Help wanted: Baby Boomer Quiet Australian who voted Liberal

A prominent journalist on The Australian is looking for a “Baby Boomer Quiet Australian who voted Liberal” to interview today. That is a person who voted Liberal but kept quiet about their intentions until getting into the booth when no one was looking.

If you qualify or if you can quickly find someone, indicate in comments that you have a candidate and I will get back to you by email. In case you did not know, posters get to see the emails of commenters.

UPDATE. Thanks to the people who put their hands up. Very surprised that full names are required for publication. Given that few of us have families, workplaces or social groups where it is safe or comfortable to come out, going public in the national newspaper is several bridges too far!

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54 Responses to Help wanted: Baby Boomer Quiet Australian who voted Liberal

  1. stackja

    Oz doesn’t believe voters want to keep quiet? I couldn’t be bothered.
    Oz just look at election results and stop all silly opinion surveys.

  2. Megan

    Missed it by that much!

  3. I wonder what sort of hit job this will be.

  4. Derp

    It’s a trap.

    It’s also telling that they can’t find someone within their own organisations to interview.

  5. duncanm

    “I don’t know anyone that voted Liberal… do you think we can find one?”

  6. Peter Greagg

    If they want a Boomer (I was born 1952) that voted strategically so that my preference filtered down so the liberals were my last preference (ie before labor or the greens), I am available. Doomlord has my email address.

  7. Rusty of Qld

    It was the RUSSIANS/COLLUSION/DIRTY TRICKS. George Christensen has been overseas getting foreign cash for Libs campaign, couldn’t have been our Dear Leader or brilliant policies the deplorable’s are too stupid to appreciate.

  8. areff

    If the reporter seeking this rare species is the loudmouth lady from last night’s Q&A, why bother?

    Alas that the fountain of youth is a myth. We could dip Rupert in it and watch in awe as he stopped The Australian’s slide toward Fairfaxian nitwittery.

    Honestly, whoever hired that creature should be the first to get it in the neck.

  9. Tom

    Rafe, before volunteering to help The Australian, I would need to know the journalist’s name to make sure s/he’s not a leftist activist like Alice Workman (who the paper recently hired — inexplicably) setting up a gotcha.

    I can see why they’re interested: the left has so intimidated voters via social media that people not planning to vote for the Greens or Labor won’t tell anyone.

    Voter intimidation on social media has effectively wrecked the opinion polling industry. It’s so bad that even the doyen of accurate polling, Newspoll, has for the first time, been humiliated through its inaccuracy.

    Despite the denials of the polling industry, the Shy Tory syndrome, which has caused major polling inaccuracies in the UK and USA in the past four years, is now rampant in Australia.

  10. calli

    The Beloved is one of thems for whom ye seek.

    And he would rather chew ground glass than speak to any j-list. Bless him.

  11. Karabar

    I am willing to participate (quietly).

  12. Tom

    Snap, areff!

    I can’t believe that The Oz‘a new managing editor, Christopher Dore, hired that creature, Alice Workman, who embarrassed the paper on Q&A last night.

    She has singlehandedly done more damage to The Australian’s reputation than the buffoonery of Peter Van Onselen and Nikki Savva combined.

  13. Shaun

    Quiet Boothby voter here happy to enlighten

  14. Leigh Lowe

    Pick me.
    The condition is that I tape the interview from go to whoa and the journo undertakes to print un-edited replies.

  15. areff

    The only advantage to hiring Workperson is that she can be trotted out as proof Rupert666 hires loons from the same, er, “talent” pool as Fairfax and ABC. Not that would shut up those afflicted with News Corp Derangement Syndrome.

  16. Leigh Lowe

    If they want a Boomer (I was born 1952) that voted strategically so that my preference filtered down so the liberals were my last preference (ie before labor or the greens), I am available. Doomlord has my email address.

    Not quite as Jurassic as 1952, but born before the Beatles were big.
    I voted exactly the same in the Senate (5 conservative minors with Libs at 6 so I didn’t exhaust my vote).
    Our HoR seat is safe Lib and I was thinking of a protest vote until he sent some election material encouraging people to go to Anzac ceremonies, and it contained almost no pollie speak.
    I gave him a tick for that alone.

  17. Peter Greagg

    Actually they are looking for a young family (dad, mum, two kids) that voted for the liberals for the first time in this election because the family thought the Morrisson family was ‘nice’.
    FFS.

  18. Tom

    The only advantage to hiring Workperson is that she can be trotted out as proof Rupert666 hires loons from the same, er, “talent” pool as Fairfax and ABC.

