International Price Fixing Cartel

Picture this.  A bunch of wealthy industrial elites set up an industry association for the purpose of price fixing.  Anyone who dares to offer prices below the agreed level is piled upon, harangued, insulted and ostracised.

And by the way, this industry organisation is based in lovely Paris and the representatives travel from far and wide, first class of course, to meet about their price fixing activities and how do beat up the competition.

How would people respond to that?  Flabbergasted would be a word that comes to mind.

But what if these wealthy industrial elites were actually governments and their industry organisation was the OECD and the prices being rigged were tax rates.  How would these high tax nations respond to another with the temerity to have low taxes.  How would they be punished?  Heaven help them.

What might be some of the responses?  How about calling them tax havens.  How about some political pressure.  Perhaps saying that they were centres for money laundering and terrorism financing.  What other set your hair on fire responses would it attract?  Well, let’s ask the Guardian and the Member for Fenner, Dr Andrew Leigh.

So much for his credentials as Shadow Minister for Competition and Productivity.

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23 Responses to International Price Fixing Cartel

  1. stackja

    Governments spending too much on silly projects getting upset at people not wanting to fund them?
    Kerry Packer said something as I remember.

  2. Eyrie

    That should read “hopes” of tax haven on our doorstep, not “fears”.

  3. mareeS

    Gee, a boat ride across the Torres Strait with a bag of cash. Sounds tempting.

  4. Entropy

    Why do we have corporate tax at all? Just tax distributed earnings, including foreign recipients.
    If we got rid of it there would be no more franking credits either, you would think the ALP would be on board…

  5. duncanm

    Yeh – drug cartels pay tax. (Facepalm)

  6. Post Alley Crackpot

    The OECD puts paid to the notion that the only French people more contemptible than their politicians are their bureaucrats.

    Not that the EU is far behind them: such things as “Rules on Health and Safety” and WEEE permit the employment of even more French bureaucrats by means of planting little eco flags on top of things that by numbers aren’t even significant problems.

    As one particularly revelatory instance of this, take lead in solder wire.

    Lead-free solder creates more problems than it solves (such as equipment burning out prematurely because of “tin whiskers”, which a mate’s Internet router did this week, causing him to scrap it entirely as waste), and the lead-bearing solder doesn’t easily leach the lead into the environment … but yet there’s a whole bureaucracy stuffed chock-a-block with French bureaucrats for the purpose of regulating this particular non-problem.

    By numbers, vehicle batteries are orders of magnitude worse because they use lead plates, yet are barely regulated, but ask any French RoHS bureaucrat and he’ll tell you that the lovely Mediterranean is one hastily binned printed circuit board away from ecological disaster.

    My belief as to the fecklessness of the French body politic is that the French elite have consistently failed to arrange terms under which they can allow their bureaucratic classes to be culled during periods of war and insurrection, of which this failing became most notable during and after the French Revolution.

    These days I suspect the recipe for Bureaucrat Thermidor would be coming directly from Brussels if it weren’t beginning to appear on English menus …

  7. ACTOldFart

    I thought Andrew Leigh had got booted off the shadow front bench entirely? Whatever, he continues his singularly unimpressive string of half-bked ideas and comments.

  8. Makka

    The left are forever on guard against those who seek to keep their hard earned for themselves. The company the LNP keep!

  9. duncanm

    James Marape talks a whole lot more sense than Andrew Leigh.

    Presumably, Mr Leigh wants PNG to remain on the Australian aid teat, rather than become an ecenomic success in their own right?

    Meanwhile, Mr Marape:

    .. signalled he planned to cut red tape for business and said he was “all about maximising gain from the resources that we have in this country”.

    “We intend to remove impediments in the system so that you will have ease of doing business,” Marape said. “Gone are the days where you think you owe a favour to a politician to push your papers through for you.

    “We want to remove impediments in the system so that your project submissions, you’re dealing with [the] government, is done with less blockages.”

