Tuesday Forum: July 2, 2019

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2,059 Responses to Tuesday Forum: July 2, 2019

  1. C.L.

    Real men smoked Temple Bar, areff.

  2. old bloke

    Naming conventions –

    Blair’s method: Rainbow Scamp
    Leigh’s method: Bourke Menzies-LogCabin

  3. Ellie

    thefrollickingmole @11:40am

    😂🤣

  4. areff

    I later switched to Albany and Camels, reasserting my rugged masculinity. All cigarettes taste the same today, except menthols, which I’ve come to detest. How did I ever smoke them!

  5. RobK

    Elanor Kelly-Peter-Stuyvesant
    Better than Elanor Kelly-van Nelies, although that does have a rhythm to it.

  6. Sinclair Davidson

    Yep. No man ever smoked menthols. Well not voluntarily anyway.

  7. egg_

    the lives of gay and lesbian people are lived sincerely and genuinely also

    Being heteronormative, like That Wong Chap?

  8. Perfidious Albino

    Dr BG – it is some 10 years since the Lady Albino and I visited Cuba, part chaperoned tour, part self-guided. We stayed in quite a few of the official ‘foreigner licensed’ guest houses and never ate so much fresh lobster over a fortnight before or since – US$10 was the going rate at the time in both the guest houses and restaurants in Havana. If you haven’t already, the revolutionary museum in Havana is worth a visit for the collection of artefacts if not the accompanying propaganda, as are the cigar rolling factories and rum museum. An afternoon at the baseball stadium was enjoyable to.

    There’s a town a few hours outside of Havana named “Australia”, which is a bit of a novelty to visit. Apparently the history is that it was so named because of the CSR operated sugar refinery there back in the pre-revolutionary days. Reportedly Castro based himself at the old refinery during the Bay of Pigs affair.

    You might also consider a few days in Varadero. Now, this is a Cuban Gold Coast with all-inclusive western style resorts, which many euros and Canadians fly directly into. It is most certainly NOT the real Cuba, but if you fancy enjoying a good cigar and refreshing beverages whilst wading in the crystal clear waters of the Caribbean and pristine white sandy beaches for a few days… We found a few days there the perfect ‘refresher’ after a few months ‘slumming it’ around South America.

    If you are exiting Cuba via Panama, and depending on your temperament – we found you could easily spend hours observing the ships passing through the canal locks.

  9. Geriatric Mayfly

    Temple Bar. The hissing and spluttering during combustion, would now make them a fire in the open air on Days of Total Fire Ban.

  10. Ellie

    Good morning Doomlord, Master, Sir – your blog picture freaks me out!

  11. Ellie

    How did I ever smoke them

    Yeah. I thought only girls smoked them.

  12. Eddystone

    Kenilworth Mabarak_Turf.

  13. areff

    I wouldn’t make that comment about real men and menthols in Harlem, Doomlord, where everyone smokes Newports and drinks orange soda at the movie. Apparently Coke is white thang, while Fanta manifests the post-slavery struggle to rise. Or something.

  14. RobK

    It’s been so long; I got the spelling wrong: Van Nelle Tobacco

  15. Sean

    The way the ALP are carrying on, right now they would be increasing spending ‘for the economy’ with the luvvy press calling it not a ‘broken promise’ but prudent financial management.

  16. C.L.

    Temple Bars would kill an elephant.
    Funny how I still remember the brands.
    Let’s see …
    Marlboro, Winfield, B&H, Johnny Players (best-looking pack), Peter Jackson, Peter Stuyvesant, Alpine, Kool, Rothmans, Viscount (your budget durry), Black and White (your REALLy budget durry), Kent, Camel, Dunhill (the pack would die of embarrassment if coupled with a Bic), Escort, Ardath, Craven A …

  17. egg_

    unless rice is a hitherto undiscovered ingredient of the diet of nomadic Aborigines.

    Red kangaroo curry on a bed of rice?

  18. Geriatric Mayfly

    Turf (Unfiltered) As to Henry Bolte as the cigar was to Churchill.

  19. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Donald Trump orders tanks to Washington for July 4 parade

    Cameron Stewart
    Washington Correspondent
    @camstewarttheoz
    2 hours ago July 3, 2019
    20 Comments

    Donald Trump is doing Independence Day his way regardless of his critics. On Friday (AEST) he will stand in front of the hallowed Lincoln Memorial in Washington to give a July 4th speech in his “Salute to America” extravaganza which he has been planning for months.

    He will be accompanied by military flyovers with a range of fighter jets and possibly by his own plane, Air Force One, while the “longest ever” fireworks display will light up the Abraham tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles that will be parked nearby.

    It is a show that no previous president has rolled out to commemorate the nation’s official birth.

    Go the Donald! Perhaps Donkey Gnashers, Shiillary Clinton and Elizabeth Whatshername might be allowed to bring up the rear of the parade, in chains.

  20. johanna

    I used to smoke Stuyvos as a teenager, because they came in affordable packets of ten. But my first choice was Marlboro Red, of which I still always have a pack of around and still indulge in now and then.

    But as age caught up with me I had to switch to B&H Smooth or die of coughing, as indeed I now add water to my Scotch, a heresy in younger years.

    The important thing is to maintain your pleasures within realistic limits.

    I read somewhere that a further hefty excise is coming on cigarettes on September 1. Is this true? If so, I will have to start having chats with my sub-continental taxi drivers about alternative sources.

  21. Something interesting about tobacco names just popped into memory:
    My boss in the paint factory told me the first time he ever saw a brand of tobacco called “Navy Cut” he laughed himself silly.
    Apparently “Navy Cut” means something a little different in Dutch.
    Any truth to this?
    Or was he just having a lend of me?

  22. Des Deskperson

    ‘Squinters’ by that upper-class, hairy up-himself mascara-wearing flog Minchin pales in comparison..

    The first series was all faux-clever dialogue and tiresome jokes around ‘edgy’ stuff that’s already been flogged to death for years

    In other words, the same sort of thing that has made any David Williamson play in the last two decades unwatchable.

    Surprisingly, they are showing a second series, starting. IIRC,. tonight. I doubt that it will have improved. The preview involved a joke about footballers in the shower.

  23. custard

    I started smoking at 10. Started out pinching the odd smoke out of Dads Capstans (in the slim green pack)
    Then we moved over the road from Senator Reg Withers who would flick all of his silver change to his youngest son Nigel and we would go to the shops and buy Ardath blues.

    For the next 25 years it was Winfield Reds, Blues and then finally Champion Ruby rollies.

    I still love the smell of a freshly lit dart but can’t stand the smell of an ashtray.

  24. Numbers given how often you’re here telling us about your job, telling us about how wonderful a teacher you were etc etcn why did you retire

    Simply because of encroaching deafness – severe in one ear and moderate in the other.
    This condition is incompatible with noisy classrooms and kids with speech impediments. Conferences on the road with my therapy team were also becoming impossible because of car noise, and I wasn’t going to become an embarrassment.
    The origin was exposure to small arms fire in SVN (when we shot off all our unexpended ammo post operations without the benefit of ear protection) didn’t help, as did a couple of months at the horseshoe where my lines were closely adjacent to the Yank self propelled M109 155mm which fired H & I missions every night.

  25. Dr Fred Lenin

    CL ,Temple Bar ! yes dreadfull things ,I smoked Gauloises Maryland ,far better and dearer and much more pretentious . I can take you to the cemetary and show you where the Temple Bar smokers lie in an early grave .
    Henry Bolte smoked Turf ,the cheapest nastiest cigs you could get ,but not a bit pretentious .

  26. ZK2A:

    He will be accompanied by military flyovers with a range of fighter jets and possibly by his own plane, Air Force One, while the “longest ever” fireworks display will light up the Abraham tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles that will be parked nearby.

    I love that man!
    (In a very heteronormative, manly way, of course. You dirty minded buggers.)

  27. Boambee John

    Leigh Lowe
    #3096102, posted on July 3, 2019 at 11:32 am
    Oh, for the days where you could make series upon series of a comeday about stuffy English aristocrats, poofery and pussy-related double entendres.

    No double entendres.
    She was referring exclusively to her vagina.
    Her only pet was a goldfish.

    Another one who doesn’t know a vagina from a vulva.

    Sad!

  28. Sinclair Davidson

    Fanta orange? Actually invented by fascists.

    Marlboro 100s were very nice. But I think targeted at female smokers. Could only get them in the US.

  29. egg_

    Van Nelle Tobacco

    Real man’s backy – it goes out if you don’t keep puffing it!

  30. Ellie

    Lipstick looks fantastic on white butts!

  31. Sinclair Davidson

    From memory the navy cut cigarettes were shorter and fatter than the usual size.

  32. Boambee John

    On naming model A

    Mathew Skippy.

    Fair dinkum maaaaate!

  33. Sinclair Davidson

    In my youth “real” men smoked Texan plain or Gunston toasted. They didn’t have filters. In those days filters were definitely for girls.

  34. johanna

    Doesn’t ring any bells with me, Winston, but my Dutch is rusty. Did he mean the translation on the homonym?

    Speaking of lost cigarette brands, remember Idlewild? It had lavish nature backgrounds with the refrain – ‘tobacco rich, menthol mild, Idlewild, Idlewild’. Never tried them, but they disappeared.

    Fag ads were cutting edge – Winfield, Marlboro and so on picked great music which is still associated with them years later. Just like Roll-a-Door and Bizet’s Carmen.

    Purists may be appalled at this use of sacred music, but to my mind it is a window into classical music for the masses.

  35. Diogenes

    I used to smoke Stuyvos as a teenager,

    My dad to discourage me from taking up smoking , gave me a cigar on my 18th. The mistake he made, was to buy a good cigar, rather than the tastes like old rope style cigars (eg ‘Shorts’), since then it has been cigars or pipes for me. Had to switch to old port pintos when playing soldiers as the smoke of my normal cigar or pipe could be smelled on other side of the battalion defence position. Cigarettes are tasteless

  36. Boambee John

    Ellie
    #3096148, posted on July 3, 2019 at 12:10 pm
    Lipstick looks fantastic on white butts!

    Phrasing!!

  37. Ellie

    shorter and fatter

    Great things come in small packages.
    A girl enjoys something more substantial than Albany Trimsize.
    Anyone remember those?

  38. Sinclair Davidson

    Now if the anti-smoking Nazis have there way a discussion like this would be illegal.

  39. Geriatric Mayfly

    How chic it was to flaunt a Sobrane in undergrad company. I imagine something less hazardous, like powdering one’s nose, has replaced them.

  40. johanna

    Ah, yes, the multicoloured Sobranie Cocktails were the height of cool for a while.

    They were very expensive and tasted awful, so I deleted them Back to the Marlbries.

  41. zyconoclast

    Nike recalls shoe after Colin Kaepernick raises racial concerns

    According to a source who spoke with Yahoo Sports, Nike began a movement to pull the shoe from stores nearly two weeks ago after Kaepernick and others raised concern that the “Betsy Ross Flag” printed on the heel of the company’s 4th of July-themed Air Max 1 was not only racially insensitive, but had also been adopted by some groups such as the Patriot Movement and Identity Evropa (pronounced “Europa”) allegedly as a symbol of white nationalism.

    Nike spokesman Mark Rhodes released a statement Monday declaring: “Nike has chosen not to release the Air Max 1 Quick Strike Fourth of July as it featured an old version of the American flag.”

  42. zyconoclast

    New Tactic: Smugglers Are Pushing Adults and Kids Into the Rio Grande to Distract Border Patrol Agents

    Last week a photo of a man and his daughter went viral after they drowned together in the Rio Grande. It happened while they attempted to enter the United States illegally.

    According to Border Patrol agents, pushing adults and children into the river is a new tactic being used as a distraction by smugglers. While agents focus their attention on water rescue missions, they take advantage.