    Meanwhile, The Oz’s credibility is flushed down the toilet because it hires political activists instead of journalists.

    I would rate The Oz’s readership the most literate and intelligent in Australia and they’re getting mightily pissed off with what Chris Dore is doing to the paper.

  19. duncanm

    Will the interview be like this?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVfkYZmXHAg&t=9s

    I’m talking to you, Alice.

  20. duncanm

    hmm.. this for the immediate visual

  21. Karabar

    She only wants husband, wife, and two kids. My offspring are both overseas.

  22. Shaun

    I spoke with her but she needed to include my surname in the article. I work in the conservation field and outing myself as anything other than Green would be career suicide. Had to abort the interview.

  23. sfw

    Peter Greagg I was born 56 and did exactly the same on my vote.

  24. Peter Greagg

    BTW, she told me the Oz moderators is a computer.
    I suppose it is like the one the Doomlord uses here.

    sfw
    #3021687, posted on May 21, 2019 at 4:02 pm
    Peter Greagg I was born 56 and did exactly the same on my vote.

    I told her I voted that way because I was very angry with the libs for their lurch to the left, but couldn’t vote for Shorten and Bowen with their agenda.

  25. Herodotus

    I couldn’t possibly comment. I’m too quite and reserved.
    And any journalist needing to do this interview has a perception problem, and probably an attitudinal one as well.

  26. JohnJJJ

    Ha – I did one better, I carried the Greens How to Vote leaflet, chatted to them, agreed about the impending climates disaster, smiled at Labor, scowled at the Liberals and then voted Liberal.
    Hedging.

  27. Nob

    I mean how many who voted Lib even knew anything about Morrison’s family before they saw the victory photos?

  28. stackja

    ALP keep losing votes, and they don’t understand why.

  29. Peter Greagg

    Good point Nob.

  30. stackja

    ALP won under Curtin, lost under Chifley, won under Gough, lost under Gough, won under Hawke, lost under Keating, then came RGR, then BS. Evatt was Evatt. Oz could read history and guess why? ALP policies?

  31. Craig Mc

    Why doesn’t she ask the guy who got sacked from Queensland Ports for daring to ask the anointed one an impertinent question?

  32. Nob

    They could always wait outside Q&A and interview one of the 40% Coalition voters

  33. Entropy

    Despite the denials of the polling industry, the Shy Tory syndrome, which has caused major polling inaccuracies in the UK and USA in the past four years, is now rampant in Australia.

    I wasn’t just shy, I told the pollsters the exact opposite of my voting intentions. Because I can. It was fun

  34. Rafe Champion

    Meanwhile, The Oz’s credibility is flushed down the toilet because it hires political activists instead of journalists.

    Don’t see it every day but they seem to be running regular columns from a couple of people on the Washington Post who have worked with the Democrats. The columns are rank Trump Derangement Stuff.

    Not to mention the Professor.

  35. Crossie

    A prominent journalist on The Australian is looking for a “Baby Boomer Quiet Australian who voted Liberal” to interview today. That is a person who voted Liberal but kept quiet about their intentions until getting into the booth when no one was looking.

    They still don’t get it. Which part of “when no one is looking” don’t they understand? Who in their right mind is going to volunteer to be eaten alive?

  36. egg_

    “Baby Boomer Quiet Australian who voted Liberal”

    I am the “Baby Boomer Quiet Australian who voted Liberal”!
    Nope.
    Followed the Labya HTV card and they lost their seat in a big swing!

  37. Roger

    Given that few of us have families, workplaces or social groups where it is safe or comfortable to come out…

    Really?

    It ought to be shameful to vote for the Socialists!

  38. Crossie

    I wasn’t just shy, I told the pollsters the exact opposite of my voting intentions. Because I can. It was fun

    It also set up the elites, ie media and Labor/Greens, for the biggest fall in Australian political history. Well done!

  39. mizaris

    1957, but won’t qualify because I’m OUT, LOUD AND PROUD CONSERVATIVE AND CATHOLIC. And spent much of the ele tion campaign wearing the Shut it down, fire them all shirt and loudly proclaiming the complete unsuitability of [Bill Shorten – edited Sinc] being our PM in every checkout queue. As well as other places. And bemoaning the loss of my franking credits, the proposed super grab, the DISGRACEFUL profligacy of all labor govts since time began. The APPALLING BIAS of the alpbc, alpfl, rugby Australia et al. I had THE BEST FUN. Almost sorry it’s over, but now can gloat.

