Open Forum: May 25, 2019

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1,855 Responses to Open Forum: May 25, 2019

  1. Arky

    Germany

    ..
    That a people known chiefly for coprophilia and genocidal stupidity should do anything for the next twenty generations but farm animals, bolt BMWs together and keep their damn mouths shut is astonishing.

  2. Dr Fred Lenin

    A relation is a very experienced psychiatric nurse ,she has been nursing for 30 odd years dealing with the afflicted including prisoners from jails . Recent ly she has worked at repat hospitals and is totally disgusted with the demands for entitlement from many of the viet nam ,timor ,iraq vets the world owes them everything for free ! Sad bastards mostly alcoholics with mental issues . Its a fair comment when experienced nurses feel more sympathy for a convicted criminal than an entitled spud peeling self obsessed spoilt alcoholic.
    Numbers has this syndrome the way he moans ,like the guy with no shoes ignoring the guy ith no legs .

  3. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    ‘I hope he looks at Australia’: President Trump drags Australia into FBI probe
    In a historic first, President Donald Trump has publicly accused Australia and the UK for their role in the “Russia hoax” and FBI probe.

  4. bespoke

    I’m resigned that there is no Utopian winning just endless conflict fed by passed grievance and the bigger and/or older an entity gets the more self serving it becomes.

  5. Leigh Lowe

    Roberto

    #3025183, posted on May 25, 2019 at 11:55 am

    Oh dear. Bass (TAS) is back on the AEC’s list of close seats

    Remain calm Roberto.
    I suspect a 2PP of 49.5% is the threshold and it has just edged back over that by a smidge.
    With a maximum of 6,000 votes to be counted, the Liars need to recoup 600.
    It is all but in the bag.

  6. Grigory M

    Dr Fred Lenin #3025202, posted on May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm

    A relation is a very experienced psychiatric nurse …

    Yawn – big yawn.

    The Cat already has a resident Fantasist – she is so much better than you could ever be at making stuff up.

  7. Mater

    Having followed this riveting “days of our lives” saga regarding numbers “call-up” I am left baffled by one issue that came up very early in the “battle” but wasn’t pursued by any of the other “combatants”.
    Namely, the loss of earnings .. The sum of $15 000 was mentioned as out of pocket expenses due to winning the “marble lottery”.

    Because we’ve heard it all before.

    1735099
    #1482404, posted on October 19, 2014 at 2:18 pm

    You see having been right royally screwed over some time ago, I have this thing about justice.

    As far as I’m concerned, I’m still owed the difference between what I was paid as a conscript 1969/70 and what I would have been paid had I remained a teacher for those two years. In today’s money, that’s worth $27,550.59.

    Salary increases for Queensland members of parliament this year ranged from an increase of $70,000 for the Premier, (bringing his annual wage to $379,562) to smaller amounts such as $148,848 P.A. for back bench members.

    These increases are backdated from July 2013.

  8. cohenite

    I’m resigned that there is no Utopian winning just endless conflict fed by passed grievance and the bigger and/or older an entity gets the more self serving it becomes.

    That’s a bleak thought. Get a thick cut lamb chop, grill it, eat it with a glass of nice red and watch William Powell in My Man Godfrey:

  9. Nick

    so in the words of a well known politician “Pleeeze explain!”

    He was selling his arse. It’s the only explanation.

  10. bespoke

    Not saying not to try but maybe its meant to be that way, cohenite.

  11. Nick

    Fairfax is doubling down on its daily Trump hate piece. They truly don’t get it.

  12. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Beaten Labor commits to three more years in denial Paul Kelly
    Meanwhile, Labor has lost seven of the last nine federal elections — and of the two it won, one was a doomed minority government. Labor has passed a new threshold — the party is beyond reform. And nobody gets angry. Nobody stands up and says “enough is enough”.

    The party is trapped — tied to a rank-and-file hopelessly to the Left of the Australian public, hostage to a trade union movement locked into counter-productive political activism and entangled in a fatal embrace with the Greens, who steal its votes whenever Labor tries to be responsibly centrist.

    Consider the ALP primary vote from the last four elections — Labor polled 33.69 per cent this year, 34.73 per cent in 2016, 33.38 per cent in 2013 and 37.99 per cent in 2010 when it last won — that being the Julia Gillard minority government.

    The last respectable primary vote was 43.38 per cent when Kevin Rudd won in 2007. No other institution with four such dismal results would be allowed to get away with the useless sophistry peddled this week by senior ALP figures, much of which is calculated to ensure nothing of genuine substance happens. The Labor comments after defeat were beyond belief: the policies, the nation was told, were courageous; the party has been upfront and honest; performances of senior figures, of course, had been impressive; Bill Shorten deserved everybody’s thanks.

    A sporting team with these results since 2010 would be purged and reformed from top to bottom, but not Labor.

  13. Leigh Lowe

    From Tom’s link to the JohnBlack analysis in the Oz …

    Tom
    #3025125, posted on May 25, 2019 at 10:34 am

    Last weekend’s election result was, at its core, about the loss of Labor’s traditional support base of working families (and I emphasise the word families) and a return to the Coalition fold of the quiet men and women of faith to a political leader they clearly respected.
    It was also a rejection of shrill hectoring from goat-cheese-circle bullies who are incapable of understanding how an economy actually works in the real world.
    Even on election night, as statistical signposts to defeat were being planted in plain view for Labor, screen commentators from the party’s Left refused to acknowledge their failed campaign, descending instead into rants about how evil some minor parties were and how the voters just didn’t understand the sophistication of the detailed package put forward by the ALP, the ACTU and the progressive inner-city Left.

    Through all the whoopin’ and hollerin’ last Saturday night, that was one thing which gave me the utter shits.
    The commentariat insisted on holding the elitist ground (they love words like “sophisticated” and “nuanced” to describe their latest pillaging), with the none-too-subtle implication that the dumb fucks out there were too obtuse to get Short’ns Masterplan.

    I desperately wanted someone to challenge Annabelle Crabs, or David Speers or, better still, the ultimate dim-bulb, Laura Jayes, to explain exactly how the taxation of dividends works.

    I’ll bet none of them would have a fucking clue.

  14. Tom

    The party is trapped — tied to a rank-and-file hopelessly to the Left of the Australian public, hostage to a trade union movement locked into counter-productive political activism and entangled in a fatal embrace with the Greens, who steal its votes whenever Labor tries to be responsibly centrist.

    FFS, Paul. Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

    The Liars are doing just fine. I mean, what could possibly go wrong as Comrade Albaneasy reinvents them as the Western Peking Stalinists?

  15. Some History

    There’s Benny, Trumbleweed, Carosene, and the Poyret… good ol’ Pete….
    Mark Knight’s offering is a beaut. Very “inclusive”.

  16. Zippy:

    A sporting team with these results since 2010 would be purged and reformed from top to bottom, but not Labor.

    My first reaction was “Yeah. Suck shit Labor.”
    Then after a little thinking, I thought “Hang on. Shorten got his arse kicked because he had soft interviews all the way up to the final week, then came unstuck through lack of preparedness.”
    We need to hold Morrisons nuts against the blowtorch. Make the bastards work.

  17. old bloke

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3025042, posted on May 25, 2019 at 9:05 am

    Swedish Government Is Looking to Ban Historic Rune Script and Viking Imagery as “Hate Symbols” Against Ethnic Groups (22 May)

    Anti-Semitism – Rune script is Paleo-Hebrew.

  18. old bloke

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3025042, posted on May 25, 2019 at 9:05 am

    Swedish Government Is Looking to Ban Historic Rune Script and Viking Imagery as “Hate Symbols” Against Ethnic Groups (22 May)

    Anti-Semitism – Rune script is [email protected]

  19. Woolfe

    George Papadopolous on twitter

    No conspiracy Marshall. It’s all coming out. Downer will go down in history as the bumbling spy I outed who almost upended the US-Australia relationship…until his own government throws him under the bus. Next time don’t use your phone to spy on me, dummy.

  20. Leigh Lowe

    Some simple questions for the “sophisticated voter” next time they raise Short’ns tax grab.
    The basic assumption is that a shareholder receives a $700 fully franked dividend from Company X.
    1. How much Australian income tax has Company X paid?
    2. If the shareholder is an individual on the highest tax bracket (47% including Medicare) and applying the current rules, what is the total tax paid by Company X and the taxpayer?
    3. If the shareholder is a super fund in accumulation phase, and applying the current rules, what is the total tax paid by Company X and the taxpayer?
    4. If the shareholder is a super fund in retirement phase, and applying the current rules, what is the total tax paid by Company X and the taxpayer?
    5. If the shareholder is an old age pensioner with no other assets apart from the shares which pay the dividend, and applying the current rules, what is the total tax paid by Company X and the taxpayer?
    6. In any situation above, combining the tax position of Company X and the shareholder, does the ATO pay a net refund to the two entities combined?

    The answers …
    1. $300
    2. $470
    3. $150
    4. Nil
    5. Nil.
    6. No. The ATO pays no net refunds to any combination of dividend payer / dividend recipient.

  21. Nick

    who steal its votes whenever Labor tries to be responsibly centrist.

    I lost count of the number of times that smug Lefty friends would lecture me about capturing the centre and how Turnbull was the only person to be able to do that. I’m betting that we aren’t going to be hearing more advice about Labor needing the centre for some time.

  22. Boambee John

    Bruce
    #3025140, posted on May 25, 2019 at 10:55 am
    Milne Bay was a close-run affair.

    Oz aircraft taking off from the hastily built strip would barely have their wheels up before going nose down to strafe Japanese landing barges and their human cargoes and anything else that looked Japanese.

    And if Japanese reinforcements and naval forces that were diverted to combat the larger US ground and naval forces around Guadalcanal had gone to Milne Bay or the Papuan beach heads, the outcomes there might have been different.

  23. Some History

    There’s Benny, Trumbleweed, Carosene, and the Poyret… good ol’ Pete….
    Mark Knight’s offering is a beaut. Very “inclusive”.

    Could’ve had Adam Ant in the centre of “the ring”, lying face down thumping his hands and feet into the soft carpet (sorry Cloyve), screaming, “If people don’t do what I thay, I’ll get… ‘brutal’. I’ll throw a handful of leaves at them. I WILL!”

  24. Leigh Lowe

    Does anyone have an approximate estimate of how many articles Mamamia, No Idea, Nein and Fewfacts had scheduled for this week, puffing up Chloe as the new Jackie Kennedy, which they had to toss in the bin?

  25. Mark from Melbourne

    Struth
    #3025167, posted on May 25, 2019 at 11:40 am

    I suppose my job has about to do with it.
    Right now I am working with aright wing old farmer mate of mine and we are taking people up to Marree and William Creek and they fly over lake Eyre and then back through Wilpena…

    Got back from a three day jaunt around that neck of the woods only yesterday. Other than one raving greenie (who “came up with FoTE to protest Roxby and stayed” – but pisses off back to Melbourne each year when it gets hot) didn’t meet anyone, including the ex-doctor’s wives who pretty much made up our tourist group, who was prepared to even try to defend the Labor/Green alliance/madness/duplicity.

    Not for lack of my and (especially) SWMBO’s trying, let me add.

    In other news… many, many flies. Oh, and the Innamincka Pub has possibly the best soundtrack going around. Hits of the 80’s and 90’s on constant rotation. And I learnt what the OPTSPU was.

  26. Nick

    Does anyone have an approximate estimate of how many articles Mamamia, No Idea, Nein and Fewfacts had scheduled for this week, puffing up Chloe as the new Jackie Kennedy, which they had to toss in the bin?

    Hahahaha all too true.
    Am I the only one to find the pictures of her gazing intently into Bill’s head, as he spoke to have been a bit weird? Strange that the femmos were silent, cough.

  27. Leigh Lowe

    Some History
    #3025226, posted on May 25, 2019 at 1:39 pm
    There’s Benny, Trumbleweed, Carosene, and the Poyret… good ol’ Pete….
    Mark Knight’s offering is a beaut. Very “inclusive”.
    Could’ve had Adam Ant in the centre of “the ring”, lying face down thumping his hands and feet into the soft carpet (sorry Cloyve), screaming, “If people don’t do what I thay, I’ll get… ‘brutal’. I’ll throw a handful of leaves at them. I WILL!”

    Ha, ha.

    Mark Knight is in that Serena Williams dangerous place again.
    He has depicted Penny Wong as a bitter, axe-faced, angry lesbian.
    No, wait …

  28. Boambee John

    If however, he is prepared to establish his truth-seeking bona fides, he will, as I have requested, apologise here so I can be sure the exercise is valid.

    Speaking of apologies, still nothing from Numbers after he verballed me.

    And to think that a few weeks ago I defended his Vietnam service here. Ungrateful sod!