  43. areff

    The MGM Choir at the end is the finishing touch.

  44. Shy Ted

    Just seen something hilarious on the box called dizzy goals. Haven’t searched the net yet but for a few minutes of light relief… Talking about light relief I’m having a Dr BG experience here in Thailand at a reunion of English childhood friends where, strangely, several have settled very happily with nice young ladies. Not quite a moment yet but I’m not sure I dare walk down that street again she was that enchanting. My guess is late 50s because that’s when sexy starts.
    As always hilarious and cutting responses welcome. 😂

  45. Ellie

    I smoked Marlboro Reds because the packaging was red – cool hot colour.

  46. zyconoclast

    In a first, 2 Somali-Americans joining ranks of St. Paul firefighters

    The newest firefighters in St. Paul and Minneapolis graduated Friday, including two men who will be the first Somali-American firefighters in St. Paul and possibly the state and nation.

    Twenty-three firefighter recruits for St. Paul graduated, including seven women. Eighteen recruits graduated for Minneapolis. The graduates make up a unique and diverse group, from war veterans to Division I athletes, said St. Paul Deputy Fire Chief Roy Mokosso.

  47. Its Remarkable

    Helen at 10.05:
    Just a bigger bandaid, I’m afraid, but it will make all the less wise feel good, and virtuous.

    +1000

  48. Sinclair Davidson

    I used to buy the cocktail sabranes for my Mum every Christmas and the black sabranes for my father.

  49. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The newest firefighters in St. Paul and Minneapolis graduated Friday, including two men who will be the first Somali-American firefighters in St. Paul and possibly the state and nation.

    Hope they have better luck then the police force did..

  50. areff

    This just popped up on YouTube feed. Worth a look to remember when jokes were fun

  51. Ellie

    Areff 12:20pm.
    What a hoot! Ads were quote “gay” back in the olden days.

  52. Diogenes

    Cigars used to come in handy when I spent a month in Europe travelling on trains in Winter of 82. To see everything I wanted to see meant that daylight was too precious to waste travelling, so I organised my trip so that I would overnight on trains, and a typical pattern would see me in Northern Germany, then Central, then to Paris, then to south of France and then in reverse, with a couple across Germany/France trips thrown in for good measure. ..
    Anyhoo. my MO was to get a ‘smoking compartment’ & ‘smoke it out’, and because of the smell I was left alone, rolled out the sleeping bag and I was set for the night.
    Except for 2 nights where it didn’t work, one was on a Paris – Frankfurt train on the night the French draftees were travelling to camp at Strassburg, they saw my slouchie, and the last of rum, and copious amounts of other home made rotgut were consumed & we were all speaking and understanding fluent gibberish by the time they got off. The other was a Munich – Kiel train, I was joined by 3 other pipe/cigar smokers & we had a great chat as we travelled north paralleling the inter-German border.

    Could not possibly do that today.

  53. Geriatric Mayfly

    The absolute peak of cool, was to affix a fag to a cigarette holder. Royalty and ladies of the screen added so much class to their personae when waving one of those acoutrements around.

  54. thefrollickingmole

    The origin was exposure to small arms fire in SVN

    As it will be in the future, it was at the birth of Man
    There are only four things certain since Social Progress began.
    That the Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mire,
    And the burnt Fool’s bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire;

  55. Its Remarkable

    Cigarettes…. tried many. Then found cigars. Now there was taste and attraction. Old port pinto’s, then colts, then on to the more larger ‘serious’ ones, and cost.
    A pipe was also a wonderous thing – my father smoked one for some years, using log cabin fine but as I recall – hardly pipe tobacco. Amphora or Borkum Riff was much more the style I found.
    Most shearers would be using Champion Ruby when they came. Better than Drum they reckoned.

    Ah, those were the days of yore 50-odd years ago (it was even allowed to smoke at school in my last year, can you believe it), but sadly all gone now…..

  56. Leigh Lowe

    I used to love a fag.
    Until the gays appropriated the word.

  57. areff

    Most shearers would be using Champion Ruby when they came.

    Must have been an extraordinary smoking experience.

  58. DrBeauGan

    Perfidious Albino
    #3096123, posted on July 3, 2019 at 11:49 am
    Dr BG – it is some 10 years since the Lady Albino and I visited Cuba, part chaperoned tour, part self-guided. We stayed in quite a few of the official ‘foreigner licensed’ guest houses and never ate so much fresh lobster over a fortnight before or since – US$10 was the going rate at the time in both the guest houses and restaurants in Havana. If you haven’t already, the revolutionary museum in Havana is worth a visit for the collection of artefacts if not the accompanying propaganda, as are the cigar rolling factories and rum museum. An afternoon at the baseball stadium was enjoyable to.

    There’s a town a few hours outside of Havana named “Australia”, which is a bit of a novelty to visit. Apparently the history is that it was so named because of the CSR operated sugar refinery there back in the pre-revolutionary days. Reportedly Castro based himself at the old refinery during the Bay of Pigs affair.

    You might also consider a few days in Varadero. Now, this is a Cuban Gold Coast with all-inclusive western style resorts, which many euros and Canadians fly directly into. It is most certainly NOT the real Cuba, but if you fancy enjoying a good cigar and refreshing beverages whilst wading in the crystal clear waters of the Caribbean and pristine white sandy beaches for a few days… We found a few days there the perfect ‘refresher’ after a few months ‘slumming it’ around South America.

    If you are exiting Cuba via Panama, and depending on your temperament – we found you could easily spend hours observing the ships passing through the canal locks.

    Thanks perfidious. Noted.

  59. Diogenes

    The MGM Choir at the end is the finishing touch.

    Fond memories 🙂

    In return … brass bands

    https://youtu.be/2adOk1wfI0U

  60. RobK

    Red kangaroo curry on a bed of rice?
    Or garlic prendi on rice.
    Reminds me of an occasion; I did vacation work on a State Battery (public gold milling plant) in my student days. The foreman was white and shacked up with an indigenous woman from the murchisson. The other workers were all locals having varying dips of the tar brush.
    One weekend the foreman had a campfire going. The boys dropped by, “what ya doin’ Barry?”
    “Im cooking some pigeons the proper way, wrapped in clay so the feathers come off easy, I thought you’d have picked that”
    The darkest one replied “nah, we just wrap em in alfoil.”

  61. Leigh Lowe

    Just watching a show about Dr Harold Shipman.
    Before his time.
    If only he had been born in Melbourne 20 years later.

  62. C.L.

    I used to love a fag.

    I’ve heard that about you.

  63. Leigh Lowe

    areff
    #3096183, posted on July 3, 2019 at 12:34 pm
    Most shearers would be using Champion Ruby when they came.

    Mrs L didn’t mind me lighting up during sex, but she did draw the line at the pipe.
    The huffing and puffing tended to emit sparks which would burn holes in the very swish flannelette sheets.

  64. areff

    I’ll see your brass band, Diogenes, and raise you a whistle.

  65. Dr Faustus

    Hand rolled.
    Old Holborn, beefed up with a teaspoon of whiskey and a thin sliver of orange zest added to the 2oz pouch.
    And Rizla licorice papers.

    The way God intended.

  66. Ellie

    I used to love a fag.
    Until the gays appropriated the word.

    Yes, indeed. When you say to your gay work colleague that another gay work colleague is outside having a fag. All sorts of images come to mind.

  67. Tel

    Lipstick looks fantastic on white butts!

    On a black guy it wouldn’t show up all that much.

  68. thefrollickingmole

    Now if the anti-smoking Nazis have there way a discussion like this would be illegal.

    They had a uni “researcher” on their ABC being suitably fuzzy with some of the results of “OMG, 2/3 of Kids!!! who try vaping try a ciggie later” with no reference to how many took up the wicked weed.
    Also talk of “toxic chemicals” without any sort of frame of reference to place on it.

    Blatant agitprop pretending to be science.

    I think this was the research, not sure why its presented as “new” in any way.

    https://news.curtin.edu.au/media-releases/research-shows-young-adults-arent-using-e-cigarettes-quit-smoking/

  69. Des Deskperson

    Speaking of old cigarette and tobacco brands, when i was a kiddie, we used to recite the following somewhat grubby monologue:

    ‘Peter Jackson took Virginia by State Express to his Log Cabin where he laid her on the green Turf, put his ready-rubbed into her fine cut and produced six Monopole Midgets”

  70. Tom

    Who remembers Lark? Back when I was smoking Camel plain (unfiltered) and before I started rolling my beloved, rich, aromatic Old Holborn, Lark was the Swiss chocolate of cigarettes.

    It had a filter on it like the exhaust on a V16 Kenworth to turn the chemicals it was burning into a raunchy ingestion of Cubaneque flavour without the double-take of breathe you get if you try to fill your lungs with cigar smoke.

    Smoking was so pleasurable. I miss it so.

  71. Ellie

    Areff, Sir Les Patterson is incredibly funny. Have seen him live. He’s truly a pig. A very clever man is Barry Humphries.

  72. thefrollickingmole

    Never get in the cab of a truck with 2 large Italian brickies smoking white ox for the 15 minute trip to site…

    Awful, awful stuff.

  73. candy

    I think it most likely Morrison/LNP were courting Zali to join LNP before she actually won as an independent. She wanted a secure well paying job and they wanted a lady blonde attractive rep member is malleable but Greenish and definitely Abbott completely out.
    It would not surprise if NSW LNP were in cahoots with GetUp.

  74. max

    On Friday (AEST) he will stand in front of the hallowed Lincoln Memorial in Washington to give a July 4th speech in his “Salute to America” extravaganza which he has been planning for months.

    He’d better be careful. He might be knocked off the podium, Egyptian style.

    Apparently a Catholic mystic predicted awhile back that Trump would not see the end of his first term. They’d be lining up.

  75. Leigh Lowe

    areff
    #3096190, posted on July 3, 2019 at 12:39 pm
    I’ll see your brass band, Diogenes, and raise you a whistle.

    Well, Tony Barber’s whistling is all very fine, but it is not an international passport to smoking pleasure.”

  76. Cassie of Sydney

    “Leigh Lowe
    #3096092, posted on July 3, 2019 at 11:26 am”

    +1000

    Steggall is already craving attention…..it is clear she is suffering from chronic attention seeking deprivation. Steggall, GetUp, Flannery and the various goons who supported her vicious campaign against Abbott did not predict this outcome. I suspect she had grandiose fantasies about being “very important in Canberra”, I also reckon she imagined herself forming a voting bloc with the likes of those two dearly departed grubs….Banks and Phelps…not imagining for a nana second that the two grubs wouldn’t be reelected. The best thing that the Liberals could do is to ignore her….she is a low life GetUp plant…and not a very bright one at that. And what really made me laugh out loud when I read the piece in The Oz is that she is clearly looking for friends….coz she hasn’t got any.

    The Liberals should tell her to go get fucked and I suspect they will……in more polite terms of course.

  77. johanna

    The Colin Kaepernick/Nike thing is just like the ‘abolish Australia Day’ crowd here. They want to destroy the Fourth of July because they hate America, just like the local equivalents hate Australia.

    Fortunately, they’ve got Buckley’s in America, but it just increases racial tension to no useful end. The notion that the long and complex history of a country can be reduced down to a single grievance is not only absurd, it is manipulative and destructive.

    As for Nike, they rode the tiger. Serves them right, lots of patriots will have even further reason to boycott their products.

    Since when is Colin Kaepernick, a black man brought up by white parents whose culture he now trashes, the conscience of a nation? He is just an athlete past his best who is bitter about imagined wrongs. He is entitled to his views, but Nike are eejits of the first water to let him hijack their PR.

  78. areff

    I miss it so

    Especially now. Have a wad of nicotine gum jammed in my cheek. It stops the twitches but doesn’t satisfy. Both my vape units are stuffed and I’ve already picked through the butts in the car ashtray for any worth harvesting.

