. Easter Day tomorrow. I would like to have attended Cathedral service but can no longer make the journey.
    All the best to you and family.

  132. mizaris

    Needless to say, me and my money no longer frequent this parish and prefer to drive out of my way to attend a real Mass. Not that all N.O. masses are so disrespectful. I find the N.O. masses by the Capuchins or the Dominican monks very reverent. But these are far and few between.

    Ditto Gab. Is St Columba’s in Bayswater still ok??

  133. JC

    I don’t believe in market bubbles. I think they are bullshit because markets are always trying to discount the future continuously.The classic example presented as a bubble in the modern day was the tech boom of the 90s. My argument is that the markets weren’t irrational because the internet was a very new technology and markets were attempting to forecast its future importance. A new new thing is hard to value.

    Here’s a chart of the Dow Jones going back to 1900. Can anyone point to a bubble? The Dow is a great marker because it’s been around for a longish time with accurate price transparency.

    https://stockcharts.com/freecharts/historical/marketindexes.html

  134. mizaris

    I have got to read C.S. Lewis. I think I may learn much from him.

    Costelloe quotes from Screwtape in his letter in the West this am. I was gobsmacked!!!

  135. Roger

    The Novus Ordo undoubtedly changed Roman Catholicism, and many would argue not for the better, but I don’t think the collapse in church attendance since its introduction is solely due to its dull and uninspiring character (if you will permit a Prayer Book Anglican to have that opinion). All churches have experienced decline in attendance over the last two generations, including those which kept their historic liturgies. The real culprit is the sexual revolution and its attendant loss of a sense of sin and thence a loss of the sense of the reality of God. I haven’t read Ratzinger’s essay yet but I understand that is his diagnosis – if so he’s hit the nail fairly on the head.

  136. Mindfree

    Bernard Gaynor has an interesting take on Izzy Folau –

  137. Bruce of Newcastle

    Best wishes Macbeth…as Calli quoted, the cathedral foremost is in the mind and the heart.
    Our small church is no cathedral but it will still be good tomorrow, God willing!

  138. Infidel Tiger

    Andrew Hastie’s campaign bus was fire bombed.

    Has barely made the news despite this being an act of political terrorism.

  139. cohenite

    Plibersek’s influence and authority stems from her intelligence, capability and loyalty. But Shorten and Plibersek are more than just leader and deputy leader. Shorten told The Weekend Australian last month that he valued Plibersek’s shrewd advice and regarded her as a friend. The feeling is mutual.

    Yeah sure, she’s a rabid anti-Semite and has a hubbie who is a convicted drug trafficker and on the strength of that and being Mr plibbers one of the most senior public servants in NSW.

    Just think auz will have tits who has an untested r.pe allegation against him and plibbers, mrs drug lord.

  140. I don’t believe in market bubbles. I think they are bullshit because markets are always trying to discount the future continuously.The classic example presented as a bubble in the modern day was the tech boom of the 90s.

    What about Greenspan’s overly enthusiastic moderation?

    I believe the Fed was pricing “hedonically” against the CPU clock rate as a measure of progress – but the relationship to output is not linear.

  141. Zyconoclast

    Can’t believe Utah sent him to DC as a senator.

    Mormon in group preference is weird and creepy unless it is used to attack regular white in group preference. Then it becomes cool.

  142. Andrew Hastie’s campaign bus was fire bombed.

    Has barely made the news despite this being an act of political terrorism.

    That’s pretty fucked up. WTF, this isn’t Ulster, this is Australia.

  143. DrBeauGan

    Calli, Gab, I have read most of CS Lewis. He’s a good writer and always interesting. Even some of his awful science fiction. Screwtape letters is brilliant.

    I don’t find him convincing. Persuasive in an emotional way, but that’s a trap for those who are willing to believe things because they want to. I’m not. My God wouldn’t want me to believe in Him for bad reasons, so I don’t.

  144. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Federal WA Liberal MP Andrew Hastie slams ‘cowards’ after alleged arson attack on campaign bus
    Daniel MercerThe West Australian
    Saturday, 20 April 2019 11:38AM

    Federal WA Liberal MP Andrew Hastie has taken aim at the “cowardly” people who used “Taliban tactics” in an attempt to destroy an election campaign bus.

    Mr Hastie, the MHR for Canning in Perth’s south-eastern suburbs, said yesterday a bus bearing his face and name had been targeted in an apparent arson attempt overnight on Thursday.

    The bus was parked at the corner of Thomas and Kargotich roads in Oakford when Mr Hastie said someone doused the ground nearby with an accelerant and set it alight in a bid to blow up the bus.

    The former SAS officer said no damage was done to the bus thanks to moisture levels in the soil and the quick actions of firefighters.

    But he decried what he said was the cowardice of those who carried out the attack, saying they were “cretins” who had no regard for public safety.

    He was also angry that the Borrello family on whose land the bus was parked had been affected by the actions of others.

    “I’m not cowed by it,” he said. “These people are too cowardly to step into the public square and have a political fight so they’ll use Taliban tactics to try to burn down your bus. Shame on them.”

    According to Mr Hastie, the Australian Federal Police were investigating and he hoped the perpetrators could be identified.

    The MP, whose seat of Canning is marginal with a buffer of 6.8 per cent, said he doubted the fire was a prank given the seriousness of its potential consequences.

  145. Gab

    Careful Gab, he was an Anglican.

    So was Bl John Henry Newman to start with.

    I’m not getting your point.

  146. Stimpson J. Cat

    “Imagine yourself as a living house.”

    At least John Lennon put a catchy tune to his Imagine.

    It really needs more work.

  147. mh

    Andrew Hastie’s campaign bus was fire bombed.

    Has barely made the news despite this being an act of political terrorism.

    George Soros is taking the Australian election too seriously.