  29. Leigh Lowe

    Am I the only one to find the pictures of her gazing intently into Bill’s head, as he spoke to have been a bit weird? Strange that the femmos were silent, cough.

    Yeah, there was a corker in the Oz last week.
    She had clearly been practicing the adoring, tilty-head gaze in the mirror.
    The mask fell during his whinge last Saturday night, but.
    Had more of the resigned look of the “I married a fucking loser” about it.

  30. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Had more of the resigned look of the “I married a fucking loser” about it.

    It’s my considered opinion she was just so looking forward to moving into the Lodge, as the Prime Minister’s wife..

  31. ZK2A:
    Behind every loser is another loser.

  32. Annie A

    @twodogs I have watched the documentary ‘ Borderless’ that you posted. Interesting and the conclusion was not what I was expecting from Lauren Southern. Not sure how to solve this problem but open borders is not the solution. The greedy and evil people smugglers have perpetuated and profited from this crisis. I have a feeling there is more to this complex situation with consquences that I am not sure are intentional or unintentional? What did you think twodogs

  33. thefrolickingmole

    Knuckle Dragger

    He had a sore nut, so he went to the doctor. During the initial check by the little Thai nurse, she gently cupped his testicles.

    ‘Don’t worry,’ the nurse said. ‘It’s quite normal to have an erection during this procedure.’

    My friend said, ‘I don’t have an erection.’

    ‘No, but I have.’

    Knuckles you will be glad to know that joke saw service this morning.

    We have a bloke whos prone to a nasty medical condition when blood is taken, he needs to be as distracted as possible.
    Doc asked me in to distract him while blood was taken and I used your joke.

    It worked extremely well in a medical setting and now has a doctors approval as a distraction gambit.

  34. Entropy

    Struth, do you know if there are any issues about putting a hobiecat onto lake Eyre? As in indigenous ones?

  35. egg_

    Does anyone have an approximate estimate of how many articles Mamamia, No Idea, Nein and Fewfacts had scheduled for this week, puffing up Chloe as the new Jackie Kennedy, which they had to toss in the bin?

    Ich bin ein bin liner.

  36. thefrolickingmole

    Judges overruling national emergency powers, Im sure that will last a long time.

    Judge bars Trump from building border wall sections with emergency funds
    Ruling immediately halts administration’s efforts to use money secured with declaration of national emergency

    I wonder who the judge was???

    On September 8, 2014, President Obama nominated Gilliam to serve as a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California

  37. bespoke

    What was her conclusion, Annie A”

  38. Tom

    Breaking: North Melbourne AFL coach Brad Scott has quit and is coaching his last game today against the Western Bulldogs.

  39. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Special Forces brace for a culture shockPaul MaleyFollow @paul_maley

    12:00AM May 25, 2019

    Within a few months, a secret inquiry into the conduct of Australia’s Special Forces will reveal to the nation whether or not its elite troops committed war crimes during their time in Afghanistan.

    The Brereton inquiry, as it has become known, threatens to take the military into uncharted territory, and the nation along with it.

    If the worst charges against the Special Air Service Regiment and the Commandos prove true, Australians will be forced to confront the fact that its most venerated soldiers are also among its worst.

    Prisoner abuses, dubious shootings, even battlefield executions — these are some of the alleged transgressions Justice Paul Brereton is investigating.

    Constituted in 2016 in the face of persistent rumours that Australian troops had breached the laws of war, the Brereton inquiry has been conducted under conditions of near-total secrecy.

    Conducted under the aegis of the Inspector General of the Australian Defence Force (IGADF), even Brereton’s terms of reference are a classified secret.

    What we do know is that in the course of his inquiry, Brereton and staff from the IGADF have interviewed more than 220 witnesses, travelled to the US, Canada and Britain to seek advice on how similar allegations have been handled by Australia’s allies, and reached into Afghanistan in search of witnesses to potential criminal acts.

    It has been one of the largest inquiries into alleged military misconduct in Australian history, if not the largest.

    ‘’I think he’s likely to find there was credible evidence of breaches of the rules of engagement,’’ says Neil James, the executive director of the Australia Defence Association. “Whether they constitute war crimes, I don’t know without seeing the evidence. My gut feel is that they’re probably not widespread. The serious ones wouldn’t have been widespread.’’

    Brereton’s job is to conduct a “scoping report’’, meaning he is to sift through the rumour, gossip and unverified reports that enveloped Australia’s contingent of troops in Afghanistan.

    He has no brief to prosecute war crimes. But if he finds credible evidence of war crimes, the material is likely to be passed over the Australian Federal Police for criminal investigation and possible prosecution.

    If the allegations are accurate, Brereton’s report paves the way for potentially widespread reform into the Special Forces, particularly the SASR, arguably the most culturally unique unit in the Australian Defence Force. Already the Defence Department has assembled a small team of staff to help implement what are expected to be significant reforms.

    At a minimum, James expects Brereton will make recommendations aimed at addressing the culture within SASR, which has bred toxic rivalries among operators and might have contributed to battlefield excesses.

    James sees an inherent contradiction in selecting and training a cohort of tough, single-minded alpha males and then expecting them to work cohesively as part of a team. ‘’When you cultivate an elite unit of tough and resourceful people, that’s markedly beneficial but it also poses a degree of risk of their institutional culture developing some bad habits,’’ he says.

    He also expects SASR’s command-and-control systems to fall under the microscope, in particular the degree of oversight and restraint exercised by officers. The SASR is famously democratic. Operators work in small patrols of four and six men. Rank counts for little. For this reason, James thinks the SASR is likely to come in for harder treatment than the Commando Regiment, which worked under the close eye of its officers.

    From the Oz.

  40. RobK

    He had a sore nut,…..
    Along a similar vein;
    jethro on headache and castration.

  41. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    He has no brief to prosecute war crimes. But if he finds credible evidence of war crimes, the material is likely to be passed over the Australian Federal Police for criminal investigation and possible prosecution.

    FFS since when does the police prosecute soldiers on a battlefield

    the insanity peaks just keeps climbing higher and higher

  42. Oh come on

    Annabel Crabb is desperately seeking a silver lining for Shorten’s defeat:

    Triumph holds an epic warning for Morrison

    It’s a long, tedious and very well-trodden wander down memory lane. (I can’t believe that, up until Crabb’s effort, no one else has drawn a parallel between Shorten’s defeat and Hewson’s in 1993. Oh, they have? Only 55,000 times or more?)

    Anyway, the conclusions drawn by Crabb are predictable. It wasn’t really a rejection of taking action on climate change – just don’t scare people too much because they’re not sophisticated enough to understand why they ought to lose their livelihoods to mollify Gaia.

    And it wasn’t an election about bigotry. You might say that it was pretty much only the ABC and the far left suggesting it was, but how gracious of Crabb to give us oiks a pass for getting our votes wrong.

  43. egg_

    There’s Benny, Trumbleweed, Carosene, and the Poyret… good ol’ Pete….
    Mark Knight’s offering is a beaut. Very “inclusive”.

    Vitrioli’s there?

  44. thefrolickingmole

    But if he finds credible evidence of war crimes, the material is likely to be passed over the Australian Federal Police for criminal investigation and possible prosecution.

    Ive heard getting the ABC to run a decade long campaign of stories/rumors/international cases then advertising in major newspapers works well.

  45. egg_

    how gracious of Crabb to give us oiks a pass for getting our votes wrong.

    Ain’t Democraceh! a b1tch?

  46. feelthebern

    I was at Bunnings this morning.
    While at the check out a father was calling out to his son who was getting an empty cardboard box for their purchases.
    “Get a smaller box. No that box is too big. Get a tighter one”.

    Smirking ensued.

  47. thefrolickingmole

    Now this would make a good movie…
    If it does I hope the lady makes a heap out of it.
    Sounds like she had a rough life but has overcome what would have sunk a lot of others.
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/may/24/i-wanted-to-look-him-in-the-eye-serial-killers-survivor-witnesses-execution

    The killer pressed a gun to Noland’s head and blindfolded her after abducting her outside a church in the Tampa Bay area, she told the Associated Press in an interview Wednesday.

    She was menstruating and deliberately got blood on his car’s back seat, which she hoped police would use as evidence, and was able to tell police after her release where she was driven on an interstate north of Tampa. At Long’s apartment, she purposely left fingerprints all over the bathroom.

    Until her kidnapping, authorities had little clue who was behind the bodies left around the Tampa Bay area, often in gruesome poses.
    ….
    Noland said if she could have spoken to Long before the execution, she would have thanked him for abducting someone so well equipped to turn the tables on him.

    “I would say ‘Thank you for choosing me and not another 17-year-old girl,’” she said. “Another 17-year-old girl probably wouldn’t have been able to handle it the way that I have.”

    Noland is now a deputy at the Hillsborough county sheriff’s office, the same department she helped catch the serial killer. “It was comforting to know this was actually happening,” she said of Long’s execution. “The peace that came over me is a remarkable feeling.”

  48. Oh come on

    Australians will be forced to confront the fact that its most venerated soldiers are also among its worst.

    The most effective arm of the ADF is about to be castrated.

    Never mind. The SAS is clearly too violent, clearly does its job too ruthlessly. Why can’t they just aim for the legs? It’s not right.

  49. Makka

    Anyway, the conclusions drawn by Crabb are predictable. It wasn’t really a rejection of taking action on climate change – just don’t scare people too much because they’re not sophisticated enough to understand why they ought to lose their livelihoods to mollify Gaia.

    Meaning, the Left have to up their hysteria and the lying about the AGW scam if they want to glean enough votes from the gullible punters. All this while the green costs of just living are rising to everyday families.I mean, it’s worked so well for them. Let’s hope Albo takes heed of Crabbe.

  50. Mitch M.

    Study Finds Marijuana Users Have Better Chance of Surviving Heart Attack

    Thought this had to be wrong until I found literature indicating a possible mechanistic explanation. Bit of a shock. The extract below is from the study and suggests that marijuana smoking reduces atherosclerosis. That supports my contention that the primary driver of atherosclerosis not cholesterol but inflammation because even hemp seed has significant anti-inflammatory properties but marijuana moreso.

    In this analysis, we found that marijuana use was associated with similar risk of receiving a coronary angiogram when compared to the control group, but marijuana-use patients were significantly less likely to undergo PCI(surgical intervention). This suggests that these marijuana-use patients did not have significant coronary artery disease or acute plaque rupture as the inciting event for their AMI. Several case reports have suggested that vasospasm or acute thrombosis may represent a primary mechanism of AMI in marijuana users [30]. Each of these details must be taken into account when considering the results of this study.

  51. Atoms for Peace

    Word of caution. The testicle joke will not work as a means of distracting cats whilst you go for a blood sample.

  52. calli

    Back in Oz. Managed to be on the last plane out before the curfew. The wind changed, the ash blew the other way and we were ready at the end of the runway. Bye bye Bali.

    The air was turned down so low I now have a roaring headcold. But still

    #winning 🙂

    Sniff.

  53. Oh come on

    Makka, it is very encouraging that the ALPBC seem to be learning all of the wrong lessons from the election result. The problem was that Shorten didn’t go hard enough! That’s clearly what the people wanted. Crabb can see that the whole thing has shades of 1949. Chifley would have won in a landslide if he proposed to nationalise the *entire* economy, not just the banks.

  54. Leigh Lowe

    Tom
    #3025241, posted on May 25, 2019 at 2:11 pm
    Breaking: North Melbourne AFL coach Brad Scott has quit and is coaching his last game today against the Western Bulldogs.

    Another brilliant appointment courtesy of James Brayshaw.

  55. ZK2A:

    Behind every loser is another loser.

    OK – that’s not fair.
    How about “Behind every Left Loser is a Lefty checker to make sure the restraining wire hasn’t come loose from the bolt holding Dear Leaders head on.”
    Is that better?

  56. Leigh Lowe

    Unanswerable question, but worth considering.
    Lots of talk of “quiet conservatives”.
    But what are the odds that traditional ALP voters in “lefty” professions (teaching and nursing) with negatively geared property or mum with a few CBA, Telstra or AMP shares, quietly ticked the LNP box, but wouldn’t dare breathe a word of their intention in the lunch room?

  57. John Constantine

    Their ruddfilth had two goes, their redfilth gillard had two goes.

    Their shortfilth just wants the rest of the thousand year reich he is entitled to.

    Their chloe and the mother in law from hell will hang around as long as they can hope to reign through the puppet.

  58. Does anyone else have a problem with the sound on Fox news? Especially Tucker?
    The sound is quite distorted and bassie almost to the point of incomprehensibility. The subtitles are about eight seconds behind the spoken word.

