Monday Forum: May 21, 2019

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2,636 Responses to Monday Forum: May 21, 2019

  1. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Cormann rebuffs Labor pitch

    Finance Minister Mathias Cormann says the government’s tax cuts will not be split, as presumptive Labor leader Anthony Albanese signals he is still unwilling to pass parts two and three.

    “No, we will not split the bill. It is a holistic plan,” he told Sky News. “It can’t be taken apart. It can’t be dealt with in bits and pieces. It will be put to the parliament as a whole. We will resist splitting it.

    “The Australian people voted on it. The Australian people rejected the class warfare approach that was prosecuted by Bill Shorten.

    “Anthony Albanese and the Labor Party should now support what was clearly endorsed by the Australian people.”

    Senator Cormann has been Finance Minister since the Coalition returned to power in 2013. He told Sky News he was happy to continue in the role, but that it was ultimately Scott Morrison’s decision as to which portfolio he takes.

    From the Oz.

  2. Chris

    Great articles linked from Insty today –

    Of course, I was aware of the complaints directed at Australian universities—that the integrity of their curricula had gradually been compromised to appease social justice activists. Ubiquitous Canadian psychologist Jordan Peterson expresses these concerns somewhat apocalyptically:

    You may not realize it, but you are currently funding some dangerous people. They are indoctrinating young minds throughout the West with their resentment-ridden ideology… They produce the mobs that violently shut down campus speakers, the language police who enshrine into law use of fabricated gender pronouns and the deans whose livelihoods depend on madly rooting out discrimination where little or none exists… And now we rack up education-related debt, not so that our children learn to think critically, write clearly or speak properly, but so they can model their mentors’ destructive agenda.

    It’s natural that these denunciations should sound wildly hyperbolic—a bit like Joseph McCarthy’s claim that there were 81 Communists lurking in the State Department. Who but a political cultist would be willing to believe something like that without seeing it for himself?

    The first indication I received that something had gone awry at Australia’s best university was in a criminology class titled “Violence, Trauma, and Reconciliation.” According to the University of Melbourne handbook, this class “considers the forms of trauma people experience as a response to… forms of violence and explores how this trauma propels calls for apologies, truth commissions, retribution, and torture.”

    The instructor, Dr. Juliet Rogers, devoted a lecture to female genital mutilation—a natural enough topic for a class on trauma. In Rogers’s view, however, the true source of trauma was not the practice of FGM itself, but the “violence” of anti-FGM laws. After all, Western societies pressure women into body modification in the form of ear piercings—so who are we to pass judgment on those who practice clitorectomies and infibulations on children? And isn’t it true that legislators’ supposed concern with FGM is actually motivated by “Islamophobia”?

    In the article “The First Case Addressing Female Genital Mutilation in Australia: Where is the Harm?” Rogers takes issue with Australian “prejudice” against the practice of clitoral “nicking”:

    For each claim that a woman’s sexual health is impacted, there is a study which suggests it is not, and others which suggest it is enhanced. For each claim of trauma, there is another which claims empowerment. However, it is the violent images which are played and replayed, on airport shelves, in documentaries and in fiction that form opinion. These, “through repetition” have come in Obermeyer’s terms again “to gain authority as truth.” Similarly, in the FLC’s [Family Law Court’s] Report the image of violence is only presented and then repeated, with the name “female genital mutilation” always attached. There is no discussion of the benefits of the practices, the increases in sexual enjoyment that women report, the cultural empowerment that women experience, the desires of many to undergo the practices or the rage that many women have at being called ‘mutilated’ when so many clearly feel that they are not.

    While working with the US Peace Corps in rural Gambia, I encountered the practice of female genital mutilation firsthand. The empowering effect of having one’s clitoris razored off was not readily apparent.

    It was clear from the tone of Rogers’s lecture that she regarded these ideas as quite subversive and challenging. However, most of the room nodded along quite comfortably. If we didn’t actually find these ideas challenging, we could at least derive some satisfaction from the thought of how challenged a less enlightened third party might be.

    Another peculiar class was Terror, Law, and War, ostensibly a survey of legal and military responses to terrorism. In practice, the class focused almost exclusively on American, European, and Israeli misbehavior, and on the perceived ridiculousness of Australian anti-terrorism measures. Islamist terrorism was left unconsidered except as a hallucination of xenophobic Westerners. As if to drive the point home, one presentation on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict referred to Palestinian suicide bombings as “terrorism,” in scare quotes.

    We spent a period discussing a televised interview with Wassim Doureihi, spokesman for the Islamist group Hizb ut-Tahrir. During the interview, Lateline host Emma Alberici took a combative stance, demanding that Doureihi either clearly denounce the Islamic State’s tactics or admit that he condoned them. Doureihi refused to cooperate, instead pushing the conversation toward Australian mistreatment of Muslims.

    The subsequent class discussion became something like a rally: we unanimously acclaimed Doureihi’s dignity and courage and took turns mocking Alberici’s hypocrisy and ill-concealed racism. The teaching assistant declared with apparent pride that she was friends with Doureihi and that he had confided in her that the interview was a trying experience, but necessary. Some of the students who rose to voice their support for Doureihi were so agitated that their voices shook. Somehow, throughout this bacchanal of self-righteousness, the fact that Hizb ut-Tahrir is an explicitly anti-democratic organization that supports the killing of apostates and whose leaders describe Jews as “the most evil creatures of Allah” escaped mention. Evidently, one can’t take sides between liberalism and totalitarianism without knowing the pigmentations of those involved.

    Link to Quillette article

  3. John Constantine


    Wool market on the slide

    SMI: 1816 -48
    18: 2257 -42
    19: 2159 -59
    20: 2148 -41
    21: 2145 -55
    22: 2141 -36
    28: 1099 -81
    Merino Cardings: 1031 -8
    Passed In: 28.4%

    Merino wool still close to century highs, but crossbred wool has slumped thirty percent since a brief spike.

    Short staple length carding wool, the bits that are different from the actual body fleece, [shorn off the belly/head/armpits] have returned to discount prices after selling strongly for a while.

    Premium Wool bought by chicoms for processing and re-export is still selling well, but the cheaper wool bought for domestic Chinese consumption in domestic Chinese currency has been hammered.

  4. DrBeauGan

    Inspired by odd Çat comments about the Lovecraft fiction, I bought a copy of The Cthulhu Casebooks, Sherlock Holmes and the Miskatonic Monstrosities. I thought it might be funny.

    It’s not. It’s awful. The author is a NYT best seller, which is a worry.

  5. Top Ender

    Didn’t take long:

    From Left field: Albanese and Corbyn and co

    Labor’s leader in waiting Anthony Albanese will be forced to jettison the hard-left policies he has ­espoused for more than three decades, with former party heavyweights questioning his passion­ate stances on asylum-seekers, boat turnbacks and ­energy policy.

    Mr Albanese, a democratic socialist from Sydney’s inner west who is set to assume the leadership unchallenged, has become close to far-left British Opposition Leader Jeremy Corbyn.

    He has met with the fellow “Tory fighter” at least three times in the past 14 months.

    In March last year, Mr Albanese posted on social media that he had caught up “again” with the British Labour leader, whose manifesto includes nationalising Britain’s energy and water network­s.

    “Talking politics and progress — and a bit of cricket,” he wrote on Facebook above a photo with Mr Corbyn at the parliament.

    Since throwing his hat into the ring to become Labor leader, Mr Albanese has pitched himself as an “inclusive” leader who is prepare­d to abandon class-war rhetoric to win over the ordinary voters in the suburbs who spurned the ALP at Saturday’s election.

    But only three days before the poll he said Labor’s infrastructure funding would be paid by hitting the “top end of town”. And just a few years ago Mr ­Albanese defied Bill Shorten at Labor’s 2015 nation­al conference by voting against boat turnbacks.

    “If people were in a boat, includin­g families and children, I myself couldn’t turn that around,” he said at the time.

    Labor sources said yesterday it may be difficult for the knockabout MP to whitewash his decade­s-long history as a spear-thrower for Labor’s hard Left.

    His former leader, Mark Latham — whose own tenure as Labor boss ended in spectacular fashion in 2005, and who now sits as a One Nation MP in the NSW upper house — said Mr Albanese had been on the “wrong side of history” in Labor’s policy ­debates for 30 years by veering too far to the Left.

    He recalled Mr Albanese as a radical Young Labor member in the 1980s speaking out against the economic policies of the Hawke-Keating governments, including deregulation and tariff cuts.

    It was about this time, also, that the firebrand student was suspended from the University of Sydney for his role in leading a protest that included breaking into the university’s clock tower and leading an occupation of the economics building.

    One former senior Labor ministe­r, who declined to be named, said Mr Albanese had been too far to the Left on the timbe­r industry, asylum policy, energy policy, mining policy and on uranium ­exports to India.

    “He used to call people from western Sydney rednecks,” the former minister said. “His record speaks for itself.” As a federal MP, Mr Albanese has never been afraid of an ­internal brawl, spearheading the Left’s strong backing for softer policies on asylum­-seekers and boat turnbacks.

    In 2001, he spoke passionately against John Howard’s bill to stop the Tampa from delivering more than 400 asylum-seekers to Aust­ral­ia. “This is not a refugee crisis,” he said. “Four hundred people on a boat do not represent a crisis. This is a political crisis for us as a nation, which has been brought on by a desperate prime minister.”

    Mr Latham recalled a shouting match in a Canberra restaurant, in front of Labor MP Joel Fitzgibbon, after the Tampa incident.

    “Albo was telling me how heartless I was for supporting Howard’s policy,” he said. “It was (his position) to let the boats flow. He was (later) influential with (Kevin) Rudd on reopening the borders, there’s no doubt.”

    Yet one former party heavyweight described Mr Albanese as “pragmatic”, and another said his political views had moderated over the years.

    One senior Right faction source defended Mr Albanese: “In the past few years he’s demonstrated the ability to keep things mainstream.” NSW Labor’s general secretary Kaila Murnain said: “Albo will be a strong and unifying force as leader of our party and we are all excited and ready to take the fight to the Liberals and ­Nationals under his leadership.”

    Mr Albanese said he wanted to return Labor to the pro-growth economic policies of the Hawke-Keating era, to reopen the door to business and abandon class-war politics.

    He is promising to drop the anti-business rhetoric of Labor’s election campaign. “The language used was terrible … unions and employers have a common interest. Successful businesses are a precondition for employing more workers, and that is obvious.”

    Additional reporting: Greg Brown

  6. calli

    Dot

    Other intelligent life secretly living on earth.

    That’s some secret. Good on ‘em.

  7. Leigh Lowe

    For those who don’t know, because they haven’t suffered parenthood, Leigh’s reference is a mix of two famous children’s books – “The Little Tug” about a little tug called Scuffy who dreamed big and learned life’s lessons, and “The Little Engine that Could” about a little steam engine that found great strength in the end after many trials.

    And I hope the reference to outsourced 457 masturbation wasn’t lost in all that.

  8. None

    I did tell you that Blanche would be on the ABC quick smarten starting to blab and self-promote. She’s already priming us for her next book about Bob.

  9. “The True Thai Tory Trouncer.”

    Love it Calli!

  10. None

    The only positive about having Albo as leader now is that he’ll self-immolate before the next election. Or more likely get knifed I think that’s why the others have backed out realising that whoever leads now is not going to lead to an election win.

