ANZAC Day message from a Returned Serviceman

Below is a list of things that current, and former members, of the Australian and New Zealand Defence Force would like to point out on ANZAC Day:

  1. ANZAC Day marks the anniversary of the Gallipoli Campaign of WWI. ANZAC is an acronym for Australia and New Zealand Army Corps. It’s written as ANZAC, not Anzac.
  2. Each year on the 25th of April we reflect on all Defence Force personnel, past and present, and the sacrifices they’ve made. It is a solemn day.
  3. ANZAC Day is one of Australia’s most important national occasions. It marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during WWI.
  4. Traditionally, Rosemary is worn on ANZAC Day. Rosemary is found growing wild on the Gallipoli peninsula.
  5. The RED Poppy symbolises peace, death and sleep of the fallen servicemen/woman. While the PURPLE Poppy represents remembrance of the animal victims of war. The ORANGE Poppy represents the acknowledgement of the Service families, and also acknowledges the families’ loss due to veteran suicide. The WHITE Poppy worn between 1918 – 1939 symbolises the wearers’ commitment to peace. Learn the difference!
  6. We commemorate ANZAC Day, not celebrate it.
  7. At dawn on the 25th of April 1915, soldiers rowed ashore in boats called ‘lighters’ during the Gallipoli landings, under fire and without outboards motors.
  8. It’s a bugle, not a trumpet. The Last Post is sounded, not played.
  9. Not every serviceman/woman were ‘soldiers’. Some were Sailors and Airmen. Please take the time to ascertain what Service they served in, and use the correct terminology. It means a lot to us.
  10. They’re medals, not badges. They’re citations, not pins.
  11. Medal recipients wear their medals on the left side of their chest covering their heart; family members/descendants wear the medals on the right side of their chest.
  12. No, I am not wearing my father’s or grandfather’s medals, they are mine. I earned them during my Service.
  13. Medals, ribbons and Unit Citations are EARNED, not WON. They are awarded to the recipient, not given to them.
  14. I am allowed to wear my ‘Return From Active Service’ badge on any day of the year that I choose to wear it.
  15. Australian and New Zealand soldiers did not retreat from Gallipoli, they withdrew.
  16. It really doesn’t matter which side you wear your Poppy on, as long as it’s worn with pride. Traditionally, men on the left breast and women on the right breast.
  17. Please, don’t try to draw comparisons between sports players and war veterans. I’ve never seen a sports player perform acts of heroism whilst under fire, to protect their fellow Service personnel, flag and Country.
  18. ANZAC Day isn’t a day to go and watch, or play sport. Show some bloody respect to the brave men and women in uniform, past and present, who fought for the blanket of freedom that you currently sleep under.
  19. Having a few drinks and playing ‘2 up’ is an ANZAC Day tradition. Getting shit faced, picking fights and acting like a yobbo isn’t.
  20. ‘Lest We Forget’ isn’t a throwaway line, it actually has meaning: it’s an expression of remembrance, par excellence. It has dignified origins, a rich history. Don’t misuse or disrespect it.
  21. The ‘Ode’ comes from the poem “For the Fallen”, written by Laurence Binyon. The verse, which is commonly known as ‘The Ode Of Remembrance’, is as follows:

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.

 

Lest We Forget

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78 Responses to ANZAC Day message from a Returned Serviceman

  1. Dylan

    Living in south-west France there aren’t all that many WWI or WW2 grave sites for Australian service members, though there are plenty for British soldiers. There’s one Australian WW2 airman buried in a war cemetary close by, and three Australian servicemen buried in a site just outside of town. Taking the time to look into their records today (24 April here still) and it turns out, coincidentally, one of the three was killed on ANZAC Day 1919 in the same village where he rests now.

    One question from the list (please excuse the ignorance in the question): what is the difference between a withdrawal and a retreat? I thought they might be nearly synonymous, but it seems I was wrong.

  2. stackja

    White organized a withdrawal.
    The Turks didn’t know what happened. They found empty ANZAC positions.

  3. C.L.

    Show some bloody respect to the brave men and women in uniform, past and present, who fought for the blanket of freedom that you currently sleep under.