  40. Anita

    I joined my group of boomer friends for lunch yesterday. As they talked about the election and how Labor had done poorly, one in the group said, “We lost in WA too.” She quickly corrected herself and said Labor lost in WA too. I was the quiet Australian who opened my mouth only to eat but not to talk. I was afraid of verbal bashing.

    Seriously, we have already lost our freedom to speak.

  41. Crossie

    It’s also telling that they can’t find someone within their own organisations to interview.

    She said Boomer, those have all been pensioned off. It’s cheaper to hire the millennials who are not exactly self-aware.

  42. Crossie

    Voter intimidation on social media has effectively wrecked the opinion polling industry.

    Tom, political correctness is reaping the harvest of unintended consequences.

  43. Crossie

    raig Mc
    #3021726, posted on May 21, 2019 at 5:07 pm
    Why doesn’t she ask the guy who got sacked from Queensland Ports for daring to ask the anointed one an impertinent question?

    Good heavens no, he is an irredeemable deplorable.

  44. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    My own sweet love Da Hairy Ape is also one, but he did break ground and come out recently; ’twas he wot wrote that letter read out on Bolt not long ago giving gyp to Scenic cruises and their caving in to Sleeping Giants (his full name was mentioned elsewhere in further media comment on this). He’s retired, and so these things now seem more possible and we care far less about offending old friends. Freedom at last!

    What a terrible comment it is on the madness of the current zeitgeist that no-one is prepared to speak their mind any more for fear of retribution, social or economic or both. That means that more than half of the voters of Australia are under a cloud.

    We need to put the boot on the other foot. Make it that all hawkers of climatic child abuse memes (yes, teacher, I am looking at you) and economic standover merchants curtailing free speech (Rugby is a dirty word as far as I am concerned) and similar transgressors against democracy are called out loudly and ridiculed and stigmatized as hateful and immoral bigots. For that is what they are.

  45. Eddystone

    She said Boomer, those have all been pensioned off.

    Oh no we haven’t! I’m not dead yet.

  46. Nob

    I’ve been saying this for some time:

    Next campaign for lefties will be against the secret pen and paper ballot .Too many Wrong results.

    Democracy is in trouble!

    Populism!

    Far right!

  47. Nob

    The campaign against secret paper ballot will be disguised as a campaign for online voting because Fairness.

  48. egg_

    Anita
    #3021832, posted on May 21, 2019 at 6:46 pm

    Near TDS at my workplace – they must have thought Tits would romp in – sour grapes, big time!

  49. I’m more than happy, for once in my life, to tell anybody who asks which way my vote went.
    Alas I didn’t vote Liberal.
    Not sure I’m anywhere near old enough to be a “Baby Boomer” – see my mum for that.
    But she didn’t vote Liberal either.

  50. duncanm

    I seem to be fortunate in my workplace.

    People seem to be more balanced, and they’re not afraid to tell me their side, nor me them.

    That, or I have no self-awareness, and they think I’m a raving nutter; this is possible, too.

  51. ACTOldFart

    Anyhow, the article is in today’s OZ, behind the paywall, with Caroline Overington’s by-line. Has anyone read it?

  52. Chris

    Quiet Australians heard loud and clear in Coalition election win

    Who are the Quiet Australians, the ones who voted for Scott Morrison?

    Listening to those spewing forth vitriol online you’d soon form a picture, and it wouldn’t be pretty.

    Coalition voters are racist, they’re sexist and they’re so greedy. Look at them, sitting like Scrooges on their big piles of money, watching while the planet burns, refusing to share.

    READ NEXT

    TALKING POINT
    Hard to see how class war ends
    That’s the stereotype. Here’s the reality.

    Single mum Rachel Bierling lives in the north Brisbane suburb of Nundah, in Wayne Swan’s old seat of Lilley.

    A traditional Labor voter, Ms Bierling, 31, said she and many of her friends voted for the Coalition hoping they would “build a strong economy” for her two daughters.

    Describing herself as “poor” — she receives a welfare payment — Ms Bierling said: “My friend said to me, ‘But Labor gives us money.’

    “I said, ‘Yeah, but it puts the country in debt, too.’

    “If there’s major crises and hospitals start shutting down and schools are affected, I’ll say, ‘Looks like we made a mistake, maybe it’s time for a change,’ ” she said. “But at the moment, it is working.”

    Amanda Harrison is a teacher and a mum. She’s married with two children, 13 and 10, and they — her family — are her everything.

    She doesn’t always vote Liberal. She takes her time, weighing up the options.

    “But it really resonated with me, what Mr Morrison said during the campaign,” she told The ­Australian.

    “We want to take care of our kids. We want to help them get good jobs, maybe go to university.