  11. calli

    Imagine Hawkie being caught outside The House of Lumbar Relief.

    He’d laugh uproariously and shout them all a session.

    End of story.

  12. lotocoti

    He has met with the fellow “Tory fighter” at least three times in the past 14 months.

    I wonder what Albo thinks of Corbyn’s penchant for snuggling up to terrorists and encouraging anti-semites.

  13. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    “Albo was telling me how heartless I was for supporting Howard’s policy,” he said. “It was (his position) to let the boats flow. He was (later) influential with (Kevin) Rudd on reopening the borders, there’s no doubt.”

    “Let the boats flow.” That should ensure a Liberal Government for the next forty years or so.

  14. calli

    Albo will be dispatched on the cusp of the next election. Based on opinion polls which will miraculously favour the conservatives for a week.

    The slightly more moderate* Plibbers will take over the reigns of the rusting Layba Charabanc (Boadicia style) and steer the somewhat mollified horses into the volcano.

    Life is good.

    * not to be confused with an actual Moderate.

  15. calli

    Last day in Bali. Treated myself to some croissants.

    Holy moley those carbs are goooood!

    Tomorrow it’s back onto the eggs and bacon. 😇

  16. calli

    Time for a new OT.

    My sugar rush is harming my reputation as a serious commenter.

  17. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    In cafe society, Adani backflip a ‘betrayal’

    Charlie Peel
    Journalist
    @charliepeeled ‏
    12:00AM May 24, 2019
    167 Comments

    Clementine Anderson believes she’s one of many voters who will abandon Jackie Trad at the next state election if the Deputy Premier does not speak out against the Adani mine.

    Ms Anderson, 23, who has lived all her life in Brisbane’s West End, went against her ­initial impulse to vote for the Greens in the 2017 election after she saw a tough-talking Ms Trad debating her opponent in a local hotel.

    But she said she would revert to the Greens at the October 2020 election if the Treasurer and leader of Labor’s dominant Left faction “rolls over” on the Adani project.

    Ms Anderson said she understood why the Palaszczuk government was at pains to win the support of disenfranchised ­voters who punished federal Labor on Saturday.

    “But locally, for Jackie Trad, I think it’s a mistake,” Ms Anderson said.

    “Local politicians need to be working for their constituents, and people here are against the Adani mine.”

    Ms Anderson said part of the reason she voted for Ms Trad, the member for South Brisbane, was “her strong voice” and public support for renewables.

    “If she were to roll over on that, I think it would be a bit of a betrayal,” Ms Anderson said.

    “I think a lot of people wouldn’t vote for her if Adani goes through.”

    Ms Trad is in danger of losing the inner-city seat at the 2020 poll if last weekend’s federal election results from the seat of Griffith, which experienced a 7.2 per cent swing to the Greens and includes South Brisbane, are repeated. Ms Trad came close to losing in 2017 after a 10 per cent swing towards the Greens reduced her margin to 3 per cent.

    Ms Anderson’s friend, 20-year-old Sydneysider Harley Wilson, lives in Anthony Albanese’s electorate of Grayndler, in NSW.

    A Greens voter whose father lives in a mining community in Queensland, Mr Wilson said he owed his comfortable life to the industry, but could not support its future because of his concerns about climate change.

    From the Oz.

  18. John Constantine

    Politics is becoming increasingly polarised, with policy decisions being made for short term political gain against the advice of experts and at the expense of our communities and future.

    Grata Fund was built to take on these challenges through the courts. We have a bold plan for holding our governments and corporate leaders accountable to science, facts and evidence. But we need your help, click here to find out how > http://www.gratafund.org.au/sign_up

    First day of the rest of the war, losing their election makes lawfare a little harder, so crowdfunding the purging of dissent is their godless commo new idea.

    Comrades.

  19. Roger

    Will a curious reporter now ask Albo why he left his Italian father’s name off his parliamentary citizenship declaration?

    One minute he’s in the press talking about the family reunion in Italy, the next he can’t remember dad’s name?

  20. Old School Conservative

    Has anyone seen Struth and Bob Brown in the same room at the same time?

    I have a sneaky feeling that Struth organised another convoy, this time deliberately aimed at provoking an anti-Labor vote in the bush.

    If so, well done Struth.

  21. cohenite

    More news about the new front alarmists are opening up – extinction – and the senate hearings:

    Congressman Jared Huffman thought when he scheduled three authors of the UN’s frightening new species extinction report to testify before the committee he chairs, his colleagues would accept their platitudes without critical inquiry.

    He did not expect CFACT’s Marc Morano and Greenpeace co-founder Dr. Patrick Moore to join the panel and lay out the cold hard facts that call the UN’s latest power play into serious question.

    The Left is not happy.

    The Guardian, Media Matters and the rest of the usual suspects are throwing a hissy fit.

    The Washington Times reports:

    A widely touted United Nations report predicting mass species extinction took a beating Wednesday at a House subcommittee hearing, with Republican-called witnesses blasting the claims as “highly exaggerated” and “authoritative propaganda…”
    “You cannot call yourself a scientist if you pretend that there are 6.2 million species that have no names and have never been identified,” said Mr. Moore. “That is not science. That is fiction. Fairy tale stories. And that’s what we’re being told here.”
    Climate Depot’s Marc Morano described the report as a politically driven document, “the latest U.N. appeal to give it more power, more scientific authority, more money and more regulatory control.”
    “At best, the U.N. science panels represent nothing more than ‘authoritative bureaucracy,’ … they hype the problem and then come up with the solution that puts them in charge of ‘solving’ the issue in perpetuity,” Mr. Morano said in his prepared remarks. “A more accurate term for the U.N. than ‘authoritative science’ may be ‘authoritative propaganda.’”
    When it became clear that neither committee Democrats, nor the three representatives of the UN panel, could marshal meaningful facts to counter Moore’s and Morano’s onslaught, Chairman Huffman did what the losing side always does: He attacked Moore and Morano personally.

    He attacked Morano for working for CFACT, a mere think tank rather than the all-knowing UN, and presented a document Greenpeace recently cobbled together to try and erase Patrick Moore from its history.

  22. Roger

    “Local politicians need to be working for their constituents, and people here are against the Adani mine.”

    Mmm…are they against coal royalties subsidising their inner city lifestyle? A good number of them would be public servants.

  23. cohenite

    In cafe society, Adani backflip a ‘betrayal’

    Charlie Peel
    Journalist
    @charliepeeled ‏
    12:00AM May 24, 2019
    167 Comments

    Clementine Anderson believes she’s one of many voters who will abandon Jackie Trad at the next state election if the Deputy Premier does not speak out against the Adani mine.

    Ms Anderson, 23, who has lived all her life in Brisbane’s West End, went against her ­initial impulse to vote for the Greens in the 2017 election after she saw a tough-talking Ms Trad debating her opponent in a local hotel.

    Yeah, dickheads, idiots, self-absorbed fuckwits. Electorates which vote in filth should only be allowed to source electricity from ruinables. I’d give them 2 days to have an epiphany.

  24. Soon to be Forgotten Tomadahs.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TegoyRkDBc

    TheQuartering
    Pinned by TheQuartering
    TheQuartering
    3 hours ago
    Rotten Tomatoes Deletes Every Single User Review & Will Basically Be Charging Money By Forcing You To Use Their App To Get Your Review To Count. lol

  25. Percy Popinjay

    Will a curious reporter* now ask Albo why he left his Italian father’s name off his parliamentary citizenship declaration? One minute he’s in the press talking about the family reunion in Italy, the next he can’t remember dad’s name?

    Section 44, come on down!

    *Mythical creatures, long extincted in Oz.

  26. stackja

    Roger
    #3024207, posted on May 24, 2019 at 10:31 am

    BS gave us BS. Until recently no questions asked. Albo will try the same.

  27. Really signing off until Christmas. I don’t know why Mum, my cousin and auntie (Nota, Gab and Calli) don’t believe me.

    Gotta zip! Have to get my programmatic specificity back on track.

    From Timmy “I can’t believe he’s not right wing” Pool.

    MeToo Backlash? Men REFUSE To Save Women’s Lives Over Fear Of False Accusations

    “Halp I’m having a heart attack !”

    *Let me call my lawyer first and i will be back at you in a few weeks*

    *Saul, what’s my liability here?*

  28. John Constantine

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-05-21/a-blood-test-can-predict-dementia-trouble-is-there-s-no-cure

    Nobel prizewinner Koichi Tanaka says the predictive blood test for Alzheimer’s disease he and colleagues spent almost a decade developing is a double-edged sword.

    Without medications to stave off the memory-robbing condition, identifying those at risk will do nothing to ease the dementia burden and may fuel anxiety. But used to identify the best patients to enroll in drug studies, the minimally invasive exam could speed the development of therapies for the 152 million people predicted to develop the illness by 2050.

    “We must be cautious on how the test is used because there’s no curative treatment,” Tanaka said in an interview at Kyoto, Japan-based Shimadzu Corp., where he’s worked for 36 years. The 59-year-old engineer, who shared the Nobel for chemistry in 2002, said he hopes the test he helped pioneer will one day be administered routinely, but right now it belongs in the hands of drug developers and research laboratories.

    Life insurance companies would be keen.

    Politicians need testing.

    Personally, i would use it.

    Suicide bomber recruitment from the ranks of the grumpy elderly?.

  29. None

    The True Thai Tory Trouncer.

    LOOOOOOOOOOL

  30. Black Ball

    I hear Melbourne will be disrupted today with 2 climate change rallies. Good luck Cats who reside there. Sounds suspiciously like a dummy spit from the result of the election.

  31. calli

    “Curious Reporters”, Probius wordsmithii is an obscure an endangered species.

    Known to go into hiding during the tenure of progressive governments, it miraculously emerges from its long hibernation period on the formation of conservative ones.

    Should one of the species go rogue and ask indelicate questions, it is immediately set upon by its fellows and rendered speechless and jobless.

  32. John64

    “FINCH LOSES OUT” roars the headline in The Oz today.

    For a brief, horrible moment I thought our World Cup hopes had nosedived.

  33. None

    Why should some inner city fuckwhit in Melbourne have any say about the economic fortunes of somebody in Central Queensland? F****** fascista.

  34. Shy Ted

    Coming to the end of my first week as a turd. Pretty much the same as last week when I was only a turd-in-waiting. And the thought struck me, is it better to be a turd or a deplorable? One thing is obvious though, at least for this week, turds smile a lot more than non-turds.

  35. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    “For hate speech, we now detect 65 percent of the content we remove, up from 24 percent just over a year ago when we first shared our efforts. In the first quarter of 2019, we took down 4 million hate speech posts and we continue to invest in technology to expand our abilities to detect this content across different languages and regions,” Guy Rosen, Facebook’s VP of Integrity, said in a blog post.

  36. calli

    I should add that its call, upon emerging from the pitch black roosting cave, is a distinctive “How can we help?”.

  37. “Black Ball
    #3024219, posted on May 24, 2019 at 10:46 am
    I hear Melbourne will be disrupted today with 2 climate change rallies. Good luck Cats who reside there. Sounds suspiciously like a dummy spit from the result of the election.”

    I hope the marvellous Bill Thompson is on the job filming and asking questions of the hypocritical wankers.