  148. Roger

    According to Mr Hastie, the Australian Federal Police were investigating and he hoped the perpetrators could be identified.

    Given their form, will the AFP conclude it was just a random bus attacks with no political motive?

  149. Gab

    Is St Columba’s in Bayswater still ok??

    I haven’t been there since my dear Mother’s death. It was her parish and I lived in another state at the time. I suggest you make your own judgement.

  150. dopey

    Alan Jones:
    “Hore (NSW rugby boss) and Castle are Kiwi rejects, seemingly able to trade off their nationality because our game is such a basket-case, our board members will listen to anyone wearing an All Blacks tracksuit.”

  151. candy

    I think God doesn’t mind living in decent little cottages even if they need some renovations.

  152. mh

    Authorities are trying to track down the animals responsible.

    Oh hang on, the news is talking about Fraser Island dingoes.

  153. Top Ender

    From the article on JFK and his intern lover:

    Indeed, she and the president took baths together, and played with his collection of rubber ducks.

    And people criticise Trump!

  154. Infidel Tiger

    AFP will probably charge Hastie with incitement.

  155. Zyconoclast

    Once you go Latin Mass, you never go back.

    I recently attended my first Latin Mass.
    I really enjoyed it.

    Hardly any oldies, mostly middles and lots of children.
    All the women were modestly dressed and many with the lace cover on their head.

    After the Mass most of the men formed an unofficial choir and sang some hymns. They spotted me and handed me a hymn card to join them.

    I asked the local priest about introducing the Latin Mass, he says he is open to the idea but doesn’t want to cop the flack…

  156. miltonf

    Bushes, Kennedys, Clintons just PISS OFF. The USA is meant to be a republic not a plaything of wealthy imbeciles.

  157. Stimpson J. Cat

    I think God doesn’t mind living in decent little cottages even if they need some renovations.

    Of course you mean you imagine God doesn’t mind living in decent little cottages even if they need some renovations.

    Because that’s what we are doing, right guys?
    Imagining about God?

    Just want make sure we are all on the same page yes?
    Just like C.S. Lewis.

  158. Gab

    The real culprit is the sexual revolution and its attendant loss of a sense of sin and thence a loss of the sense of the reality of God.

    Some truth in that, Roger. But we must ask how that sexual “revolution” was allowed to evolve in the first place? Could it be that around the same time the prelates of the Church started to change things in their “new springtime for the Church” mission? These church “modernists” who started shaking the chains of modernism in the early 1900s and saw the “fruits” of their ways in 1969. Mind you, the Church did not say much back then about societal mores and values as they too were caught up in their own “revolution” of change.

    As goes the Church, so goes society. And here we are. The sweet burden of being Catholic is that much responsibility is laid at our feet to do penance, prayers and fasting for what ails the world in general. Sadly, these “old-fashioned” notions were all but dismissed by the Church to the point where Confession is only advocated once annually and Holy Days of obligation relegated to Sundays, (although some Anglican prelates have recently abolished even that) the Assumption and Christmas (in Australia).

  159. Bushes, Kennedys, Clintons just PISS OFF. The USA is meant to be a republic not a plaything of wealthy imbeciles.

    Well said. This was always the most appealing part of Trump for me.

    You’ve actually got to hand it to Reagan and Carter for taking away the nominations for a while.

  160. Mitch M.
    #2993024, posted on April 20, 2019 at 2:15 pm

    Speaking of faith …

    Craft using an inertial mass reduction device

    Why would say anything so ignorant and hurtful? I’m deeply offended, I identify as a resonant RF cavity thruster. I’m sure you’re criticism is tongue in cheek. The assignee info is a big eyebrow raiser.

    I highly recommend Michael E Mc Culloch.

    http://physicsfromtheedge.blogspot.com/

    I have his book and it explains quite a lot.

  161. Oh come on

    Supported it to the point of teaching some boat kids English in the seventies.

    Weasel words. Teachers don’t get to choose who ends up in their classrooms. Also, it doesn’t prove a thing. I could be fully on board with OSB and the Pacific Solution whilst also being absolutely willing to teach the children of illegal boat arrivals.

  162. miltonf

    If it wasn’t for Chappaquiddick Ted K would have beaten Carter for sure. So maybe there is some justice in this world.

  163. DrBeauGan

    Mitch M.
    #2993024, posted on April 20, 2019 at 2:15 pm

    Speaking of faith …

    It has the requisite mumbo-jumbo. With equations, too.

  164. Mitch M.

    I’m sure you’re criticism is tongue in cheek.

    Of course it is. Ya know, the time of the year. I’m in no position to assess the claims of that patent. I place it here because there are people who can think constructively about such matters.

  165. cohenite

    Mitch M.

    #2993024, posted on April 20, 2019 at 2:15 pm

    Speaking of faith …

    Craft using an inertial mass reduction device

    Neat; you strengthen the EMF by transferring part of the other 3 forces to the EMF and enable a craft to potentially reach near light speed relatively free of inertia.

  166. Also, it doesn’t prove a thing.

  167. jupes

    Have often been a critic of Alan Jones, but his column in The Australian defending Folau is absolutely brilliant.

    Yep and the awful Patrick Smith tried to rebut it in the same addition.

    His rebuttal consisted of opining that Qantas money is more important than the religious convictions of the players and that Alan Jones is a big mouth. He actually got pretty personal with Jones so let’s just hope Big Al has a crack back.

  168. Also, it doesn’t prove a thing.

    Note the complete incapacity of the average Cat poster to hold on to two ideas at once.
    It is possible to believe that our commitment to Vietnam in the sixties and seventies was a complete debacle, whilst at the same time supporting the arrival of boat people.
    You inhabit a world constructed of stereotypes.
    You must live in a state of permanent bewilderment.