    If by women you mean nurses and if by “fought” you mean served as nurses, that’s fine.
    Regarding the present, there are no Australian women fighting in any wars. Nor should there ever be whilesoever some semblance of honour and manliness prevails in this land. As for strictly enforced terms for bugles and the like, the ANZACs themselves couldn’t have cared less about such things.

    … what is the difference between a withdrawal and a retreat?

    There is no difference. The ANZACs lost and they were evacuated. They withdrew. They retreated from an indomitable onslaught. That’s what we’re commemorating. A debacle.

    May they all rest in peace.

    The day itself has become an oddball cult which has come close to ruining the proper day of remembrance and honour – which is Armistice Day.

  4. struth

    You still should go to the dawn service CL.
    Don’t let the quacks own the day.
    I think they regard a retreat as being forced under fire from the enemy whereas a withdrawal is being ordered back from held positions.
    I too think playing sport and going to watch it is poor form.
    Especially AFL who claim some sort of ANZAC tradition when right up to and past WW2 cricket was more the followed sport.
    AFL is also just a southern states game.
    I find it disgraceful they play it on ANZAC day.

  5. Tom

    Hey, millennials: the fascism that the entire Australian nation mobilised to defeat at huge human cost in two world wars is the same fascism that leftwing thugs now use to silence dissent. Time to join the dots.

    Evil never sleeps. Rise up against the tyrants in our midst.

    Lest we forget.

  6. Baldrick

    The Last To Leave

    The guns were silent, and the silent hills
    had bowed their grasses to a gentle breeze
    I gazed upon the vales and on the rills,
    And whispered, “What of these?’ and “What of these?
    These long forgotten dead with sunken graves,
    Some crossless, with unwritten memories
    Their only mourners are the moaning waves,
    Their only minstrels are the singing trees
    And thus I mused and sorrowed wistfully

    I watched the place where they had scaled the height,
    The height whereon they bled so bitterly
    Throughout each day and through each blistered night
    I sat there long, and listened – all things listened too
    I heard the epics of a thousand trees,
    A thousand waves I heard; and then I knew
    The waves were very old, the trees were wise:
    The dead would be remembered evermore-
    The valiant dead that gazed upon the skies,
    And slept in great battalions by the shore.

    Gellert, Leon Maxwell (1892–1977)

  7. TAOR
    I remember an Ektachrome daylight
    In the Binh Ba rubber.
    She sat, ochred feet resting.
    That old, old woman who showed me
    How to wear a headband.
    She was unafraid of our scout
    And his outlandish burst of Armalite;
    It was more important to be comfortable.
    She ignored us, our futile armour
    Mud-green high-tech camouflaged nonsense,
    She smiled and smoked a grudged cigarette,
    Turned away and thought on soldiers and children.
    Her eyes were as wise as Lao Tzu
    As she quietly waited for our departure.

    04.07.70

  8. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Vale. Many brave men in the full force of combat, and brave women too, nurses in hospitals under fire and auxiliaries in later wars in many dangerous roles. They all fought and died for a way of life.

    The debacle of ‘Lest We Forgot’ shows how much as a Nation we have forgotten.

    The tense is present: “Lest We Forget’

    Darkness before dawn.

  9. hzhousewife

    AFL is also just a southern states game.
    I find it disgraceful they play it on ANZAC day.

    For my Dad, a Victorian country lad, football made the Army tolerable. His time in the NT and New Guinea was described via all the footy games he played in and attended, indeed for years after the VFL was filled with Army mates. Footy was social glue in rural areas in the thirties and forties, so natural for the young men to incorporate into their war experience. Dad was an RSL Life Member, his graveside service was lead by the Viet Vet who took over his Club Presidency from him, their RSL incorporated Viet Vets very early and thoroughly. Dad never came to like the Japs.
    Dad would not have found it disgraceful to play football on Anzac Day, after the formalities of course, which he (and we) attended every year marching in Melbourne at first then later attending services often in multiple locations in the district.

    Lest We Forget.

  10. Bruce of Newcastle

    Well said.

  11. bespoke

    Going to the beach, having BBQ or protesting is a celebration of the day. My only objection is when people go out of there way to spoil it for others.