    Poor me

  79. Some History

    Ah, those were the days of yore 50-odd years ago (it was even allowed to smoke at school in my last year, can you believe it), but sadly all gone now…..

    Japan has been under enormous pressure over the last few years to pass all sorts of antismoking measures as the Olympics circus is set to enter in 2020. Now smoking is to be banned at universities.

    “Universities divided over whether or not to enforce no-smoking rules”
    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/06/30/national/universities-divided-whether-not-enforce-no-smoking-rules/#.XRlivy2ZPuQ

    Antismoking has been ramping up in Paris, e.g., smoking bans in more and more parks. Didn’t realize that Paris has the Olympics circus in 2024. The antismoking (Olympics “ethos”) pressure has already begun on Paris/France.

  80. Ellie

    All this talk about smoking has me craving a fag.

  81. Some History

    The antismoking nut cases make the gaystapo look…. gay.

  82. egg_

    The first series was all faux-clever dialogue and tiresome jokes around ‘edgy’ stuff that’s already been flogged to death for years

    Cliched crap.

    The SBS stuff is far more original – Housos meets Squitners: Where the Housos borrow Minchin’s beloved lawnmower?

  83. Diogenes

    All this talk about smoking has me craving a fag.

    And a cigarette too !

    (boom tish)

  84. johanna

    Oh my sides, thanks areff for the Sir Les clip.

    The last recognition I heard of Barry Humphries’ contribution to Australian humour was that his name got taken off some award at the (so called) Melbourne Comedy Festival.

    The award winners were about as funny as a washed up whale carcass that had been three weeks in hot sun.

  85. Bruce in WA

    Marlboro Red (soft pack), Winston, Gauloise (pretentious little prat I was), even Salem occasionally.

    When I hit 60 Winston a day in the early 80s, I knew I had to do something about it.

    Now, I enjoy a “cee-gar” with my American BIL about once every two years.

    Regret it the next day though.

  86. Dr Faustus

    The worst international passport to smoking pleasure would have to be Indonesian kretek.

    I once smoked one out of politeness and was left dizzy with nicotine poisoning and with a numb throat. The taste comes straight from Satan’s bottom.

  87. Knuckle Dragger

    White Ox baccy.

    Chosen by discerning crooks since the filthy murdering livestock thief Kelly.

  88. Ellie

    And a cigarette too !

    (boom tish)

    We make a good couple, Diogenes.
    Noice.

    Back to work. Sigh.

  89. Tom

    Donald Trump is doing Independence Day his way regardless of his critics. On Friday (AEST) he will stand in front of the hallowed Lincoln Memorial in Washington to give a July 4th speech in his “Salute to America” extravaganza which he has been planning for months.

    He will be accompanied by military flyovers with a range of fighter jets and possibly by his own plane, Air Force One, while the “longest ever” fireworks display will light up the Abraham tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles that will be parked nearby.

    It is a show that no previous president has rolled out to commemorate the nation’s official birth.

    All Trump has to do tomorrow is deliver his Independence Day speech with a battalion of Abrams tanks doing the choreography, then sit back and watch the Democratic Party’s wannabes unload their anti-American hatred. They won’t be able to help themselves: Trump victory guaranteed in 2020.

    For a Washington outsider, he’s a genius at this politics racket.

  90. C.L.

    Yhffsiyygvfdhjlgdaklo

    Welsh brand, wasn’t it?

  91. johanna

    Ah, those were the days of yore 50-odd years ago (it was even allowed to smoke at school in my last year, can you believe it), but sadly all gone now…..

    Yep, we were allowed to smoke in the Prefects Room, which made a welcome change from cowering against the wind at the back of B Block. This was a government school, in 1971, in NSW.

    Prefects were elected. So, my policy of not shopping fellow smokers behind B Block paid off, although a bit of baksheesh may have been involved. 🙂

  92. Some History

    Antismokers (misocapnists/capnophobes) hate smoke/smoking/smokers. You know –
    “Why should I have to put up with the filthy®, disgusting© smoke…”
    “Oh, oh, I had to walk by a smoker and caught a whiff of the smoke. I almost died… died, I tell you”.
    “There was someone smoking about 50 metres from me. It was a ghastly sight. I was so offended”.
    “Won’t someone think of The Children™”.

    Antismokers hate smokers. Well, that’s not completely true. There’s one thing antismokers love about smokers – their MONEY. The firsthand smoke, the secondhand smoke, the thirdhand smoke doesn’t taint the money at all. Load up the funding trough.

  93. Leigh Lowe

    Gab
    #3096220, posted on July 3, 2019 at 1:04 pm
    Yhffsiyygvfdhjlgdaklo

    covfefe

  94. Bruce in WA

    How do you think this Lucky Strike advert would fly today?

  95. RobK

    The worst international passport to smoking pleasure would have to be Indonesian kretek.
    Were they the ones lovingly hand rolled on the inner thighs by the females factory workers?

  96. Some History

    Forgot this one:

    “Oh, there were cigarette butts everywhere. The butts were at least ankle high. I tried walking through them but it was almost impossible”.

  97. Knuckle Dragger

    Tom,

    It’s beautiful, and it’s because he’s not a career politician. They keep getting wrong-footed and they hate it.

    It’s like a pack of footballers being forced to play cricket against Jeff Thomson and Ricky Ponting.

  98. dopey

    ABC News: Body of Kenya Airways stowaway found in London Garden.
    So near and yet so far.

  99. Mark from Melbourne

    If it’s Viscount ads you’re after, the later ones are the true gems…

  100. Leo G

    Red kangaroo curry on a bed of rice?

    Spit-roasted koala pilaf.

  101. hzhousewife

    The last recognition I heard of Barry Humphries’ contribution to Australian humour was that his name got taken off some award at the (so called) Melbourne Comedy Festival.

    He’s touring in September. I’m taking the couple who took me to see Tom Gleeson last year. Last saw Humphries in 1977 or 78.

  102. Helen

    First name = street name of the hospital you were born in.
    Hyphenated family name = name of your High School English teacher + brand of ciggies your dad smoked.

    I dunno Fullarton Patterson-Log Cabin just doesnt quite do it.

  103. Some History

    Yep, we were allowed to smoke in the Prefects Room…

    I remember uni. You could pretty well smoke anywhere. Even the library had smoking sections. Remember many visits to RMIT (before it became a “university”). You could smoke anywhere. There weren’t “great smoke clouds of suffocating smoke”.

    Now universities are “smokefree” – even outdoors – with scholars a rarity.

  104. Knuckle Dragger

    Discount travel news:

    Bloke hides in wheel well of aircraft about to take off from Nairobi. Destination London. A forward thinker, he takes food and water with him for sustenance.

    Aircraft takes off. Wheels up. No probs. Nine hour flight takes place.

    On approach to Heathrow. Wheels down. Bloke falls out of wheel well, plummets to earth, obliterates himself on concrete footpath in some punter’s backyard – missing punter in his deckchair by a metre or so.

    Much hilarity ensues.

  105. Leigh Lowe

    I dunno Fullarton Patterson-Log Cabin just doesnt quite do it.

    Rules can be bent.
    How about Fullarton Patterson-Rolly?

  106. Knuckle Dragger

    Snap, dopey.

  107. Sinclair Davidson

    All this talk about smoking has me craving a fag.

    That’s why the anti-smoking nazis want to ban all images of smoking and now even all talk of smoking. As things stand on this thread – I could get a rude letter from the department of health telling me off for promoting smoking. What they want to do to remove intent from the criminal test for promoting smoking.

  108. Old School Conservative

    areff, your Viscount ad had me immediately singing. Word perfect. Note perfect. All popped up unasked from what I assumed were dim, distant memories.

    Now, if education could only copy those advertising techniques…………

  109. RobK

    How about Fullarton Patterson-Rolly?
    Ready rubbed.

  110. Some History

    Now universities are “smokefree” – even outdoors – with scholars a rarity.

    – puniversities.

  111. Diogenes

    Ah, those were the days of yore 50-odd years ago (it was even allowed to smoke at school in my last year, can you believe it), but sadly all gone now…..

    Student smoking was not allowed in my time (HSC class of ’77), but we had our own ‘burning bush’ in the middle of the seniors lawn (a cotoneaster that had been hollowed out , and had its own cloud above it.

    Still recall Mr Formosa lighting up his pipe after lunch in 1969 (it was his TV we watched the moon landings on) when I was in grade 4 – that was in Victoria. He was the only smoker I had ever seen lighting up in class.

    In high school it was common practice to knock on the staffroom door, open it , step back, wait 30 seconds for cloud of smoke to dissipate a bit and then pop your head in to ask for the teacher you wanted to see.

    I am particularly hard on the smokers I catch behind my classroom at lunch, and when they complain, I say if I can’t smoke on school premises , neither can you !

  112. thefrollickingmole

    File under “a pox on both their houses”.

    Labor reluctant to hold inquiry into ministerial standards, Rex Patrick says
    Centre Alliance senator says opposition going cold on idea despite lashing Christopher Pyne for taking job with consultancy giant after leaving office

    Labor has not provided any firm commitments and is continuing to deliberate about the best means of examining compliance with the standards. “We are discussing the best way to deal with this, including senator Patrick’s proposition,” Wong told the ABC on Tuesday.

    “But I think the important point here is this, ultimately, shouldn’t have to be dealt with by the parliament, it should be dealt with by the prime minister of the day.

    “The ministerial standards are enforced by the prime minister. So this is a test of Scott Morrison and what sort of man he is”.

    Those rivers of superannuation gold and board memberships have them stuffed.

  113. Some History

    That’s why the anti-smoking nazis want to ban all images of smoking and now even all talk of smoking. As things stand on this thread – I could get a rude letter from the department of health telling me off for promoting smoking. What they want to do to remove intent from the criminal test for promoting smoking.

    In one American school, the very word “cigarette” is forbidden:
    http://www.pennlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2012/12/children_do_not_need_us_to_artificially_sanitize_the_world.html

    That was back in 2012. Who knows where it’s at now.

  114. Gab

    Menthol ciggies are disgusting.

    You can get others flavours in the Phillipines that are quite nice. Like berries or apple. Not for the men of course.

  115. Ellie

    That’s why the anti-smoking nazis want to ban all images of smoking and now even all talk of smoking.

    Doomlord, Master (autocarrot wanted me to put Mastercard in), Sir, you keep mentioning ‘Nazi’. I’m so triggered!

  116. Ellie

    Images of SS uniforms and all. 🙃

  117. Robber Baron

    Leo G at 1:23 pm

    Spit-roasted koala pilaf.

    Phrasing.

  118. Old School Conservative

    At the risk of getting Sinc thrown in the klink, two more cigarette memories.

    Englsih ex-pats in Africa and Australia smoking Senior Service.
    As a callow schoolboy, throwing used, folded cigarette packets at another one leaning against a fence/wall.
    Miss, and the cigarette packet entrepreneur would keep it. Knock it down and you get 5, 10, 15 etc depending how far back you were standing when you threw.

    Those were the days.

  119. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Reddit Proves Hypergamous Women On Tinder Have No Moral Compass

  120. Some History

    Perth pub owner pledges to fight health order to remove vintage tobacco signs
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/australia/77052524/perth-pub-owner-pledges-to-fight-health-order-to-remove-vintage-tobacco-signs

    UPDATE:

    Health Minister Kim Hames has intervened in the J.B. O’Reilly’s tobacco sign saga – telling the Health Department to stop its action against the Leederville pub.
    …Mr Hames said that if Mr North had taken down any signs he could put them back up, saying the department demand was overkill.
    Mr Hames said he would amend the legislation.

    https://thewest.com.au/news/australia/jb-oreillys-joke-is-over-as-minister-tells-health-department-to-drop-action-ng-ya-329543

  121. Sinclair Davidson

    We should all be triggered by the anti-smoking Nazis. Storm troopers of the Nanny state and part of the very deep state that few, if any, elected politicians want to take on. They get their orders from the WHO.