  169. jupes

    Imagine your life without the 10 months you spent in Vietnam, Numbers you fuckwit.

    What would you bang on about?

  170. Zyconoclast

    The headline from a earlier link

    Lord Ahmed of Rotherham to face trial on child sex charges
    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-south-yorkshire-47969220

    How appropriate.

  171. calli

    You guys don’t do allegory and metaphor and illustrations do you? How unfortunate. You’re missing out on so much.

    Unless the allegory or metaphor or illustration works for your world view. Then it’s perfectly okay.

    I have to face a sad fact. I’ll never be as smart as you think you are.

  172. It has the requisite mumbo-jumbo. With equations, too.

    So you reckon all the peer reviewed stuff (20+ papers) Mc Culloch has done with data that has better goodness of fit than the orthodoxy are all nonsense as well?

    Oh well. Looks like you’re not interested in real research at all.

    All of this stuff is based off the field equations. Eventually you’re going to be left behind and sound like the cranks who reckon they’ve “disproved the Einsteinian religion, derp”. Even the more out there stuff Martin Tajmar is researching on electrogravitics is standard stuff; the field equations imply ‘communication’ between the electroweak and gravity forces. Woodward’s contraption seems to be working better than anyone else’s.

    White is working on warp bubles at 400W intensity. He has made microscopic ones prior without having to follow the idea regarding negative energy density.

    Yes I know this may never be feasible, but the underlying principles are actually correct. Just like LENR; I highly recommend “Hacking the Atom” by Steven J Krivit. Widom and Larsen might have cracked it.

    The principles are correct, what matters is engineering, particularly materials science. Read some papers by Smolyaninov if you want to be blown away.

  173. Knuckle Dragger

    Numbers’ daily activity:

    1. Ensure all my talking points are exactly the same, day after day after day and are unsolicited.
    2. Introduce point (a).
    3. Have point (a) thoroughly demolished by people with real world experience.
    4. Introduce point (b) once I have been publicly humiliated.
    5. See point 3.
    6. Repeat for points (c) through (k).
    7. Arctic swimmer’s dick time.

  174. DrBeauGan

    I hope you haven’t forgotten our bet, dot. It involved using the EM drive to accelerate one kilogram at one tenth of a gravity for one minute, as I recall.

    I’m from Missouri. I’ll believe it when I see it.

    Us atheists are like that. Not very trusting. Evil, cynical bastards. Short on simple faith and not overwhelmed by equations. Barely human, if you think being human is all about the feelz.

  175. Entropy

    Gab
    #2993008, posted on April 20, 2019 at 2:01 pm
    Careful Gab, he was an Anglican.

    So was Bl John Henry Newman to start with.

    I’m not getting your point

    It’s alright, he was high Anglican.

  176. cohenite

    Gawd, mueller is filth: Michael Caputo on Tucker who was a former Trump campaign advisor; he got a guernsey in the mueller report because he was contacted by an ostensible wussian guy, henry greenberg, willing to sell dirt on shrillary; the Trump guy didn’t proceed so no collusion; but what was not mentioned in the mueller report was the fact greeberg was an FBI informant sent by his handlers to entrap guys like Caputo.

    How fucked does this have to become?

  177. candy

    Of course you mean you imagine God doesn’t mind living in decent little cottages even if they need some renovations.

    yes, after I posted that I realised I should have said “I imagine” or “I believe” so as not to offend anyone.

  178. Gab

    I’ve heard the Screwtape Letters and CS Lewis being quoted and referenced by many a “traditional” priest as being an excellent resource.

  179. dopey

    Sydney Morning Herald out does itself.
    ” Democrats hold short of call for Impeachment.”

  180. jo

    Knuckle Dragger
    #2992907, posted on April 20, 2019 at 11:48 am
    . You make Numbers look like Stephen Hawking.

    I didn’t know Stephen Hawking was a spudpeeler.

  181. Beachcomber

    C.L. at 12:33 pm

    Until the Church puts aside rancid pride and admits the New Order ‘mass’ was a mistake, things will not get better any time soon.

    The parallels between the decay of the Catholic Church in the West and the frighteningly rapid collapse of Western civilization itself is described in this fascinating assay.

    How Long before the Fate of Benedict’s Church Is the Fate of the West?

    As the devil was taking over the seminaries, something was also seizing the great universities of Europe and America, turning them into bastions of political correctness. Everything that happened inside the Church also happened outside with astounding swiftness. In less than 20 years, marriage was redefined from its centuries-old meaning as a union between a man and woman to include homosexuals. Abortion became a progressive sacrament. Concepts of gender and race, which some had thought to be immutable, were transformed in a few short years into a veritable smorgasbord of categories.

    We know what that something is but what can be done to stop it or even slow its destructive conquest?
    Cardinal Pell resisted Marxist homosexual incursions into the Catholic Church and he is now a political prisoner. Does the same fate await secular conservatives in Australia?

  182. rickw

    A Grumman TBF avenger torpedo bomber of VT-15 Torpedo Air Group, approaches and lands on the deck of the USS Essex (CV-9) during the Battle of Manila Bay, in World War 2. Upon landing, Lt. Robert Cosgrove (Pilot) and Sailor Digby Denzek (Radioman) can be seen in their respective forward and middle crew positions. But the rear gunner position, occupied by Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class,Loyce Edward Deen (Gunner) has been completely destroyed by enemy 40mm shell fire. As the aircraft is parked amongst others, with wings folded, sailors of the Essex take fingerprints and cut dog tags from the body of AMM2C Loyce Deen in the gunner position. Captain Carlos W. Wieber, Commanding Officer of the Essex, and her crew, participate in funeral services on the deck. A chaplain conducts the services from beside the aircraft, where Loyce Deen’s remains in the gunner’s position have been shrouded. Closeup view of Rear Admiral Frederick C. Sherman during the burial service. A bugler sounds taps. Beside the bugler is David L. McDonald, who was XO of the USS Essex (and later Chief of Naval Operations in the 1960s). Deen’s remains are then buried at sea in the TBF avenger in which he perished. The aircraft floats off the fantail for a short time before sinking from view. Two TBF Avengers are seen flying overhead , in tribute. Crew members then disband and return to their duties. Location: Manila Philippines. Date: November 5, 1944.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FMWz10jaK0g

  183. JC

    Cronkite

    As though that’s a new thing. We’ve been talking about Downer for ages. Keep up.