  38. It’s Remarkable

    Tweet just now from POTUS:
    “Today at the request and recommendation of the Attorney General of the United States, President Donald J Trump directed the intelligence community to quickly and fully cooperate with the attorney generals investigation into surveillance activities… during the 2016 presidential election. The attorney general has also been delegated full and complete authority to declassify information pertaining to this investigation, in accordance with the long established standards for handling classified information. Today’s action will help ensure that all Americans learn the truth about the events that occurred, and the actions that were taken, during the last presidential elections and will restore confidence in our public institutions.”

    Wow, seems like the Dems continually intimidating him has gone a little too far and now he is getting pissed. – good! And about time.

  39. calli

    I would post an example of the mating call of the Curious Reporter bird, but it seems to have been mysteriously swept from Youtube.

  40. Shy Ted

    Wonder if Albo will ruv being opposition leader for a rong time.

  41. notafan

    What separates Dan Andrews and the mass murderer Bonaparte ?

    Not much.

    Today the 24th Mary is a very good day to pray for the release of Cardinal Pell, another victim of a wicked regime.

    Napoleon Bonaparte had jailed Pius VI who died in jail (after being dragged across Italy and France he died in Valence, France). When Pope Pius VII was elected he too was jailed by Bonaparte, who kept him prisoner at Fontainbleau.

    The Holy Father vowed to God that if he were restored to the Roman See, he would institute a special feast in honour of Mary.

    The infant church in Australia had a special reason for turning to Mary. No priests were sent to the colony in its early days and Mass was not allowed except for one brief year until 1820. It was largely the Rosary in those early days that kept the faith alive.

    Catholic Australia remained faithful to Mary and was the first nation to choose her under the title Help of Christians, as principal Patroness.

    St Mary’s Cathedral was dedicated in her honour by the Irish pioneer priest, Fr John Therry, who arrived in Sydney in 1820 and assumed responsibility for the planning and initial construction of the Cathedral

    .

    especially for Catholic cats

  42. notafan

    Cold and wet in Melbourne, perfect weather for a climate rally

  43. notafan

    Imagine Hawkie being caught outside The House of Lumbar Relief.

    He’d laugh uproariously and shout them all a session.

    I imagine Hawkie was one of those blokes who prided himself as one who

    “never had to pay for it’

  44. “very good day to pray for the release of Cardinal Pell”

    I’m not a Christian but I am praying for the Cardinal Pell’s release.

  45. Mother Lode

    “This is not a refugee crisis,” he said. “Four hundred people on a boat do not represent a crisis. This is a political crisis for us as a nation, which has been brought on by a desperate prime minister.”

    History proved him a pugnacious imbecile.

    The Libs should bring this up every moment that offers itself since country shoppers is still a hot button topic.

  46. notafan

    KD more accurately Bill’s father who is erased from memory supported his family while Bill and his brother went to Kosta Hall then Xavier senior school while mum studied and worked as a teacher to help out with school fees.

    She went back and did law when the boys were older, by then she had already completed a teaching related doctorate

    She had the luxury of perpetual studentship thanks to that husband.

  47. notafan

    We will always be able to ask Albo if he likes Thai

    and the book is

    Scuffy The Tugboat (And His Adventures Down The River)

  48. notafan

    Thank you Cassie

    You guys had the first covenant

  49. Mitch M.

    Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment

    This raised a question for me: will a ketogenic diet aid in recovery after surgery or injury? The current literature very much suggests it will help. The biology is a little complicated so I won’t bore you with it but here’s a hint: if you have an injury and\or chronic pain consider going keto just to see what happens.

  50. Roger

    Italian citizenship law is very generous, with reportedly up to 60 million people of Italian descent living abroad – US, Argentina, Australia – being eligible for an Italian passport. Many Argentines of Italian descent acquire an Italian passport to qualify under EU rules to live and work in Spain.

  51. calli

    Little Golden Books.

    I have a much thumbed copy* in the kiddies’ book box.

    * not a euphemism

  52. notafan

    Isn’t that Labor’s biggest problem

    the complete lack of conviction?

    Plibbers is uber wealthy

    so apparently was Shorten who was married to a billionaire’s daughter.

    Much the same for the Greens in whose face we should rub Julian Burnside’s extraordinary materialism on a daily basis.

    Bet the gensets are running at Dick de Christmas’s house today.

  53. Mitch M.

    Nobel prizewinner Koichi Tanaka says the predictive blood test for Alzheimer’s disease he and colleagues spent almost a decade developing is a double-edged sword.

    Without medications to stave off the memory-robbing condition, identifying those at risk will do nothing to ease the dementia burden and may fuel anxiety.

    Misses the point of early diagnosis. We know that the pathogenesis of dementia precedes symptom presentation by decades. There is no cure once symptoms appear but there is plenty a person can do in the preceding decades.

  54. notafan

    No doubt Albo is entitled to Italian citizenship via his father.

    Not that I really care, in the circumstances for him the link is really tenuous.

  55. Old School Conservative

    calli
    #3024245, posted on May 24, 2019 at 11:18 am
    Little Golden Books.

    Ah, delightful memories surface of buying one each payday to bring home after work on Friday.

  56. Roger

    …the circumstances for him the link is really tenuous.

    Albanese travelled to Italy several times to visit his father, including when the latter was near death in 2013.

    That’s not a tenuous relationship.

    He has a case to answer under S. 44.

    I don’t really care either, except for the matter of lying on his parliamentary citizenship declaration.

  57. notafan

    Once you’ve found an institution and a supervisor, it doesn’t come with any course costs.
    In fact, many Ph Ds are subsidised.

    A great pity

    if people had to pay for them we wouldn’t see quite so many incredibly useless never to be read research projects undertaken

    Yours definitely falls into that category

  58. Mitch M.

    if people had to pay for them we wouldn’t see quite so many incredibly useless never to be read research projects undertaken

    *J. Frank Dobie

    The average Phd thesis is nothing but a transference of bones from one graveyard to another.

  59. notafan

    Roger he met him so late in life after believing him dead until he was about 14 and never went looking for him until after his mother died in 2002, in ties that bind terms that is tenuous.

    Carlo Albanese was located in 2009. “It took my breath away. I didn’t think it would happen,” the MP said.

    Albanese travelled to Italy to meet his biological father. Before the meeting, Albanese described his emotional state. “I went on a walk by myself. I was very emotional. It was a big deal. It was a big moment in my life.”

    The two men formed a relationship, and Albanese was also united with two siblings, before Carlo Albanese died of cancer in 2013.

    If he lied he lied though

    He is after all a true labor man

  60. DrBeauGan

    That will teach me to boast about making money on the stock exchange. I have lost $3,000 today so far, and $2,500 yesterday.

    I think the trick is not to care.

  61. Ubique

    Over 13,000 have already signed the Windfarms for Warringah petition.

    Hop in and support this worthy cause. Help the woke Warringahites think global and act local! Windfarm installation on local beachfronts will reduce transmission losses and avoid the staggering costs involved in connecting remotely sited windfarms to the grid.

  62. Mother Lode

    Isn’t that Labor’s biggest problem

    the complete lack of conviction?

    The only thing stopping the ALP from being the party with convictions is the appalling state of the judiciary in this country – you can always keep appealing until you run into the activist progressive judge who who will finally overturn the original verdict – and you only need one.

    In a proper justice system everyone in the ALP would be standing around in striped pyjamas breaking rocks while shouting incoherently about all the things they are ‘gunna’ to do.

  63. lotocoti

    Why should some inner city …

    Apparently you can only avoid a Global Fascist Climate Crisis Horror Show by being part of a Global Fascist Climate Crisis Horror Show.

  64. Mother Lode

    No doubt Albo is entitled to Italian citizenship via his father.

    Maybe.

    Italian citizenship encompasses the Mafia, greasy Lotharios with improbably matted chest-hair and kamikaze drivers. The peninsula has thrown up the likes of Nero, Machiavelli, the Borgias, and Mussolini.

    But I think Albo would be just a bridge too far.

  65. Roger

    If he lied he lied though

    Yes, a man who aspires to lead a government whose bureaucracy every day threatens Australians with a fine or imprisonment for false declarations on much less weighty matters than one’s citizenship of a foreign country.

    But he evidently feels himself immune from such threats.

    He is after all a true labor man

    Yes, it goes to his character.

  66. Boambee John

    That myth may hold for WW1, and WW2, but it is on shaky ground in Vietnam.

    We have been through this before.

    Not “everyone” volunteered to fight outside Australian territory or Australian administered territory in WW2. The WW 1 anti-conscription campaigner John Curtin legislated in 1943, when the Japanese high tide of conquest had passed, to force conscripts to serve on foreign territory.

  67. cohenite

    The average Phd thesis is nothing but a transference of bones from one graveyard to another.

    Or one gender to another.

    The ARC gives out about half a billion for research grants every year. What % of them are to do with alarmism; some samples:

    Approved Project Title
    Social Adaptation to Climate Change in the Australian Public Sphere: A comparison of
    individual and group deliberative responses to scenarios of future climate change
    DP0879092 Dr SJ Niemeyer; Dr P’ Hart; Dr KP Hobson; Prof W Steffen; Prof BG Mackey; Dr JA Lindesay
    2008 : $ 182,500
    2009 : $ 176,000
    2010 : $ 20,000
    Total: $378,500
    Primary RFCD 3601 POLITICAL SCIENCE, The Australian National University
    This research addresses the ARC National Research Priorities Goal of ‘An Environmentally Sustainable Australia, specifically ‘Reducing and capturing emissions in transport and energy generation’. Avoiding, managing, and/or adapting to the climate change impacts is now the most pressing global environmental problem. This project will produce tangible and original insights into policy options for institutional adjustment to future climate change in Australia; will provide insight into the scope for positive community behavioural change; and possible transformations in Australian social debate to maximise adaptive capacity. It will also strengthen and produce original conceptual approaches and research methods.
    ————————————————————–
    DP120103976
    Approved Project Title
    Deliberative democracy in the public sphere: achieving deliberative outcomes in mass publics
    Niemeyer, Dr Simon J; Dryzek, Prof John S; Schlosberg, Prof David; Hobson, Dr Kersty P;
    Goodin, Prof Robert E; Bachtiger, Prof Andre; Setala, Dr Maija T
    2012 $110,000.00
    2013 $110,000.00
    2014 $120,357.00
    Total $340,357.00
    Primary For 1606 POLITICAL SCIENCE, The Australian National University
    Project Summary
    This project will systematically explore ways in which citizens can engage more deeply with complex policy issues
    without the need to resort to massive expenditure on running multiple deliberative forums, such as citizens’ assemblies. It will identify the language is needed to deliberatively inform and the vehicles for providing that information.

    Here’s a list from 2009 (the only details I can find) of government grants given specifically to alarmist projects, about 350 million:

  68. stackja

    s there something sinister behind Labor’s leadership vacuum?
    https://www.2gb.com/is-there-something-sinister-behind-labors-leadership-vacuum/
    3 HOURS AGO
    ALAN JONES ED HUSIC JIHAD DIB
    Alan Jones is questioning Labor’s leadership vacuum at both the state and federal level.

    Anthony Albanese is the only candidate to replace Bill Shorten following last week’s election disaster.

    But Alan questions why someone like Ed Husic isn’t getting a look-in?

    The western Sydney MP has been in parliament since 2010, is a shadow minister and is in touch with normal Australians, describing himself as, “Blacktown through and through”.