  122. johanna

    TheirABC never stops. Today, we have a downtrodden Muesli who complains about the Skaf brothers’ effect on perception of his wonderful religion, here:

    Among six books shortlisted for the nation’s most prestigious literary prize is Michael Mohammed Ahmad’s The Le

    The loosely autobiographical novel about growing up in Western Sydney is set against the backdrop of the August 2000 Skaf gang rapes and the September 11 attacks in the United States — a few years before the Cronulla riots.

    The novel’s central character is a sensitive teenager called Bani who finds himself adrift in a community beset with angry Middle Eastern masculinity.

    A Miles Franklin shortlisting can equate to an immediate boost to book sales.

    While Mr Ahmad said that would be welcomed, the honour itself had already eased the insecurity and inadequacy he said was inherent to being an Arab Muslim immigrant in Australia.

    I don’t even know where to begin, but this pathetic creature has obviously pushed all the right buttons for winning a tax free literary award.

  123. Some History

    And then there are the attempts to “re-write history”.

    For example, concerning a commemorative stamp issue, the US Post Office authorized the airbrushing out of a cigarette dangling from James Dean’s lips. The same was done with Black American blues guitarist Robert Johnson and with artist Jackson Pollock. The French Post Office did similarly with philosopher Andre Malraux (and Jean-Paul Sartre). Columbia Records has removed a cigarette Paul Simon was holding to his lips for the CD cover of the retrospective of Simon and Garfunkel titled “Old Friends.” A cigarette was airbrushed out from the hand of a cast member for the cover of the 25th Anniversary CD of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. A cigarette in Paul McCartney’s right hand has been removed from the cover of the album “Abbey Road.” An impromptu photo of Britney Spears on the balcony of a Sydney hotel had the “offending” cigarette she was smoking airbrushed out by US Weekly. A cigarette has been removed from the mouth of one of the characters appearing in the “Keep Mum She’s Not So Dumb” war-time advertisement. In a brochure photograph (The Maritime Heritage Centre) a cigar has been removed from the mouth of the great engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Further, “[i]n 1953 Dr Cardew had photographed a reconstruction of the laboratory bench on which Fleming discovered penicillin. [S]ituated on the bench was a Petri dish of cigarette ends (Fleming having been a heavy smoker). The reconstruction was located in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington but as Dr Cardew relates: ‘The museum reconstruction in 1993 omitted the Petri dish on the grounds that the hospital had a no smoking policy….’”

    They’ve even airbushed out Winston Churchill’s signature cigar.

  124. Zyconoclast

    As for Nike, they rode the tiger. Serves them right, lots of patriots will have even further reason to boycott their products.

    The get woke to broke meme only applies to the vegan cafe.
    Nike, P&G and Marvel movies just keep making money.

    NKE Sales vs. its Competitors Q1 2019
    https://csimarket.com/stocks/compet_glance.php?code=NKE

  125. johanna

    johanna
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    #3096263, posted on July 3, 2019 at 1:45 pm

    TheirABC never stops. Today, we have a downtrodden Muesli who complains about the Skaf brothers’ effect on perception of his wonderful religion, here:

    Among six books shortlisted for the nation’s most prestigious literary prize is Michael Mohammed Ahmad’s The Le

    The loosely autobiographical novel about growing up in Western Sydney is set against the backdrop of the August 2000 Skaf gang rapes and the September 11 attacks in the United States — a few years before the Cronulla riots.

    The novel’s central character is a sensitive teenager called Bani who finds himself adrift in a community beset with angry Middle Eastern masculinity.

    A Miles Franklin shortlisting can equate to an immediate boost to book sales.

    While Mr Ahmad said that would be welcomed, the honour itself had already eased the insecurity and inadequacy he said was inherent to being an Arab M^^lim immigrant in Australia.

    I don’t even know where to begin, but this pathetic creature has obviously pushed all the right buttons for winning a tax free literary award.

  126. Des Deskperson

    ‘Cliched crap.’

    Speskjng of which, the new series of the ABC. err, drama, The Heights, is on this Friday.

    The first series was an absolute bumper crop of ABC cliches of plot, character and dialogue. The cast included;

    infinitely decent disabled in the line of duty Aboriginal ex- cop

    dedicated lady doctor who has the hots for the said ex-cop

    her daughter, disabled (not ugly) but brave and irreverent in the face of her disability

    feisty old Irish-Australian lady publican

    hard working and devout M-lem family

    hard working,non-specifically Asian grocer lady

    nasty whitey private school boy who has the hots for the disabled girl

    a wise and compassionate old Indigenous elder

    an Irish drunk.

    Let’s hope they maintain the standard.

  127. Some History

    Now it’s not just smoking. You know… slippery slope. Recently from Snowdon’s blog:
    Theodore Dalrymple on the British Medical Journal

    Theodore Dalrymple has written an excellent article about the state of the British Medical Journal, inspired by the BMJ’s recent attack on the Institute of Economic Affairs. It’s full of gems so read the whole thing, but here’s a sample…

    To most modern doctor-philosophers, everything, up to and including a meal, is either health-giving or health-harming, and it is the most important function of a government, under their expert direction, to promote the health and prevent the harmful. They are the Islamic fundamentalists of human welfare: their religion allows the healthy and forbids the unhealthy. They do not recognise any ambiguities. Vested interest for them arises only from the possibility of making a commercial profit: their own demand for control over ever more resources, or for ever more power to forbid, is purely and objectively for the good of humanity. As the BMJ puts it, concern has been “prompted” that the current Health Secretary might be “listening to the views of vested interests above those of the health community”. The “health community”—assumed to be of one mind, incidentally—has no vested interests, because its interests by definition cannot be vested.
    .. I am not so much concerned that the views expressed in this article should be expressed (everyone is entitled to his opinions) as that there is not likely to be much debate about them. One has the impression on reading the medical journals—the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the BMJ—that a kind of stifling pensée unique has overtaken or infected an important part of the medical world: a pensée unique from which it is increasingly harmful to a career to dissent.

    https://velvetgloveironfist.blogspot.com/2019/06/theodore-dalrymple-on-british-medical.html

  128. johanna

    johanna
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    #3096263, posted on July 3, 2019 at 1:45 pm

    TheirABC never stops. Today, we have a downtrodden Muesli who complains about the Skaf brothers’ effect on perception of his wonderful religion, here:

    Among six books shortlisted for the nation’s most prestigious literary prize is Michael Mohammed Ahmad’s The Le

    The loosely autobiographical novel about growing up in Western Sydney is set against the backdrop of the August 2000 Skaf gang rapes and the September 11 attacks in the United States — a few years before the Cronulla riots.

    The novel’s central character is a sensitive teenager called Bani who finds himself adrift in a community beset with angry Middle Eastern masculinity.

    A Miles Franklin shortlisting can equate to an immediate boost to book sales.

    While Mr Ahmad said that would be welcomed, the honour itself had already eased the insecurity and inadequacy he said was inherent to being an Arab Muslim immigrant in Australia.

    I don’t even know where to begin, but this pathetic creature has obviously pushed all the right buttons for winning a tax free literary award.

    The novel’s central character is a sensitive teenager called Bani who finds himself adrift in a community beset with angry Middle Eastern masculinity.

    A Miles Franklin shortlisting can equate to an immediate boost to book sales.

    While Mr Ahmad said that would be welcomed, the honour itself had already eased the insecurity and inadequacy he said was inherent to being an Arab M^^lim immigrant in Australia.

    I don’t even know where to begin, but this pathetic creature has obviously pushed all the right buttons for winning a tax free literary award.

  129. Some History

    Now it’s not just smoking. You know… slippery slope. Recently from Snowdon’s blog:

    From Theodore Dalrymple:

    To most modern doctor-philosophers, everything, up to and including a meal, is either health-giving or health-harming, and it is the most important function of a government, under their expert direction, to promote the health and prevent the harmful. They are the Islamic fundamentalists of human welfare: their religion allows the healthy and forbids the unhealthy. They do not recognise any ambiguities. Vested interest for them arises only from the possibility of making a commercial profit: their own demand for control over ever more resources, or for ever more power to forbid, is purely and objectively for the good of humanity. As the BMJ puts it, concern has been “prompted” that the current Health Secretary might be “listening to the views of vested interests above those of the health community”. The “health community”—assumed to be of one mind, incidentally—has no vested interests, because its interests by definition cannot be vested.
    .. I am not so much concerned that the views expressed in this article should be expressed (everyone is entitled to his opinions) as that there is not likely to be much debate about them. One has the impression on reading the medical journals—the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the BMJ—that a kind of stifling pensée unique has overtaken or infected an important part of the medical world: a pensée unique from which it is increasingly harmful to a career to dissent.

    https://velvetgloveironfist.blogspot.com/2019/06/theodore-dalrymple-on-british-medical.html

  130. Sinclair Davidson #3096262, posted on July 3, 2019 at 1:41 pm

    +1
    First they came for …

  131. Some History

    Now it’s not just smoking. You know… slippery slope. Recently from Snowdon’s blog:

    https://velvetgloveironfist.blogspot.com/2019/06/theodore-dalrymple-on-british-medical.html

  132. Some History

    Sinclair Davidson
    #3096262, posted on July 3, 2019 at 1:41 pm

    +100

  133. johanna

    BTW, even though it is actually getting colder, as it will for the next few weeks, the days here are now about 3 minutes longer, and slowly increasing.

    I noticed today that my gelsemium sempervirens (a yellow flowering, hardy climber) is starting to form flower buds. The days are only 3 minutes longer, but certain plants get the trend.

  134. johanna

    When they get away with airbrushing Winnie’s cigar, you know they think they have won.

    What is needed is a movement among younguns to buck the establishment and reintroduce the cigar. It’s just the sort of thing they’d like.

  135. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2019/07/kimberley-kitching-albaneses-shadow-assistant-minister-for-government-accountability.html

    There you go, thrillseekers, that’s what the Albanese Shadow Ministry thinks of you. Kimberly Kitching – FMD.

  136. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘sensitive teenager called Bani who finds himself adrift’

    Beta Moohoosley upset at being around alpha Moohoosleys.

    Clearly whitey’s fault. Literary prize followed by unspecified victim compo to come.

  137. Knuckle Dragger

    Or potentially a Moohoosley poove terrified of being thrown off the Harbour Bridge, the throwers apparently unmoved by several thousand males dressed as nuns waving rainbow flags on his behalf in Oxford Street.

  138. Geriatric Mayfly

    Bloke falls out of wheel well, plummets to earth, obliterates himself on concrete footpath in some punter’s backyard – missing punter in his deckchair by a metre or so.

    Cryonics fail. The hopeful immigrant fell as a frozen block, no vital signs on arrival.

  139. feelthebern

    From memory the navy cut cigarettes were shorter and fatter than the usual size.

    Phrasing!

  140. Ellie

    When I am triggered re SS uniforms I think of this Image

  141. Some History

    Good opportunity to highlight how Pietro Fitzbombomalucci, Pirate to the Starz and protector of homosexualism, figures in the antismoking nitwittery.

    Simple-minded Simon Crapman attempts to distance himself from proposed outdoor smoking bans at his University of Sydney:

    Last year, my university debated the introduction of a ban on smoking on all areas of its campuses, after the senate alumni representative and Herald columnist Peter FitzSimons led the charge. To the surprise of some, I spoke against banning it entirely. I supported bans near buildings, because of significant smoke drift into offices, and in outdoor eating areas, because of the sardine-like proximities and the easy option for smokers to move away.
    But I wanted nothing of banning it on the big campus boulevards or lawn areas. I know of no evidence that the fleeting encounters you can get from walking past a smoker in a wide-open space can cause any disease. The campus is now smoke-free, save for four outdoor smoking zones.

    http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/politics/why-even-wowsers-argue-about-smoke-bans-20120222-1to4x.html#ixzz1nD5K0cJ3

    Pete the Poyret was/is a senate alumni representative (Sydney University). WOW! And the Poyret hates smoke/smoking/smokers.