  184. DrBeauGan

    calli
    #2993038, posted on April 20, 2019 at 2:42 pm
    You guys don’t do allegory and metaphor and illustrations do you? How unfortunate. You’re missing out on so much.

    Unless the allegory or metaphor or illustration works for your world view. Then it’s perfectly okay.

    I have to face a sad fact. I’ll never be as smart as you think you are.

    Yes, we do allegory and metaphor when we write poetry, Calli. Not when we’re trying to decide if propositions are actually true instead of feeling good.

    Mathematics works, when it works, by formalising analogies. Like natural language, relying on it to determine truth is unsafe.

    You’re a woman so you believe things because they make you feel good. I’m a man and I don’t.

  185. candy

    Hi Macbeth

    Good to hear from you above there in your post for Lizzie, that you are around and about, and coming up to another Anzac Day. Time goes so quickly, so it seems to me.

  186. I hope you haven’t forgotten our bet, dot. It involved using the EM drive to accelerate one kilogram at one tenth of a gravity for one minute, as I recall.

    No not at all. Even an admirable failure is a win for humanity. I’m looking forward to it.

    It is all about the Q factor now, and possible manifold optimisation. Right now the contraptions are too inefficient and the requisite power would probably melt the damned thing.

    The Chinese report 2.5 kW for 720 mN. That’s less than 3% of 1% efficiency. So we’d need 340kW of electrical input to achieve 0.981 N. Yes I know that’s about 20 MJ of energy for a minute.

    Which is in part why I am so interested in the progress of nuclear power, especially miniaturised nuclear power.

  187. mh

    Liberty Quote
    “It was obvious from day one there was no collusion. … That meant Mueller and his partisan staff would use the report as a political and impeachment weapon.”

    — Mark Levin

  188. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Shorten ‘struck deal with Greens

    Scott Morrison has accused Bill Shorten of clinching a deal with the Greens to rush through key tax and climate change policies before the start of the new Senate, following revelations Labor was planning to “maximise its changes” of reversing penalty rate cuts before June 30.

    The Weekend Australian today reports Labor has approached several crossbench senators to ask generally about a passage of ALP legislation before the Senate of the 45th parliament expires.

    New senators elected on May 18 begin their terms on July 1 but if the Senate was to sit before then the existing senators would vote on legislation.

    Labor has had success in the current Senate, being able to pass some of its own legislation and motions that have embarrassed the government.

    The Prime Minister refused to say if he would recall the Senate before July if he won the election or what his priorities would be.

    “First of all cool your jets Bill, there’s an election first,” Mr Morrison said after campaigning at Westmead Hospital in Sydney.

    “I do find it interesting he seems to want to reconvene the parliament before the 30th of June. I don’t know what he assumes the makeup of the Senate will be after the 30th of June but it sounds to me he’s struck a deal with the Greens.

    The Greens are up for death taxes, even (Labor frontbencher) Andrew Leigh’s up for death taxes let alone the union movement, what is the deal that Bill Shorten has with the Greens to get all of his taxes through and to get all of his carbon abatement policies, emissions reduction policies, which he won’t explain tot he Australian people?

    Breaking, from the Oz.

  189. Dr zfred Lenin

    Just a note to leigh lowe about the patsy thing msybe it is pasty he is from SA where they put people in barrels ,got to find some use for the contents .

  190. None

    But is our message to kids that the taking of drugs is OK for the “values of the game”, but having strong religious beliefs and sharing them is wrong.

    Preach it Mr Jones. Now I know that Mr Jones has some special dogs in this fight but he’s also been an outstanding example of moral courage on this as well.

  191. DrBeauGan

    I hope you haven’t forgotten our bet, dot. It involved using the EM drive to accelerate one kilogram at one tenth of a gravity for one minute, as I recall.

    No not at all. Even an admirable failure is a win for humanity. I’m looking forward to it.

    It’s a bet I’d be ecstatic to lose, dot.

  192. Stimpson J. Cat

    You guys don’t do allegory and metaphor and illustrations do you? How unfortunate. You’re missing out on so much.
    Unless the allegory or metaphor or illustration works for your world view. Then it’s perfectly okay.
    I have to face a sad fact. I’ll never be as smart as you think you are.

    Now, you are simply imagining I don’t do allegory and metaphor.
    You are also imagining that I think I am smart.
    I am not smart, I simply have an amazing imagination.

    😁

  193. Colonel Crispin Berka

    DrBeauGan says

    It involved using the EM drive to accelerate one kilogram at one tenth of a gravity for one minute, as I recall.

    The test object would move 1766m during that time. That seems like a rather high criteria to set when even 2 or 3 metres would be enough to prove the point and could fit inside a typical lab.

  194. Stimpson J. Cat

    yes, after I posted that I realised I should have said “I imagine” or “I believe” so as not to offend anyone.

    You didn’t offend me.
    You only imagine you did.
    The day would be incredibly long if I took offence at everything a Woman said.
    Lifes too short.

    😁

  195. Boambee John

    Knuckle Dragger
    #2992964, posted on April 20, 2019 at 12:34 pm
    Zulu,

    Yep.