  12. rickw

    Well said.

    A good recap of the obvious, but sadly these days the obvious cannot be assumed.

    The ANZAC day service I remember most was at Bomana, hundreds of Papua New Guineans up early walking for hours in the dark to come and show their respects.

    Lest We Forget.

  13. calli

    Have you forgotten yet?…
    Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you’ll never forget.
    ― Siegfried Sassoon

  14. jupes

    ANZAC Day isn’t a day to go and watch, or play sport.

    Then what is the ADF doing supporting the ANZAC Day AFL match you pompous git?

    Having a few drinks and playing ‘2 up’ is an ANZAC Day tradition. Getting shit faced, picking fights and acting like a yobbo isn’t.

    Except of course for just about every member of a combat unit over the last 100 years or so, (though it may be true for today’s gay-arsed ADF members).

  15. Clam Chowdah

    Thanks.

    I’m not a fan of military service being used as another identity politics hook to create divisions within society, so I’d hate to see a list like this used to separate society. Commemoration of national service should unite the nation because it is deeply symbolic of our will to defend what we value.

    I have many close friends who serve in the ADF, some of whom have seen combat and suffered great personal losses. They all possess dignity and humility and a sense of wanting to serve their nation.

  16. stackja

    Bill the Bastard, Bill was a fractious, fierce and some thought unbreakable chestnut, Waler, stallion who became a Great War legend for his incredible stamina and effort in saving many soldiers’ lives. He was one of over 130,000 Australian horses that served in the First World War, who were never to return home

  17. one old bruce

    My profound respects to all members of Australia’s armed forces past and present.

    (Yes even you Numbers. I’m not interested in anything you say – because I know better – but it’s all part of the ANZAC tapestry now).

    Last night a mighty bang from the town war memorial a few blocks away. Made me sad to realise it was timely vandalism, probably local brats. I don’t know how long we can coast with ‘She’ll be right mate’. When ME origin tourists who flood in here every holiday pull a knife and mug locals over parking outside a local shop for cigs, how long will toleration last? If wondering that makes me ‘far right’ so be it. There has to be a limit to this crap.

    Forget Lao Tze Numbers, Chuang Tze is vastly better and more human. Chuang Tze says a rural peasant went to the big city to learn how to walk like a sophisticated city man, but he came back walking on all fours like a dog. Don’t abandon your natural ways for the promise of progress or you’ll lose everything – that’s the message of Taoism.

  18. Aussieute

    Sadly the MSM ignores the first statement and continually uses Anzac
    Very poor form!!

  19. Entropy

    Especially AFL who claim some sort of ANZAC tradition when right up to and past WW2 cricket was more the followed sport.
    AFL is also just a southern states game.
    I find it disgraceful they play it on ANZAC day.

    Another manifestation of Melbourne People.

  20. Tim

    Well written

    The points above would make a good lesson plan for teachers to teach students at this time every year

    Say it often

    Thanks for the post

  21. duncanm

    Thank you for your service, you grumpy bastard.

  22. There is no difference. The ANZACs lost and they were evacuated. They withdrew. They retreated from an indomitable onslaught. That’s what we’re commemorating. A debacle.

    This is just uninformed Fenian heathen bashing of the Poms.

    The Australian forces acquitted themselves well under their own commanders and the campaign was a tactical loss but a strategic victory even if the strategic objectives were not met.

    The campaign prevented the Turks from attacking Russia & Italy, which could have changed the war.

  23. Leo G

    We commemorate ANZAC Day, not celebrate it.

    Celebrate: from Latin celebratus, celebrare “assemble to honour”.
    The author misunderstands the meaning of the word “celebrate”.
    We perform appropriate rites and ceremonies on ANZAC Day, that is, we celebrate ANZAC Day.
    We don’t commemmorate ANZAC Day, we commemmorate the service of the ANZAC in times of war. ANZAC Day brings that service to remembrance.

  24. bespoke

    Below is a list of things that current, and former members, of the Australian and New Zealand Defence Force would like to point out on ANZAC Day:

    This is presumptuous from an anonymous poster BTW.