    Alan says there must be more to it.
    “He’s been totally involved in the local community, he’s intelligent, he’s presentable. Why is he not a candidate?

    “Is it because he’s a Mu$l1m?

    The same goes for state politician Jihad Dib who isn’t even getting a mention in the NSW Labor leadership race.

    “Does religion have something to do with the Labor Party?” asks Alan.

    “I hope not.”

  69. candy

    Hop in and support this worthy cause. Help the woke Warringahites think global and act local! Windfarm installation on local beachfronts will reduce transmission losses and avoid the staggering costs involved in connecting remotely sited windfarms to the grid.

    Indeed, Ubique, I would sign twice if I could!

    It’s really very exciting for the Warringahites to think of having their own wind turbines on their own beach.

  70. stackja

    Is there something sinister behind Labor’s leadership vacuum?
    https://www.2gb.com/is-there-something-sinister-behind-labors-leadership-vacuum/
    3 HOURS AGO
    ALAN JONES ED HUSIC JIHAD DIB
    Alan Jones is questioning Labor’s leadership vacuum at both the state and federal level.

    Anthony Albanese is the only candidate to replace Bill Shorten following last week’s election disaster.

    But Alan questions why someone like Ed Husic isn’t getting a look-in?

    The western Sydney MP has been in parliament since 2010, is a shadow minister and is in touch with normal Australians, describing himself as, “Blacktown through and through”.

    Alan says there must be more to it.
    “He’s been totally involved in the local community, he’s intelligent, he’s presentable. Why is he not a candidate?

    “Is it because he’s a Muslim?

    The same goes for state politician Jihad Dib who isn’t even getting a mention in the NSW Labor leadership race.

    “Does religion have something to do with the Labor Party?” asks Alan.

    “I hope not.”

  71. zyconoclast

    ‘Anti-Fascist’ Beer Company Owner Calls on Customers to Hit ‘Far-Right’ ‘Fascists’ in the Head with a Brick

    In a recent tweet, the owner of a beer company in Manchester England urged his customers to hit “fascists” (like Farage and Tommy Robinson) over the head with a brick.

    “Note to our customers: Please don’t throw out beer over fascists,” wrote Mike Marcus, the director and founder of the Chorlton Brewing Company. “Hit them over the head with a brick as is traditional.”

    In his Twitter profile, Marcus describes himself as “Anti-fascist (any means necessary).”

  72. stackja

    Ubique
    #3024260, posted on May 24, 2019 at 11:37 am
    Over 13,000 have already signed the Windfarms for Warringah petition.

    Hop in and support this worthy cause. Help the woke Warringahites think global and act local! Windfarm installation on local beachfronts will reduce transmission losses and avoid the staggering costs involved in connecting remotely sited windfarms to the grid.

    Yes! I signed after AJ alerted me to it.

  73. notafan

    DRBG it is only a ‘real’ profit/loss if you sell.

  74. zyconoclast

    A US Army veteran has been arrested as he was in the final stages of a plan to bomb a white supremacist rally in California, say authorities.

    M00slim convert Mark Domingo, 26, also allegedly plotted terror attacks on J00ws, churches and police in revenge for the New Zealand mosque shootings.

    He was held on Friday after accepting what he believed to be a live bomb, delivered by undercover officers.

    Mr Domingo had expressed support for violent [email protected], say prosecutors.

  75. Boambee John

    Once you’ve found an institution and a supervisor, it doesn’t come with any course costs.
    In fact, many Ph Ds are subsidised.

    Numbers getting back some of the $15 million in taxes he paid?

  76. stackja

    Ubique
    #3024260, posted on May 24, 2019 at 11:37 am
    Over 13,000 have already signed the Windfarms for Warringah petition.

    Hop in and support this worthy cause. Help the woke Warringahites think global and act local! Windfarm installation on local beachfronts will reduce transmission losses and avoid the staggering costs involved in connecting remotely sited windfarms to the grid.

    13,341 have signed. Let’s get to 15,000!

  77. Roger

    The ARC gives out about half a billion for research grants every year.

    The Australian Research Council

    Formed: 2001
    Headquarters: Canberra
    Employees: 124

  78. stackja

    Updates
    4 hours ago
    12,500 supporters
    4 days ago
    Brendan Triffett started this petition

  79. cohenite

    Gregory La Cava’s 1928 silent classic Feel My Pulse; worth catching for William Powell’s glance at the camera at 46:49:

  80. Infidel Tiger

    I see leftist filth are now doing the old switcheroo and seamlessly moving to “Adani is not economically viable” mode.

  81. notafan

    “Does religion have something to do with the Labor Party?” asks Alan.

    “I hope not.”

    lol

    the same reason that Labor was ‘disgusted’ at posters of Fijian Indian Australian Deakin candidate Shireen Morris (Deakin deserves better) being ‘defaced’ with a nijab

    when is Labor going to preselect a nijabi?

    huh huh huh

  82. candy

    13,341 have signed. Let’s get to 15,000!

    When does a petition become kind of viable for the relevant minister (ie, Ms Steggall) to take it to Parliament and demand action?

  83. notafan

    Isn’t Adani’s economic viablenessessence a matter for the owners?

  84. Bruce of Newcastle

    In fact, many Ph Ds are subsidised.

    Maybe Numbers wants to keep up with Greta.

    Dr. Greta! Belgian university will honor ‘teen cimate defender’ Greta Thunberg with honorary doctorate

    Teen cimate defender Greta Thunberg will receive an honorary doctorate from the University of Mons, alongside British economist Nicholas Terne and former French minister Nicolas Hulot, the university announced on Thursday.

    How can you get more subsidised than that? Free! Belgians seems welcoming of lefties. Maybe Numbers could move there. The chocolate is nice, also the craft beer.

  85. notafan

    I remember reading an article in the Age? years ago about World War Two conscripts from poverty stricken areas of Sydney.

    Called lousy soldiers and cowards who felt no loyalty to Australia because all they had known was hunger and want growing up.

    Forced overseas to the hellhole that was PNG by Labor.

  86. Roger

    Fijian Indian Australian Deakin candidate Shireen Morris

    Once a regular on The Dumb.

    What a coincidence!

  87. “zyconoclast
    #3024276, posted on May 24, 2019 at 11:55 am
    ‘Anti-Fascist’ Beer Company Owner Calls on Customers to Hit ‘Far-Right’ ‘Fascists’ in the Head with a Brick

    In a recent tweet, the owner of a beer company in Manchester England urged his customers to hit “fascists” (like Farage and Tommy Robinson) over the head with a brick.

    “Note to our customers: Please don’t throw out beer over fascists,” wrote Mike Marcus, the director and founder of the Chorlton Brewing Company. “Hit them over the head with a brick as is traditional.”

    In his Twitter profile, Marcus describes himself as “Anti-fascist (any means necessary).””

    I bet Mr Marcus won’t be thrown off Twitter, Instragram and Facebook any time soon.

    After all, there is some hate speech and incitement to violence that is deemed to be quite okay….when it’s hate speech and incitement to violence directed against the right.

  88. DrBeauGan

    I followed your advice on antibiotics, Notafan. I have prescriptions for three sorts.

    I know you are right about gains and losses being meaningless until I sell, getting relatively real dividends next month on the other hand will definitely help me when I’m in foreign parts.

    I’ve never really been much interested in money. It has a very artificial whiff about it. And there’s a notable absence of bodies starving in the gutters hereabouts.

  89. “Roger
    #3024299, posted on May 24, 2019 at 12:18 pm
    Fijian Indian Australian Deakin candidate Shireen Morris

    Once a regular on The Dumb.

    What a coincidence!”

    Of all the candidates Labor put forward last week…Shireen Morris was easily one of the worst. I’ve had the misfortune to see her interviewed….a nasty creature…the female Tim Soupy.

  90. zyconoclast

    Check out the pictures

    ‘Perhaps life would be easier if I shaved, but why?’

    Alok Vaid-Menon is a poet and performance artist who campaigns on trans visibility with bold, colourful portraits on social media. But they are often trolled for the way they look.

    When I told my family I was trans, one of their initial reactions was, “But you’re so hairy! It’s going to be so difficult to remove all your hair to be a woman, so you should just give up.” They were zeroing in on my body hair as the barrier for me to be seen as feminine.

  91. notafan

    Once a regular on The Dumb.

    What a coincidence!

    I wondered where she had popped up from

    The previous candidate was Tony Clark who, despite being legally blind, was a visible presence in the electorate.

    Shireen is a very very special private school (of course) labor wally who got deservedly walloped in Deakin.

  92. Infidel Tiger

    Dr. Greta! Belgian university will honor ‘teen cimate defender’ Greta Thunberg with honorary doctorate

    In my day, kids like her may have received a Scratch n’ Sniff sticker and been told to sit down.

  93. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Little Golden Books’

    ‘The Jumping Jungle Jellybean’ is a cracker.

  94. zyconoclast

    UN orders UK to end ‘colonial’ rule of Chagos Islands

    Both the ICJ and the UN decisions are not legally binding,

  95. notafan

    Bestseller! bought to you by MUP (of course)

    Neither Indigenous nor white, Shireen Morris is both outside observer and instrumental insider in the fight for Indigenous rights. Shaped by her family’s Indian and Fijian migrant story, Morris is a key player in what many consider the greatest moral challenge of our nation: constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians.

    She takes us inside this vital campaign to meet the powerful Indigenous advocates, helpful (and unhelpful) non-Indigenous lawyers, unlikely conservative and monarchist allies and infuriating politicians. We travel with Morris through the wins, disappointments and, ultimately, the betrayals that led to the Turnbull government’s heartbreaking rejection of the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

  96. Roger

    I wondered where she had popped up from

    Iirc she was always introduced on The Dumb as an “advocate for indigenous Australians”.

    With a handsome tax payer funded salary, no doubt.

  97. C.L.

    There is, of course, no criminal connection between Damion Flower and Alan Jones.
    For the ABC, however, no matter …

    Damion Flower, the racing identity accused of smuggling cocaine, owns shares in same horse as Alan Jones.

  98. Top Ender

    For aircraft lovers only – all others scroll down.

    What’s missing from modern-day air shows
    BYRON BAILEY

    Flying displays these days are rather tame compared to previous air shows that featured exciting planes of yesteryear.

    One of the missing ingredients is noise. Modern jet aircraft, including fighters, have more efficient turbofan engines that mix cold bypass air with the hot jet engine core. With a lower exhaust velocity, this considerably reduces the intensity of the shear noise generated when the pure jet supersonic exhaust of earlier-generation aircraft meets the free airstream.

    F-18s and their ilk such as the F-35 are noisy but just lack the ear-splitting, painful shockwaves generated by previous generations of aircraft with their pure jet engines.

    The fast-climbing English Electric Lightning interceptor made the ground shake when pilots applied afterburner to the engines for take-off. I loved watching them take off when we were engaged in exercises against them in the seventies from RAF Tengah Singapore. Though a loser as a dogfighter, the Lightning was exceptional as an air display aircraft because of the incredible intensity of the noise.

    Also, who can forget the earth-shaking roar of reheat from those engines of the magnificent Concorde when taking off. A French aircraft with British engines but supersonic commercial flight is still a long way off as the fuel burn is incredibly high due to the supersonic drag.