    One of Adolf’s great mistakes was his belief, no doubt cemented by his successes of 1939 and 1940, that he was a much brighter military star than either Charles XII of Sweden or Napoleon.

    Had he curbed his desire for lebensraum to just Austria and Czechoslovakia, and then pulled his head in he may well have been seen today as equivalent to Frederick the Great or Bismarck.

    But no. Overreach, the classic trap for young players.

    H1tl3r was an early adopter of technology. He flew a lot in an era in which flying was dangerous.

    Had he been killed in a plane crash in around April 1939, with the German economy seemingly recovering well, and German populations in Czechoslovakia and Austria part of the Reich, but before the pogroms really got underway, he might well have been so remembered. His likely immediate successor, Goering, was too fond of the high life, and to lazy, to want to start a war.

  196. Bruce of Newcastle

    Note the complete incapacity of the average Cat poster to hold on to two ideas at once.

    Doublethink, Numbers, is what totalitarian lefties do. Someone wrote a book about it once.

  197. jupes

    rickw
    #2993049, posted on April 20, 2019 at 2:58 pm

    Excellent video Rick. Thanks for that.

  198. DrBeauGan

    Colonel Crispin Berka
    #2993061, posted on April 20, 2019 at 3:17 pm
    DrBeauGan says

    It involved using the EM drive to accelerate one kilogram at one tenth of a gravity for one minute, as I recall.

    The test object would move 1766m during that time. That seems like a rather high criteria to set when even 2 or 3 metres would be enough to prove the point and could fit inside a typical lab.

    I don’t recall the details of the bet, it might have been only a second instead of a minute.

    I don’t recall the stake, either. But if it provides a tenth of a g on a kilogram for even a second, I’ll fly to Sydney and stand dot a dinner at the restaurant of his choice. As long as it’s not Maccas.

  199. Fisky

    Weasel words. Teachers don’t get to choose who ends up in their classrooms.

    Indeed, it’s very telling that Numbers doesn’t even try to claim that he supported the arrival of Vietnamese boat people in the 1970s, instead choosing to hide behind his professional obligations. Nobody on the pro-Soviet far left was supportive of those refugees at the time.

  200. Mitch M.

    Mathematics works, when it works, by formalising analogies. Like natural language, relying on it to determine truth is unsafe.

    Not a single algorithm in the holy books. Ya think the good Lord would have had the foresight to drop the hint that in the future mathematics will prove to be the most powerful means of explaining the natural world. In the very least He could have included the value of pi. 🙂

  201. Fisk – he has never answered anything about the Viet Minh’s premeditated murder of 15,000 Vietnamese landlords, nor the 80,000 – 200, 000 otherwise purged outside of combat operations.

    Let alone the oppression of the Catholic church he so boastfully says he is a member of.

  202. Stimpson J. Cat

    Note the complete incapacity of the average Cat poster to hold on to two ideas at once.

    You guys can only hold on to two ideas at once?
    I can do many, many, many, and none.

    Do catch up.

  203. DrBeauGan

    Mitch M.
    #2993069, posted on April 20, 2019 at 3:26 pm
    Mathematics works, when it works, by formalising analogies. Like natural language, relying on it to determine truth is unsafe.

    Not a single algorithm in the holy books. Ya think the good Lord would have had the foresight to drop the hint that in the future mathematics will prove to be the most powerful means of explaining the natural world. In the very least He could have included the value of pi.

    He might have got it badly wrong. His geography wasn’t too hot.

  204. johanna

    Wonderful piece at Spiked here, about the island of Sark. The best is saved for the end of the article:

    It was at this location where, in 1859, the islanders gathered to greet Queen Victoria, who was expected to stop off at Sark on her way to Jersey. They had prepared a lavish banquet, and the quay was decorated with flowers, flags and a red carpet. But the queen and her entourage simply sailed by. To make matters worse, by the time they got back to the Seigneurie the dining room where the banquet was to be held had been trashed by peacocks.

    Worthy of Nancy Mitford. This Andrew Doyle chappie really can write, well worth a read.

    Gorgeously quiet here in Queanbeyan, a substantial proportion of the population having decamped to The Coast or to other bush retreats. The weather is perfect – it’s still, about 24C as I write. The cockies are shrieking now and then, I just had a tiny brown wren hopping about eating spiders (thanks!) in my shrubs,
    peewees shrilling about. The sky is bright blue.

    I saw some discussion about the nature of happiness backthread, well, I’m happy just now. Surrounded by beauty, in my own home.

    As for all those misogynists of a couple of days ago, look at the log in your own eye, chaps. As someone who was 100% faithful and blindsided by a serial philanderer (ask Phillipa Martyr about this) many years ago, I, too, learned my lesson.

    Lizzie mentioned buying baccie for her relative. When my sister was surviving on the Single Mothers pension (because her deadbeat drunk husband bailed on her and their toddler daughter) I always arrived for visits with a carton of cigarettes.

    I remember leaving one visit where we stopped on the way to the airport at a sort of 7/11 at the service station. I grabbed tissues, cheese, Corn Flakes, peanut butter, Vegemite and baked beans. We were in a hurry. It may have helped for a couple of days.

    Nowadays, she has just bought a house after selling her unit. She has a good job. But, boy, things were hard back then. And bringing her a carton of fags made a huge difference to her budget.

    I am currently watching movies of the 1940s and 50s on youtube. John Nolte, at Breitbart, has been tracking the decline of Hollywood. Anf no wonder, when you see old movies that are rated about 6/10 on imdb which are much more compelling and interesting than X Men 10.

  205. From the patent

    Puthoff, H.E., Polarizable-Vacuum (PV) Approach to General Relativity, Foundations of Physics, Jun. 2002, vol. 32, No. 6.