    Someone should ask the Poyret why he hates smokers, why he wanted smoking booted off campus for no good reason.

  142. johanna

    There you go, thrillseekers, that’s what the Albanese Shadow Ministry thinks of you. Kimberly Kitching – FMD.

    Dear little KK, who was found in the Royal Commission to be into nefarious matters up to her neck.

    Failing upwards is a thing.

    BTW, my comment about a Ms Mallia, also a shady character in the RC, was chucked into the censorator bin. Guaranteed nobody here read it.

  143. feelthebern

    Kimberly Kitching – FMD.

    Kimberly Kitching must have photos of someone doing something very very bad.

  144. Derp

    No man ever smoked menthols. Well not voluntarily anyway.

    Exception: Kool brand menthols were immensely popular in PNG and some tough nuggets hoovered them down.

  145. Ellie

    The Nazi regime were the first government to pursue anti-tobacco policies.
    Read on.

  146. feelthebern

    I don’t mind an inquiry into Pyne getting a gig at EY.
    If it is expanded.
    We should use 2007 as the line in the sand.
    That is, every Minister/Assistant minister from the Howard 2017 government onward, we should look if an a group that benefited from their decision making employed them post government.
    The biggest one of all is Gillard who’s contribution to the Clinton Foundation ensured she was employed there post her resigning.

  147. Dr Fred Lenin

    Does anyone remember Damons Tobbacconists in Melbourne City. A virtual treasure trove of smoking stuff ,every brand of cigarette you could get ,used to get my pretentious Gauloise Marylands there ,along with Gauloise Bleu ,Gitanes and Sincs Sobranie . Huge jars of tobbacco where a pipe smoker coukd get his own blend made ,cigars in humidors ,straight from Dr BG s Cuba ,lighters holders cigar cutters ,ashtrays ,an alladins cave for the smoker . Just the place to lock a smoking nazi in to drive them over the edge. Been gone for years unfortunately . Part of Melbournes history .

  148. feelthebern

    No man ever smoked menthols. Well not voluntarily anyway.

    Obama did.

  149. Diogenes

    ust the place to lock a smoking nazi in to drive them over the edge. Been gone for years unfortunately . Part of Melbournes history .

    A similar tobacconist near Central Station is Sydney looked after my smoking & cigar wax needs .
    I was trying to go for the ‘Kaiser Bill’ but could only manage a ‘Hercule Poirot’

  150. dover_beach

    Last year, my university debated the introduction of a ban on smoking on all areas of its campuses, after the senate alumni representative and Herald columnist Peter FitzSimons led the charge.

    What an arsehole.

  151. Helen

    Rules can be bent.
    How about Fullarton Patterson-Rolly?

    Fullarton becomes the Princess Highway, so Princess Patterson-Rolly it is.

    Yes really truely, I was born in Adelaide. Sadly, I find the place of my birth which should be a shrine is turned into a block of flats.

  152. Atoms for Peace

    Meanwhile, in the real world, cigarette smuggling is on the rise as our version of prohibition is shown to be a waste of time.

  153. Some History

    Exception: Kool brand menthols were immensely popular in PNG and some tough nuggets hoovered them down.

    Remember seeing a documentary of some Aussie celebs walking the Kokoda Track so they could feelz some of the diggers’ pain. All of them had trained for months for the walk. As the walk progressed, most of them had major problems, e.g., severe blisters, joint pain, gastro issues. As the virtue-signallers hobbled about the place, you would catch sight of one of the native guides [who carried most of the provisions] in the background walking briskly, cigarette in hand. At the end of one day’s walking, one of the celebs was terribly exhausted. A guide, cigarette in one hand and spare chair (for the celebs feet) in the other, tried to ease the misery.

    How embarrassment.

  154. Chris

    ‘Squinters’ by that upper-class, hairy up-himself mascara-wearing flog Minchin pales in comparison.

    I think flogs everywhere are offended by the allusion.

  155. Helen

    I remember my fist puff. I was not yet tall enough to see the top of the kitchen table but on the edge, sitting in an ashtray was my Mother’s smoking Alpine and it was ever so easy on tippy toes, to reach up and take a puff.

    I have been off again for about 5 months and doing it tough. Ten years break before that. Log Cabin was my first real tobacco at about 12 years old, with Tallyho papers, Redhead matches, later Drum and then Alpine, full strength, just like mum. I used to love the fresh taste as I walked out around my rabbit traps early in the morning as a 15 year old; my brothers left the experiment behind but I immersed myself for decades. I wish I was like Joh who can have a puff then leave it but I cant.

    The thing about smoking is it is so zen. A fag and a cuppa there is something about that that cant be got with other things. That is what I miss so about it.

  156. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Does anyone remember Damons Tobbacconists in Melbourne City. A virtual treasure trove of smoking stuff ,every brand of cigarette you could get ,used to get my pretentious Gauloise Marylands there ,along with Gauloise Bleu ,Gitanes and Sincs Sobranie .

    Sharp’s Tobacconist , in Perth, used to be the same. They are still there, but it’s been several years since they sold cigarettes.

  157. johanna

    A similar tobacconist near Central Station is Sydney

    I remember that place – a hole in the wall in the bend in George Street, they sold everything a discerning smoker could want.

    Nowadays we have legal injecting facilities where smoking is forbidden. What a world!

    BTW, I note that Julie Bishop has just joined the Board of a company that has half a billion worth of contracts with DFAT.

    Nothing to see here, move on.

  158. thefrollickingmole

    Do lawyers ever listen to the crap that comes out of their own moths?
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-03/second-man-charged-with-murder-over-love-machine-shooting/11274226

    Allan Fares, 22, of Preston was arrested just before 7:00am this morning and has faced court charged with two counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder.

    Wearing a plain white polo shirt, Fares sat between two guards with his head bowed for most of the brief hearing.

    Fares’s lawyer Nicole Menegas told the court her client was “young and vulnerable”.

  159. thefrollickingmole

    Moth wings being what lawyers use to semaphore their communications rather than talk with their mouths…..

  160. Some History

    Moth wings being what lawyers use to semaphore their communications rather than talk with their mouths…..

    🙂

  161. johanna

    Oh, and you Cats (you know who you are) who, against my advice, promoted Julie Bishop as PM should get down on your hands and knees and scrub out the toilet.

    You are all men, claiming to be superior, but easily led by the penis, although I will exempt Dr B.

    I see that some here are still treating him like their 18 year old daughter on her first trip to Bali, and demanding regular updates.

    Get thee back to the safety of your cruise ships.

  162. thefrollickingmole

    More legal spastics.

    Counting angels dancing on the heads of pins while ignoring the blatantly obvious.

    Apparently ladies lives matter, unless its a visa issue for the murderer.

    Peter Dutton’s bid to cancel wife killer Frederick Chetcuti’s visa overturned in Federal Court

    Chetcuti spent 25 years in jail for killing his wife Gloria and, later, assaulting his cellmate.

    During his 1993 murder trial it was revealed Chetcuti had, with his teenaged son in the car, followed his wife, forced her off the road, kidnapped her, battered her with a rock and dumped her in the Parramatta River, weighing her down with rocks until she drowned.

    The sentencing judge said Chetcuti had been seriously contemplating killing her for “at least a couple of weeks” and that “he had acted in wilful defiance of a Family Court order by approaching her, and he had killed her because she was seeking relief against him in the Family Court and he feared that he might lose some of his property”.

    Chetcuti was also sentenced to two more years in prison for assaulting his cellmate, after being asked to switch out the light at 3am.

  163. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Family refused permission to board accuse Jetstar of racism

    Robyn Ironside
    Aviation Writer
    @ironsider
    An hour ago July 3, 2019

    A family who was refused permission to board a Jetstar flight from Sydney to the Gold Coast, has accused the low fare carrier of racial discrimination and demanded $10,000 compensation.

    Vala Setareh and wife Dr Dona Hooshmand were travelling with their two young children and a grandparent on March 18, when an argument broke out with a senior crew member who they accused of ignoring their request for assistance.

    Their boarding passes were taken from them and they were told to stand aside which Mr Setareh described as very humiliating.

    Another crew member eventually returned their boarding passes but as they were waiting on the air bridge to board, the managing crew member decided they should not be allowed to fly.

    Dr Hooshmand objected on the grounds they needed to get back to the Gold Coast for work but the crew member refused to back down, instead calling in Australian Federal Police officers.

    Mr Setareh, a lawyer, said there was no basis for their treatment and the AFP took the family to a Virgin Australia counter which booked them on the next available flight to the Gold Coast.

    After writing to Jetstar to express his concerns about their treatment, Mr Setareh was offered a $444.49 refund for the untravelled flights, and an additional $295.51 to cover the difference between the Jetstar and Virgin Australia fares.

    When he expressed his dissatisfaction with the offer and demanded a personal apology from the crew member and $10,000 compensation, Jetstar added a $500 travel voucher, and apologised for the “negative experience” his family had.

    From the Oz. Play the race card early..

  164. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Moths’

    Good save, mole.

  165. Some History

    For anyone interested in the nasty antismoking regulations required when the Olympics circus (in partnership with the WHO) is set to come to town, see my comments here:

    http://catallaxyfiles.com/2018/03/17/open-forum-march-17-2018/comment-page-5/#comments

    http://catallaxyfiles.com/2019/04/22/monday-forum-april-22-2019/comment-page-6/#comment-2996484

  166. thefrollickingmole

    And last in the “first we kill all the lawyers” for today.
    Brayden Dillon murder probe leads police to arrest Bassam Hamzy over alleged prison ice ring
    Detective Acting Superintendent Mark Henney said police would allege Hamzy was directing the operation through confidential communications with his solicitor Martin Churchill.

    “This investigation has uncovered the abuse of the client-solicitor communication in order to organise criminal activities,” he said.

    “Particularly the supply of drugs outside the prison complex.”

    Dillon, 15, was shot in the head while in bed in his Glenfield home on April 14.

  167. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Helen, I had the occasional puff on a borrowed Stuyvesant in my ‘sophisticated’ early twenties, but didn’t smoke at all as a teen. Then, when left as a single mum with two kids and a new job in academia in my early thirties I loved joining in the tea-room conviviality so much, and it was an economist wot did me in (would be, wouldn’t it?), offering me his ciggies in chatty sympathy to turn me vivacious again. I became thoroughly addicted. Could hardly finish one before dreaming of that first miracle puff on the next one; smoked through classes, through meetings, through love-making and through loneliness. Also wrote myself an academic career with some articles published, puffing away at making them sound important when they weren’t.

    Had to give them up of course when I became pregnant with my daughter, Hairy’s first child. Then lived abstemiously with no drinks or smokes through the second pregnancy, but seized by body back at the end of it via a cigarette festival for three months after he was weaned. Meantime, Hairy had given his heavy smoking habit away to protect precious babies’ lungs, with such bad withdrawals that he never took it up again, so after a few months I went back on the anti-smoking wagon, and haven’t fallen off since. I have absolutely no desire to light up now, although I do understand the appeal. Still love my red wine though.

    So I think there are people who can have only one or two smokes, until they can’t. My archaeologist friend claims to be one of those, just a puff here and there, but life hasn’t yet smote her hard enough for utter devastation to set in, allowing the friendly nicotine ghost to move in. Or maybe some of us just take certain things a bit harder than others. Dunno.

  168. thefrollickingmole

    Knuckle Dragger
    #3096322, posted on July 3, 2019 at 3:20 pm
    ‘Moths’

    Good save, mole.