  25. JohnA

    Regardless of the minor quibbles expressed above, this post will deeply inform and infuse my preparations for leading the public prayers in our church next Sunday.
    Thank you, Guest Author

  26. Behind Enemy Lines

    ANZAC Day message from a Returned Serviceman
    Posted on 12:00 am, April 25, 2019 by Guest Author
    Below is a list of things that current, and former members, of the Australian and New Zealand Defence Force would like to point out on ANZAC Day

    Mate, get an editor or get over yourself.

    Along with the best men I’ll ever know, I also served with a lot of cocks. Among them, people who couldn’t separate the true essentials from their own personal hobbyhorses. This post makes you sound like one of them.

    Reflect on that.

  27. Perth Trader

    Off topic but relevant , my grandfather came home from WW1 a very changed man. Tho changed he still married ,fathered , educated 4 sons and started all 4 sons into there own businesses. In the last few decades of my life I have learned of the true horrors my grandfather would have witnessed and now understand the meaning of ‘brotherhood’ , a word he never used but practiced in real life. My father inlaw , a man of very few words , married and was sent off to Europe and returned 3 years later to his waiting bride.These men and these women were ‘tuff’ , mentally and physically and when I’m cold, tired and sore or hear a young person complain they cant afford a inner city terrace house at age 25 , or I miss my wife and family , I remember my grandfather and my father inlaw and I shut the f–k up.

  28. jupes

    what is the difference between a withdrawal and a retreat?

    A withdrawal is a tactical manoeuvre under the control of the commander.

    A retreat is when the commander loses control as the troops run away from the enemy.

  29. the not very bright Marcus

    I did read an article years ago that claimed that the line ” nor the years condemn” was actually ” nor the years contemn ” …it seemed to make more sense to me , anybody heard this at all ?

  30. jupes

    BTW, the RSL in WA spell Anzac Day in lower case, as does the War Memorial.

    My advice to the tosser who wrote the above list is to stop being such a pedant and get on the turps with your mates.

  31. Peter Greagg

    Perth Trader
    #2996906, posted on April 25, 2019 at 10:47 am
    Off topic but relevant , my grandfather came home from WW1 a very changed man. Tho changed he still married ,fathered , educated 4 sons and started all 4 sons into there own businesses. In the last few decades of my life I have learned of the true horrors my grandfather would have witnessed and now understand the meaning of ‘brotherhood’ , a word he never used but practiced in real life. My father inlaw , a man of very few words , married and was sent off to Europe and returned 3 years later to his waiting bride.These men and these women were ‘tuff’ , mentally and physically and when I’m cold, tired and sore or hear a young person complain they cant afford a inner city terrace house at age 25 , or I miss my wife and family , I remember my grandfather and my father inlaw and I shut the f–k up.

    This!
    Specifically, my Grandfather I am thinking about in this context. He was 17 and a stretcher bearer and was gassed at Villers Bretonneux. He lived to be 87 years old and I never heard him complain about the Germans that gassed him, or the infirmaries he endured in his life. In fact he never mentioned the war in my hearing.

    That generation gave so much, and I am not sure that people today have much of an idea about the horror they lived through.

    In relation to how service people and their families conduct themselves on ANAZAC Day (and Armistice Day for that matter), I think it is a huge conceit for anyone else to form a view on these things. We weren’t there, so we didn’t see/do/ etc anything, so how could be know what it was like for them.

    /Rant off.

  32. Perth Trader

    jupes
    #2996937, posted on April 25, 2019 at 11:12 am

    Jupes, ever thought that the ‘tosser’ ? might be right and the WA , RSL are wrong?
    The ‘Tosser’s’ point is these are protocols and symbols that are to be used and followed.

  33. Tel

    Show some bloody respect to the brave men and women in uniform, past and present, who fought for the blanket of freedom that you currently sleep under.

    I’m sure the Turks say exactly the same thing. Some of them possibly even believe it.

    What I see is a smothering blanket of government regulation, pointless virtue signalling, stupid leadership, constant police surveillance, shallow outrage politics, and a lot of people who don’t know and don’t care about freedom anyway. Cynicism has served us much better than hero worship.

  34. Behind Enemy Lines

    jupes
    #2996937, posted on April 25, 2019 at 11:12 am
    BTW, the RSL in WA spell Anzac Day in lower case, as does the War Memorial.