  206. Mitch M.

    He might have got it badly wrong. His geography wasn’t too hot.

    Obviously God didn’t know about GPS. It takes 2 weeks to walk from Egypt to Palestine yet we are to believe that tribe spent 40 years in the desert. Or is that an analogy, metaphor or whatever?

  207. Stimpson J. Cat

    It is all about the Q factor now

    Trust The Plan Dot Confirmed!!!

  208. Macbeth

    Hi Candy.Nice that you are here. Yes,still around but not about these days. I’ll probably watch the ANZAC Dawn Service and March on TV. One good thing is that I am now so deaf that I don’t hear the fatuous commentary by the ABC.
    Cheers.

  209. cohenite

    Mathematics works, when it works, by formalising analogies. Like natural language, relying on it to determine truth is unsafe.

    What a bunch of bullshit.

  210. Knuckle Dragger

    Moses let the chicks read the maps, Mitch.

    Terrible, terrible mistake.

  211. johanna

    Oh, and for fans of 1066 and all that, here is Dave Barry’s version:

    At this time France was experiencing its glory years under Louis XIV, who became known as the “Sun King” because he was more than 2 million miles in circumference. But things were not so good for England, which in 1665 suffered through the Great Plague of London, which was followed in 1666 by the Great Fire of London, which was followed in 1667 by the first recorded attack on London by Godzilla.

    Nevertheless there was hope, and that hope was focused on the New World, where a group of hardy settlers had founded the first permanent English colony in Jamestown, Va., where the Native Americans introduced them to a local plant with broad leaves. The Virginians found that when these leaves were cured, shredded and smoked in a pipe, they tasted terrible.

    “That’s because it’s corn, you morons,” pointed out the Native Americans. So things looked bad for the colonists, but then they discovered tobacco, which was not as bad, and which was introduced to consumers back in England via a media campaign using the slogan: “Tobacco — Eventually, You Stop Throwing Up.” This marked the dawn of modern marketing.

    Meanwhile, two other famous settlements were being established farther up the North American coast. One was an island on the north end of what we now call New York Bay, which the Dutch settler Peter Minuit purchased from the Manhattan Indians for $24, plus $167,000 a month in maintenance fees. Minuit named this settlement “New Amsterdam,” although after it was taken over by the English it became known by the name that has become synonymous with urban greatness, “Easter Island.”

    The other famous settlement was of course Plymouth Colony, which was founded by Puritans, a group of religious separatists who sailed across the Atlantic in search of a place where they could starve to death. In the winter of 1620 they landed in Massachusetts, where they signed the Mayflower Compact, in which they swore before Almighty God that if they managed to survive the winter and create a viable colony, and if that colony prospered and grew to the point where, someday, it boasted a major city with a professional baseball team, and if that baseball team was stupid enough to trade away the greatest hitter of all time, then that team would never again win a World Series. And that is why we celebrate Thanksgiving.

  212. Mitch M.

    You guys don’t do allegory and metaphor and illustrations do you?

    In my experience the use of metaphor or whateverphor to explain scientific findings has all too often led to huge misunderstandings in the general public and professional spheres. That might also explain why religions often become so divided within themselves. The stories are too open to interpretation, are too vague, are too culturally entrenched. The Church can’t present a united front on many issues and expects sinners to believe the message. In Science when there are competing hypotheses the point is argued out ad nauseam at times but eventually progress happens. The history of the Church is the opposite, still arguing with each, still not reaching agreement on various biblical claims, nothing new to see there.

  213. Knuckle Dragger

    Actually, it’s probably similar to our indigenous’ famed counting system. ‘One, two, three, many’ becomes ‘one, two, three, forty’.

    Wasn’t just the I#raeli folk, though. Al-Ad Din has his forty thieves, although I dunno what he was going to do with 40 hands. Perhaps wait for rigor mortis to set in and use them as clamps.

  214. Top Ender

    The most famous firearms manufacturer in Australia is the Lithgow Small Arms Factory. On the grounds of the existing factory site is the Lithgow Small Arms Factory Museum. The Museum is independently owned and operated, primarily by volunteers, as an independent trust on behalf of the City of Lithgow. Just a few weeks ago, the museum learned that 70 percent of its collection is at risk of being destroyed because of a thoughtless change in firearms law passed in 2017, specifically aimed at museums.

    Link

  215. Stimpson J. Cat

    Moses let the chicks read the maps

    “No no, eat the apple.
    It’ll be fine.

    Just take the left turn in Albuquerque.
    It’ll be fine. “

  216. Tel

    Not a single algorithm in the holy books. Ya think the good Lord would have had the foresight to drop the hint that in the future mathematics will prove to be the most powerful means of explaining the natural world. In the very least He could have included the value of pi.

    I dunno, the writers of the Old Testament correctly predicted the Vietnam War and it’s aftermath.

    If you don’t believe me … read the Book of Numbers!

  217. Knuckle Dragger

    Got no idea who Dave Barry is.

    He’d better be able to make a mean Big Mac though, because writing ‘comedy’ is a long way from his strong suit.

  218. DrBeauGan

    cohenite
    #2993079, posted on April 20, 2019 at 3:36 pm
    Mathematics works, when it works, by formalising analogies. Like natural language, relying on it to determine truth is unsafe.

    What a bunch of bullshit.

    In my innocent youth, I used to do it for a living, Cohenite. Both research and teaching. And learning.

    Not that it was much of a living, but I found out a few things about it.

  219. Dr Faustus

    “I do find it interesting he seems to want to reconvene the parliament before the 30th of June. I don’t know what he assumes the makeup of the Senate will be after the 30th of June but it sounds to me he’s struck a deal with the Greens.

    This line has Shorten squealing, and is certainly one that Morrison needs to run with.