    At the same time he voiced his support for new whistleblower protections and anti-corruption measures.

    “We are trying to create a safe environment and give you, as businessmen and business women and as company, the impetus as businessmen, businesswomen and company that you have a safe environment that is less susceptible to corruption and bribery and lawlessness,” he said.

    “You can then ensure that you grow as a business in our country and together we can prosper.

    “You can prosper for your shareholders and we prosper for our shareholders, the 8 million people of Papua New Guinea.”

  10. Sydney Boy

    Tax havens are used by drug-runners, extortionists & money launderers. They’ve facilitated tax-dodging by millionaires and multinationals.

    That’s not a worry when guys like Mike Cannon-Brookes does the same because he likes electric vehicles.

    Funny how the leftist media never mention that Atlassian is based in an off-shore tax haven and pays no tax in Australia.

  11. Shy Ted

    Tax havens are used by drug-runners, extortionists & money launderers. They’ve facilitated tax-dodging by millionaires and multinationals.
    So it’s based on the CFMMEU/ALP business model then.

  12. Colonel Crispin Berka

    So much for his credentials as Shadow Minister for Competition and Productivity.

    Nah, that title is totally appropriate. Because if Andrew Leigh were in charge our competition and productivity would be a shadow of its former self.

  13. Roger

    James Marape sounds like the best thing PNG has had going for it for years.

    ScoMo & Co. should take note.

    Hint: a focus on reducing carbon emissions is not compatible with maximising gain from our resources for your “shareholders”, the Australian people.

  14. Beachcomber

    Nosferatu does not approve of the little black people in PNG having the freedom to run their own economy.

  15. Chris

    I thought Andrew Leigh had got booted off the shadow front bench entirely? Whatever, he continues his singularly unimpressive string of half-bked ideas and comments.

    The man is a remarkable waste of education.
    Well, compared with rational people. Compared to Lefties, he successfully shuts up and takes the donation in the presence of his betters in the unions. And isn’t that the main thing?

  16. Perth Trader

    The reasons tax havens are used for ‘funny money’ is not because of lower tax but because less questions are asked. Funny money would pay a tax if Govt. asked less questions about transfers.

  17. Dr Fred Lenin

    Is the late PMturnbulls Cayman Islands account tax dodging ? Are the overseas accounts where the money from the printing works “accidental fire” created by rivkin and half the NSW labor gang ,is that tax dodging? . Are the sources of wealth of the former labor leaders who were extremely rich ,]declared for tax purposes ? The big ccomoanies and drug dealers arent the only ones at it ,what about paying their “fair share “ of tax .

  18. David Brewer

    Tax havens are used by drug-runners, extortionists & money launderers. They’ve facilitated tax-dodging by millionaires and multinationals.

    I’m trying to make up my mind what I like best about this statement. The moral equivalence of “drug-runners, extortionists and money launderers” with people who happen to have saved a million dollars and companies that happen to operate internationally? Or the idiocy of saying that something ought to be outlawed because some of its users are criminals or people you don’t like? On the latter, maybe we should get rid of public toilets, because I’m sure they’ve been used by murderers and terrorists…

  19. Bronson

    Way to go labor! Leigh has set new lows with our relationship with our nearest neighbour. No wonder PNG is ‘looking north’ in it’s foreign affairs.

  20. Eyrie

    Post Alley Crackpot
    #3048075, posted on June 21, 2019 at 10:36 am

    “As one particularly revelatory instance of this, take lead in solder wire.”

    Just for that ridiculous brainfart, Brussels should be nuked. Frankly, Europe should be turned in to a ruined post nuclear wasteland populated by ragged, starving cannibal tribes.

  21. Empire 5:5

    The Panama Papers prove politicians are keen users of tax minimisation and offshore banking.

    Andrew Leigh is a low energy fella with an acute knowledge deficit, severely educated and asleep.

  22. W Hogg

    Andrew Leigh is another example of why you should never trust anyone with 2 first names.

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