    My advice to the tosser who wrote the above list is to stop being such a pedant and get on the turps with your mates.

    I have a pretty fair idea what a young Anzac (brought back to life for the day) would do. Mates, family and fun would be top of the list. Moping and lecturing civvies would be down the bottom of the list, right after going to church and painting the chook shed.

  35. Tel

    You are forgetting the historical context.

    The war raised the dominions up from colonies to equal partners with Britain.

    The war ended the sick old man of Europe and the caliphate.

    Aussies and Turks were both better off (at least on paper) for (what was viewed by the end of the war and later as) “fighting someone else’s war”.

  36. Makka

    There is no difference. The ANZACs lost and they were evacuated. They withdrew. They retreated from an indomitable onslaught. That’s what we’re commemorating. A debacle.

    No, it’s not what I’m commemorating or respecting. To me Anzac Day is about the ordinariness of those young men in extraordinary situations and how in the face of hopelessness still went out night and day to put their lives on the line. The values and ideals that drove them on ; their mateship and love of their homeland. Also the families that lost these wonderful people in such pointless circumstances. They deserve my fullest respect , always will. Anzac Day is about the blokes themselves and servicemen and women who didn’t come back to enjoy their lives.

    The truly sad part about Anzac is the disgust those blokes would experience now seeing what Australia has become. Watching turds like Andrews read the commemoration of these blokes. Sickening.

  37. Behind Enemy Lines

    Behind Enemy Lines
    #2996952, posted on April 25, 2019 at 11:23 am
    I have a pretty fair idea what a young Anzac (brought back to life for the day) would do. Mates, family and fun would be top of the list. Moping and lecturing civvies would be down the bottom of the list, right after going to church and painting the chook shed.

    Actually, sh*tpoasting on Anzac Day comes way below painting the chook shed, so enough rubbish from me – I’m off for some mates, family and fun.

  38. Ellie

    That’s a familiar post.

    Lest we forget.

  39. Peter Greagg

    Makka
    #2996955, posted on April 25, 2019 at 11:25 am
    There is no difference. The ANZACs lost and they were evacuated. They withdrew. They retreated from an indomitable onslaught. That’s what we’re commemorating. A debacle.

    No, it’s not what I’m commemorating or respecting. To me Anzac Day is about the ordinariness of those young men in extraordinary situations and how in the face of hopelessness still went out night and day to put their lives on the line. The values and ideals that drove them on ; their mateship and love of their homeland. Also the families that lost these wonderful people in such pointless circumstances. They deserve my fullest respect , always will. Anzac Day is about the blokes themselves and servicemen and women who didn’t come back to enjoy their lives.

    The truly sad part about Anzac is the disgust those blokes would experience now seeing what Australia has become. Watching turds like Andrews read the commemoration of these blokes. Sickening.

    Yes.

  40. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The truly sad part about Anzac is the disgust those blokes would experience now seeing what Australia has become. Watching turds like Andrews read the commemoration of these blokes. Sickening.

    Well said.

  41. Makka

    I’d have to say, the Kings Park service and memorial would be the most moving ceremony I’ve ever attended. Truly glorious setting and the shear number of names on all the plaques is tragic when you think of the WA population during WW1 and 2. Gut wrenching in fact.

  42. Trader Perth

    Here in this country of ours,

    You, the mothers,

    Who sent their sons from far away countries

    Wipe away your tears,

    Your sons are now lying in our bosom

    And are in peace

    After having lost their lives on this land they have

    Become our sons as well”.

    Tel….Kemal Ataturks speech. Yes, the turks believed also that there soldiers died for freedom .

  43. stackja

    Women in harms way will always face ‘abuse’. Do the activists care?
    Probably not.

  44. Perth Trader

    Here in this country of ours,

    You, the mothers,

    Who sent their sons from far away countries

    Wipe away your tears,

    Your sons are now lying in our bosom

    And are in peace

    After having lost their lives on this land they have

    Become our sons as well”.
    Tel,….Kemal Ataturks speech. Yes, the turks believed there men died for freedom and both sides had respect for each other.