    Shorten and his bunch of ‘back of the fag packet’ policies is probably a foregone conclusion; the electorate is nicely set up with a majority primed to vote itself a decent serve of OPM, and Morrison isn’t exactly leading an inspirational government himself.

    However Morrison can limit the damage by appealing to the Australian tradition of parking the Senate vote on the other side of the aisle.

  220. vicki

    I’m reminded of this passage by Chesterton in St Thomas Aquinas:

    The Saint is a medicine because he is an antidote. Indeed that is why the saint is often a martyr; he is mistaken for a poison because he is an antidote. He will generally be found restoring the word to sanity by exaggerating whatever the world neglects, which is by no means always the same element in every age. Yet each generation seeks its saint by instinct; and he is not what people want, but rather what the people need… Therefore it is the paradox of history that each generation is converted by the saint who contradicts it most.

    Whilst I certainly don’t believe Jordan Peterson is a “saint” – & nor would he – the paradox described certainly applies to his extraordinary success amongst alienated youth.

  221. stackja

    TE – A mental patient with access to money and a gun gave gun control activists an excuse to claim guns kill and a compliant MSM agreed.
    Lithgow armed the UK and Australia.

  222. calli

    I wasn’t talking about allegory and scientific findings, Mitch. I was talking about Lewis’s hypothetical house renovation/rebuild. Funny how that morphed in otherwise clever minds into a real house. Or an imagined house, or anything other than the writer’s intent.

    Pi has been known for about 4,000 years. No divine textbook, only a flesh and blood blueprint to unlock its secret. The human brain. I find that rather wonderful and elegant, like Pythagoras.

  223. Stimpson J. Cat

    Funny how that morphed in otherwise clever minds into a real house. Or an imagined house, or anything other than the writer’s intent.

    So when someone says to
    “Imagine yourself as a living house.”
    I shouldn’t imagine anything?

    It’s not actually an imagined house at all?

    I’m simply imagining imagining imagined things?

  224. stackja

    BS wants to end weekend and holiday trading and create more unemployment and close more businesses. Voters gullible? Time will tell.

  225. DrBeauGan

    Pi has been known for about 4,000 years. No divine textbook, only a flesh and blood blueprint to unlock its secret.

    Um, no. The early cultures thought its value was 3. They got it by measuring the circumference of round things, dividing by the diameter, and neglecting the little bit over. Pi wasn’t even properly defined until Euclid, two and a half thousand years ago. And the proof that it was irrational had to wait for a long time, like the proof it is transcendental.

    Which doesn’t mean what you might think.

  226. Tom

    Got no idea who Dave Barry is.

    He’d better be able to make a mean Big Mac though, because writing ‘comedy’ is a long way from his strong suit.

    You literacy’s in your arse, KD. Barry’s wit is razor-sharp; he’s a post-war American treasure. Before he retired from newspaper writing, he was also incredibly prolific, a natural talent who could churn out columns of very high quality several times a week. Huge fan.

  227. Stimpson J. Cat

    He will generally be found restoring the world to sanity by exaggerating whatever the world neglects

    That’s me.
    That’s definitely me.
    I’m 105.793% certain.

  228. dover_beach

    In Science when there are competing hypotheses the point is argued out ad nauseam at times but eventually progress happens. The history of the Church is the opposite, still arguing with each, still not reaching agreement on various biblical claims, nothing new to see there.

    You underestimate the differences in science and overestimate the differences re Christianity. The latter enjoyed agreement for nearly 1500 years and those disagreements which later emerged appear pronounced largely because of the actors involved and the politics that intruded.

  229. rickw

    Just a few weeks ago, the museum learned that 70 percent of its collection is at risk of being destroyed because of a thoughtless change in firearms law passed in 2017, specifically aimed at museums.

    “Thoughtless”, the hallmark of most Australian legislation.

    “Destroy”, the end result of most Australian legislation.

  230. Stimpson J. Cat

    Is there a Patron Saint of the Mentally Ill?
    I bet there isn’t.
    It’s time for Saint diversity quotas,
    Catholic Church.

  231. DrBeauGan

    He will generally be found restoring the world to sanity by exaggerating whatever the world neglects

    That’s me.
    That’s definitely me.
    I’m 105.793% certain.

    I have faith in you to save us all, St. Stimpy.

  232. rickw

    “We want justice,” Alisha Pradhan, a model and actress, said during Friday’s demonstration.

    “Our girls must grow up safely and with dignity.

    “We protest any forms of violence against women, and authorities must ensure justice.”

    You’re not going to get any of this with is lam ladies.

  233. Notafan

    We even have a saint for hopeless causes Stimpy,

    never fear St Dymphna is here.

  234. Stimpson J. Cat

    overestimate the differences re Christianity.

    When was the last time an Ex-Pope wrote a letter to the Church and the current Pope while he was still alive?

  235. areff

    Dave Barry can’t write? Good Lord!

    The Difference Between Men and Women
    by Dave Barry

    LET’Ssay a guy named Fred is attracted to a woman named Martha. He asks her out to a movie; she accepts; they have a pretty good time. A few nights later he asks her out to dinner, and again they enjoy themselves. They continue to see each other regularly, and after a while neither one of them is seeing anybody else.

    And then, one evening when they’re driving home, a thought occurs to Martha, and, without really thinking, she says it aloud: “Do you realize that, as of tonight, we’ve been seeing each other for exactly six months?”

    And then, there is silence in the car.

    To Martha, it seems like a very loud silence. She thinks to herself: I wonder if it bothers him that I said that. Maybe he’s been feeling confined by our relationship; maybe he thinks I’m trying to push him into some kind of obligation that he doesn’t want, or isn’t sure of.

    And Fred is thinking: Gosh. Six months.