  59. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Everyone has the right to get home without being killed’: Melbourne garbage truck driver starts local chapter of Guardian Angels vigilante group to protect women after the brutal rape and murder of an Israeli student

    A Melbourne man patrols the streets to keep an eye out for anyone in danger
    Michael Makridis founded the Melbourne chapter of the Guardian Angels
    He says everyone should feel safe from being assaulted or killed when in public
    The 53-year-old was spurred on by Aiia Maasarwe’s rape and murder in January

    From the Daily Mail. You watch Fatty Ashton’s circus come down on this mob like a ton of bricks.

  60. Shy Ted

    I wouldn’t use being in Mt Isa in the 1990s as any show of credibility, numbers. I was there for most of it and spent many hours of a weekend helping the nieces and nephews with basic homework. It was almost like they hadn’t learned it in the classroom but they had no great problem picking it up. A bit of adult oversight and they were top of the class and accepted at the private Catholic school with worthy careers and stable relationships. Mrs Ted and I did a little helping out of other kids and and it wasn’t that the kids couldn’t do the schoolwork, but based on a lot of things I thought the real problem was ineffectual teachers in unruly classrooms.
    One grandson was premature and he really was a struggle for a long time, impulsive, energetic and slow learner. 22 year old graduates “diagnosing” him with ADHD, autism, “not quite sure, needs further assessment”. Just needed time, discipline, sports and consistency at home, now a tradie and doing well in a genuine primary export industry, bringing wealth to the nation. But still with a tendency to be a bloody idiot. As I was at his age.
    And if you were doing special ed back then, I disagree with the long-running ABC theme of lead poisoning being the main cause of so many backward kids. Foetal alcohol syndrome in 90+% of the unlucky kids and a few other syndromes as you would see in the general population. Twas my job to determine these things.
    The Kalkadoon “massacre” was over native predation of cattle by the last few traditional blackfellas who were fearsome warriors, protecting what you do in the desert, food, water and ladies. Cattle are far easier to hunt and a much better feed than native fauna. Lots of old books about the times which have been rewritten in Wikipedia to suit a narrative. And lots of older, very dark Aboriginal people who say they were “saved” by removal from dysfunctional families. Can’t get and don’t want jobs in the Aboriginal bureaucracies because they’re simply “too black”.

  61. High temperature superconductors.
    It may be old news repackaged, but this sounds like an exciting development.
    Works at -23 celsius. Which is room temperature in Alaska. Sorta.

  62. John Constantine

    The first day of the rest of their war.

    Victorians property owners will face millions of dollars in new taxes to be unveiled in this year’s state budget.

    Treasurer Tim Pallas is expected to officially announced increased property taxes for heritage property and residential land owners on Saturday as well as an increase for foreign investors.

    The taxes are designed to go some of the way to addressing the $5.2 billion shortfall in stamp duty to be forecast in Monday’s budget.

    The duty on foreign investors buying properties will rise from 7 to 8 per cent from July 1 this year, while from January 1 around 3000 property owners will be hit with a rise in the absentee owner tax from 1.5 to 2 per cent.

    Mr Pallas is selling the tax increase on foreign owners as an act of fairness that will raise $330 million over four years.

    “It’s only right that foreign property buyers contribute more so we can keep building the vital projects we need across our state,” he said.

    ‘It’s only right that foreign property buyers contribute more.’

    Local owners will also contribute more.

    Heritage property owners who have traditionally paid less land tax because of the heritage status will also pay more, with the government to change what it calls a “loophole” affecting 13,000 buildings.

    Land tax will also be applied to 1700 blocks of land across the metropolitan area in a bid to “discourage land banking” by people who own vacant residential land attached to their residence but on a separate title.

  63. John Constantine

    Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million.

    And Victoria will join the rest of the country when it introduces a 2.75 gold royalty to all but small miners from January 1, to generate an expected $56 million for the budget.

  64. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    This potential ban could be in serious violation of religious freedom, as these norse symbols are an important part of the pagan religion still practised by some people in Sweden.
    People are organizing a protest this Friday in Stockholm between 2pm and 4pm and also delivering a petition for the government to save the old norse cultural heritage.

    This one may be a step too far for the Swedes. I’ve just finished writing a small section on how when I first visited Sweden I was amazed at how much the old seasonal ways and the Old Religion still pervaded Swedish life, even in cosmopolitan Stockholm. Asatru, the True Way of Odin, albeit a New Age offshoot, is a formally recognized religion in Sweden, careful to avoid all associations with the Nazi past and the Nazi rallies at Gamla Uppsala, the grave mounds of the Bronze and Irons Age Royals. That Neo-Nazis use some runic symbols as an emblem means nothing; so do hotels and restaurants, for these symbols are everywhere. To remove these would be a genuine cultural suicide of Sweden, when added to the current denigration of all things Viking by the Swedish left.

  65. Leigh Lowe

    Watching Richo replay on Sky.
    Albo still fucking referring to adjustment of tax on dividends to shareholders marginal tax rate (dividend franking) as “money we give away”.
    Keeps it up you buck-toothed prick.
    Opposition for a generation.

  66. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    For a reference re how bad it is getting in Sweden, see Hal G P Colebatch, ‘Sweden Disowns Its Vikings’, Quadrant, 12-14, May 2019, Vol 63, No. 5

  67. Bar Beach Swimmer

    Speaking of winning, Bar Beach Swimmer, we may well turn to looking at the various state loonie governments around Australia.

    That includes so-called Liberal governments that are really LINOs – Liberals In Name Only.

    Yes, we’re looking at you Gladys.

    True, TE. But Gladys does need an extra five votes in the Legislative Council if Labor won’t come to the party on her legislation. And what do we find lurking there? Why the beautiful symmetry of two O.N. including Mark Latham, two Shooters, Fishers & Farmers and Fred Nile!

    While it’s not perfect it is #winning

  68. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Watching Richo replay on Sky.
    Albo still fucking referring to adjustment of tax on dividends to shareholders marginal tax rate (dividend franking) as “money we give away”.

    And any Party, which is too fvcking thick to understand something as simple as this, expects to run this country?

  69. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million.

    If this is simply a State tax, wouldn’t that just increase customer numbers of luxury car dealers in other States? You could enjoy driving it back to Victoria, or simply pay someone to do it for you.

  70. cohenite

    Eighteen metres above the ground in Melbourne’s north, a giant Jacinda Ardern wraps her arms around a woman in need of comfort.

    The mural on a silo at Tinning Street in Brunswick took nine days to paint — from sun up to sun down — as well as 25 litres of paint and it took its toll physically on artist Loretta Lizzio….

    “There’s so many people out there who treat other people like shit because they don’t understand their background, or where they come from,” Lizzio told news.com.au.

    “They should feel like they can walk down the street and not feel like they’re looked down upon. No matter who they are.

    “People say to me, ‘What about Sri Lanka?’ Or, ‘What about the Christians? Where’s their mural.’ Well, go crowdfund for it.”

    “My body is broken,” the 32-year-old told news.com.au from her home on the sunny Gold Coast.

    Her arms ache from the constant sweeping motion and her back is stiff from bending down to lift four litre cans all day long.

    But looking back at what she’s achieved, her heart is full.

    Partly because the image of the New Zealand Prime Minister dressed in a headscarf and hugging a grieving RoP woman after the Christchurch massacre means so much to her.

    So, the idiot painted the mural of the new zealandistan bint to bring people together and when people justifiably criticised her she told them to fuck off.

  71. Leigh Lowe

    Albo …

    “We were a good government that lost it’s way to the starting gates.”

  72. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    But what are the odds that traditional ALP voters in “lefty” professions (teaching and nursing) with negatively geared property or mum with a few CBA, Telstra or AMP shares, quietly ticked the LNP box, but wouldn’t dare breathe a word of their intention in the lunch room?

    Quite good odds on that, I would have thought. See the couple on the front page of today’s Oz.
    Life-long Labor oldies, put off by franking credit changes.

  73. duncanm

    Entropy
    #3025237, posted on May 25, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    Struth, do you know if there are any issues about putting a hobiecat onto lake Eyre? As in indigenous ones?

    Entropy — have you checked out the Lake Eyre Yacht Club ?

    Lots of info on their website, including current sailing conditions (primarily depth).

  74. Bruce of Newcastle

    The air was turned down so low I now have a roaring headcold.

    Volcanic climate change!

  75. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Back in Oz. Managed to be on the last plane out before the curfew.

    Wow. Calli’s Casablanca moment.

  76. Nick

    But what are the odds that traditional ALP voters in “lefty” professions (teaching and nursing) with negatively geared property or mum with a few CBA, Telstra or AMP shares, quietly ticked the LNP box, but wouldn’t dare breathe a word of their intention in the lunch room?

    Definitely. On the flip side. Harry Ergas coined a phrase this week about people who ‘live Right but vote Left’. They inhabit the goats’ cheese curtain (this is becoming an established term), have multi million dollar homes, European cars, travel overseas widely, though believe in open borders, sneering at the need for for places for them to live or more roads.

  77. Mark A

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #3025277, posted on May 25, 2019 at 3:22 pm

    Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million.

    If this is simply a State tax, wouldn’t that just increase customer numbers of luxury car dealers in other States? You could enjoy driving it back to Victoria, or simply pay someone to do it for you.

    Registering it would be in an other state too, complicate things as you only allowed to drive on an interstate rego for so long. I think it’s 6 months?

  78. Cohenite:

    Eighteen metres above the ground in Melbourne’s north, a giant Jacinda Ardern wraps her arms around a woman in need of comfort.

    Is the painter a Balsamic Painter?
    She appears to be wearing a head covering in the onsite photos.
    If that’s the case, then her motive is triumphalist – not conciliatory.

  79. Nick

    Instead, she said it became a target for some to sprout their racist views.

    Oh…

    “People say to me, ‘What about Sri Lanka?’ Or, ‘What about the Christians? Where’s their mural.’ Well, go crowdfund for it.”

    Using Sri Lanka as an example is now racist ? Wow.

  80. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Liberty Quote
    The lesson from Australia’s (2019) election isn’t that this country is right-wing but that it’s conservative — as in cautious.
    — Waleed Aly

    Never thought I’d see the day that the Liberty Quotes would include him, but there it is.

  81. cohenite

    Is the painter a Balsamic Painter?
    She appears to be wearing a head covering in the onsite photos.
    If that’s the case, then her motive is triumphalist – not conciliatory.

    Yep.

  82. Nick

    Liberty Quote
    The lesson from Australia’s (2019) election isn’t that this country is right-wing but that it’s conservative — as in cautious.
    — Waleed Aly

    It just shows they ain’t stupid. When Shorten says we are going to spend cash on climate change, but refuses to say how much, let alone what it will achieve, you can’t blame them for sniffing a rather large turd that they will pay for.

  83. calli

    Wow. Calli’s Casablanca moment.

    My mum, in her yoof, resembled Ingrid. Beautiful.

    Dad, however, is more like Bogey. I take after him.

  84. calli

    Lizio is not Balsamic, neither aged nor caramelised.

    I wonder if she’ll do a nice depiction of Sri Lankan Christians rebuilding their churches?

    A silo too far perhaps.

  85. Some History

    A “dispersal illustration”:

    https://imgur.com/Y2YmmWo

  86. Leigh Lowe

    Hello Roberto.
    Bass has disappeared from the “Close Seats” radar screen again!
    Margin out to 690 votes and the Liars on a 2PP 49.49%.
    The close seat criteria must be +/- 0.5%.
    Liars need a minimum 2PP of 55.5% from hear to tie. They are slightly under 50% on postals.

  87. RobK

    Der Spiegel laments the EU being undermined by Russia, the US and China. Still, an interesting perspective and some good graphics on immigration etc.
    https://m.spiegel.de/international/europe/european-right-wing-populists-eye-european-election-success-a-1269122.html

  88. Chris

    Does anyone have an approximate estimate of how many articles Mamamia, No Idea, Nein and Fewfacts had scheduled for this week, puffing up Chloe as the new Jackie Kennedy, which they had to toss in the bin?

    Don’t forget the Australian Weekend Lifestyle, equal to Fewfacts in its proclivities.

  89. Leigh Lowe

    hear = here.
    here, here.

  90. Leigh Lowe

    Don’t forget the Australian Weekend Lifestyle, equal to Fewfacts in its proclivities.

    Yep, wanker central.

  91. calli

    Recipes and knitting patterns too.

    Chothilde’s pies and pie warmers woulda been a big seller.

  92. jupes

    Never thought I’d see the day that the Liberty Quotes would include him, but there it is.

    You haven’t been paying attention.

    Waheely Bin is a favoured member of Sinc’s Turnbull fan club.