  45. stackja

    CL – ANZAC Day is the day. Armistice Day is not.

  46. eb

    The VFL started playing on ANZAC Day in 1960. So yes, I think it is reasonable now to call it a tradition.

    And as some posters have pointed out above, ANZAC Day should also be a day to celebrate the good things, and the way of life the diggers were fighting to preserve. To abandon those entirely on this day would be wrong.

  47. jupes

    I’d have to say, the Kings Park service and memorial would be the most moving ceremony I’ve ever attended. Truly glorious setting and the shear number of names on all the plaques is tragic when you think of the WA population during WW1 and 2. Gut wrenching in fact.

    I agree with you about the setting however I was there too but not so impressed with the service. They have removed the padre and all prayers and hymns. The Dawn service has always been a Christian service. The WA RSL changed it to be more “inclusive”.

    Virtue signalling fuckwits.

  48. vlad

    I would say that “ANZAC” is not a suitable name for something as mundane as a railway station.

    Thanks, Dan. Not.

  49. stackja

    As I remember CEW Bean wrote someone in an office created the term, ANZAC.

  50. Makka

    I agree with you about the setting however I was there too but not so impressed with the service. They have removed the padre and all prayers and hymns. The Dawn service has always been a Christian service. The WA RSL changed it to be more “inclusive”.

    I didn’t make it this year but was at the prior 4 years. That’s a real shame. Just more evidence of the bs nation we have become. I’m glad I was there for the better services then.

  51. Infidel Tiger

    I agree with you about the setting however I was there too but not so impressed with the service. They have removed the padre and all prayers and hymns. The Dawn service has always been a Christian service. The WA RSL changed it to be more “inclusive”.

    Come to the Claremont one next year.

    Was very good and the Lions Club put on a free brekky after. Only sour note was they read some turgid war poet.

    The war poets were all poofters.

  52. Infidel Tiger

    Needless to say our local member Julie Bishop wasn’t there.

    Thankfully her replacement was.

  53. struth

    For my Dad, a Victorian country lad, football made the Army tolerable. His time in the NT and New Guinea was described via all the footy games he played in and attended, indeed for years after the VFL was filled with Army mates. Footy was social glue in rural areas in the thirties and forties, so natural for the young men to incorporate into their war experience. Dad was an RSL Life Member, his graveside service was lead by the Viet Vet who took over his Club Presidency from him, their RSL incorporated Viet Vets very early and thoroughly. Dad never came to like the Japs.
    Dad would not have found it disgraceful to play football on Anzac Day, after the formalities of course, which he (and we) attended every year marching in Melbourne at first then later attending services often in multiple locations in the district.

    Lest We Forget.

    Units were from same areas.
    Footy is still the unifying force of country Vic, SA, WA, and parts of NSW.
    I understand that it is a big part of the culture of country Australians.
    So is Rugby, Surfing, Fishing, Swimming, cricket, etc etc.
    It is a day to remember sacrifice, the ultimate sacrifice Aussies and NZ’ders for our freedom.
    Celebate our culture, or particular sports that take pride of place in it, on Australia day.

    I detest the fact the AFL try to ride the Anzac’s day and profit from it.
    Trying to insert itself as part of what we should celebrate on Anzac day is great marketing, but bloody poor form in my opinion.
    I also understand many (especially Victorian) diggers are so into footy that they can’t detach from it, but in my opinion (and it is only mine) it’s not what the day is about.
    The fact remains the majority of Anzacs had nothing to do with Aussie rules.
    The AFL is sport, and the day is not about sport, and again I make the point that if there was an official sport that covered the entirety of the Anzacs culture in those days it would have been cricket.

    I also understand the religious zeal AFL has with many of you, so I expect a negative response.
    So be it.

  54. jupes

    I also understand the religious zeal AFL has with many of you, so I expect a negative response.

    Consider my response negative.

  55. notafan

    HZhousewife

    my dad played football when he was in ‘the islands’ during ww11 and went home to a short stint in the VFL

  56. stackja

    ANZAC Day seems to annoys the Left more any other day. Another good reason to commemorate the day.

  57. jupes

    Numbers!

    “The Vietnam blokes fall into a couple of kinds.