    Shh dont draw attention to it, I think i got away with it.

  169. Ellie

    I remember my fist puff.

    Me too, Helen.

    I was 13 and in the back seat of my dad’s Chevy Blazer with my stepsister.
    It was back in the day when our parents did a bit of drink driving. We were on our way home from a dinner. Dad was pissed, driving and puffing on a fag. My stepsister and I, very curious as to what it was like to smoke, pestered my dad until he lit a ciggie for us. We had to duck down so no one else could see. We coughed and spluttered. A funny memory. Pretty cool. I’d forgotten about it.

  170. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Peter Dutton’s bid to cancel wife killer Frederick Chetcuti’s visa overturned in Federal Court

    From the link

    The material relating to Frederick Chetcuti’s visa status was 130 pages long
    Mr Dutton was legally required to give “proper, genuine and realistic consideration” to it
    However, the judgment said it was likely Mr Dutton looked at it for “no longer than 11 minutes”

    So how long is it supposed to take to decide that, the sooner this rooster is on the next plane out of Australia, the better?

  171. dover_beach

    Re: Trump shuts down Jim Acosta.

    Brutal. Savage. Rekted.

  172. Empire 5:5

    RTWT and consider what happened on Sunday and preceding at G20.

    This doesn’t mean that China isn’t included. The problem, in fact, seems to be the Chinese economy. No one can account for what’s going on there because there is no official or mainstream explanation other than trade wars. Tariffs are the only thing anyone talks about; therefore, it must be them.
    ——————
    The issue is entirely liquidity risk, meaning dollar shortage. The bond market sees this in global monetary conditions and hedges against it in a manner consistent with forecasting imminent FOMC rate cuts. This global PMI data therefore confirms the economic consequences of something that must already be substantial.

    That isn’t trade wars.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-07-02/gold-spiking-bond-yields-plunging-china-composite-pmi-tumbles

  173. Robber Baron

    Only the ABC could turn a story about farmers killing animals for vegan food production into a call to eat less meat.

    Vegan agenda driven propaganda.

  174. Empire 5:5

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    I am pleased to announce that it is my intention to nominate Judy Shelton, Ph. D., U.S. Executive Dir, European Bank of Reconstruction & Development to be on the board of the Federal Reserve..

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1146185983458775042?s=20

    The Case for Monetary Regime Change
    Central bankers aren’t omniscient. A linked-currency system could improve economic growth.
    By Judy Shelton
    April 21, 2019 3:07 pm ET

    Since President Trump announced his intention to nominate Herman Cain and Stephen Moore to serve on the Federal Reserve’s board of governors, mainstream commentators have made a point of dismissing anyone sympathetic to a gold standard as crankish or unqualified.

    But it is wholly legitimate, and entirely prudent, to question the infallibility of the Federal Reserve [paywalled]

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-case-for-monetary-regime-change-11555873621

  175. egg_

    ‘Squinters’ by that upper-class, hairy up-himself mascara-wearing flog Minchin pales in comparison..

    They might shoot a Qwerty sequel: Sphincters?
    A gritty drama about the Triage unit in downtown Darlinghurst?
    Episode One deals with the fallout from the Mardi Gras After Party.

  176. Old School Conservative

    thefrollickingmole
    #3096324, posted on July 3, 2019 at 3:22 pm
    And last in the “first we kill all the lawyers” for today.

    This is the same Bassam Hamzy who was praised by a Judge for all the legal work Bassam had done leading up to a case the Judge ruled on.
    The same Bassam Hamzy who is reported to have made 20,000 illegal phone calls whilst in jail.
    Goulburn Supermax to be precise.

    A protected species.

  177. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Jacqui Lambie demands Tasmania debt relief for tax cuts support

    Richard Ferguson
    Reporter
    @RichAFerguson
    23 minutes ago July 3, 2019
    6 Comments

    Independent senator Jacqui Lambie says she wants to see Tasmania’s debt from the federal government relieved if she is to pass Scott Morrison’s full tax cuts agenda.

    Senator Lambie, in a statement to her supporters today, writes that she cannot “in good conscience” support tax cuts while the Tasmanian state government owes $157m to the Commonwealth in social housing debt.

    The Tasmanian independent is the key vote the Prime Minister needs to pass through the cornerstone of his economic policy and election agenda.

    “I am yet to arrive at a final position on the Coalition’s tax cuts,” Senator Lambie writes.

    “People in Tassie are doing it tough and for them $1k in their back pocket now will give them some immediate relief. But there are thousands of Tasmanians who are on the pension, Newstart and don’t earn enough money to pay tax, and they don’t see any benefit from a tax cut.

    “The State of Tasmania owes the Federal Government $157m in social housing debt. Tasmania is paying 50c in every dollar of our state housing budget back to the Federal Government in interest and debt repayments. That means we are building half as many homes, helping half as many people.

    “This debt is holding Tasmania back and denying shelter to thousands of Tasmanian families. The Commonwealth coffers don’t need $15m a year from the Tasmanian budget. We’ve got families living in cars who need a roof and a meal, and they’re the ones I’m thinking about.

    “There is no way in good conscience I can vote for substantial tax cuts without making sure that the people who so desperately need a roof over their heads aren’t left to go without.”

    From the Oz. Jackie Lambie proves yet again that Tasmania should be leased back to the British Crown, to serve as a penal colony.

  178. johanna

    Gosh, she is back talking about her favourite subject (herself) yet again.

    What a surprise.

    Still, I suppose it makes a break from perking up the 76 year old tits.

  179. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I hope that Indian couple get their compensation. Officious airline personnel need to be pulled up occasionally when they think they are entitled to boss people around, instead of their job being to smooth any ruffled feathers that passengers may have. Travelling with family is a stressful business, made worse by uncooperative personnel.

    Our worst experience was during the first Gulf War, when our children were very young and we were flying from London to Bangkok and thence on to Sydney. We set off on the night of Bush’s Ultimatum to Saddam Hussein. We thought they would go over the top of Russia and bugger the expense of it, for the Russians were charging plenty for flyover rights. But the Captain blithely announced our routed would be ‘over Southern Saudi Arabia’. I don’t think that’s at all safe, I said to Hairy, with our two little poppets sitting between us happily. Too late now, he says, and tops up my gin and tonic, indicating we should not alarm the littlies, who were looking up trustingly. Then, when over Sarajevo, the plane’s flight radar did a sudden about turn, an announcement was made by the Captain that ‘Our Company has determined that it is unsafe for us to continue on our planned route this evening, and we are returning to Schiphol airport (no prizes for guess which airline). At Schiphol, we were all to be taken to a hotel, and civilization collapsed as the unencumbered and able raced towards the buses, leaving me, Hairy, two small sleepy children, and two old ladies, to get to the last of the buses as it disappeared off. Another one was called and took over an hour to arrive. I complained to one of the plentiful airline staff, who had done nothing to help us or the old ladies whose belongings we were also helping to tote, that there should have been a system to let families with children and elderly people go first, and other forms of assistance to stagger the bun rush.

    Don’t you know there is a war on? she dismissed us with her Dutch unhelpfulness.
    Yes, like there was a war on in 1942, said Hairy more angry than I have ever seen him, and you lot did nothing to help some people in great need then either.

  180. Bruce of Newcastle

    Sounds like a great time to review the GST carve-up formula for Tasmania.

  181. Johanna:

    Doesn’t ring any bells with me, Winston, but my Dutch is rusty. Did he mean the translation on the homonym?

    You’d be much too refined to get the translation.

  182. Bubbles

    Rome, Paris, Amstrerdam…
    Arr, them were the days.
    Make smoking great again.

  183. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Another hour on that flight and we would have been in the line of fire of a row of US missiles in the Red Sea directioned over South Saudi Arabia and ready to bring down any aircraft moving in the area.

    One good thing of you all knowing my length of time for various experiences is that I can speak of them here. Remind me to tell you of the time Hairy flew as a member of an Australian Government Trade Mission to Israel, when Saddam was threatening to send chemical-weaponed missiles into Tel Aviv. Our government took off all of its MHR’s before the Israel flight, but civilians were encouraged to go on in. Hairy relates how when he arrived at the airport they had just run out of gas masks they were handing out to those who still decided to come. He did meet Netanyahu surrounded by a heap of bodyguards, and while there this small group (some Jooish, Hairy and others not) who had braved the threats were royally treated.

    When unpacking Hairy came across the roll of masking tape I had secreted into his luggage, for he had laughed at my concerns about chemical weapons, but he said later he was glad to find it there in case he had to seal up windows and doors.

  184. johanna

    More and more and more ofr Me! Me! Me!

    Boring.

  185. dover_beach

    Three Babies in Minnesota Were Born Alive After Failed Abortions in 2018 and Left to Die:

    Minnesota has been keeping track of abortion survivors since 2015 when pro-lifers passed the state Born Alive Infants Protection Act. The law recognizes infants who survive abortions as human persons and requires that they be provided with reasonable medical care.

    Since the law went into effect, state reports indicate that 11 babies have survived abortions: five in 2016, three in 2017 and three in 2018, according to Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life.

    According to the most recent report:

    For the calendar year of January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018, three (3) abortion procedures resulting in a born-alive infant were reported.

    •In one instance, APGAR score was 1 at 1 and 5 minutes. There were anomalies incompatible with life. No measures taken to preserve life were reported and the infant did not survive.

    •In one instance, comfort care measures were provided as planned and the infant did not survive.

    •In one instance, the infant was previable. No measures taken to preserve life were reported and the infant did not survive.

    An APGAR score of one means the baby was observed as one of the following: flexed arms or legs, had a pulse (below 100 bpm), had a pink body with bluish hands/feet, displayed some level of breathing or showed facial movements such as a grimace or weak cry.

    However, approximately 18 states do not have laws to protect abortion survivors from infanticide. Some states never have passed laws to protect abortion survivors, while at least two others, New York and Illinois, repealed their laws requiring medical care for infants who survive abortions.

    Texas recently passed a law strengthening protections for infants who survive abortions. The state legislatures in Montana, North Carolina and Wisconsin did as well; however, their Democratic governors vetoed the legislation. Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers argued that the legislation was “not a productive use of time.”

    Not a ‘productive use of their time’. Hmmm.

  186. cuckoo

    Let’s hope they(The Heights) maintain the standard.

    Des, you left out the gay couple.

  187. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Gosh, she is back talking about her favourite subject (herself) yet again.

    Oh do shut up, you miserable jealous old narcissist, always going on about yourself immediately after claiming others have no right to speak here of their experiences. At least my reminiscences have some substance and reminiscences hardly constitute all of my Cat comments. Sharing experiences is part of what is done here, often. Live with it and improve your own tellings, or stick to knitting that is more your forte. Work on improving your body too, if it is letting you down. Sounds as though there is much to be done in that direction.

  188. C.L.

    This literally just in at ABC Online:
    Baby bird photographed holding cigarette butt in its beak.
    The James Dean of birds.

  189. Geriatric Mayfly

    Looks like Lambie has been taking lessons from Brian Harradine. Tasmanian housos outshine their mainland counterparts, as tenants of good stewardship, to a significant degree, so I have been told.

  190. Atoms for Peace

    If Tasmania revisited the Franklin dam, they could make a shed load exporting hydro green ‘lecky to the mainland, and maybe help pay their own way.

  191. Mother Lode

    Spit-roasted koala

    Yeah.

    I love doing that. Particularly at family functions.

  192. Atoms for Peace

    How rooted will Tassie be when the next power station closes on the mainland ?

  193. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Oh, and you Cats (you know who you are) who, against my advice, promoted Julie Bishop as PM should get down on your hands and knees and scrub out the toilet.
    You are all men, claiming to be superior, but easily led by the penis, although I will exempt Dr B.
    I see that some here are still treating him like their 18 year old daughter on her first trip to Bali, and demanding regular updates.
    Get thee back to the safety of your cruise ships.