    Even the Mirage of the RAAF required airmen, working on aircraft in the ORP’s (operational readiness platform) near the runway, to wear kidney belts and ear defenders to protect against the shockwaves. You could feel the pulses like punches hitting your body when the pilot selected afterburner for take-off.

    I misjudged the noise intensity when returning to RAAF Williamtown in a Mirage in the middle of winter on a cold, crisp, clear night when passing over Newcastle at 2000 feet at about 600 knots. As I passed over my suburb at about 6pm, I gave a quick burst of afterburner to let my wife know I would be home for dinner. The wash-up was many noise complaints and claims of cracked windows and walls with the result I wore 10 days as duty officer.

    The RAAF’s big stick F-111, at the time the world’s best strike weapon, was a particular crowd favourite especially with its fuel “dump and burn” producing 40 metres of flame when the afterburners were lit. Really awesome at night.

    I have attended many air shows worldwide but one of my favourites was the RAF Duxford “fighter meet” for WWII aircraft in the UK. The time I attended, the magnificent Avro Vulcan was still flying at air shows. When that huge bomber starts spooling up those big engines, the harmonics of the intakes produce the most incredible banshee wail that was mind-blowing.

    Perhaps flying is now so humdrum for much of the public that air shows do not generate the same degree of excitement they once did.

    Byron Bailey is a former RAAF fighter pilot and flew B777s as an airline captain.

  99. Geriatric Mayfly

    Check out the pictures

    Looks like a fairly normal uber-lezzo.

  100. notafan

    Shaped by her family’s Indian and Fijian migrant story

    Both doctors, they ran/run a GP business somewhere in Ringwood and no doubt thanks to medicare must be doing very very nicely.

    So much dishonestly Labor try so hard to establish wukka/struggler credibility and fall flat on their faces when their play with the truthing is exposed

  101. C.L.

    What’s missing from modern-day air shows?

    Wing walkers.

  102. notafan

    Iirc she was always introduced on The Dumb as an “advocate for indigenous Australians”.

    She worked for the Cape York Institute for seven years

    no doubt in their Cairns office, if she was even in QLD.

  103. Infidel Tiger

    Uber Eats needs to be banned.

    It is destroying Australia’s food scene.

  104. Roger

    She worked for the Cape York Institute for seven years

    I was right then, an activist on a handsome tax payer funded salary.

    The revolution is being subsidised.

  105. Mother Lode

    Apparently Morrisey has had his records dropped from the “world’s oldest record store” because of his politics.

    He actually makes sense, although I would quibble:

    “When someone calls you racist, what they are saying is “hmm, you actually have a point, and I don’t know how to answer it, so perhaps if I distract you by calling you a bigot we’ll both forget how enlightened your comment was.”

    These people who reflexively accuse others of racism never get as far as understanding the point others are making. It is like those glasses that Zaphod Beeblebrox has in Hitch Hiker’s Guide, that turn black at the first hint of danger so you never see it.

    They aren’t objecting to what you have said, but the uneasy feeling that you are about to say something they are not ready for.

    Like animals in the wild that have ventured outside their nests for food, they exist in a state of heightened anxiety and panic, alert for the slightest threat. That is why they want to expand their nests far beyond the ABC, the universities, and the inner cities.

    The “racist” thing is especially stupid. Dismissing a person’s opinon on the grounds they are racist is meaningless. Dismissing what they say because what they say is racist makes sense, but then it should be possible to show what was racist in what was said. But they rarely get that far. They just accuse you of racism and thinks that is enough.

    You only know a person is a racist because how they speak and act betrays racist underpinning. It would not make sense to consider a person who never says or does any such thing as a racist. It should be possible to demonstrate someone is a racist, and thus argue.

    In fact, the word today seems to mean that someone who differentiates themselves on the basis of race does not enjoy what someone has said. They will call someone a racist who is disinclined to provide them special privilege, regardless of the fact this someone wants everyone treated equally.

  106. The ABC election website..updated 10 minutes ago,..is giving Macquarie to the Libs.

    That’s 78 seats.

  107. notafan

    I bet there are a lot of frequent flyer points though for someone who is passionate about climate change (of course)

  108. C.L.

    When you’re artist whose themes include knifing Trump, you win $100,000.

  109. “Mother Lode
    #3024323, posted on May 24, 2019 at 12:39 pm”

    Morrissey’s red pill moment occurred just on two years ago when something “irritating” happened in Manchester…the city Morrissey grew up in.

  110. notafan

    The giraffe is bejewelled with gems, including the engagement ring her ex-husband gave her.

    From CL’s link.

  111. notafan

    The giraffe is bej ewelled with gems, including the engagement ring her ex-husband gave her.

    From CL’s link

  112. twostix

    When you’re artist whose themes include knifing Trump, you win $100,000.

    lol what a shit painter. literally the quality of the paintings taped to the windows of my kids classrooms.

  113. twostix

    Fijian Indian Deakin candidate

    It would be easier and more expressive to just write “Not Australian candidate” than that word salad.

  114. Mother Lode

    A US Army veteran has been arrested as he was in the final stages of a plan to bomb a white supremacist rally in California, say authorities.

    It didn’t say who this group were. It calls them white supremacists, but the BBC is like the ABC in their use of labels for effect, not information.

    Hell, if it was a group of people at a rally calling for border security to be ramped up they would be called white supremacists because in their febrile calculus, America equals white, and the people scurrying over the border are brown. Therefore people wanting borders enforced are white supremacists.

    Of course they may also have been a local chapter of the Klan.

    I just don’t trust the BBC or the ABC.

  115. notafan

    My apologies I should have written

    Fijian Indian heritage but Australian citizen Deakin candidate.

    She may well have been born here, she certainly primary schooled here and apparently went to Carey Baptist Grammar in Kew but don’t get in the way of her migrant credentials, please.

  116. Bruce of Newcastle

    UN orders UK to end ‘colonial’ rule of Chagos Islands

    Sounds like the mueslis aren’t happy with kaffirs using Diego Garcia to bomb mueslis.

  117. zyconoclast

    Of course they may also have been a local chapter of the Klan.

    I suspect a modern Klan get together would look more like a FBI staff meeting with the only actual Klan member being the geriatric serving the tea.

  118. DavidH

    earth-shaking roar of … the magnificent Concorde when taking off

    Never mind takeoff. For a while, I was living under the Heathrow flightpath. When on the phone to my family, if Concorde was coming in to land, we just had to stop talking and wait for it to pass otherwise it was impossible to hear anything else. Not complainin’ though – I loved it. I remember a couple of sights of it – flying in formation with several Spitfires over central London; on one flight I took, the pilot advised us that Concorde was departing on the runway next to our taxiway – I could see the shock diamonds it made with the afterburners all lit and I could feel the noise.

  119. Boambee John

    Mitch M at 1134

    The average Phd thesis is nothing but a transference of bones from one graveyard to another.

    Worked with a nuclear physicist many years ago, smart man, though socially a little odd.

    He once described people with PhDs as individuals who had found three years with nothing else to occupy them.

  120. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Shorten in a different shirt

    Scott Morrison has labelled his new opponent Anthony Albanese “Bill Shorten in a different shirt” for suggesting the government’s tax cuts package be split.

    “Labor haven’t learned the lessons of last Saturday. I mean, Bill Shorten did exactly the same thing. This is just Bill Shorten in a different shirt,” the Prime Minister said.

    “I mean, did he not get the message from the Australians that they want a government that backs aspiration and legislation that backs aspiration?

    “Our tax relief package, we took to the Australian people, sets out a plan over the next seven years.

    “And that’s what Australians voted for on the weekend. It seems that Anthony Albanese is no different to Bill Shorten.”

    Mr Albanese, the presumptive Labor leader, said this morning he would consider passing the government’s full tax cuts package but wanted to focus on cuts which would come into effect in this term of parliament.

    From the Oz. Hit him again, Scomo, he’s got no friends.

  121. Shy Ted:
    Adelaide speeding fines.

    That includes motorists using their mobile phone behind the wheel, who will face a $534 fine – a $200 increase.
    Fines for people caught speeding at 30kph or more above the speed limit will increase by $552 to $1472, while motorists going 45kph above the limit will cop a $1658 fine – an increase of $622.

    I think this pretty well confirms what I’ve been saying – this isn’t about safety or revenue. Those effects are merely secondary to the real aim – punishment for resisting the Dictatorship of the Bureaucracy.

  122. Infidel Tiger

    Step out of the office for 5 minutes and some maniac sheila has turned the office into a crematorium.

    FFS. How hot do you want it?

  123. Infidel Tiger

    There’s only one place I work better under heat.

    My barbecue.

  124. Oh come on

    UN orders UK to end ‘colonial’ rule of Chagos Islands

    LOL

  125. notafan

    is she a committed greenie IT?

    tell her to put a jumper on

  126. calli

    The average Phd thesis is nothing but a transference of bones from one graveyard to another.

    Excellent description, Mitch.

    The latest one in the Beloved’s family, courtesy of your taxes ladies and gentlemen, is a rehash of how to “manage” a labour. By someone who has never given birth. Yawn.

    The one underway is some sort of sociology claptrap, again paid for by youse all.

    Fortunately we also have some useful doctors in the family, so there is that.

  127. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Step out of the office for 5 minutes and some maniac sheila has turned the office into a crematorium.

    FFS. How hot do you want it?

    I’ve heard a theory that wyminses are in fact alien reptiles

  128. zyconoclast

    San Francisco is the nation’s leader in property crime.
    Burglary, larceny, shoplifting, and vandalism are included under this ugly umbrella. The rate of car break-ins is particularly striking: in 2017 over 30,000 reports were filed, and the current average is 51 per day. Other low-level offenses, including drug dealing, street harassment, encampments, indecent exposure, public intoxication, simple assault, and disorderly conduct are also rampant.

  129. calli

    Actually, it’s managing the managers.

    “Working clean” as it was once known.

  130. – Were you or were you not deferred twice?
    I was not “deferred”. My enlistment was delayed until I completed one year of teaching, which was a requirement of the then National Service Act.
    Really Bob?
    In that case, you’ve been really loose with the truth.
    1735099
    #622426, posted on October 31, 2012 at 2:04 pm
    I was 23 when I arrived in Vietnam, having been deferred for 2 years because I was at Uni. By the time I got there I’d read everything available on the war and it’s history. I knew what was going on, and history has proved me correct….

    Both statements are true.
    My birthdate was drawn from the ballot during my second year of Teachers’ College (Kedron Park – 1967).
    My enlistment was delayed until I completed my qualification at the end of that year, and then for another year until I had completed one year of teaching at Goondiwindi State School in 1968.
    This was the standing arrangement negotiated between the Department of Education, and the Department of Labour and National Service at the time.
    The term “deferred” is American in origin, and should probably not be used in this context, but the fact is (as expressed in two different ways above) that my enlistment was delayed and I was eighteen months older (on average) than most Nashos in my intake.
    Only those too thick to understand the machinations of the NS Act at the time would be confused by my explanation.
    That includes you.
    I am still waiting for you to post something that shows that I post untruths.
    That’s quite different from posting something you disagree with.
    Have another go.
    Take your time….

  131. cohenite

    The ABC election website..updated 10 minutes ago,..is giving Macquarie to the Libs.

    That’s 78 seats.

    AEC Tally Room has Macquarie, Bass and Lilley still in play with the first 2 heading LNP and Lilley slight lead by the liars. Cowan seems not to be in play unfortunately.