    There are some who’ve never let it go because we were 10 feet tall and brightly shining, then when we stepped out of the bubble again we found we were just ordinary people.

    “I’m happy with just being an ordinary person but some people mourn that moment of brief time of being something rather special.

    LOL

  58. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Just heard that last post at Villiers Bretonneux; we were there when we toured those battlefields, ending up at Ypres and the Menin Gate. Also scouted around Mons a couple of years ago, which I wrote about here, for we visited a rural cemetery holding the graves, opposite each other, of the first and last soldier killed in the Great War, opposite each other. Plus, unusually, sharing this quiet simple place with many of the German dead.

    I would say that “ANZAC” is not a suitable name for something as mundane as a railway station.

    Near Mons we visited Obourg Station. Around there was where Private Carr, the first British Commonwealth soldier killed in the war, engaged in some mighty heroics. Obourg today is rather derelict, the station not where it was, a few brick walls of it remaining, and a general air of desolation about the place where a light breeze blew a litter of rubbish around. We had to search very hard walking over the railway lines to find the broken plaque commemorating this spot. Stations were major sites of battle, this one was fought for desperately, and they are worthy of better recognition than is accorded many of them. It is sad that some in France appear not to think so, like the commenter above.

  59. Infidel Tiger

    I just read that list.

    Doubt whoever wrote it was invited to many social events with the lads.

  60. jupes

    Doubt whoever wrote it was invited to many social events with the lads.

    Stuck in the corner with Numbers while the boys get on it most likely.

  61. Oh come on

    Didn’t this list pop up elsewhere on the site a few days ago?

  62. Infidel Tiger

    Yeah. I think Elle wrote it.

  63. Didn’t this list pop up elsewhere on the site a few days ago?

    I’ve seen it on at least seven Facebook groups.
    And received it in an email circular at least once, possibly twice.
    No saying where or when it originated.

  64. Stimpson J. Cat

    I’m at work.
    We can’t all stand around literally blowing our own trumpets and writing rules and lists for people to follow.
    Some of us have actual responsibilities.

  65. Stimpson J. Cat

    Sorry, “sounding our own bugles.”

  66. Chris M

    Thank you for this returned Serviceman, God bless you!

  67. jupes

    Fantastic first half of football at the ‘G, following the toss of the coin from a 99 year old Rat of Tobruk.

    Great Anzac Day tradition.

  68. Infidel Tiger

    The Rat seemed very sprightly.

    How many WWII vets are left?

  69. Tel

    I’m going with Peter Schiff on this one: every war Australians have ever fought, Australia was the loser.

    Why? Because after every war taxes were higher, government larger and more onerous, and individual liberty reduced as compared with before the war. Our freedom was left behind somewhere in all that shooting.

    Those young men were fighting for bigger government … even though perhaps they thought they were fighting for something else … what they actually bestowed upon us was bigger government, which takes our freedom away.

  70. JohnL

    Watching turds like Andrews read the commemoration of these blokes. Sickening.

    Not only Andrews, Shorten, Morrison and Pyne, Christopher Pyne!, also made speeches.
    There is no tragedy that would stop them from making speeches to buy votes!

  71. Petros

    And that includes the war on terror, Tel. Possibly the worst war for having more big government foisted upon us.

  72. Yeah Tel but basically we were the production model MY1901, so you can’t blame the wars for that.

    The Korean War was fought and then we only had 22% GDP as government spending in 1963.

    It can be done, but governments will of course use war and Keynes whenever they can to expand.

  73. Sinclair Davidson

    Ellie forwarded me the email. So not written by her.

  74. Win

    Getting shit faced is not a tradition. Yes it is my aunt deceased at 96 never forgave her Uncle when she found him one ANZAC day drunk in the gutter in down town Sydney. Surviving world war 1paled into insignificance.

  75. An alternative view of the “one day of the year”.

    Our national lament is for those who died overseas in wars chosen for us by our great and powerful friends, most of the time against enemies who would never have been able to threaten Australia. How is that commensurate with frontier wars fought in Australia about the ownership and control of the continent itself? For us this must be of far greater significance than the balance of power in Europe or the scramble to carve up the remains of the Ottoman Empire.

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