  93. jupes

    What we do know is that in the course of his inquiry, Brereton and staff from the IGADF have interviewed more than 220 witnesses, travelled to the US, Canada and Britain to seek advice on how similar allegations have been handled by Australia’s allies, and reached into Afghanistan in search of witnesses to potential criminal acts.

    Fucking treason.

    Back in the day, lawyers were only needed to prosecute the defeated enemy after victory celebrations. Now they spend YEARS looking for the enemy to dob in Australian soldiers while not prosecuting one single enemy in over a decade of war.

    It doesn’t get much more immoral than that.

  94. bespoke

    Wife’s been told she has influenza A. Few more day sleeping on the lounge, yay!

  95. jupes

    Does anyone have an approximate estimate of how many articles Mamamia, No Idea, Nein and Fewfacts had scheduled for this week, puffing up Chloe as the new Jackie Kennedy, which they had to toss in the bin?

    Either No Idea or Women’s Day had a headline this morning that Charles and Camilla had divorced!

    One would assume such dross is a quick replacement for a Chloe puff-piece.

  96. Colonel Crispin Berka

    You haven’t been paying attention.

    Guilty. I visit the Cat but I don’t live here.

    Waheely Bin is a favoured member of Sinc’s Turnbull fan club.

    Must be the yellow-top variety, since due to government subsidies all his opinions are destined to be recycled endlessly, despite costing more than original material.

  97. Struth

    Anyone considering going to lake Eyre wait a few more weeks.
    You have time.
    People at belt bay with boats have been disappointed.
    That’s what happens when you believe what the ABC beats up to help left wing politics.
    It’s coming down alright but you still have time.

    Flies etc are horrendous at Birdsville and down to about Lyndhurst.
    Get a net.
    Regards Lake Eyre Yacht club, they don’t hold races on it anymore and the usual suspects are trying to Lord it over people.
    (There is a sign at Belt bay telling people not to walk on the lake but nobody gives a shit)

    Bring ya boat in a few weeks and have fun.
    Even your indigenous cats!
    Personally, I am over flies in my life, and it’s typical of Australia.
    But I love the Flinders enough to make me put up with it.
    Oh and shoving our history down the throats of people that just don’t want to hear it!

  98. Boambee John

    I ask Numbers to apologise for verballing me, and point out that contrary to his allegation against me, I actually defended his Vietnam record, and he disappears up his own fundament.

    Gutless worm, worse that m0nty.

  99. Mother Lode

    Say what you like about the psephological integrity of Warringah (and I suspect Zali only got over the line mostly due to the booths North of The Spit) but our bottle-o’s are second to none.

    The bloke at Mosman Cellars remembered a casual shop conversation from months ago, and made a point of showing me a bottle of Farr Rising Gamay they had just got in stock. A straight Gamay too – none of your Pinot Noir added to add depth because the Gamay is lacking.

    Darker colour too, so it spent more time on the skins. I would not be surprised to find more tannins too. Farr Rising is a good vineyard, so I can expect they have thought about how to get the best from the fruit.

    I tried one from Pfeiffer a few years ago – wretched. Very light colour, and flavour to match. Sorrenberg is very good. But I have high hopes for this one.

    And he tells me Sorrenberg is coming out soon too.

    Zali’s gullible mates will probably want to ban it, I suppose. Alcohol and rape culture. It would be great for ScoMo to let word leak out that they are considering the Warringah Windfarm idea – force her to backtrack on her core position.

  100. Gilas

    Lot of feline dental gnashing over numbnutz’s false argumentation and verballing etc..

    That’s what happens to troll feeders.

    Serves youse bonza!

  101. Roberto

    Leigh Lowe
    #3025298, posted on May 25, 2019 at 4:03 pm
    Hello Roberto.
    Bass has disappeared from the “Close Seats” radar screen again!

    Yes, I agree. It looks very much like a +/- 0.5% threshold.

  102. Does anyone else have a problem with the sound on Fox news? Especially Tucker?

    Would have thought that sound problems on a Fox News cast could only be an improvement.

  103. Ellen of Tasmania

    This is an interview with the guy who wrote the ‘This Is Not a Daycare’ (re: Uni.) article that went viral and is now a book. Good man. Goes for 28 mins.

  104. And to think that a few weeks ago I defended his Vietnam service here. Ungrateful sod!

    I don’t post here for you to be grateful.
    I post to expose bullshit.
    It works a treat….

  105. Tintarella di Luna

    Finally have a new computer so can have a better look see here — was wondering if anyone has an update on the seat of Cowan and whether the terrorism expert has been given the shove? Thanks

  106. Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million.

    Poor petals…..

  107. Oh come on

    I’ve watched just about all of the Brexit Party rallies on YouTube, as well as many media pieces covering the party’s campaign. A couple of things have struck me. Firstly, the Brexit Party has really high calibre candidates. Secondly, and more interestingly, Donald Trump is *very* popular amongst your average leave-supporting Brit. His name always gets a hearty cheer from the crowds, and when the media interviews a bunch of Brexit Party rank-and-file, they uniformly profess their admiration for Trump.

    This is a really interesting phenomenon. Trump seems to be the most internationally popular GOP President in recent memory. And more consequential than Obama – foreigners liked Obama for the style, but they like Trump for the substance. They like his blunt America First approach – they want their leaders to unapologetically put their countries first, too.

    I was listening to a podcast awhile ago about the rise of nationalist sentiment in the Middle East. Not pan-Arab nationalism, but Saudis who want Saudi Arabia First and Egyptians who want Egypt First and so on. This is a phenomenon largely overlooked or misunderstood by Western commentators. Who are the sworn enemies of the ME nationalists? The Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamist organisations! Nationalists (correctly) view the objectives of the MB to be at odds with their own. They don’t want their countries subsumed to some Islamist caliphate. The Saudi people were, by and large, not particularly concerned about the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, for example. Khashoggi was a MB stooge, after all, and that’s what comes to such people.

    This new form of ME nationalism explains the popularity of leaders like President Sisi and MbS. It explains a willingness to establish friendlier ties with Israel, who is increasingly regarded as a reliable and necessary partner in the showdown with Iran that’s likely to come.

    Trump is also popular in the ME with the nationalists there. They like his America First rhetoric and stances, as they want the same for their own countries. Trump is also popular in Eastern Europe, and I suspect in other parts of the world where nationalist pride is surging and the globalist agenda and its assorted organisations are being rejected. No wonder Brexiteers are fond of Trump.

  108. Oh come on

    I’ve watched just about all of the Brexit Party rallies on YouTube, as well as many media pieces covering the party’s campaign. A couple of things have struck me. Firstly, the Brexit Party has really high calibre candidates. Secondly, and more interestingly, Donald Trump is *very* popular amongst your average leave-supporting Brit. His name always gets a hearty cheer from the crowds, and when the media interviews a bunch of Brexit Party rank-and-file, they uniformly profess their admiration for Trump.

    This is a really interesting phenomenon. Trump seems to be the most internationally popular GOP President in recent memory. And more consequential than Obama – foreigners liked Obama for the style, but they like Trump for the substance. They like his blunt America First approach – they want their leaders to unapologetically put their countries first, too.

    I was listening to a podcast awhile ago about the rise of nationalist sentiment in the Middle East. Not pan-Arab nationalism, but Saudis who want Saudi Arabia First and Egyptians who want Egypt First and so on. This is a phenomenon largely overlooked or misunderstood by Western commentators. Who are the sworn enemies of the ME nationalists? The Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamist organisations! Nationalists (correctly) view the objectives of the MB to be at odds with their own. They don’t want their countries subsumed to some Islamist caliphate. The Saudi people were, by and large, not particularly concerned about the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, for example. Khashoggi was a MB stooge, after all, and that’s what comes to such people.

    This new form of ME nationalism explains the popularity of leaders like President Sisi and MbS. It explains a willingness to establish friendlier ties with [email protected], which is increasingly regarded as a reliable and necessary partner in the showdown with Iran that’s likely to come.

    Trump is also popular in the ME with the nationalists there. They like his America First rhetoric and stances, as they want the same for their own countries. Trump is also popular in Eastern Europe, and I suspect in other parts of the world where nationalist pride is surging and the globalist agenda and its assorted organisations are being rejected. No wonder Brexiteers are fond of Trump.

  109. Notafan

    Land tax on the tennis court next door.

    Balwyn greenies say ouch.

  110. Leigh Lowe

    Tinta.
    The terrorist in Cowan leads by 833 votes with 82% counted.
    Seat is roughly 98,000 voters so could be a lot more to come.
    Libs picking up 55% of postals, so I expect it to be classified as “close” sometime soon.

    Not sure if it will be enough to unseat her.

  111. Leigh Lowe

    Sorry, that should read “terrorist expert”.

  112. Tintarella di Luna

    Thanks Leigh Lowe been really really snowed under at work and with some rather serious problems with the my youngest — it’s said that the meaning is in the suffering but I do wish for less meaning at times —

  113. Tintarella di Luna

    Sorry, that should read “terrorist expert”.

    Easy to miss out words when typing fast

  114. Eyrie

    “Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million.”
    Should just raise rego on sports cars to $2000 p.a.

  115. RobK

    Ungrateful sod!

    I don’t post here for you to be grateful.


    ??? Wtf. Never mind.

  116. Mater

    ??? Wtf. Never mind.

    Thought the same thing, RobK, but I’m still spinning out from the I deferred/I didn’t defer/both statements are correct debacle.

    He’s in a parallel universe.

  117. Knuckle Dragger

    jupes, 4.14 pm;

    ‘Fucking treason’

    Exactly.

    This will, no doubt, at some point be about aghast pogos getting teary because troopers on return from a patrol emptied a bag of severed hands on the desk so they could be fingerprinted. To identify known terrorists, recently given their 72 raisins by said troopers.

    Well darlings, if you know a better way to identify punters you kill whilst doing your job I’d like to know what it is. DNA can be easily cross-contaminated, and a retina scan will naturally require the removal of eyes from sockets.

    Unless, of course, you take the entire head. Which would be too heavy, seeing as how you’re carrying almost your own weight on your back. So – hands it is.

    One of the many things this cavalcade of fanta-pants window-lickers fail to understand is that the ‘rules of engagement’ are bullshit. The baddies don’t use them, so neither should we.

    And don’t start crying about sinking to their level, and that’s why we’re the good guys. You do what you have to to win. And maybe some more, so they’ll be so terrified of you that you won’t have to win again.

    They should have given the enquiry to Dermot Brereton. He’d have wrapped up the whole thing before his first coat of hair gel dried.

  118. Tintarella di Luna

    Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million

    Is that the fuel-efficient threshold? if not what is the non-fuel efficient threshold

  119. Bruce of Newcastle

    “Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million.”

    Ouch!
    Tesla S: $105,000 – $250,000
    Tesla X: $150,000 – $260,000
    How dare he tax Gaia’s holy chariots like that!

  120. Knuckle Dragger

    Mole,

    Glad that anecdote was of service!

    I remain, as always, a man of the people, for the people.

    Except Greens and MX5 drivers.

  121. Boambee John

    1735099
    #3025319, posted on May 25, 2019 at 4:53 pm
    And to think that a few weeks ago I defended his Vietnam service here. Ungrateful sod!

    I don’t post here for you to be grateful.

    You should read more carefully. Actually, I was hoping that you would show some gratitude, by apologising for falsely verballing me, however, it seems that humility is beyond you.

  122. calli

    They’ll be exempt, BoN.

  123. Aly – 50.5%; Stewart – 49.5% – one hour ago, with 81.9% counted.
    This was the seat of Graeme Edwards, (ex 7 RAR) who lost his legs in a mine incident on 12 May 1970.
    He went on to hold the seat for Labor from 1998 until 2007.
    The electorate was named in honour of Edith Dircksey Cowan OBE, 1861–1932. Cowan was the first woman elected to any Parliament in Australia, state or Commonwealth, when she was elected in 1921 as the Member for West Perth in the Western Australian Legislative Assembly.

  124. Tintarella di Luna

    I see that gob-shite Jane Caro was accurately depicted and easily recognisable in Zanetti’s cartoon today. He’s a very good cartoonist unlike the indecipherable sketches in vomit done by David Crowe.

  125. You should read more carefully. Actually, I was hoping that you would show some gratitude, by apologising for falsely verballing me, however, it seems that humility is beyond you.

    You should be grateful that I post here, raising the tone, calling bullshit, and providing a counterpoint.
    This site would simply be a boring echo chamber without my input.
    I am verballed daily.
    If I insisted on an apology every time that happened, there’d be nothing else on the thread.

  126. RobK

    This was the seat of Graeme Edwards, (ex 7 RAR) 
    A good bloke and able politician.

  127. Bruce in WA

    If this is simply a State tax, wouldn’t that just increase customer numbers of luxury car dealers in other States? You could enjoy driving it back to Victoria, or simply pay someone to do it for you.