  132. He once described people with PhDs as individuals who had found three years with nothing else to occupy them.

    May be something in that.
    In my case, my wife’s ongoing treatment has stymied our travel plans, so if we’re anchored, I might as well put the time to good use.
    If we don’t learn from history, we’re bound to repeat it.

  133. notafan

    Meanwhile in Victoriastan

    Business and welfare groups say they fear tax increases and service cuts while unions are worried about job security for public servants as the Andrews Labor government prepares to hand down its budget on Monday.

    Plummeting revenue from stamp duty, the state government tax on property sales, has led to fears that Treasurer Tim Pallas might impose a horror budget on Monday, making cuts and raising taxes to replace the money he is losing through the cooling real estate market.

    The property sector’s peak body has warned Mr Pallas that imposing new taxes or levies in next week’s budget to fill the gap left by dwindling stamp duty revenue would only lead to more long-term pain.

  134. notafan

    Every cloud has a silver lining

  135. Geriatric Mayfly

    UN orders UK to end ‘colonial’ rule of Chagos Islands

    At last. This example of massive injustice will take the heat off Israel.

  136. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Morris is a key player in what many consider the greatest moral challenge of our nation: constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians.

    not another greatest moral challenge of our time.

    I think eliminating the neverending stream of greatest moral challenges of our time is the greatest moral challenge of our time.

  137. Some History

    As for the San Francisco Police, they’re doing their best. “It looks like hell here, but we’re charging more and more people with smoking on the sidewalks,” says San Francisco Police Department Captain Carl Fabbri. “We can’t go soft on smokers or this city will go to poop”.

  138. Shireen Morris, apart from some sewage is yet to make one contribution to Australia.
    Yet the ALP put her up as a candidate.
    They wonder why they lost?

  139. calli

    Fijian Indian heritage but Australian citizen Deakin candidate.

    And spokesmouth on Indigenous issues because dusky.

    You couldn’t make these clowns up if you tried.

  140. struth

    Thank you Lizzie.
    Been flat out up and back to the spectacle of Lake Eyre.
    Now days off according to law.
    I find myself in Adelaide about to hit the foody market.
    See my son tomorrow and his new fiancé, I hope, and then back into it.
    Going off.
    Marree pub and William Creek don’t know what’s hit it.
    Stayed in the Sidney Kidman room (room 6) in the old Marree pub the other night.
    Reminding myself while showing others just how great this country once was and what was achieved.
    Makes yer cry to think how stuffed it now is.
    Leigh Creek now a virtual ghost town.
    Power wires extending from a power station no longer there.
    Wilpena taken over by mulitant left wing white abos.

    Etc etc etc.

  141. notafan

    Shireen Morris, apart from some sewage is yet to make one contribution to Australia.

    Be fair SATP

    she was on Neighbours

  142. calli

    He once described people with PhDs as individuals who had found three years with nothing else to occupy them.

    It’s also a beaut credential to get into a higher APS wage bracket.

    Forget needing any actual intelligence or life-nous. Droning is much more lucrative.

  143. Bruce of Newcastle

    If we don’t learn from history,

    Which the left never seems to do.

    we’re bound to repeat it.

    Which the left always seems to do.

    PhDs are a great way to get into research. Worthwhile for that. I had a lot of fun even though the absence of anything remotely resembling money was notable. I hope yours goes well Numbers and that you have a good time too!

  144. zyconoclast

    Remittances: How Much Money Do Migrants Send Home

    Australia – According to the World Bank estimates, remittances from Australia could be worth US$ 16 bn – including US$2,922 mn to China, US$ 1,944 mn to India, US$ 1,182 mn to Vietnam, US$ 1,084 mn to the UK and US$ 1,002 mn to the Philippines.

    The biggest senders of remittances to Australia are the UK (US$ 446 mn), United States (US$ 289 mn), New Zealand (US$ 248 mn), Canada (US$ 98 mn) and Italy (US$ 84 mn).

  145. calli

    I see BoN now lives in a Division of Righteousness.

    Look out Coal Fitz and Bev Swanston*. You’re next.

    * disclaimer – I don’t mind Bev. Shame about her politics.

  146. calli

    Yes, Bruce. You know the type of PhDs I’m referring to.

    Got a few pals working in medical research. Always scrambling and scratching around for money for the most basic stuff. Pretty disgraceful really.

  147. Mater

    Both statements are true.

    F-off and waste someone else’s time with your semantics, Bob.

    First you say you were, then you say you weren’t. Then you smother it all in a pile of verbose crap, trying to camouflage it.
    This isn’t a mix up of definitions or a misunderstanding between two individuals. Both quotes came from you. You were either deferred or you weren’t…and you’ve been quoted as saying both attempting to score points.
    You can’t have it both ways you mendacious clown.

  148. Mitch M.

    Morris is a key player in what many consider the greatest moral challenge of our nation: constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians.

    Yesterday I read an article critical of Identity Politics. The author made the point that the Civil Rights movements wasn’t so much anti-racist as about addressing the material conditions of the African Americans and other groups. Today it is more about symbolic gestures and taxonomy, the latter being divisive and potentially setting people against one another. Constitutional recognition turns our eyes away from addressing material conditions that must be addressed and putting on my cynical hat I suggest it is because they don’t want us to empirically address what is causing all the problems in the indigenous communities because then we might have face the inconvenient truth that many of those problems are better addressed through understanding the personal behavior and consequences nexus which are fundamental to the problems all of us confront when seeking to improve our lot in life.

  149. zyconoclast

    Senate Reaches $19 Billion Deal For Disaster Aid Without Border Wall Funding

    The measure passed overwhelmingly — 85-8.

    The bill also includes funding for Puerto Rico, which is still recovering from devastating hurricanes in 2017.

  150. Infidel Tiger

    I have never been a fan of morbidly obese women with small breasts.

  151. Mitch M.

    PhDs are a great way to get into research. Worthwhile for that. I had a lot of fun even though the absence of anything remotely resembling money was notable. I hope yours goes well Numbers and that you have a good time too!

    That’s true Bruce but how many post grads these days are for research based employment? I suspect the increasing majority of post graduate work is more about credentialism and advancing a career that is not research oriented.

  152. Sniffy if you care to come on down to Canberra between 5-7 June this year I will personally introduce you to a couple of hundred nashos who remember “the date place and unit ” when they were given” the opt-out”.

    A kind offer, but completely unnecessary.
    I have a pretty strong network of people I served with.
    They appear completely unembarrassed by my presence and my questions about “opt-outs” at any number of reunions over the last twenty years.
    I haven’t yet found one who remembers such a parade, but many remember “rumours”.
    Funny that…..

  153. notafan

    Don’t think Morris spent much time dealing with the day to day material conditions of Aboriginal people in FNQ

    Was all about some wordy mumbo jumbo, at at distance of several thousand kilometres

  154. F-off and waste someone else’s time with your semantics, Bob.

    Semantics are wasted on those without the wit to understand simple English.
    Your problem – not mine.
    I’m still waiting…..

  155. Some History

    More Labor Camp “profundity” from Jane Carosene.

    Jane Caro: If I was a carpenter Tanya Plibersek

    https://www.thebigsmoke.com.au/2019/05/21/jane-caro-if-i-was-tanya-plibersek/

    Jane Caro
    Jane Caro has a low boredom threshold and so wears many hats; including author, idiot, novelist, lecturer, idiot, mentor, social commentator, idiot, idiot, columnist, workshop facilitator, idiot, speaker, broadcaster and award winning advertising writer. And idiot… big, leftist idiot.

  156. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #3024382, posted on May 24, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    I have never been a fan of morbidly obese women with small breasts.

    Please, please.
    Can we let the Bill Shorten thing go.
    Enough already.

  157. numbers is a Vietnam War, Communist Party genocide denier.

    I asked him on his opinion of the Viet Minh’s pre meditated murder of the top 1% of landholders in North and South Vietnam. He didn’t want to give an opinion under the ruse of wanting to read “peer reviewed” research. I don’t need peer reviewed research to know for example, that there was a war in Korea in the early 1950s.

    Hence I questioned his motivation.

    To wit:

    Do you deny that this genocide occurred?

    *No response*

    Nayzees have the Bergen Belsen deniers and modern day university Trotskyites are Viet Minh genocide deniers.

  158. None

    Sydney Airport has spruiked electric buses and dumping plastic straws as climate raised at its AGM

    Also quizzed on sea levels for fucksake.

  159. calli

    Seaplanes are the answer.

  160. “None
    #3024391, posted on May 24, 2019 at 2:22 pm
    Sydney Airport has spruiked electric buses and dumping plastic straws as climate raised at its AGM

    Also quizzed on sea levels for fucksake.”

    FFS….since Sydney Airport is now woke to “climate change”…then they should close the airport down.

  161. “Frank Walker from National Tiles
    #3024389, posted on May 24, 2019 at 2:14 pm
    numbers is a Vietnam War, Communist Party genocide denier.”

    Probably isn’t the only genocide he denies.

  162. twostix

    Got a drink with a paper straw with an orange juice the other day, five minutes in and the top of the straw was a soggy disgusting mess.

    Revolting.

  163. calli

    Just wait until Badgery’s experiences a fog.

    Horrors!

  164. Mother Lode

    Don’t think Morris spent much time dealing with the day to day material conditions of Aboriginal people in FNQ

    She has something far more precious than experience: She has a theory.

    The causes of the problems experienced by the indigenous is:
    > Lack of special voice in government
    > Lack of government funding
    > Colonialism
    > White racism
    > Climate change

    All the violence, child rape, alcohol and substance abuse, suicides etc are due to these.

    If you go and visit the places you would probably erroneously conclude it is the boredom and aimlessness of remote community life.

    The solutions are simple:
    > Apology
    > Reparations
    > More reparations
    > A special legislative advisory body with veto power to be staffed from a small pool of urban Fauxboriginals
    > A treaty with the unified Aboriginal nation that never existed
    > Abolition of all mineral extraction
    > Increase of royalty payments by orders of magnitude, managed by urban Aboriginals
    > More social workers
    > More reparations
    > Decisive action on climate change
    > Lots of schools and hospitals built in the middle of nowhere.

    See?

    It is so obvious!

  165. twostix

    The greatest moral challenge of our time is that the governments which white christian nations built for ourselves (in Australia literally by the baby boomers grandparent’s) to serve us at our leisure have divorced themselves from us and declared themselves completely sovereign entities – a thing that exists outside the control of and apart from the people who created it.

  166. RobK

    For the history types:https://arolsen-archives.org/en/
    My father’s number is amongst them.

  167. bundyrum

    Saw this on the interwebs, seems to suit Australia whoever won the election.

    NOTICE

    Due to the current workload, the light at the end of the tunnel will be turned off until further notice.

  168. Do you deny that this genocide occurred?

    There were any number of genocides in Vietnam between 1945 and 1975.
    From Paul Ham’s Vietnam – The Australian War

    The human cost of the war, in terms of personal grief and moral degradation, is Immeasurable. In our helplessness, we surrender to statistics: 520 Australian soldiers dead and about 3,000 wounded; 58,193 Americans dead and about 300,000 wounded; 43 220,357 South Vietnamese troops dead or missing in action and 1.17 million wounded; 666,000 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese troops dead, with the possibility that a third were civilians mistaken for enemy troops or deemed legitimate targets. Of South Vietnamese civilian casualties, about 325,000 were confirmed killed (rising to a million, depending on your source and definition of a ‘civilian’), 30 per cent of whom were children younger than 13. In total, an estimated 65,000 North Vietnamese civilians died as a result of US bombing. The Viet Cong assassinated 36,725 civilians between 1957 and 1972; the North Vietnamese and/or Viet Cong assassinated 166,000 South Vietnamese civilians. About three million Vietnamese people are believed to have suffered herbicide poisoning. In total, 3.5 million people died in Vietnam over fifteen years.