    And Martha is thinking: But, hey, I’m not so sure I want this kind of relationship either. Sometimes I wish I had a little more space, so I’d have time to think about whether I really want us to keep going the way we are, moving steadily towards, I mean, where are we going? Are we just going to keep seeing each other at this level of intimacy? Are we heading toward marriage? Toward children? Toward a lifetime together? Am I ready for that level of commitment? Do I really even know this person?

    And Fred is thinking: …so that means it was…let’s see…February when we started going out, which was right after I had the car at the dealer’s, which means…lemme check the odometer…Whoa! I am way overdue for an oil change here.

    And Martha is thinking: He’s upset. I can see it on his face. Maybe I’m reading this completely wrong. Maybe he wants more from our relationship, more intimacy, more commitment; maybe he has sensed – even before I sensed it – that I was feeling some reservations. Yes, I bet that’s it. That’s why he’s so reluctant to say anything about his own feelings. He’s afraid of being rejected.

    And Fred is thinking: And I’m gonna have them look at the transmission again. I don’t care what those morons say, it’s still not shifting right. And they better not try to blame it on the cold weather this time. What cold weather? It’s 87 degrees out, and this thing is shifting like a garbage truck, and I paid those incompetent thieves $600.

    And Martha is thinking: He’s angry. And I don’t blame him. I’d be angry, too. I feel so guilty, putting him through this, but I can’t help the way I feel. I’m just not sure.

    And Fred is thinking: They’ll probably say it’s only a 90-day warranty…scumballs.

    And Martha is thinking: Maybe I’m just too idealistic, waiting for a knight to come riding up on his white horse, when I’m sitting right next to a perfectly good person, a person I enjoy being with, a person I truly do care about, a person who seems to truly care about me. A person who is in pain because of my self-centered, schoolgirl romantic fantasy.

    And Fred is thinking: Warranty? They want a warranty? I’ll give them a warranty. I’ll take their warranty and stick it right up their…

    “Fred,” Martha says aloud.

    “What?” says Fred, startled.

    “Please don’t torture yourself like this,” she says, her eyes beginning to brim with tears. “Maybe I should never have…oh dear, I feel so…”(She breaks down, sobbing.)

    “What?” says Fred.

    “I’m such a fool,” Martha sobs. “I mean, I know there’s no knight. I really know that. It’s silly. There’s no knight, and there’s no horse.”

    “There’s no horse?” says Fred.

    “You think I’m a fool, don’t you?” Martha says.

    “No!” says Fred, glad to finally know the correct answer.

    “It’s just that…it’s that I…I need some time,” Martha says.

    (There is a 15-second pause while Fred, thinking as fast as he can, tries to come up with a safe response. Finally he comes up with one that he thinks might work.)

    “Yes,” he says. (Martha, deeply moved, touches his hand.)

    “Oh, Fred, do you really feel that way?” she says.

    “What way?” says Fred.

    “That way about time,” says Martha.

    “Oh,” says Fred. “Yes.” (Martha turns to face him and gazes deeply into his eyes, causing him to become very nervous about what she might say next, especially if it involves a horse. At last she speaks.)

    “Thank you, Fred,” she says.

    “Thank you,” says Fred.

    Then he takes her home, and she lies on her bed, a conflicted, tortured soul, and weeps until dawn, whereas when Fred gets back to his place, he opens a bag of Doritos, turns on the TV, and immediately becomes deeply involved in a rerun of a college basketball game between two South Dakota junior colleges that he has never heard of. A tiny voice in the far recesses of his mind tells him that something major was going on back there in the car, but he is pretty sure there is no way he would ever understand what, and so he figures it’s better if he doesn’t think about it.

    The next day Martha will call her closest friend, or perhaps two of them, and they will talk about this situation for six straight hours. In painstaking detail, they will analyze everything she said and everything he said, going over it time and time again, exploring every word, expression, and gesture for nuances of meaning, considering every possible ramification.

    They will continue to discuss this subject, off and on, for weeks, maybe months, never reaching any definite conclusions, but never getting bored with it either.

    Meanwhile, Fred, while playing racquetball one day with a mutual friend of his and Martha’s, will pause just before serving, frown, and say: “Norm, did Martha ever own a horse?”

    And that’s the difference between men and women.

    -Dave Barry

  236. Bruce of Newcastle

    It takes 2 weeks to walk from Egypt to Palestine yet we are to believe that tribe spent 40 years in the desert. Or is that an analogy, metaphor or whatever?

    It was a feature not a bug. Going around for forty years in the desert until the rebellious generation died off.

    Here’s a fun story for you Mitch from a few days ago:

    Bible PROOF: Evidence of Moses’ journey from Egypt to Saudi Arabia REVEALED (15 Apr)

    Mr Mauro from the Doubting Thomas Research Foundation (DTRF) describes what he uncovered as “mind-blowing” and claims the real Mount of Sinai is located over a hundred miles eastwards across the Gulf of Aqaba, which separates the Sinai Peninsula from Saudi Arabia.

    The Daily Express loves such stories (and ones about aliens, extra planets and apocalypses of one sort or another) but this one is not so silly. The account of Moses and the tablets would sound to any volcanologist as a guy going up an erupting volcano and coming back down again. And there are several active volcanoes in Saudi Arabia.

    I could easily imagine a bunch of people going around and around in the middle of Saudi Arabia for forty years, with a little divine misguidance and a lot of manna and water from rocks.

  237. Farmer Gez

    Vetch and oats for hay are in the ground.
    Spent a couple of hours getting a Vtwin Honda to go. There’s a solenoid that controls the fuel flow through a plunger and this glues up with gunk from the fuel or grey corrosion off the alloy.
    We’ve got two identical motors and one always gives trouble and the other never. I’ve heard that plastic fuel tanks create fuel problems that steel tanks don’t.

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