    This was raised a couple of years back and our State Treasurer threatened a “punishment tax” on any car bought in other states and re-registered in WA.

  128. Tintarella di Luna

    A good bloke and able politician.

    Fact check: True

  129. Bruce in WA

    Hope this works …

    That’s not a hailstorm … THIS is a hailstorm!!

    https://www.facebook.com/100007647735454/videos/2275174622747440/

  130. RobK

    You should be grateful that I post here,
    Wow.

  131. A good bloke and able politician.

  132. Leigh Lowe

    RobK

    #3025341, posted on May 25, 2019 at 5:26 pm

    This was the seat of Graeme Edwards, (ex 7 RAR) 
    A good bloke and able politician.

    Pity the current time-server is an apologist moron.

  133. Tintarella di Luna

    Article in the Australian today: A good man is harder to find

    The drought is real: where are all the solid Aussie blokes who are churchgoing, single and worldly wise?

    Asks Anna Hitchings — I think the answer is they’re all transitioning given that career advancement is apparently tied to vaginas

  134. A good bloke and able politician.

    Who eloquently described Wilson Tuckey once thus in 2003 –

    “Mate, I think he’s a disgrace,” Edwards says. “As far as I’m concerned, he’s just a bloody big coward. Anyone who makes a name for himself on the basis of having someone else hold a person down while you hit them is, in my books, a dingo”.

  135. Knuckle Dragger

    Breakfast television, once again dealing with the big issues.

    The latest one – women need more public toilets than men. This has been identified as a ‘public toilet gender gap’. Discussion ensued on same.

    The ladees should just follow the age-old country race meet tradition, and use the mens’ anyway.

  136. Leigh Lowe

    I see that gob-shite Jane Caro was accurately depicted and easily recognisable in Zanetti’s cartoon today. He’s a very good cartoonist unlike the indecipherable sketches in vomit done by David Crowe.

    The essence of caricature is to capture and exaggerate unique identifying characteristics with a few deft strokes.
    Leak was a master of that.
    Rowe’s stuff is grossly overwrought in style, the subject matter is usually tedious and predictable.
    Not to mention his obsession with naked men.

  137. Mater

    Gee, and only 32 minutes apart.

    1735099
    #3025319, posted on May 25, 2019 at 4:53 pm
    I don’t post here for you to be grateful

    1735099
    #3025340, posted on May 25, 2019 at 5:25 pm
    You should be grateful that I post here

  138. egg_

    Anyway, the conclusions drawn by Crabb are predictable. It wasn’t really a rejection of taking action on climate change – just don’t scare people too much because they’re not sophisticated enough to understand why they ought to lose their livelihoods to mollify Gaia.

    Meaning, the Left have to up their hysteria and the lying about the AGW scam if they want to glean enough votes from the gullible punters. All this while the green costs of just living are rising to everyday families.I mean, it’s worked so well for them. Let’s hope Albo takes heed of Crabbe.

    Don’t our resident journos refer to Ms Crapp as a junior reporter raised above her station?

  139. memoryvault

    Forget it Boambee John and ignore him.
    Twice I’ve written in his defence and both times he kicked me in the teeth by way of thanks.
    Simply ignore the prick, don’t give him the attention he craves.
    It’s the only reason he comes here and does it.

  140. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Gutless worm, worse that m0nty.

    people really need to stop feeding the cowardly troll

  141. Bruce of Newcastle

    The latest one – women need more public toilets than men. This has been identified as a ‘public toilet gender gap’. Discussion ensued on same.

    Aren’t all toilets unisex by now? We should report all monosex toilets to the HRC.

  142. John64

    How dare he tax Gaia’s holy chariots like that!

    I’m pretty sure I heard EVs are exempt.

  143. min

    Numbers in my second career I treated PTSD from a wide variety of circumstances, .for example , a WWII mortar attack to bank robberies to witnessing a horrible car accident. Sometimes the symptoms do not appear until triggered by another event not necessarily one that would be thought of as traumatic. A very dear friend , had survived a tank incident in Vietnam did not suffer until triggered by another incident in his 50s . I referred him onto a colleague.
    Anyway just explaining perhaps you should talk to someone if vietnam issues are bothering you ,even though not connected with a trauma.

  144. BrettW

    I see the “regular” Vietnam veteran imposter is still droning on.

    Hates being forced to go to Vietnam but happy to mislead people into thinking he was a regular. Not only that actually thinks there is nothing wrong with his fakery.

  145. egg_

    ‘This Is Not a Daycare’ (re: Uni.)

    Love the quote “this time Marxism/Socialism will work!”.
    Sounds like Labor’s post election mantra from Ms Crapp.

  146. P

    Article in the Australian today: A good man is harder to find –

    The drought is real: where are all the solid Aussie blokes who are churchgoing, single and worldly wise?

    Phillippa Martyr: Be in love with God first
    The Catholic Weekly, May 9, 2019

    Anna Hitchings (‘For want of a lot of good men’, Catholic Weekly, 2 May 2019)
    has Biblically left the best till last. I will start where she finished:
    “… if you shift your aim to perfecting the life you have, rather than chasing after the one you imagine, you won’t lose your way. For where your treasure is, there is your heart also.”

  147. John64

    I think I’ll watch Ol’ Leathery’s Sunday morning offering tomorrow.

    Bawwie had it all worked out; four weeks of crowing about one more Liars win and the start of the Shortenreich before putting the cue in the rack on 9th June and riding off into his defined-benefits, index-linked superannuated sunset.

    Instead of crowing; he’ll be eating crow.

    #winning

  148. Anyway just explaining perhaps you should talk to someone if vietnam issues are bothering you ,even though not connected with a trauma.

    “Vietnam issues” as you call them, seem to bother those posting here a great deal.
    It’s like poking a nest of ants.
    Perhaps those reacting so strongly with abuse and threats are the people who need counselling.
    But thanks for your concern….

  149. memoryvault

    Good evening Mrs P.
    Been a while since our paths crossed here.

  150. BoN:

    The latest one – women need more public toilets than men. This has been identified as a ‘public toilet gender gap’. Discussion ensued on same.

    Aren’t all toilets unisex by now? We should report all monosex toilets to the HRC.

    Perhaps if the girls stopped using the ‘blow dry’ and ‘fluff’ cycle, there would be more time for toileting, eh?

  151. RobK

    P,
    “… if you shift your aim to perfecting the life you have, rather than chasing after the one you imagine, you won’t lose your way. “
    This is sage advice to our energy policy too, especially regarding the electricity grid.

  152. Fleeced

    Aren’t all toilets unisex by now? We should report all monosex toilets to the HRC.

    They should be…

    Best public* toilets I used (something I avoid) were just a bank of unisex “accessible” toilets (that’s what they call disabled toilets, now). Make all public toilets like that, and everyone will get onboard with the unisex bandwagon.

    *private public toilets – the public in this case being customers, not general public. Council/government run public toilets just shouldn’t exist.

  153. memoryvault

    min
    #3025361, posted on May 25, 2019 at 5:51 pm

    Min, Numbers just needs someone he can talk to on his own intellectual level.
    Maybe we could all club in and get him a yellow crested cockatoo?
    They can be very talkative.

  154. Mark A

    I’ve only been reading the cat for about 5 years and before the arrival of numbers, I can’t recall any post referring to Vietnam in general and none to the war in particular.

    However, I have encountered numbers on other blogs, even on kae’s and the issue of conscription and Vietnam inevitable came up.

    So who is obsessed here with Vietnam issues?

  155. Knuckle Dragger

    At least the cocky wouldn’t forget the lies it told, then try to paper them over, then point to something else.

    I’ll chip in, as long as you blokes teach it to say ‘lock and load’ first.

  156. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’m pretty sure I heard EVs are exempt.

    Doesn’t really matter anyway. Tesla, like Venezuela, now can’t afford toilet paper.

    Not A Square To Spare: Tesla Cost Cuts Wipe Toilet Paper From Some Facilities (24 May)

    Tesla, which is a $35 billion company (on paper), is now refusing to provide toilet paper for its employees at some locations. After Elon Musk’s email days ago about “hardcore” cost cutting, and the company literally pulling every lever that it possibly can to try and cut costs, electrek is now reporting that the result is some employees not being provided with toilet paper. Sounds like a very futuristic place to work, perhaps they should consider the name “Beyond Toilet Paper”.

    Maybe this could be discussed on breakfast television too. I wonder how many women work in those facilities?

  157. memoryvault

    Well done Mark and Knuckle DRagger. That’s the way.
    Talk about him all you like – just don’t actually address him directly.

  158. Knuckle Dragger

    That can’t be right Bruce. Electric cars are the future. Bob Brown said so.

    Why, an electric car company that could survive on its own merit without subsidies……….

    Well, that’s just silly.

  159. Tel

    Tesla, like Venezuela, now can’t afford toilet paper.

    As an employee who has been in and out of various occupations … I can tell you it’s never a good sign when the boss starts cutting down on amenities. Time to get your resume up to date and start subscribing your email to those annoying jobs boards.

    With Telsa now it’s more a matter of when it goes under and how.

  160. 2dogs

    What did you think twodogs

    My solution for the global problem is Fair Borders, not Open Borders:

    1. Nations should form on the basis of freedom of association. All separatists are accommodated.
    2. The territory of the Earth should be fairly allocated among all nations.

    As well as solving many other problems, it fixes the refugee issue – we don’t let them in (which would deny the freedom of association to the local citizenry), we give them their own nation, free from the oppression where they came from.

  161. zyconoclast

    MV

    Any updates on your 2019 Newsletter?

  162. memoryvault

    The other great problem with EV’s – in this country at least – is that they need electricity.
    At the moment we’re struggling to keep the lights on, let alone power cars.

  163. memoryvault

    Any updates on your 2019 Newsletter?

    Progressing.

  164. bespoke

    we give them their own nation, free from the oppression where they came from.

    How do you that without taking land from others?

  165. Empire 5:5

    I don’t post here for you to be grateful.
    I post to expose bullshit.
    It works a treat….

    So true, in much the same way that a shit sandwich is a gourmet dessert. It’s just a matter of closing your eyes, pinching your snoz and suspending disbelief.

    Buon appetito!

  166. Knuckle Dragger

    Or, 2dogs, and hear me out here:

    We say to the refugees, leave your filthy oppression and culture you’re escaping at the door (a practice successfully used by some migrants since 1945) – and if you want your own nation, feel free to try and take a bit of this one by force and see how far you get.

    The earth is owned by those who own the different bits of it. Fairly self-allocated, if you like. If you want to live in a better bit of the earth, play friendly with its owners or fuck off back to your shit bit.

  167. Empire 5:5

    the other great problem with EV’s – in this country at least – is that they need electricity.
    At the moment we’re struggling to keep the lights on, let alone power cars

    Mel CBD grid is already dicey.

  168. Knuckle Dragger

    And – I don’t give a rat’s what other nations do. I do care about what this one does.

    Your unicorn reality has a whole pile of similarities to the EU.

  169. 2dogs

    How do you that without taking land from others?

    As I said,

    2. The territory of the Earth should be fairly allocated among all nations.

    Those nations that are over-endowed with territory have the obligation to surrender it.

  170. Farmer Gez

    “Those in the market for luxury cars worth upward of $100,000 will be hit by a duty increase form July 1, expected to raise $260 million.”

    Ouch!
    Tesla S: $105,000 – $250,000
    Tesla X: $150,000 – $260,000
    How dare he tax Gaia’s holy chariots like that!

    Andrews isn’t taxing rich wankers in their 12 volt virtue wagons.
    Only petrol and diesels get the tax whack.

  171. urb

    *Katrina was adopted and, now aged 50, she has just changed her name back to a “slightly altered” version of her birth name. She explains all that here (paywalled).

    as an adoptee myself i find her thoughts on this very interesting as i have never, ever looked at it all in this way

  172. Mitch M.

    Sometimes the symptoms do not appear until triggered by another event not necessarily one that would be thought of as traumatic. A very dear friend , had survived a tank incident in Vietnam did not suffer until triggered by another incident in his 50s . I referred him onto a colleague.
    Anyway just explaining perhaps you should talk to someone if vietnam issues are bothering you ,even though not connected with a trauma.

    That’s interesting min. A friend of mine is involved in treatment of vets with PTSD and said something strange to me: he estimated over half are smoking pot. Some even give up the meds for the pot and that makes them worse. I’m mystified why they would smoke pot because THC can exacerbate anxiety. Have you noticed the same and do you have any ideas why they would give up the meds for pot?

  173. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘have the obligation to surrender it’

    Or what?

  174. bespoke

    Those nations that are over-endowed with territory have the obligation to surrender it.

    And what part of Australia would NZ get?