    Then, of course, we add the deaths of between 1.671 and 1.871 million people from 1975 to 1979, in the Cambodian genocide, an event which was largely triggered by the indiscriminate American bombing of Cambodia which pushed a terrified and demoralised population into the arms of the Khmer Rouge.

    Then there is one of the great “what-ifs” of the conflict.
    What-if the Geneva Accord of 1954 had been honoured by both sides, elections held, and the country unified?
    We would be where we are today, but all of the above lives would not have been forfeited in a stubborn and mindless ideological conflict.

  169. calli

    NOTICE

    Due to the current workload, the light at the end of the tunnel will be turned off until further notice.

    Approaching train derailled?

  170. Jessie

    24 May 2019
    The Day the Earth Moved
    by Viv Forbes

    The proposed Adani mine has been wading through a green swamp of political obstacles for nine long years. Other coal optimists have struggled to develop coal in the Galilee Basin for over 40 years. Federal Labor, State Labor and the Greens have taken turns to man the anti-coal barricades.

    In these bad new days, before anyone can open a mine they need multiple approvals, each one providing opportunities for do-nothing activists to raise new hurdles at every hearing. The whole process of judicial judgements and reviews, enquiries, objections, hearings and re-hearings has been a gold mine for lawyers and barristers and a bottomless pit into which mine optimists throw money.

    Nine years ago, Labor Premier Anna Bligh declared Adani “a significant project for Queensland”.

    The Queensland Co-ordinator General gave Adani approval to proceed in 2014.

    The Federal Government also gave its approval to proceed in 2014 but that approval was set aside because of complaints by the Mackay Conservation Council, the Australian Conservation Foundation and others that the yakka skink, the ornamental snake, koalas, the waxy cabbage palm and the black throated finch would be disturbed. And of course the Great Barrier Reef, the coastal seagrass and inland ground water would be threatened.

    The ACF and the Greens have also cowed most Australian banks into denying finance to the Carmichael Project. Native title rights have been asserted by two groups, and Greenpeace and the Climate Council have run scare campaigns on Greenhouse gas emissions should Adani go ahead. Naturally the ABC gives all Adani opponents good air time.

    Just 5 months ago the anti-Adani Deputy Premier of Queensland, Jacki Trad, said she did not believe the Adani project would ever get off the ground.

    But immediately after the recent Federal election landslide which left the ALP holding zero federal seats north of Brisbane, and winning only one of the six Queensland senate vacancies, Queensland Premier Palaszczuk flew north to Mackay and demanded that her departments produce firm timeline for Adani decisions “by Friday” (today).

    What a difference a day makes.

    Viv Forbes
    Executive Director, The Saltbush Club

  171. Johno

    Hey sniffy. Just answer the bloody question you evasive half wit. God you are a worthless boofhead.

  172. thefrolickingmole

    I am still waiting for you to post something that shows that I post untruths.

    Numbers the sad fact is you just arent worth the time to look back and present the numerous times you have been mistaken, lied, obscured the truth or partially presented others arguments to shore up your bloated ego.

    Have a look at you last post in it you went for pity, then “dropped” your PHD as a humblebrag.

    Its childish and theres something wrong with you that you feel a need to continue on like this.

    Nasho Bucket

  173. calli

    Just to rub it in (for the last time)…

    On a sun lounge, overlooking the Indian Ocean, a soft, warm breeze blowing. My second Long Island Iced Tea (a potent free-pour) and a rice-paper prawn roll in hand.

    Bags packed, ready to go later tonight. This part of Bali has destroyed all my pre-conceptions. Unfortunately, not all of them.

    Australia has much to answer to. Our country needs to return to modest, conservative righteousness. 😄

  174. cohenite

    A number of flyers were recently posted in Hoffman Park (Canada) asking dog owners to keep their pets leashed.

    “Many M.slims live in this area and dogs are considered filthy in I.lam. Please keep your dogs on a leash and away from the M.slims who live in this community,” the flyers read.

    Nor is Canada some weird, hyper-polite anomaly. M.slim politicians in the Netherlands have tried to ban dogs from The Hague. In Spain, local politicians rejected such a ban. An epidemic of dog-poisonings happened shortly after. As the Gatestone Institute reports:

    In Britain, which has become “ground zero” for Europe’s canine controversies, blind passengers are being ordered off buses or refused taxi rides because M.slim drivers or passengers object to their “unclean” guide dogs.

    I can’t see that happening in Australia

  175. Numbers the sad fact is you just arent worth the time to look back and present the numerous times you have been mistaken, lied, obscured the truth or partially presented others arguments to shore up your bloated ego.

    Translation –
    I can’t find any evidence to back up my ad hom attacks, so I just post crap about you because I don’t like your opinions.

  176. Oh come on

    Let’s not forget that before Numpty was all in on illegal immigrants fraudulently claiming refugee status, he was virulently opposed to Australia accepting genuine refugees from Vietnam who were fleeing persecution from the victorious communists.

  177. thefrolickingmole

    Ok in the UK their major remaining steelworks is about to close down.
    Fortunately this sort of thinking will allow them to get through.
    Its terrifying.

    The British Steel crisis shows the danger of allowing tens of thousands of people’s livelihoods to be put into the hands of private equity firms. Those people – and every other citizen – could be rescued from insecurity by a citizen’s income. If the government assumed its responsibility for issuing money then, instead of allowing banks to issue 97% of money as debt, the government could issue 100% of money as social credit. This could fund a state income big enough to replace wages, pensions and benefits, and could also fund social spending.
    Chris Hughes

    So much wrong in one paragraph.

  178. cohenite

    A number of flyers were recently posted in Hoffman Park (Canada) asking dog owners to keep their pets leashed.

    “Many RoP live in this area and dogs are considered filthy in RoP. Please keep your dogs on a leash and away from the RoP who live in this community,” the flyers read.

    Nor is Canada some weird, hyper-polite anomaly. RoP politicians in the Netherlands have tried to ban dogs from The Hague. In Spain, local politicians rejected such a ban. An epidemic of dog-poisonings happened shortly after. As the Gatestone Institute reports:

    In Britain, which has become “ground zero” for Europe’s canine controversies, blind passengers are being ordered off buses or refused taxi rides because RoP drivers or passengers object to their “unclean” guide dogs.

    I can’t see that happening in Australia

  179. I am breaking my own promises.

    1. Not interacting with numpty because he is mentally unstable. He shouldn’t vote. He’ll be the Mayor of some luvvie enclave near the Adani mine before he pops his clogs.

    2. Until St Tibb’s Day.

    “Indiscriminate bombing of Cambodia”

    This is a lie in at least a few ways. i. The VC and NVA were sending personnel and materiel down the Uncle Ho trail. ii. It was light up with modern bomb aiming devices, gunships and later on, some early PGMs. Some operations by the US, IIRC, were carried out by boots on the ground. iii. The US were trying to bomb NVA and VC forces who were illegally occupying Cambodia as a foreign army.

    Poor old Bob hasn’t answered the question directly and tried a “pox on both of their ideologies” nonsense because he doesn’t want to admit the pure evil of every Communist regime to ever have existed, or that the whole thing is morally poisonous and the source material is bloodthirsty and unhinged.

    He refused to answer the question; he’s a genocide denier. There should be protests when this stupid, stupid prick graduates from his joke of a doctoral programme.

  180. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    What-if the Geneva Accord of 1954 had been honoured by both sides, elections held, and the country unified?

    What if my auntie had balls, she’d be my uncle.

    The Geneva Accords were a ceasefire agreement, between the French and the Viet Minh. Neither the South Vietnamese nor the United States were signatories to the Accords. It’s an inconvenient truth that the new State of North Vietnam flouted the Accords as soon as the ink was dry, and it’s since been revealed that they had no interest in any free and fair elections.

  181. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    What-if the Geneva Accord of 1954 had been honoured by both sides, elections held, and the country unified?

    What if my auntie had bOlls, she’d be my uncle.

    The Geneva Accords were a ceasefire agreement, between the French and the Viet Minh. Neither the South Vietnamese nor the United States were signatories to the Accords. It’s an inconvenient truth that the new State of North Vietnam flouted the Accords as soon as the ink was dry, and it’s since been revealed that they had no interest in any free and fair elections.

  182. thefrolickingmole

    No numbers, you just genuinely are rooted in the head.

    Theres little to be gained by doing any sort of proving anything to you because you ignore it, disappear for a few hours then come back and act as though it never happened.

    Your just a dishonest troll who lies like other people breathe, and the saddest thing is you consider it “winning” to do so.

    Mr Bucket.

  183. Austria is in a hell of a mess.

    “It is hard to shock the population of a country where racism and corruption have become so normalised that they are considered business as usual. Yet, the latest revelations of Austria’s “Ibiza scandal” are on an entirely new scale, setting in motion a complete meltdown of Austria’s coalition government.”

  184. notafan

    Everyone so happy in Cuba

    Medicines arrived from Cuba out of date, so we had to destroy and bury them before including them in the inventory as used so they could be charged for. We would get our pay from soldiers, who were sometimes months late in coming, and would also take medicines from the hospital,” recalls Carlos.

    you can see why Fijian Indian doctors don’t emigrant to Cuba

  185. notafan

    Austria Cuba Austria Cuba which would you choosa of you weren’t a losa?

  186. thefrolickingmole

    And straight out of being called out for his biased account of Cambodian bombing Mr Bucket springs a fresh distraction squirrel.

    Low energy.
    Sad.

  187. Mr Rusty:
    I can’t find the Green Pile of Skulls t shirt.
    Where do I get it?

  188. calli

    I will really enjoy DrBeau’s Cuban travelogue. He seems to be a grassroots tourist, unlike me.

    Having spent a few years at the pointy end (albeit slightly blunted) in the third world, I’m more than happy to pour my money in via a resort.

  189. Sinc, please ban Calli for that bloody picture of three old biddies.

    (Sure Winston – consider it done. Sinc)

  190. Top Ender

    Stop the silly sign time in Melbourne as “climate change” protestors make people feel positive about them by blocking the streets.

    Favourites:

    – the person whose sign needed an apostrophe to spell “I’ll” but came across as “ill”

    – the one who argued the Titanic would not have a problem in 2019. That there are MORE icebergs in 2019, in which case isn’t it global coldening? Or if there are LESS, how could the Titanic hit an iceberg now?

    “We are all in this together” really needs someone down the end with a small sign saying “I’m not”

    “Stop using fossil fuels or life as we know it will future”??? (Better colouring-in skills needed mate)

  191. Let’s not forget that before Numpty was all in on illegal immigrants fraudulently claiming refugee status, he was virulently opposed to Australia accepting genuine refugees from Vietnam who were fleeing persecution from the victorious communists.

    I think you’re getting me mixed up with someone else who has red hair and warned us against being “swamped” by Asians.
    Here’s some of what I’ve written about Vietnamese boat people.