    Aha. I see that the bitter old sow has been on the plonk again.

  194. Empire 5:5

    C.L.
    #3096354, posted on July 3, 2019 at 4:07 pm
    This literally just in at ABC Online:
    Baby bird photographed holding cigarette butt in its beak.
    The James Dean of birds.

    Instructive the j’ismist ascribes nil capability to the mother who adjudged the butt to be suitable nutrition for its chick. Leftists will do anything to avoid personal responsibility.

  195. Empire 5:5

    Culpability.

    The James Dean of snakes [gravatar]

  196. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Looks like Lambie has been taking lessons from Brian Harradine

    Best suggestion, over on the Oz, is that the Commonwealth forgives the debt, then deducts debt, plus interest, from the next round of funding…

  197. C.L.

    Andrew Bolt’s son, James, is intelligent and capable as a radio broadcaster.
    Good on him.
    Very good point he makes about foreign interference in elections – which the left is now pretending to care about. He points out that Big Tech – especially Google – are upfront about their ongoing intention to skewer, influence and data-rig the 2020 presidential election.
    Is this not FOWEN INTERFEWENCE?
    ——-
    Vid at Bolt’s

  198. Tal

    No fighting in The War Room ladies😀

  199. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Speskjng of which, the new series of the ABC. err, drama, The Heights, is on this Friday.
    The first series was an absolute bumper crop of ABC cliches of plot, character and dialogue.

    Thanks for the list of characters, Des. Imagine the tedium of the sessions that worked up that little lot.

    One to avoid. Never watch anything ABC anymore now though, so needs no planning ahead.

  200. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    No fighting in The War Room ladies😀

    Great to see you dropping in now and again still, Tal. Hope you are well.

    But look, mum, she always hits me first. 🙂

  201. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    IZIZ [email protected] Khaled Sharrouf’s brother Arken Sharrouf charged with domestic assault
    Eliza Barr, St George Shire Standard
    36 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    The brother of slain Australian IZIZ [email protected] Khaled Sharrouf will face court today charged with savagely bashing the mother of his children and shaving her head.

    Arken Sharrouf, 32, is in custody charged with three counts of assault and choking after his 27-year-old female partner staggered into Riverwood police station at 10pm on Tuesday night with severe facial injuries and her head shaved.

    Police will allege the woman’s head was shaved, her ribs and vertebrae were broken and her eye socket was fractured when she arrived at the police station with a small child.

    Court documents reveal Sharrouf is accused of choking his partner, punching her, kicking her and stomping on her, causing a fractured left eye socket, 10 broken ribs and two fractured vertebrae.

    Sharrouf is also charged with common assault in relation to “forcibly cutting all her hair from her head”.

    Such a charming family! Such an asset to Australia!

  202. John Constantine

    It has been a good year for shareholders who kept the faith with driver fatigue monitoring technology firm Seeing Machines Limited (LON:SEE).

    The shares started the year at 5.625p and currently trade at 9.25p, following a succession of positive news announcements.

    The most recent was an announcement of a workshop aimed at improving the training of aeroplane pilots.

    Three aircraft operators – Emirates, Qantas Airways and FedEX Express – attended the two-day workshop in Dubai to explore the use and benefits of eye-tracking technology in pilot training and performance monitoring.

    Patrick Nolan, the general manager of aviation at Seeing Machines, said having “key industry leaders” at the workshop had demonstrated a commitment within the aviation industry to “adopt technology that will enhance safety and support critical training requirements in their organisations and across the sector”.

    The workshop was another example of the company’s diversification away from its historical core market of providing fatigue monitoring systems for drivers working in the mining industry.

    In short, this technology is too useful to be restricted to trucks, lorries and vans; it needs to be part and

    Too useful to the State to keep out of cars.

    Comrades.

    https://www.proactiveinvestors.co.uk/companies/news/203706/seeing-machines-is-opening-eyes-with-its-technology-203706.html

  203. Doomlord:

    As things stand on this thread – I could get a rude letter from the department of health telling me off for promoting smoking.

    Is that true?
    Or are you just pulling our collective legs?

  204. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Not a ‘productive use of their time’. Hmmm.

    biowaste

  205. Knuckle Dragger

    Bloody hell Lizzie.

    We don’t know what the nature of the ‘request’ was by the Indian menagerie that turned up at the counter. I suspect that since it wasn’t mentioned in the initial report and the very bland recompense eventually offered that it may well have been unrealistic, making demands they weren’t entitled to or just being pretentious morons.

    And if ever there’s a reason to turn a flight around and have the pax spend the night in the home port, ‘if we continue we’ll be shot down’ would be that reason, trusting poppets or not.

  206. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Arken Sharrouf, 32, is in custody charged with three counts of assault and choking after his 27-year-old female partner staggered into Riverwood police station at 10pm on Tuesday night with severe facial injuries and her head shaved.

    Time to address domestic violence in the religion of pieces, as well as in aboriginal remote areas.

    So much of it is hidden behind the MSM wall of virtue seeking.

  207. TFM:

    Labor reluctant to hold inquiry into ministerial standards, Rex Patrick says

    Obviously don’t want to be investigated, then.
    Obviously this is a wedge issue for Morro to use.
    Obviously, he’ll fail to use it.
    If I could emotionally cope with being in Canberra for 24 hours, I’d stand outside Parliament House with a sign demanding mandatory drug testing for the people who make the laws.
    But it would be a waste of time.
    Obviously.

  208. Dr Faustus

    Lambie cranks up the Free Stuff organ: $157m, a very modest first dip of the beak.
    Whatever one may think of her, she is doing exactly what her six-fingered supporters put her in Canberra for.

    Somewhere, where no one cares, Zali Steggall is spewing to herself: ‘It should so have been me...’

  209. Top Ender

    The nuclear energy option

    A new paper undermines the claim it’s more about culture wars than electricity generation.

    By GRAHAM LLOYD

    In the opening scenes to The Smartest Guy in the Room, a documentary that traces the collapse of US energy trading giant Enron, there are several accounts of what went wrong.

    Enron was a $US63 billion company that grew quickly but imploded in an instant after making profits from gaming the Californian energy squeeze two decades ago.

    One excuse was that executives at Enron had been “blinded by the money and didn’t see they were sinking their own lifeboat”.

    The fatal flaw? “If there was one you would say it was pride, but then it was arrogance, intolerance and greed.”

    Enron is a cautionary tale for governments trying to remake their electricity systems to meet the demands of climate change.

    The volatile conditions exploited by Enron are similar to what has been experienced in Australia’s National Energy Market.

    Patient capital

    The lesson from Enron is that corporations appreciate volatility and will exploit regulatory weakness to make quick profits.

    Patient capital and governments must work to safeguard the lifeboat.

    A discussion paper prepared for the union-backed Industry Super Australia provides a blueprint for patient capital in the energy sector.

    Superannuation is a natural fit for long-term infrastructure investment and has been a big supporter of renewable energy projects with mixed results.

    The discussion paper seeks to strip away the ideological baggage to set out an over-the-horizon view of where Australia’s energy market may be heading.

    It is critical of the chaotic nature of government policy and sets out where governments should have started with efforts to de­carbonise the energy system.

    The document is technology neutral.

    Controversially, it says nuclear must be considered part of the mix.

    Energised debate

    The super fund discussion paper does not set out to push nuclear but it has arrived as the issue is gaining renewed traction in Australia’s energy debate.

    Its findings undermine the claim that nuclear power is more about culture wars than electricity generation.

    The view globally is that nuclear power provides the best emissions-free hedge against a failure of renewables to satisfy more than about one-third of a nation’s energy requirements.

    The Prime Minister is being urged to give his blessing to a review of the potential for nuclear energy in Australia.

    Queensland MPs Keith Pitt and James McGrath have proposed terms of reference for an inquiry that will review advances in nuclear energy including small nuclear reactors and thorium.

    The NSW parliament will conduct its own review.

    One Nation MLC Mark Latham has legislation before parliament to legalise uranium mining and nuclear facilities.

    “The climate change challenge is real but a renewables fetish can’t solve it,” he says.

    NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro has called for a national vote to end the ban and says the northern cities of Tamworth or Armidale could be the site of a new nuclear power station.

    Scott Morrison says he won’t oppose nuclear if the economics stack up but no one is offering to build a reactor in Australia.

    Advocates of the nuclear option are playing a long-term game.

    In April, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency director general William Magwood made his first official visit to Australia. He met the energy ministry, the Australian Safeguards and Non-proliferation Office, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation and the Energy Policy Institute of Australia.

    Australia has no nuclear power plants but is the world’s third largest uranium producer and holds about 30 per cent of the world’s identified resources.

    Magwood’s discussions highlighted uranium resource issues but also focused on NEA analyses related to the decarbonisation of electricity systems and radioactive waste management.

    While Australia has no plans to build nuclear plants, in 2016 the country joined the Generation IV International Forum, for which the Nuclear Energy Agency acts as technical secretariat.

    Magwood’s talks with Australian authorities included the latest research and development on advanced nuclear systems.

    Discussion thwarted

    Nuclear energy is still controversial in Australia and has proved difficult for governments even to discuss.

    Environment group Friends of the Earth continues to run an active anti-nuclear campaign team. It says Australia does not need nuclear power.

    The group favours renewable energy sources such as bioenergy, geothermal hot rocks, solar thermal electricity with storage and sometimes hydro-electricity to provide baseload power.

    The group says nuclear power is the only energy source with a direct connection to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. It says nuclear reactors are vulnerable to disasters.

    And while it would take 15 years or more to develop nuclear power in Australia, clean energy solutions can be deployed immediately, it says.

    But after studying the evidence, Industry Super Australia chief economist Stephen Anthony has produced recommendations in his discussion paper that he says go against conventional wisdom and assumptions.

    “No attempt is made to avoid this,” he says. “Our aim is to provide the best analysis possible. It is not to simply run with the herd.”

    He says the inclusion of nuclear energy has caused some alarm but: “It does not mean we are pro-nuclear any more than not excluding solar means we are pro-solar.”

    The conclusion, however, is that it is difficult to see Australia decarbonising its energy sector without the use of nuclear power.

    Mainstream misleading

    One of the themes of the discussion paper is that mainstream thinking on the energy market may be misleading in many areas.

    It is often based on a partial analysis of the problem that ­ignores its economy-wide implication. The assessment of technologies is sometimes weak and based on time horizons that are too short.

    Critical to the report is how it deals with the real cost of renewables and storage and the difficulties of managing increasing amounts of variable power generation.

    As the amount of variable electricity increases, its value to the system declines. At times of high production, there is more chance that solar and wind projects will be curtailed.

    Ultimately, there is the prospect that some wind and solar projects themselves may become stranded assets.

    The problems of intermittency are at the heart of global concerns. Federal Energy Minister Angus Taylor is trying to address the issue with a reliability obligation for generators.

    Magwood says there is a need for strategies that more accurately reflect the costs and attributes of renewables. “As it becomes clear that the amount of baseload supply needed in the future is not zero, each country will need to decide how it will meet its future electricity supply needs,” he says.

    Expensive option

    One criticism of nuclear is that it is expensive, but costs vary widely depending on where projects are being built. They can be as high as $US7bn ($10bn) per gigawatt in Europe and as low as $US2bn a giga­watt in China. At its most expensive, nuclear is double the cost of onshore wind.

    But nuclear has advantages that intermittent sources of energy cannot provide.

    And a recent OECD report assesses the levelised cost using a 3 per cent interest rate at $US100 per megawatt hour for commercial solar, $US70 per megawatt hour for onshore wind and $US50 a megawatt for nuclear.