  175. 2dogs

    The earth is owned by those who own the different bits of it.

    I’m more inclined to believe that everyone has an equal claim to sovereignty.

    I say sovereignty as opposed to wealth, that is the product of labour, and therefore wealth is something earned.

    If you consider that sovereignty is also something which is somehow earned, what is the just means of acquiring it?

  176. zyconoclast

    I hope they win the challenge.

    Orthodox J00ws protest opening of women-only London pond to trans swimmers
    J00wish religious bathers, who shun immodest dress in the presence of men, expected to join jvdicial review challenge against the City of London’s decision on Hampstead Heath site

  177. Roger

    If you consider that sovereignty is also something which is somehow earned, what is the just means of acquiring it?

    Power. It has ever been thus, just or not.

  178. memoryvault

    Those nations that are over-endowed with territory
    have the obligation to surrender it.

    “From each according to his means, to each according to his needs”.

    Because it’s worked so well every time it’s been tried.

  179. zyconoclast

    From 2016

    Demand surges for clinicians serving transgender youth — and for earlier treatment

    LOS ANGELES — Pediatrician Dr. Johanna Olson-Kennedy uses a stethoscope and otoscope, of course. But running a clinic for transgender youth means her pediatric medical supplies also include a selection of silicone p3nises and chest-flattening binders.

    Her youngest patient is 3.

  180. Knuckle Dragger

    Jesus Christ 2dogs.

    You do the same thing that humans have done for tens of thousands of years.

    You take it by force of conquest. Which is earned. I’ll be damned if I’m giving up by tiny little bit of KD country because some faceless bozo decrees that some nitwit hut dweller who hasn’t even sat on chairs before is more entitled to it than me.

    Which brings me to – who allocates land in 2dogs World? Is there a formula? A matrix of some kind? The Duckworth-Lewis system?

    It is clear you’re one of these Citizens of the Earth lunatics. Earthians, if you like.

  181. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘my tiny little bit’

    Jeez.

  182. bespoke

    Not all land is equal, 2dogs how do you get around that?

  183. Mark A

    If you consider that sovereignty is also something which is somehow earned, what is the just means of acquiring it?

    You are obviously not going to agree, but to answer your question;
    Usually a bigger, better gun or more soldiers than the previous owners.

  184. 2dogs

    Power. It has ever been thus, just or not.

    I see your position, but it would make the Islamic theocrats entirely justified in their brutality.

  185. Roger

    Jesus Christ 2dogs.

    Since Jesus eschewed the power of the sword, I suggest he’s best left out of this, KD.

  186. 2dogs

    Not all land is equal, 2dogs how do you get around that?

    Fair by value.

  187. RobK

    2dogs,
    I think that scheme will need a bit more work.

  188. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    And what part of Australia would NZ get?

    Toowoomba.

  189. bespoke

    1. Nations should form on the basis of freedom of association. All separatists are accommodated.

    Somalia?

  190. 2dogs

    You take it by force of conquest. Which is earned.

    I refuse to accept that those who spread misery and bloodshed are entitled to any reward.

  191. Mark A

    2dogs
    #3025416, posted on May 25, 2019 at 6:48 pm

    You take it by force of conquest. Which is earned.

    I refuse to accept that those who spread misery and bloodshed are entitled to any reward.

    I may be wrong but this is not the 2dogs I recall from my traveling the blogs.

    Have you got religion?

  192. 2dogs

    It is clear you’re one of these Citizens of the Earth lunatics.

    Absolutely not. I despise multiculturalism. My scheme ends it. I quite like my culture and would like it preserved. I would rather it lost territory than lost its unique character.

  193. Arky

    All resources on Earth should be reallocated every 50 years, by lottery.
    Followed by ten years of intense warfare.

  194. Knuckle Dragger

    2dogs. Seriously.

    Your Wiki link to the fair cake cutting example, which says it’s still being researched, already assumes that some people won’t be happy with their proportion of the cake.

    Back here in Reality Land, people are already unhappy with their portion of the cake. We stop these greedy bastards by deterrence – ie, try and take my more delicious slice of cake and I will kill you, which if done also has the added bonus of scaring other people away from my cake, or part thereof.

    People, because they’re humans, will always want more cake than they have and will ultimately resort to force of arms to take it. (For cake, read: land, money, resources and power.) It’s wired in our systems.

    You’re probably a big fan of Lennon’s ‘Imagine’. That’s a load of shit as well.

  195. memoryvault

    I refuse to accept that those who spread misery
    and bloodshed are entitled to any reward.

    You are probably right, 2dogs.
    Unfortunately “entitlement” doesn’t come into it.
    Not even close. Never has. Never will.

  196. mh

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    1h
    Can’t believe that Rolling Thunder would be given a hard time with permits in Washington, D.C. They are great Patriots who I have gotten to know and see in action. They love our Country and love our Flag. If I can help, I will!

  197. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘I refuse to accept that those who spread misery and bloodshed are entitled to any reward’

    Bad luck, bub. We’re stuck with it. More accurately, you’re stuck with it.

    The punters who do this, do so because they want your stuff. Fairness has nothing to do with it. You’re either strong enough to keep your stuff from other punters that want it, or you’re not.

    It’s that simple.

  198. How about those who leave their country because it’s a shithole, get sent right back and told to fight to make it a not shithole.
    It’s what we had to do – fight for our country, our land, and our culture.
    We’re better off for it.

  199. memoryvault

    I may be wrong but this is not the 2dogs I recall from my traveling the blogs.

    Any chance Numbers is moonlighting with a borrowed identity?
    There would be different email addresses.
    Any way to check?

  200. 2dogs

    All resources on Earth should be reallocated every 50 years, by lottery.

    I am in no way suggesting capital or wealth by redistributed. That stuff is earned.

    But sovereignty is something else.

    Let me point out that democracy also assigns everyone equal sovereignty.

  201. 2dogs

    I may be wrong but this is not the 2dogs I recall from my traveling the blogs.

    I think you find I have always been polyarchist. Google, say, FOCJ and Catallaxy Files and you will invariably see 2dogs right beside the comment.

    This is also not the first time I have proposed this particular solution on this site.

  202. Harlequin Decline

    Down in Adelaide at the moment. Stopped in Narrandera on the way to Hay and took a look at some historical panels which explains why it never made it as a tourist town-

    Typhus and smallpox killed off 25% of the population in 5 years from 1878, half of them children.
    A grasshopper plague in 1899 was so bad the trains couldn’t operate due to the crushed grasshoppers on the tracks and horses had trouble walking.
    Rabbit plagues that never went away until myxomatosis in 1957.
    30 feet floods in 1870 and 1974

  203. 2dogs

    How about those who leave their country because it’s a shithole, get sent right back and told to fight to make it a not shithole.

    Certainly, the fact that people are leaving the shithole makes the shithole itself less entitled to sovereign lands.

  204. Mark A

    2dogs
    #3025429, posted on May 25, 2019 at 7:03 pm

    This is also not the first time I have proposed this particular solution on this site.

    Right you are, I must have missed a lot of your relevant posts.

  205. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘democracy also assigns everyone equal sovereignty’

    Subject to certain conditions, yes, but most importantly within your own country’s borders.

    I might like mountains. I have no mountains of my own. I have zero, nil, no right at all to take over a bit of some Nepalese farmer’s block he’s had for generations so I can have (or at least see) mountains.

    To suggest otherwise would be, well, stupid.

    Speaking of force of conquest, I’m going to the pub. Bloody hell.

  206. Roger

    And what part of Australia would NZ get?

    Toowoomba.

    The locals would not abide the prospect of being governed by a Socialist hijabi.

    Melbourne, surely.

  207. 2dogs

    Or what?

    Subject to certain conditions, yes, but most importantly within your own country’s borders.

    I would hope that such a scheme would be phased in by existing countries first using federal structures within their borders to adopt it.

  208. Percy Popinjay

    Just in – a picture of an animated Josh Frydchickenberger celebrating last week’s against the odds Gliberal election triumph.

  209. Knuckle Dragger

    Actually, I might be able to give 2dogs a bit of a chop out.

    The 2dogs system says all land on Earth must be fairly allocated.

    Therefore, there must be someone to determine who and what is fair.

    And to solve 2dogs’ problem, I hereby propose that that person be me.

    Job done, and thank your mother for the fairly-acquired rabbits. KD I, God Emperor will now leave the building.

  210. Empire 5:5

    One may have individual sovereignty but no title to land. Or vice versa. Or neither.

    Collective coercion, typically the state, determines the paradigm for most individuals.

    Propaganda, guns and money buy sovereignty for some.

  211. Black Ball

    Can’t wait for this round of AFL to be over. Yes it’s nice to acknowledge black players and their deeds, but I thought this acknowledgement was processed as ticket sales to watch them play. Would pay to see Franklin, an all time great. Once the caravan moves on, will there be change in the living standards of blacks across the country? Gil McLaughlin looks thrilled with the Long Walk, forced to take leave of his cushy warmth of the MCC Long Room. Apparently according to Aunty Annette, footy has been played for thousands of years. FMD.

  212. John Constantine

    https://www.createdigital.org.au/emergency-australia-fuel-needs/

    Greater diversification of supply is also important, Blackburn believes.

    “We’re actually buying fuel from the Chinese Government. So, if we had a problem with the Chinese Government … they can switch off 25 per cent of our aviation fuel, tomorrow.

    “Energy is the lifeblood of our society and I’m sure that even if Australians had to pay an extra few cents per litre — not a tax but instead a security resilience guarantee — they would happily do so.”

    Non-conventional hydrocarbons have bought Trumps America to the point they could get by if an oil embargo was launched.

    Australia could do big state tax and spend, or just allow the market to explore and develop what we have.

    Their american left dream of banning fracking to progress their revolutionary struggle.

    Comrades.

  213. 2dogs

    Therefore, there must be someone to determine who and what is fair.

    Not necessarily someone, it only needs generally accepted rules.

    The precise detail might be arguable, have grey areas, etc., but I think there would still be a broad consensus that would form as to which nations are over-endowed. Even if different calculation methods were used, they would still have a lot of correlation in their results.

    The moral duty upon the those nations that were broadly accepted as over-endowed would be then to make territory available to new nations. Better to choose which territory to surrender now, then lose territory not of your choosing later.

  214. 2dogs

    Collective coercion, typically the state, determines the paradigm for most individuals.

    Propaganda, guns and money buy sovereignty for some.

    But not justly so.

  215. Percy Popinjay

    footy has been played for thousands of years. FMD

    Craig Forster uncovered evidence that our beloved indigenes were playing a brand of football known locally as “wogaballiri”* well before Yerpian** settlers arrived on this continent.

    *Sounds a lot like “wogball”, dunnit?

    **Yerp: Continent west of Asia and north of Africa.

  216. bespoke

    You have decide what is a nation first.

  217. Percy Popinjay

    footy has been played for thousands of years. FMD

    Craig Forster uncovered evidence that our beloved indigenes were playing a brand of football known locally as “w#gaballiri”* well before Yerpian** settlers arrived on this continent.

    *Sounds a lot like “w#gball”, dunnit?

    **Yerp: Continent west of Asia and north of Africa.

  218. Percy Popinjay

    Grate. Double U O Gee is now a banned word on this site.

    FFS.

  219. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Her youngest patient is 3.

    And the parents are? What’s the bet on some sort of lefties?
    Poor child.

  220. 2dogs

    “From each according to his means, to each according to his needs”.

    Because it’s worked so well every time it’s been tried.

    Absolutely not.

    In fact, under my scheme, socialists would starve. Because no actually productive person would choose to be in the same country as one.

  221. Empire 5:5

    bespoke
    #3025452, posted on May 25, 2019 at 7:31 pm
    You have decide what is a nation first.

    Essential.

  222. mh

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    1h
    Getting ready to land in Japan with First Lady Melania. We look forward to seeing everyone soon!🇺🇸🇯🇵

  223. memoryvault

    Not necessarily someone, it only needs generally accepted rules.

    And when “someone” doesn’t abide by the “generally accepted rules”?
    What happens then? We collectively give them a thumbs down and cry out “shame on you”?

    Sorry 2dogs, but you’re living in fantasyland.
    The rest of us understand and accept reality.

  224. 2dogs

    You have decide what is a nation first.

    My “freedom of association” point didn’t cut it there?

  225. Bruce of Newcastle

    Typhus and smallpox killed off 25% of the population in 5 years from 1878, half of them children.

    Then there’s 2019.

    Dr. Drew Pinsky warns Los Angeles could be at risk of a deadly epidemic this summer (24 May)

    “I want to give you a prediction here. There will be a major infectious disease epidemic this summer in Los Angeles.”