  192. Mitch M.

    With all the facilities available to production studios it would be nice if they could get the details right. Perhaps some nitpicking in this video but if you are going to portray someone’s life get it right.

  193. calli

    I know, Winston.

    You just wanted to see vast, pale, wobbling expanses of tattooed flesh in g-strings.

    My retinas are being destroyed so yours don’t have to.

    I owe it to Da Cat.

  194. Mitch M.

    If you go and visit the places you would probably erroneously conclude it is the boredom and aimlessness of remote community life.

    With all that time on their hands I thought they would be furiously preoccupied with preserving their culture.

  195. struth

    Yes but dot, in numbers world , living causes more deaths than communists.
    Therefore communism is just peachy, and you’re all picking on it.
    The old ” but what about” bullshit never seems to cover initial violence.
    Those that started it.
    Always the left.
    Every single time.

  196. It was light up with modern bomb aiming devices,

    Absolute rubbish.

    Just over 10 percent of this bombing was indiscriminate, with 3,580 of the sites listed as having “unknown” targets and another 8,238 sites having no target listed at all.

  197. Makka

    The 5 decade dummy spit continues. Riveting stuff.

  198. cohenite

    Top Ender

    #3024427, posted on May 24, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Stop the silly sign time in Melbourne as “climate change” protestors make people feel positive about them by blocking the streets

    All girls including the poor dears with bum fluff beards. And I used to like father Bob. Silly old buggar.

  199. “Makka
    #3024438, posted on May 24, 2019 at 3:32 pm
    The 5 decade dummy spit continues. Riveting stuff.”

    It’s almost time for the grub’s nana nap.

  200. struth

    Father Bob was suffering from old timers before that joooish kid made him a celebrity.

  201. Boambee John

    My birthdate was drawn from the ballot during my second year of Teachers’ College (Kedron Park – 1967).

    Sprung again. Kedron Park Teachers’ College was not a degree granting university, it was a two year Dip Ed mill.

  202. struth

    The climate protests are the last gasp of the gullible.
    The rain fell in the dams again and again.
    By the Flanneries.

  203. notafan

    Confusing

    Russell street now appears to have been an attempt against the victim of a gang r ape or were they going to do it anyhow but brought plan forward because victim went to police?

    Still kudos to vicpol for getting justice for the victims so swiftly

    Russell Street bomber Craig Minogue has refused to hand over his DNA to police investigating historical charges of kidnapping and rape, a court has heard.

    >at the OZ

  204. Leigh Lowe

    Top Ender
    #3024427, posted on May 24, 2019 at 3:18 pm
    Stop the silly sign time in Melbourne as “climate change” protestors make people feel positive about them by blocking the streets.

    And another one on Asylum Shoppers at the same time.
    A true swampy dilemma.
    But take comfort.
    This was going to be their victory lap.
    I have no doubt that Pieman would have appeared on morning TV this morning all “shocked and appalled” at the “environmental vandalism which the mine would cause, that the Tories had been suppressing”.
    He would have appeared before the throng in Melbourne and announced that the Adani mine was dead, to the cheers of the crowd throwing their Che Guevara berets in the air.
    A quiet little chortle later about his tactical brilliance having talked out of both corners of his mouth about Adani during the campaign and duped the hi-vis numpties in Queensland into voting for him anyway.

    What a difference a week makes.

  205. lotocoti

    his joke of a doctoral programme

    Lê Duẩn And My Part In His Glorious Victory.

  206. calli

    The climate protests are the last gasp of the gullible.

    The Beloved, plus two thirst-quenching Bintangs, offered this opinion last night.

    The response, after the initial amazement at such boldness, was heartening.

    It’s over, warmies. Unless you decide to kill us to Save Da Planet.

  207. Shy Ted

    You haven’t lived til you’ve worked with someone with a PhD in one of the humanities. Sit, listen with feigned interest, give them the first dole recipient who comes through the door and wait. Don’t start laughing til you get home. Double the fun by turning the thermostat down while she’s out. At least it makes feigning interest more believable.

  208. Boambee John

    1735099
    #3024386, posted on May 24, 2019 at 2:05 pm
    F-off and waste someone else’s time with your semantics, Bob.

    Semantics are wasted on those without the wit to understand simple English.
    Your problem – not mine.
    I’m still waiting…..

    See my 3024443 and explain the semantics oh learned one!

  209. Leigh Lowe

    notafan
    #3024445, posted on May 24, 2019 at 3:43 pm
    Confusing
    Russell street now appears to have been an attempt against the victim of a gang r ape or were they going to do it anyhow but brought plan forward because victim went to police?

    Plod says not, and I tend to believe them.
    Why detonate a whole building and bring the sky down on your head for a small chance of killing a witness?
    No, another kidnapping and just a simple little drive in the bush would more the style I would think.
    But, shit, what a surreal 24 hours for the poor victim … gang-raped and then the building gets lifted off it’s foundations while she is being interviewed.
    Then she finds out 30 years down the track that the same arseholes did both crimes.

  210. struth

    SNIFFY Mc BOOHOO tell us please.

    Why was Hitler right wing according to you?
    If you believe Norway is a socialist country while it has private business ownership, do you just know you’re right about this because you’re always right being left?

    Are Totalitarian socialists who lose wars (THEY START) instantly called right wing?

    You’re a tired old joke.
    Fuck off.

  211. Sprung again. Kedron Park Teachers’ College was not a degree granting university, it was a two year Dip Ed mill.

    So?
    That makes absolutely no difference to the fact that my enlistment was delayed two years – one whilst I completed that qualification (which was Dip Teach, incidentally, not Dip Ed) and one whilst I served out one year as a teacher on probation at Goondiwindi SS.
    What is highly amusing is the image of you trawling around the interwebs trying to find something to use to discredit me.
    Ever been diagnosed with OCD?

  212. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Having spent a few years at the pointy end (albeit slightly blunted) in the third world, I’m more than happy to pour my money in via a resort.

    much of the 3rd world is best enjoyed from the inside of a tour bus or your private driver

  213. Boambee John

    What-if the Geneva Accord of 1954 had been honoured by both sides, elections held, and the country unified?

    I am somewhat surprised that your extensive research has not disclosed that Vietnam is the forced amalgamation of three different groups, Tonkinese, Cochin-Chinese and Annamites.

  214. struth

    I refuse to visit the third world inside my private driver.

  215. Mother Lode

    “Many RoP live in this area and dogs are considered filthy in RoP. Please keep your dogs on a leash and away from the RoP who live in this community,” the flyers read.

    How does the preferences of one mob turn into obligations on others? There are no laws or regulations to effect the process – just the RoP demanding more.

    A lot of people find being called filthy kaffir and infidel and ‘behead those who insult the prophet with his own words’ pretty offensive too.

  216. struth

    Stick your dog in a burqa.

    That’ll fuck ’em.
    Get a pet pig and train it to seek and steal sandals.

  217. calli

    Zippy, I’ve seen enough and know exactly what it looks like.

    The secret is to stuff money into the economy bypassing the Big Men.

  218. struth

    Stick your dog in a burqa and call it whiskas or fluffy.

  219. Knuckle Dragger

    How about this one?

    Cambodia and Laos were aiding and abetting the VC and NVA by letting them use their country as a supply route.

    Or, they just didn’t have the military grunt to kick them out and maintain their neutrality.

    Either way, I for one don’t have a problem with them getting smacked up by US bombs.

    Any civvies living within shrapnel range should have known what was coming. It’s not rocket science.

  220. areff

    call it whiskas or fluffy.

    or ‘Mohammad’

  221. Geriatric Mayfly

    Stick your dog in a burqa and call it whiskas or fluffy.

    Fatima or Mo would be more culturally appropriate.

  222. Boambee John

    1735099
    #3024454, posted on May 24, 2019 at 3:56 pm
    Sprung again. Kedron Park Teachers’ College was not a degree granting university, it was a two year Dip Ed mill.

    So?
    That makes absolutely no difference to the fact that my enlistment was delayed two years – one whilst I completed that qualification (which was Dip Teach, incidentally, not Dip Ed) and one whilst I served out one year as a teacher on probation at Goondiwindi SS.
    What is highly amusing is the image of you trawling around the interwebs trying to find something to use to discredit me.
    Ever been diagnosed with OCD?

    My apologies, I omitted to post the other bit.

    1735099
    #622426, posted on October 31, 2012 at 2:04 pm
    I was 23 when I arrived in Vietnam, having been deferred for 2 years because I was at Uni. By the time I got there I’d read everything available on the war and it’s history. I knew what was going on, and history has proved me correct….

    PS, I didn’t have to go “trawling around the interwebs”, I just had to look at this page.

    OCD? Bit rich from the bloke with a foot fetish about Trump!

  223. Leigh Lowe

    You haven’t lived til you’ve worked with someone with a PhD in one of the humanities. Sit, listen with feigned interest, give them the first dole recipient who comes through the door and wait.

    We’ve got one.
    Terribly learned chap.
    Everyone ignores him.
    He does have that annoying passive aggressive fucking trait though … “How are we going to address this issue?”
    Code for “Can you do something I am incapable or unwilling to do that will make me look good?”
    Oxygen thief with an unwarranted superiority complex.

  224. Mitch M.

    I refuse to visit the third world inside my private driver.

    Zippy must have inadvertently chose the gay tour.

  225. notafan

    You are right LL
    for once it is a coincidence

  226. calli

    Twenty three and just left Uni?

    Holy moley! Most degrees went for three years (17 + 3 = 20). DipEd, 21.

    Did you do an Honours Year?

  227. struth

    Stick a leash around your pig and call it Rover.
    Chuck a ball and complain when it just won’t fetch.
    Tie your cat to the tow ball of a car.
    Claim it farted too often and you’re doing it for the climate.
    Drive car at high speed.
    Stop car.
    Frigging cat will still be alive.
    Not a scratch on it.
    Trade in for a dog.

    Name dog mohummad.
    Make it fetch and sit on command.
    Show off skills in front of Mosque.

  228. I am somewhat surprised that your extensive research has not disclosed that Vietnam is the forced amalgamation of three different groups, Tonkinese, Cochin-Chinese and Annamites.

    I am somewhat surprised that your extensive research has not disclosed that the names Tonkin, Cochin China, and Annam were all conferred on the Vietnamese by the French when they created protectorates.
    During the French colonial period, the Cochinchina label moved further south, and came to refer exclusively to the southernmost part of Vietnam, controlled by Cambodia in prior centuries, and lying to its southeast. The capital of the French colony of Cochinchina was at Saigon.
    The two other parts of Vietnam at the time were known as Annam (Central Vietnam) and Tonkin (Northern Vietnam).
    They are geographical terms and bear no relationship to any Vietnamese sense of identity.
    The more significant divide was always between the Nguyễn in the South and the Trịnh lords in the north.
    They fought a protracted civil war (1627–73) called Trịnh-Nguyễn phân tranh by the Vietnamese.

  229. It’s over, warmies. Unless you decide to kill us to Save Da Planet.

    PLease don’t give them any new ideas.

  230. Knuckle Dragger

    TE,

    Excellent silly signs in Melbourne.

    I was particularly fond of the earnest young thing holding a sign that said, ‘Don’t get mad, get elected’.

    She’s talking to you, Bill.

    NB: My God there are some frightful skanks in those pictures.

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