    The OECD says “a cost-effective low carbon system would probably consist of a sizeable share of variable renewable energy, and at least an equally sizeable share of dispatchable zero carbon technologies such as nuclear energy and hydro-electricity and a residual amount of gas-fired capacity to provide some added flexibility alongside storage, demand-side management and the expansion of interconnections.

    “What nuclear energy and ­hydro-electricity, as the primary dispatchable low-carbon generation options, bring to the equation is the ability to produce at will large amounts of low-carbon power predictably according to the requirements of households and industry.

    “For the right decisions to be made, these factors must be understood and addressed.”

    For Australia, Anthony says the likely energy mix will include renewable technologies such as solar, wind, hydro and battery storage, with some pumped hydro and combined-cycle gas generation as a back-up.

    But this is unlikely to be good enough for the long term.

    Gas produces significant emissions and this may operate as a strong inhibiting factor on its long-run value without carbon capture and storage. Coal seems increasingly risky unless carbon capture and storage becomes an option.

    “It is difficult to see how these problems can be resolved without some nuclear in the mix and the principles of optimality, fairness and merit would suggest it should not be discounted,” Anthony says in his report.

    Australia lagging

    It was noted that Australia is one of the few First World economies without nuclear power and experience in managing a nuclear plant.

    The Industry Super paper says: “This seems to be undesirable. It pre-empts the ability to make decisions between all major options for emission reduction.’’

    Not considering nuclear puts Australia in the minority of First World economies. It is also lagging several Second and Third World economies in our region and elsewhere such as Argentina, Mexico, Bangladesh and Turkey and geographical neighbours such as ­Indonesia and Vietnam.

    The industry super paper says this exposes the economy to considerable risk since it is far from obvious that solar and wind can provide all primary energy in any feasible combination.

    A recent Australian National University report calculates that there is enough storage capacity to provide back-up for a solar and wind system that provides all primary energy in Australia.

    But the industry super discussion paper says “capacity is not the same as feasibility”.

    It says to provide 1½ days’ energy storage, Australia would need about 100 Snowy Mountain 2.0 schemes at a total cost of $700bn. This is enough to build about 100 to 150 nuclear reactors, which would provide more than half of Australia’s current primary energy needs.

    The economics of batteries are assessed as being much worse.

    Based on the Tesla battery in Adelaide, achieving 1½ days’ energy storage would cost $6.5 trillion, enough to build about 1000 nuclear reactors.

    For household batteries, it would cost about $US7000 per household every 10 years to provide back-up for 36 hours.

    A switch to electric vehicles may provide an increase in ­storage capacity but there may be other impacts on peak-time loads.

    The discussion paper says: “The key takeout is that intermittent technologies may not provide the best means of delivering all primary energy.

    “It is also doubtful whether they are the best means of providing all electricity at current levels of demand.”

    Industry Super says the assumption that climate scientists are wrong and that large-scale changes will not be necessary in the medium term is a serious mistake and a bad bet for investors.

    Enron provides a lesson on leaving things to chance. And without the ability to consider nuclear, Australia could be making a difficult dilemma all but impossible.

    Industry Super says it would be desirable for Australia to spread its technological options.

    One important step would be to build some capacity to operate a nuclear facility.

    This would provide insurance against failure in alternative options or rapid change in technology.

    It says a single reactor would be a relatively small investment.

    GRAHAM LLOYD
    ENVIRONMENT EDITOR

    Oz complete article

  210. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    And if ever there’s a reason to turn a flight around and have the pax spend the night in the home port, ‘if we continue we’ll be shot down’ would be that reason, trusting poppets or not.

    KD, you misread me. Hairy and I think that flight should not ever have taken off on that route on the night the ultimatum was called. Not in a million years. But we were stuck on it, for the route was only announced once we were on the tarmac. We couldn’t conceive how any commercial flight would have been directed by any airline to take that flight on that night. But it was. We’ve never flown that National carrier again. The existence of our ‘trusting poppets’ on that flight were breaking our hearts till the flight was turned back. Uh huh, Bush has gone, I remember Hairy saying in great relief (meaning of course that Bush had pulled the pin and was ready for the war which started that night and that thankfully we weren’t quite yet in the line of fire and someone with morals had called for the turnback).

    The British press, as I recall, did mention that a commercial airliner was bound in that direction on that night and was at risk. That was us. The reprieve was very very last minute.

  211. Knuckle Dragger

    Speaking of shaved heads, I might go and get mine done again by the hot chick at Tommy Gunn’s this arvo.

    That is a fine plan.

  212. Dr Faustus

    Labor reluctant to hold inquiry into ministerial standards, Rex Patrick says

    So, dopy Rex is shoved out, blinking, into the daylight to do Mx Wong’s wet work.

    It’s a matter for the Prime Minister, a ‘character test’.
    But not for the parliament. Fuck no.

    A bit of a pub test problem, right there.

  213. Derp

    Most shearers would be using Champion Ruby when they came.
    Must have been an extraordinary smoking experience.

    Oh that brings back memories of country boarding school and cadet camps, with smuggled packs of either Champion Ruby or Port Royal and the Tally-Ho! papers. A lost art.

  214. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    making demands they weren’t entitled to or just being pretentious morons.

    It happens, KD. Airline staff should know better than to escalate situations like this.
    Sadly, they don’t. These days especially, they are full of pompous HR entitlement feelings.

  215. Geriatric Mayfly

    Such a charming family! Such an asset to Australia!

    And there is a surfeit of Sharouff spawn lurking offshore awaiting a big welcome into the ‘Aussie’ tribe.

  216. Sinclair Davidson

    Is that true?
    Or are you just pulling our collective legs?

    True

  217. Bubbles

    Lambie.
    Is there no end of tinpot morons and [email protected] who can hold us to ransom.
    She is perhaps more galling than even the filth.
    Just grow some and call a DD Morrison. Shake the [email protected] out of the cesspit.

  218. Dr Faustus

    Scott Morrison says he won’t oppose nuclear if the economics stack up but no one is offering to build a reactor in Australia.

    Perhaps the most dishonest response possible.
    Australia is blessed with ignorant gnomes leading both sides of the national debate.

  219. Cassie of Sydney

    Domestic violence as practised by the religion of pieces….prescribed, Halal, Koranic…all Sharia compliant. I wonder if we will ever see a gubbermint campaign with adverts targeting Muesli men not to beat their wives?

    Don’t be silly!

  220. thefrollickingmole

    My own “you are kiddingme” travel experience.

    Post 9/11 (by about a month) I did an escort back to Dubai to drop off some failed asylum seekers.
    They forgot to tell the embassy.

    I was stuck for hours in the airport with 2 blokes travelling on temporary documents (in English) trying to get through customs.
    But its alright they gave me a phone and the contact details of the immigration rep for the middle east if something went wrong.
    With the wrong number.
    Eventually I got through to the consulate who got through to the migration rep who raced down to get us through, excellent bloke.
    He then dropped me off to my hotel near the consulate.

    The world trade center hotel.

  221. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Speaking of shaved heads, I might go and get mine done again by the hot chick at Tommy Gunn’s this arvo.
    That is a fine plan.

    Hairy off getting the fuzzy part of his sconce shaved right now, KD.

    I don’t know if some hot chick attends to his needs or not.
    On minor matters, I do not make too many enquiries. 🙂

  222. dover_beach

    He points out that Big Tech – especially Google – are upfront about their ongoing intention to skewer, influence and data-rig the 2020 presidential election.

    Google, Facebook, etc. were openly engaged in promoting the pro-SS’M’ and abort side in the two recent referenda in Ireland and actively muzzled those against.

  223. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    He points out that Big Tech – especially Google – are upfront about their ongoing intention to skewer, influence and data-rig the 2020 presidential election.

    Also Twitter, by the sound of it.

  224. Mark A

    Started in the EU, it was only a matter of time to ban a mostly harmless weedloiler

  225. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The world trade center hotel.

    Hope it wasn’t a high rise.
    I will never ever stay in a new high rise in Dubai again. Rumour has it they do nothing to check the cladding and they’ve already had a few truly disastrous flame-ups that ran up whole buildings.
    Come to think of it, I suspect I am over Dubai altogether.

  226. The Australian dutifully quoting the utter BS about Antarctic ice loss.
    Do they ever ask basic questions like “how is this happening if the sea ice area is expanding each year”; or “if it has been happeninng for four years, how come we have just learned about it”.
    The new gen of Oz journos are just punk kids.

  227. Bubbles

    The Australian dutifully quoting the utter BS about Antarctic ice loss.
    Do they ever ask basic questions like “how is this happening if the sea ice area is expanding each year”; or “if it has been happeninng for four years, how come we have just learned about it”.
    The new gen of Oz journos are just punk kids. Inky Antifa.

  228. Tal

    Dover remember when we would warn people about the slippery slope and we were called tin foil hat wearers?
    Sometimes I hate to be right

  229. Geriatric Mayfly

    Read that bit about Antarctic ice having disappeared to the equivalent size of France X 4. Have these rabbits any idea how vast Antarctica is, even without its perimeter of frozen sea water?

  230. zyconoclast

    Dozens of police hurt, 60 arrested as Ethiopian Israeli protests turn violent

    Demonstrator moderately injured in hit-and-run; some 50,000 commuters remain stuck in traffic as thousands block highways nationwide; car set on fire in Tel Aviv

  231. Bruce of Newcastle

    Started in the EU, it was only a matter of time to ban a mostly harmless weedloiler

    When will the EU ban the emission of the deadly gas CO2?
    I can think of so many soon to be illegal sources of it.
    Juncker, Merkel and Macron to start with.

  232. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Don’t smoke. It is a dirty, filthy, unhealthy expensive habit.

    There y’are, Doomlord. I fixes it for ya.
    You can say it was simply being discussed here under the rubric of taxation.
    It can also be a great comfort and a pleasure but we won’t mention that.

  233. Vicki

    Bush had pulled the pin and was ready for the war which started that night and that thankfully we weren’t quite yet in the line of fire

    Lizzie, your experience reminded me of a similar occasion when my husband & I & my small daughter made our first OS trip in the 1980s. It was at the beginning of the Iran/Iraq war & at that time our national carrier flew to Europe (our destiny was Frankfurt) over the Middle East.

    During the night my husband (who annoyingly always has his window shutter open) noticed some periodic “flashes” coming from the terrain below. He idly thought there must be “weather”below. Shortly after, he was startled to see a fighter jet off our wing. He summoned the flight attendant (god knows why!) who promptly told him that he must be mistaken…and to go to sleep!

    However, on our return to Oz some weeks later, we clearly avoided that route, since our flight had an unscheduled landing in Damascus! That was not without its drama, either, as we experienced the worst landing that I ever experienced since then. The captain actually apologised for the scare, & indicated that Damascus (at that time) did not have effective runway lights.

    Nothing was explained to the passengers, on either flight – but I suspect we were the last flight over the actual war zone for a good few years. I have often reflected on that experience – particularly in view of the tragic destruction of MH17 over the Ukraine in 2014. Our national carrier did the right thing all those years ago in diverting flights from over a war zone.

  234. Eyrie

    “It says to provide 1½ days’ energy storage, Australia would need about 100 Snowy Mountain 2.0 schemes at a total cost of $700bn. This is enough to build about 100 to 150 nuclear reactors, which would provide more than half of Australia’s current primary energy needs.”

    This doesn’t add up. Max demand in Oz is around 35GW IIRC. So only 35 to 40 1 GW plants costing say 100 to 200 billion would provide ALL of our electricity. No need for any other mickey mouse generators.

    Let contract for this and I’m sure you’ll get a better price. Maybe as low as an NBN or bunch of far future submarines.

  235. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Gotta go. My hands are cold and I think I will take a bath to warm them up.
    Could put them under my jumper of course, as it’s warm enough there. Two nice hotties.
    Wrath of the Dutch though leads me to desist.
    The truth is, with these, I can’t cut her some slack. Woo hoo! 😀

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