    “Labor seemed to be implying we were greedy and selfish for wanting pretty basic things.

    “I looked at the Morrison family, and I thought: his family looks like us, a typical Australian family, wanting to get ahead.

    “I looked at how I was being ­described, and I looked at my own parents, who worked hard for 30 years, and Bill Shorten was going to punish them, and why? What had they done wrong? Just worked hard, all their lives. And I just thought, no, you can’t do that. But what’s been really interesting this last few days is how many other people there are, just like us. Waking up to look at the vote, I thought: oh, OK, we’re not wrong!

    “It is normal to want the things we want. And it felt great.”

    Quiet Australians — it’s the name Morrison gave to the ­Coalition’s not-at-all-noisy but rather determined supporters on election night — are often ­appalled by the hatred online, ­especially on Sunday morning.

    A sample: “To the many f*& up people who voted for the #LiarFromTheShire … the Coalition are going to have so much more fun wiping their asses with your money.”

    Also: “You are the dumbest ­nation on earth giving this pack of liars thieves and cut throats another term.”

    And: “The grandchildren of the people that voted for Morrison will be remembered as the people that approved further extinction of our native animals.”

    The commentator Jane Caro’s remarks have been reported elsewhere. She referred to voters as “turds” (in The Sydney Morning Herald yesterday, Ms Caro said she’d had too much to drink, and she is now calling for more civility in public life.)

    Still, ordinary Australians look at this, and think: OK, you’ve lost me.

    Mark Humphery-Jenner is a fin­ance expert, based in Sydney. He’s never been a hardline conservative, having voted Yes in the same-sex marriage plebiscite, for example.

    “The specific reason I voted Liberal was because Labor’s policies would attack people who are hardworking and ambitious,” he said.

    “Their policy was to attack success. And they are intolerant. Whenever you express an opinion that is positive about a conservative position on something, you are castigated as being racist, homo­phobic.

    “They were demonising people, saying, ‘Oh, it’s only the big end of town’, like anyone who might get hurt wasn’t human.”

    Ben Vandenberg was one of those whooping with joy as Mr Morrison took the stage on Saturday night. By his own admission, he’s very far from struggling. He’s under 40, he’s a family man, with three kids. He’s got a grape-growing business in Mildura that employs up to 50 people, seasonally.

    It’s a big operation, and he’s proud of the work that’s gone into it. “I have been building this business for years. I took a risk and I took out a big loan, and when you’re just starting to get ahead, you’re just starting to see rewards, somebody wants to come and tax you and redistribute my wealth?” he said.

    “I created a business. I created jobs. I don’t want to deal with ­people swearing at me, those ­people living in their castles, in the cities, dictating to me.

    “I’m sorry, but how people in the cities think, it’s not how everyone thinks. People tell me to worry about climate change. I’m a grape grower. I know about climate. I also know that I could turn off every light in my house and put in candles, and I could ride a donkey to work and it would not make a difference to climate change.”

    The Quiet Australians also include voters who aren’t yet wealthy, but hoping to get there.

    Tyler Mapstone, 27, voted for the Morrison government.

    He grew up on the Sunshine Coast, moved to Adelaide for uni and now works in finance in ­Sydney

    “It was a hard decision,” he said, “the last six months, I thought, no, I don’t want more turmoil. But they got it together.

    “I’m young, and I wouldn’t mind making some investments one day. I can’t see why you’d punish people for trying hard. A lot of my friends vote Labor and Greens. But my choice is my choice. I don’t feel like I have to justify it.”

    Then, too, you can’t talk about the Quiet Australians without talking about the baby boomers.

    Lynne Dawson, 68, of Cooroy, Queensland, is a boomer, and “I consider myself a Quiet Australian, because my voice seldom gets heard. Increasingly, I’m less and less quiet.”

    She has two adult children, and “four gorgeous granddaughters”, and lives in a pretty village in Queensland, but previously ran a macadamia farm; before that, she had 14 staff in a hairdressing salon in Mt Isa.

    “People forget, when you run a business, you’re responsible for your staff, who have to pay their mortgages,” she said.

    “They don’t take into account that small business people put their houses and everything on the line, and there’s no guarantee, one week to the next, that you’ll make money.

    “The only way to put appren­tices on is to have a successful ­business.

    “People want to call us greedy, but — wonderful Australians! — we just weren’t going to cop it.”

    Too right: on Saturday, they got up, and in a rather delightful show of independence, ignoring those who presumed to tell them how to think and what to do, they stepped quietly to the cardboard ballot booth, and ticked the box that would deliver a majority for the man who spoke not over but right to them.

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