Never ask a barber if you need a hair cut

Famous investor, Warren Buffet has a folksy saying:

Never ask a barber if you need a hair cut.

Perhaps one day our political overlords will learn that one should never ask a public servant what government should do because almost certainly, the answer will be more government.

Look at the latest piece of advice on the future role for government, written, directed and produced by …. government: the CSIRO’s Australian National Outlook 2019.

TAFKAS won’t step on the toes of Alan Moran’s clear and articulate Cat-analysis of earlier today. But he will note and emphasise the utter folly of this report, and will do so by referring readers to page 14 of the report:

Furthermore, this report does not canvass all of the necessary contributing factors to a growing and vibrant economy, which will be key to Australia’s future. These include, but are not limited to: tax reform, policies and incentives to create investment and research, good budgetary policy and continued focus on ensuring Australia remains globally competitive and not overly burdened with unnecessary regulation. Although important, these issues have been the subject of considerable public discussion elsewhere.

So there you go. A report that “explores a range of nationally significant issues, risks and opportunities to identify how Australia’s long‑term prosperity can be secured” does not consider little things like tax, regulation, competitiveness and budgetary policy. Rather, the report focuses on a bunch of actions around industry, urban, energy, land and culture. Actions which of course will be developed, governed, driven, legislated by …. government.

Notably, under “culture”, the report identifies the need to:

Rebuild trust and respect in Australia’s political, business and social institutions.

Kind of hard to do that when you produce a self serving, near 100 page, expensive and glossy pile of clap trap.

Thank you Dr Henry AC and Mr Thodey AO for your service. Keep on rebuilding that trust. BTW, how are those NAB and Telstra share prices going?

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Never ask a barber if you need a hair cut

  1. stackja

    Ronald Reagan joked: I’m from the government. I’m here to help.

  2. Russell

    Don’t think my Super fund has investment with many of those “more than 20 non-government organisations” that helped shape the report. Maybe that’s a good thing?

  3. John A

    No, stackja, Ronald Reagan WARNED that the most fearsome nine words in the English language were:

    I’m from the government and I’m here to help.

  4. But if you start putting genuine issues that affect Australia’s prosperity first and foremost, where will that leave the Left?

  5. mem

    Took the time to google all those bodies that had input to this report and their boards of directors and management and projects. Apart from the Birchip Group the rest were of a variety that I call the ‘whispering classes”. Many individuals had the same pedigree and some belonged to the same organisations. All had an interest, financial or otherwise, in climate change. They probably had a special Somali vegetarian lunch served by ladies in traditional garb, washed down with fruit juice before leaving the conference room, then downed a few chardonnays at the local wine bar before jumping into their BMW’s or cabbing it to the airport. These are the people that think they can change the future. If their was a fire during the meeting most wouldn’t know what number to ring or how to detach and use the fire unit on the wall next to them.

  6. Bruce of Newcastle

    CSIRO needs a hair cut. It looks like Cousin Itt at the moment. Is there any actual substance under all that excess hair?

  7. Suburban Boy

    Ah, CSIRO! Our home-grown Nostradamus produced a report on the future of our snowfields back in 2003 which was uniformly gloomy: http://asaa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/CSIROSnowandGreenhousereport.pdf

    Compare the Aussie Nostradamus’ efforts with current news on our snowfields, such as this one: https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6192329/snowfields-open-early-after-huge-snowfall/?cs=14231

  8. egg_

    These are the people that think they can change the future. If their was a fire during the meeting most wouldn’t know what number to ring or how to detach and use the fire unit on the wall next to them.

    But, but… these are our “betters”!

  9. egg_

    CSIRO! Our home-grown Nostradamus produced a report on the future of our snowfields back in 2003 which was uniformly gloomy

    How much of Flannery’s and ManBearPig’s bulldust did they swallow?
    UNSW hosted IPCC’s Raj Pachauri, the pr0n novel author, too.

  10. Squirrel

    Must be about time to dust off the Multi-function Polis and give it a re-run for a new generation of wide-eyed twits.

    From a glass half full perspective, while the people who produce these sorts of reports are busy producing these sorts of reports, they’re not mucking around with stuff that actually matters.

  11. Mark M

    2004: “The IPCC (and CSIRO) relied heavily on the Mann paper in coming to their global warming conclusions.
    The paper’s climate curve was nicknamed the “hockey stick”: relatively flat from 1550 to 1900, with a sharp rise as greenhouse warming lifted global average temperatures.”

    http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/01/16/1073878029212.html

  12. Dr Fred Lenin

    These “scientists are like horse racing tipsters in the media,but not as honest ,the paper tipsters had an annual contest the winner was the one who LOST the leastmoney during the year .

  13. Blair

    “does not canvass all of the necessary contributing factors ….. good budgetary policy
    I guess bad budgetary policy wouldn’t be a necessary contributing factor.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.