    Pinsky described to Kilmeade what he believes to be the almost medieval conditions in the City of Angels and compared local politicians to Nero, the infamous Roman Emperor who allegedly fiddled while his nation burned.

    “We have tens and tens of thousands of people living in tents. Horrible conditions. Sanitation. Rats have taken over the city. We’re the only city in the country, Los Angeles, without a rodent control program. We have multiple rodent-borne, flea-borne illnesses, plague, typhus. We’re gonna have louse-borne illness. If measles breaks into that population, we have tuberculosis exploding. Literally, our politicians are like Nero. It’s worse than Nero,” Pinsky said.

    Plague, typhus, measles and TB. Which millenium are we in, exactly?

  226. bespoke

    My “freedom of association” point didn’t cut it there?

    No

  227. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Typhus and smallpox killed off 25% of the population in 5 years from 1878, half of them children.
    A grasshopper plague in 1899 was so bad the trains couldn’t operate due to the crushed grasshoppers on the tracks and horses had trouble walking.
    Rabbit plagues that never went away until myxomatosis in 1957.
    30 feet floods in 1870 and 1974

    Obviously all due to runaway climate change. Any schoolchild could tell you that.

    Ooops. Forgot to look at the dates.

  228. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Plague, typhus, measles and TB. Which millenium are we in, exactly?

    Climate change, obviously. Any schoolchild could tell you that too.

  229. Mark A

    2dogs
    #3025460, posted on May 25, 2019 at 7:36 pm

    You have decide what is a nation first.

    My “freedom of association” point didn’t cut it there?

    So, unless you put a minimum number of “associates” there could be literally tens of thousands of ‘nations’ claiming land?

  230. Struth

    Geez 2dogs.
    I didn’t think you were quite such a knob.
    Got
    Nievity much?

    Someone’s cumming my lord , Kumbaya.

  231. min

    Mitch M , I am now retired but once PTSD was acknowledged in DSM , trained in therapies the help deal with symptoms. One I trained in,EMDR, back when Hawke was still prime minister, I see that it is back in fashion with it now being used for paramedics etc. In the early days we trained in Critical Incident when psychs were sent in very early in the situation ,eg bank robberies to manage problems, however subsequently found that outcomes were not positive so not used anymore .
    As for marijuana , often used even before PTSD a diagnosis , a self medication just as alcohol is also used . Anxiety extremely prevalent these days and many cannot afford therapy .

  232. memoryvault

    But not justly so.

    And so we have come full circle. So I ask again –
    “Who” decides what is “just”?
    And even more importantly, “who” enforces it?
    And how?

  233. 2dogs

    What happens then? We collectively give them a thumbs down and cry out “shame on you”?

    Yeah, pretty much. Sanctions will do it.

    If a rogue state is small, it is unlikely to be over-endowed. If a state is over-endowed, it’s economy will be more focused on commodities, make it sensitive to trade actions.

  234. Mitch M.

    Mitch M , I am now retired but once PTSD was acknowledged in DSM , trained in therapies the help deal with symptoms. One I trained in,EMDR, back when Hawke was still prime minister, I see that it is back in fashion with it now being used for paramedics etc. In the early days we trained in Critical Incident when psychs were sent in very early in the situation ,eg bank robberies to manage problems, however subsequently found that outcomes were not positive so not used anymore .
    As for marijuana , often used even before PTSD a diagnosis , a self medication just as alcohol is also used . Anxiety extremely prevalent these days and many cannot afford therapy .

    Thanks Min.

  235. Top Ender

    Turning history on its head
    Bruce Pascoe’s long-running conflict with academia accidentally turned him into our most influential indigenous historian.

    By RICHARD GUILLIATT

    Bruce Pascoe likes to tell a good yarn, and one of his better ones concerns the time that his long-running conflict with academia accidentally turned him into our most influential indigenous historian. This was eight or nine years ago, not long after ­Pascoe began vehemently proclaiming that generations of ­Australians had been duped by their history books into the false belief that Aboriginal people were ­nothing more than spear-throwing nomads before white colonisers arrived here. In fact, he said, ­Aborigines cultivated crops, built large ­villages and devised sophisticated dams and ­aquaculture ­systems — achievements Australians were so ignorant of that the country was like “an innocent baby” with a paper bag over its head.

    At the time he was lobbing these polemical bombs, Pascoe was best known as a writer of ­fiction and a publisher, pursuits he had subsidised over many decades by working variously as a tourist guide, dairy farmer and fencer. His broadsides against the history profession, he recalls, came to the attention of a group of academics in Canberra who were sufficiently concerned to invite him to an off-campus meeting at one of their homes. Pascoe remembers arriving there in his second-hand ute, having driven to the nation’s capital from his home four hours away in the remote Victorian town of Gipsy Point in East Gippsland. “They said, ‘Look, we don’t want you talking to our students about this stuff, because it’s wrong, it didn’t ­happen’,” he says. “‘You’re talking about agriculture, but that didn’t happen. Aboriginal people were hunter-gatherers’.”

    Pascoe is hazy on the identity of these eminent professors, but remembers that they slapped him over the wrist with utmost civility. “Cup of tea, lovely conversation — nice people, actually. But when I left that meeting, I got in my old beaten-up ute, and I was furious.” He says he drove straight to a second-hand bookstore and plonked down $8 for a copy of the journals of 19th-century explorer Sir Thomas Mitchell, which he cracked open while sitting in the driver’s seat. There his eyes fell on Mitchell’s eyewitness account of Aboriginal ­villages in Queensland housing more than a ­thousand people, and “haycocks” of harvested seed-grass stretching for miles, drying in the sun to make flour for native bread. It was then he knew he had his next book. “I have to thank that group of academics,” he says wryly. Because ­without their intervention, he might never have written his one and only bestseller.

    Pascoe’s slim tome, Dark Emu, first published in 2014 by a small non-profit press, has become the unlikeliest nonfiction hit in the country. Subtitled Black Seeds: Agriculture or Accident?, it has sold more than 100,000 copies, won Book of the Year at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards and is coming soon to a classroom near you. In it, Pascoe argues that the true history of pre-colonial Australia was hidden away for more than 150 years. Not only did Aborigines invent democracy, pioneer humankind’s first complex fishing systems and bake the first loaf of bread, they were agriculturalists with skills superior to those of the white colonisers who took their land and despoiled it.

    It’s a sweepingly revisionist view, one that still gets some eminent professors very hot under the collar. But it has so captured the public imagination that the book is now in its 28th printing and has launched Pascoe on a publicity tour without end, a white-bearded 72-year-old enjoying a late-life flush of fame and influence. His optimistic vision of indigenous culture as a balm for a world beset by ecological and political calamity has found a receptive audience among younger readers. The arc of his own life, from working-class whitefella to Aboriginal eminence, tells its own story of hidden history and racial reconciliation. Even some of the historians who contest the details of Dark Emu doff their hat to its author’s breakaway success.

    “It’s a positive message that a lot of people want to hear, and Bruce is an Aboriginal man telling it,” says Ian McNiven, professor of indigenous archaeology at Monash University. “He’s an extraordinary looking man, he’s a great orator and a great writer… if you can turn a book like this into a bestseller in airport bookshops, more power to you.”

    Pascoe himself embraces the success with his own peculiar mixture of self-deprecation and grand uplift. “I had a feeling this book would reach a wider audience,” he says. “It just goes to show that Australia is changing its mind about its own history — there’s a conversation going on, and ­people are using the book to open that conversation. There’s still a few dinosaurs about, but the kids in particular are all over it.”

    When we first meet, Pascoe is sitting on a ­banquette inside the Sydney Opera House, preparing to deliver an address to a gathering of the ­Heritage Council. Five years after the release of Dark Emu its author is in constant demand at ­history conferences, literary festivals, indigenous gatherings and more specialised events such as the Lake Bolac Eel Festival in western Victoria. At the nearby Rainbow Serpent Festival in January he drew a crowd of admiring young alt-lifestylers ­taking a break from the doof. At rural gatherings he yarns with farmers about sustainable agriculture. More recently he’s become a fixture on the burgeoning “native cuisine” gourmet circuit, spreading the ­gospel about roast daisy yams and indigenous ­millet bread. “There’s a thirst for knowledge out there, so indigenous people who can talk about it are running around like cut cats servicing the other 97 per cent of the population,” he says, looking exhausted after a day spent talking to indigenous film students and meeting colleagues at the University of Technology Sydney, where he is a professor of indigenous studies. “But there’s no point grumbling about it. I hate to use a football analogy, but there’s a point in the game when the ball is in the air, the pack has formed underneath it and everyone knows whose moment it is to take it.”

    Pascoe’s gift of the gab, both in person and on the page, is no small part of Dark Emu’s appeal. Not many historians have the vernacular gift to describe Melbourne’s founding father, John ­Batman, as a fraudster with “more angles than a map of New Guinea”. For tonight’s gig he’s dressed in dungarees, short-sleeved shirt and work boots, much the same outfit he wears while tending his 60ha farming block near Mallacoota, on the remote far eastern coast of Victoria. His flowing white beard and crinkly gaze complete the picture of a Whitmanesque bush elder dropped into the big smoke. Up at the podium, he’s both provocative and disarming, denouncing the mining ­industry’s “malicious” industrialising of the Burrup Peninsula in WA, then pleading for financial backing for indigenous farmers (“I’m beggin’ ya, seriously…”). Along the way he outlines his thesis in Dark Emu and his passionate case for indigenous Australians as the pioneers of human society.

    “Aboriginal people, who invented government 120,000 years ago, decided that the worst thing they could do in a society was fight for land,” he asserts with typical brio. “[They] decided everybody would have a house, everybody would have enough to eat, everybody would take part in the culture.” We’re facing a pivotal moment of history, he tells the crowd. “We’ll think of this era of change in Australia and say: ‘This was the moment we changed our minds about our country; this is the moment that we became Australians’.”

    It’s the evangelising of someone who experienceda late awakening to indigenous history, both the country’s and his own. Growing up in 1950s working-class Melbourne, Pascoe knew poverty but not much family lore. His father Alf — “a terrific carpenter but a terrible businessman” — earned such an erratic living that Pascoe can remember watching his mother at the kitchen table, divvying up her husband’s meagre wages right down to the last threepenny piece. In his ­fiction there’s a deep identification with society’s toilers and an equally deep distrust of bosses and the political class. Bricklaying was Pascoe’s first employment but his “infatuation with words” led him to Melbourne University and a job as a high school teacher in Mallacoota, which wasn’t even on the power grid back then. By his late 20s he was married with a daughter, Marnie, and had bought a home in Melbourne, determined to avoid the poverty he’d grown up in.

    Today Pascoe can identify moments in his childhood when the hidden history of his family was briefly illuminated: the taunt of “nigger lips” at primary school; an indigenous woman remarking that “we know who your family are”. His mother’s brother sometimes alluded to their Aboriginal ancestry but ­Pascoe didn’t begin investigating it in earnest until he was in his early 30s, by which time his marriage was crumbling and he was attempting the financially perilous switch from teacher to writer. He had fallen for the woman he would spend most of his life with, Lyn Harwood, and moved with her to a caravan at remote Cape Otway, three hours southwest of Melbourne, with a crazy plan to launch a quarterly magazine of Australian fiction.

    For the next couple of decades, he and ­Harwood would run Pascoe Publishing and ­Australian Short Stories. Helen Garner published her first short fiction in the quarterly, and Tim Winton and Gillian Mears were among the young writers it nurtured. Pascoe kept it going by working as a lighthouse guide, indigenous ­language researcher and farm fencer (“I’d take my dog to work, which is a lovely thing to do, and I’d have a fire going and boil a billy. Where’s the downside?”). His literary confreres were working-class lefties like Frank Hardy and Barry Dickins, and he voiced a disdain for the “snobs” who ran university literature courses. Hilary McPhee, who published Pascoe’s first novel Fox while at Penguin Books in the ’80s, recalls him fondly as a ­shaggy-haired yarn-spinner who was “incredibly stubborn, determined and funny”. McPhee cites his stewardship of Australian Short Stories as an extraordinary feat — Pascoe kept the magazine going for 16 years, along the way writing three novels and two short story collections that reflected his own deepening dive into his indigenous ancestry. By the time he was 40, he had fully identified as Koori and was immersing himself in indigenous language and the history of frontier massacres, a subject that sparked ructions in the farming community where he lived.

    Even today, the profound impact of this period is palpable when Pascoe talks about the years he spent in libraries and in meetings with indigenous elders such as Zelda Couzens from eastern Victoria, who lambasted his ignorance of Aboriginal history. “They were talking about what happened in the ‘war’, and I had been taught that no war had ever been fought on our soil,” he recalls. “So when my aunty Zelda was talking about the war I’d say ‘What war?’ and she’d say ‘’You infuriate me! You’re interrupting me, and you’re stupid — there was a war!’” Pascoe says he found indigenous ancestors on both sides of his family, tracing them to Tasmania, to the Bunurong people of Victoria and the Yuin of southern NSW.

    By the early 2000s, he had moved to Gipsy Point with Harwood and pushed aside fiction to write Convincing Ground, a 302-page polemic about Aboriginal dispossession and its legacies. In one passage he embraced the animist spirituality of traditional Aborigines, claiming to have witnessed quails gathering at the side of the road when Zelda Couzens passed by. In the book and in interviews he admitted that his indigenous ancestry was distant, and he was “more Cornish than Koori”. It was all too much for the conservative commentator Andrew Bolt, who mocked Pascoe on his blog for succumbing to “the romance of the Noble Savage… the thrill of the superstitious”.

    Others took legal action over such ridicule; Pascoe preferred to gently mock “Bolty” by ­offering to explain everything over a beer. The explanation would be long and involved, as Pascoe admits — he once stated that his great-grandmother had an Aboriginal name, but declines to elaborate today because the claim has put him in dispute with the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre, which polices claims of Aboriginality in that state. It’s an example of how contested this territory can be, and Pascoe acknowledges the “schizophrenic” nature of ­having both Anglo and indigenous ancestry yet choosing one over the other. He has been to Britain and walked around the Cornish landscape of his forebears, he says, but felt nothing. “When people ask me whether I’m ‘really’ Aboriginal, because I’m so pale, I say ‘Yeah’. And when they ask me whether I can explain it, I say: ‘Have you got three hours?’”

    In the broader indigenous community, Pascoe’s acceptance is now so established that he is ­routinely bestowed the honorific “uncle”, and he was anointed Person of the Year at the 2018 Dreamtime Awards — a ceremony he attended in his first suit jacket, bought from a charity shop. Seven years ago he was summoned to a meeting with Uncle Max Dulumunmum Harrison, a Yuin elder, arriving to find himself at a cultural ceremony that lasted a number of days (“fortunately I had a swag in the car”). It was the beginning of his ­complete acculturation into indigenous lore, although Pascoe again declines to elaborate. “This is an honour but not something we talk about, nor do we point to the marks,” he says, adding that he prefers not to use the term “initiated” because of its capacity to be overdramatised. “I don’t call myself an elder,” he says, “just older.”

    It was during the research for Convincing Ground that Pascoe came across colonial-era descriptions of Aborigines living in villages and harvesting crops, activities he had never learnt about during his 1960s university education. Researching the topic, he discovered that other historians were pursuing the same material: in 2008 the eccentric independent scholar Rupert Gerritsen published Australia and the Origins of Agriculture, which argued that Aborigines were agriculturalists as much as hunter-gatherers; three years later ANU historian Bill Gammage released The Biggest Estate On Earth, a major study of how Aborigines used fire, dams and cropping to shape the landscape and farm it sustainably.

    In Dark Emu, Pascoe acknowledges his debt to both authors; like them, he draws on the eyewitness accounts of colonial settlers and explorers to describe unfamiliar scenes of Aborigines living in permanent villages, building stone dwellings and devising elaborate fish traps, irrigation systems and cultivation methods for vegetables and grains. Gerritsen died in 2013 without ever achieving a university job, and Pascoe cites him as a scholar who languished in obscurity because his theories contradicted the mainstream view. “Rupert should have got all the credit for Dark Emu,” he says candidly, a sentiment that gets ready agreement from Gerritsen’s brother Rolf, a professor of economic and indigenous policy studies at Charles Darwin University. “Ninety per cent of Bruce’s book is taken from my brother’s research,” Rolf Gerritsen says with a chuckle, adding that this is not to ­belittle Pascoe’s considerable achievement in popularising complex issues and shifting the national conversation about indigenous history.

    Pascoe sent the manuscript of Dark Emu to Broome-based Magabala Books, the independent press that had published his young-adult fiction. The company’s publisher, Rachel Bin Salleh, laughs sheepishly when she recalls that their initial print run was 800 copies. “We had no idea how it was going to be received,” she says. “We really underestimated the thirst for knowledge of this ­subject matter.” The book’s brevity is a key to its appeal; Magabala wisely reined it in to 175 pages with footnotes and bibliography, making it ­popular among teachers. Pascoe also married its historical themes to contemporary issues such as land management and climate change; its final pages are a veritable call to arms for younger readers.

    Many academic historians admire Pascoe’s achievement, among them Professor Lynette ­Russell of Monash University, the co-author of a new book of revisionist indigenous history, ­Australia’s First Naturalists. “What Bruce has done is trawl the records and found fantastically rich and useful material,” Russell says. “I’m a big fan of the book because it’s had such a huge impact.” Bill Gammage likewise praises Pascoe’s gift for shaping a story that challenges the reader’s ­preconceptions. He cites Dark Emu’s account of the 1844 encounter between explorer Charles Sturt and several hundred Aborigines living in an established village in outback Queensland: Sturt’s journal describes a welcoming party that offered him water, roast duck, cake and a hut to sleep in, prompting Pascoe to dryly remark: “Sturt was doing it tough among the savages, all right.”

    It’s when Pascoe wades into more polemical terrain that he incurs a rebuke from academics. Throughout Dark Emu, he argues that historical accounts of Aboriginal housing, farming and ­fishing were suppressed for most of the past 150 years. The myth that Aborigines were simple nomads was perpetuated to justify white occupation, he asserts, and scholars who tried to argue otherwise were marginalised so effectively that it is rare to come across a text after 1880 that describes Aboriginal fishing systems or intensive grain and vegetable harvesting.

    That claim is “ridiculous”, says Professor Peter Hiscock, chair of archaeology at Sydney ­University, who cites numerous studies of indigenous fish-farming and plant-cultivation. “The literature on this subject is massive,” says Hiscock, “so the assertion that it is ignored or hidden does not reflect the reality of the disciplines; it must reflect the political mindset of Pascoe.” Ian McNiven of Monash University likewise says ­Pascoe’s assertion flies in the face of decades of published research, as does the veteran archaeologist Harry Lourandos, who began documenting traditional indigenous eel farms in the 1970s.

    Many academic experts also believe Dark Emu romanticises pre-contact indigenous society as an Eden of harmony and pacifism, when in fact it was often a brutally tough survivalist way of life. It’s a criticism most are reluctant to air publicly, given the sensitivity of contradicting a popular indigenous historian, although even Gammage chuckles at some of Pascoe’s loftier claims about stone age Aborigines inventing democracy and baking. “I wouldn’t push these things too far,” Gammage says. “We don’t know what was going on in the world 65,000 years ago.”

    For archaeologists such as Ian McNiven and Harry Lourandos, however, any criticism of ­Pascoe is tempered by their delight at seeing a book detailing the complexities of indigenous culture riding high in the bestseller lists. Lourandos — now an adjunct professor at James Cook University — agrees with Pascoe that much of Dark Emu’s content is little known to the broader reading public, and he’s heartened to see an indigenous author filling that gap. “He’s appealing to that younger generation and he’s got the persona of a guru, and once you get that, you are celestialised,” Lourandos notes wryly. “In this age of political unrest, there’s a hankering for that.”

    Pascoe dedicates Dark Emu to “the Australians”, an all-inclusive phrase that encapsulates the book’s ultimately hopeful tone. His friend and ­fellow writer Gregory Day theorises that Pascoe connects with general readers because “he knows what it feels like to be a whitefella — in a sense, Bruce is translating it for whitefellas”. The book’s final pages are an impassioned treatise that argues Australia could heal from its racial scars and secure its ecological future by adopting indigenous systems of governance and landcare. Get rid of wheat and grow native grass; eat kangaroo instead of cow; replace capitalism with “Aboriginalism”. It’s a gospel Pascoe now preaches passionately in his public appearances, detailing his own efforts to cultivate kangaroo grass and daisy yams on the small farming block in Mallacoota.

    The personal cost of that mission has been high, for he and Harwood separated in 2017 after 35 years together, a split Pascoe attributes to his many absences and his late-life mission to pursue farming. “I think Lyn didn’t want to take on another venture as demanding as that,” he says. “She’s probably right, but I couldn’t not do this job.” Harwood still lives nearby, at Gipsy Point, and ­Pascoe describes her as “my best friend”, his voice cracking.

    Their son Jack, who is 34 and works in land management in Cape Otway, acknowledges the scale of the task his father has taken on. “He’s a 72-year-old man who’s literally just bought a farm and he’s travelling around the country to speak at every opportunity,” Jack says. “Of course we’re concerned, but would you try to stop someone who is that passionate? No, what’s the point?”

    Pascoe has a big year ahead of him: two new versions of Dark Emu are being released, one for primary school children and another a high school geography text. There’s also a new collection of his stories, two young adult books and a novel, Imperial Harvest, which he describes ­ominously as a butchering of world history incorporating “love and sex while rolling around on bear skins”. He’s also launching Black Duck Foods, a ­company seeking to commercialise his indigenous produce business. Some years ago he made the rash decision to bake a loaf of bread from native flour on breakfast television, a culinary disaster from which he learnt a valuable ­lesson. These days he teams up with top chefs such as Ben Shewry and David Moyle, who in April accompanied him to the Chairman’s Lunch at the Melbourne Food & Wine Festival to bake a “sensational” loaf of bread.

    “It’s a bit late for me to be making a million dollars but I’m not particularly interested,” he says. “I live a terrific life and I don’t need much. But I need time and I can see how depressed our communities are. I’m really in a panic of getting things done.”

    And some comments from readers:

    Rohan B
    6 HOURS AGO
    Beware the broad sweeping generalizations about indigenous history and practices. The notion that they were democrats or farmers, etc, its not particularly factual, nor is it helpful.
    Likethumb_up5
    John
    8 HOURS AGO
    If this flight of fancy is even remotely close to correct then it means that the arrival of the white man caused such a cataclysmic decline in the culture etc of the aboriginal peoples that it spread across the length and breadth of the continent immediately leaving no trace even in verbal history of the wonderful civilisation they had created. They would be better issuing books about all the Dreamtime stories to the schools it would be more educational in explaining aboriginal culture etc than the fantasy this person is peddling. The young are being brainwashed enough about a Global Warming without adding to their confusion on this subject.
    Likethumb_up5
    Tony
    8 HOURS AGO
    I wouldn’t call him a historian, I’d call him a storyteller & a myth-maker. History is supposed to based on facts & evidence & the process includes examining your sources & distinguishing between reliable, accurate accounts of the past & tall tales.
    L

    Tonya
    10 HOURS AGO
    A sweet sweet fantasy.
    Likethumb_up3
    G
    10 HOURS AGO
    There’s a big difference between “turning history on its head”, and fabricating history. Unfortunately this is a tendency toward the latter, interpreting accidentally discovered routine with innovation; suggesting some 21st century agricultural sophistication where it never existed. Presumably the sequel will suggest that Australian Aborigines invented physics, split the atom and flew to the Moon too. Enough. It does nobody any favours, in fact, quite the opposite. Keith Windschuttle called out this strategy of the Left years ago.
    Likethumb_up8
    Andrew
    11 HOURS AGO
    The fear of preventing academics from exposing Pascoe’s romantic fiction is the same politically motivated fear that locked Ireland into its fictitious History of brave Catholic resistance to Protestant oppression.

    Such fictions are at the root of identity politics and drive a dangerous disconnect between ideas and reality. They have underpinned political radicalization and destructive politics in regions throughout the world – most tragically in the middle East.

    Such romanticized histories create a simplistic “us vs them” narrative of good vs evil, conspiracies and dark forces that fail to address and channel energy into addressing real problems and their causes.

    Indigenous Australians face real challenges rooted in real situations. People like Bess Price speak of those realities but few listen. In comfortable sububurbia those embracing “indigineity” prefer the heroic myths promoted by Pascoe.

    One I’m adding if the Oz lets me:

    Researching history is more than saying something happened – it’s proving it. Where are the sources of evidence for this supposition? Harvesting crops on a big scale would need substantial amounts of tools. Where are they?

    Building “stone houses” would need foundations and some sort of structure – where are the remains of these?

    If all of this, and more, was destroyed by the arrival of the white man there would be substantial records of that destruction. Where are those?

    And a pic of the author – he notes he gets asked about his “whiteness”.

  236. Mitch M.

    Tragically hilarious stupidity and unbelievable incompetence by the Russian Navy during the turn of the century conflict with Japan. The trip from the Baltics to Port Arthur in northern China.

  237. 2dogs

    And so we have come full circle. So I ask again –
    “Who” decides what is “just”?
    And even more importantly, “who” enforces it?
    And how?

    I thought my response to Knuckle Dragger covered this?

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