Tuesday Forum: July 2, 2019

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2,059 Responses to Tuesday Forum: July 2, 2019

  1. Dr Faustus

    Try putting hemorrhoid cream on your deviant septum.

    Surely repentance is the correct treatment for deviant septa.
    Or celebration.

    One of them.

  2. John Constantine

    https://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/news/opinion/jobs-and-farmers-hung-out-to-dry-with-murray-darling-basin-plan/news-story/6f931c1f25657f96b7176819885cee8a?fbclid=IwAR0NGR25mkxiE9MIRcLpjMqqbHskQckMcOWej7viZP40YcBU9jl9p_UuvvM

    IMAGINE if you lost your livelihood and were forced to move from your community only to find out later that the cause of that upheaval was based on false information.

    Well, that is how many former farmers in northern Victoria and southern NSW must be feeling after The Weekly Times this week revealed that a major part of the controversial Murray Darling Basin Plan was implemented on the back of a misleading premise.

    In an exclusive story, senior reporter Peter Hunt revealed that one of the plan’s central scientific premises was based on a research finding that had been altered.

    The decision has been made, and the transnational conventions signed, that Australia will conduct Clearances and Rewilding of its frontier territory, demographically transforming to a postcolonial future of a massive, imported, tightly stacked megacity of a hundred million hugging the coastline from adelaide to the gold coast.
    Nothing but crows and Logan’s Run in the interior.

    Comrades.

  3. Infidel Tiger

    Sales of new vehicles in Australia fell almost 10 per cent in June compared to the same month in 2018, making it 15 successive months of decline.

    It’s world wide trend.

    Uninspiring vehicle choices and fallout from the vehicle finance deals done during and post GFC.

  4. Mother Lode

    Why not just go the full Soviet broadcaster and put up a photo of Hillary for two hours and play classical music.

    I know it is cruel (but my conscience is salved by the fact she would have been sooooo bad) but I can’t help a little glee at her frustrated ambitions. She would have been possibly not as bad as Bambi: She is motivated by greed and would only go as far as the price paid warranted. Obama was just malign. Hillary had contempt for America and was happy to ignore it. Obama hated it and would doubtless stay awake at night looking for more ways to punish it.

    And what lesson did the Democrats take from all this? Better to go radical like Obama than pretend to be middle of the road like Hillary.

    What a barnyard of braying, lowing and neighing animals they are running with.

  5. Leigh Lowe

    zyconoclast
    #3096990, posted on July 4, 2019 at 1:03 pm
    A financial version of coitus interruptus ?
    Mike Baird pulls out of the race to become NAB’s CEO

    Yeah, nah.
    He has been quietly told he has missed the cut, and they have allowed him to save face by “withdrawing”.

    And he has been run off early as there seems to be 4 or 5 still in the mix.

    After six months, the moron discovers that NAB HQ is in Melbourne and he is in Sydney.

  6. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Sales of new vehicles in Australia fell almost 10 per cent in June compared to the same month in 2018, making it 15 successive months of decline.

    ageing boomers and migrants that can’t afford new cars on welfare

  7. zyconoclast

    Judge blocks Trump policy keeping asylum-seekers locked up

    SEATTLE (AP) — A federal judge in Seattle on Tuesday blocked a Trump administration policy that would keep thousands of asylum-seekers locked up while they pursue their cases, saying the Constitution demands that such migrants have a chance to be released from custody.

  8. zyconoclast

    As trusted individuals in a deeply religious society, pastors and priests can offer comfort and a promise of safety to those undertaking the dangerous trek north. They also take a cut of the profits.

    “The church is an invisible actor in migration,” said Francisco Simón, a researcher on migration and smuggling at the University of San Carlos in Guatemala. “Using the image of the pastor is just one of the many ways coyotes [people smugglers] recruit clients. He has credibility and the trust of the people.”

    Out of 23 towns Simón recently visited in the western highlands, he found cases of pastors and priests helping people to migrate in 14 of them.

  9. zyconoclast

    Facebook said Monday it would take new steps to eliminate content promoting white nationalism and white separatism after an external audit said its efforts were “too narrow.”

    “Today’s report recommends we go further to include content that supports white nationalist ideology even if the terms ‘white nationalism’ and ‘white separatism’ aren’t explicitly used,” Sandberg said in a statement.

  10. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger
    #3097003, posted on July 4, 2019 at 1:11 pm
    Sales of new vehicles in Australia fell almost 10 per cent in June compared to the same month in 2018, making it 15 successive months of decline.

    Everyone held off waiting for their free Shorten-Tesla.
    I know I did.

  11. …or maybe talking about Whiskey?

    We only talk about Whisky here.

    Unless it is Makers Mark or Yamazaki.

  12. zyconoclast

    Cambridge to assign white academics an ethnic minority mentor to combat racism and assist ‘institutional change’

    Cambridge University is running a “reverse mentoring” scheme for staff to combat “structural racism”.

    Under the project, white senior academics and management staff are assigned one of their black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) colleagues as a mentor in order to encourage “institutional change” at the university.

  13. Beachcomber

    A of the items from Inconvenient Energy Realities

    38. It takes the energy-equivalent of 100 barrels of oil to fabricate a quantity of batteries that can store the energy equivalent of a single barrel of oil.

    39. A battery-centric grid and car world means mining gigatons more of the earth to access lithium, copper, nickel, graphite, rare earths, cobalt, etc.—and using millions of tons of oil and coal both in mining and to fabricate metals and concrete.

    40. China dominates global battery production with its grid 70% coal-fueled: EVs using Chinese batteries will create more carbon-dioxide than saved by replacing oil-burning engines.

    Remember that masterpiece of Green filmic propaganda The Age of Stupid? The title of the film was so lacking in self-awareness that it was ironic. We certainly live in an age of post-reason, where scientific reasoning has been replaced by Green-Marxist dogma.

  14. zyconoclast

    Leigh Lowe
    #3097005, posted on July 4, 2019 at 1:13 pm

    I worked that out, I just wanted an excuse to use the only Latin I know.

  15. Atoms for Peace

    Cambridge gets it’s version of political commissars . How long before mission creep sees those pricks in the military. Well done chaps , chapesses and chavs .

  16. Beachcomber.
    38 & 40 should kill the roonabaubles market (in a rational world).
    39 is good for my mining stocks.

  17. egg_

    Sales of new vehicles in Australia fell almost 10 per cent in June compared to the same month in 2018, making it 15 successive months of decline.

    Around Ryde, it’s not uncommon to see middle aged Chinese women driving 12 y.o. Holden Commodores, so presumably bargain motoring in a large, safe, powerful vehicle.

  18. Bubbles

    Not name dropping, it was too impressive for that. By sheer good luck, I was in Berlin about six weeks after the wall fall.
    It remains the most resiliant travel memories that I possess.
    The blackened and shell scarred Unter den Linden, the wasteland of the former Chancellery and other Nazi power center streets, the wrecked Reichstag, the neo-Stalinist kitch of Alexanderplatz. Bewildered Russians and East Germans in their enormous helipad military caps already setting up stalls to flog gear to gawkers like me.
    Modern history just leaped out from behind the wreckage and mugged you. You could almost hear the tanks.
    West Berliners were peculiar though. Very much like 60’s uni students. Just missing the roll necks and the cord jackets. Smug and heavily Lefty.

  19. Mitch M.

    It’s world wide trend.

    Uninspiring vehicle choices and fallout from the vehicle finance deals done during and post GFC.

    The younger generations aren’t even bothering to get a licence, something which used to be a rite of passage in my teenage years. I don’t know why this happening and it is odd because now we can buy very good and reliable vehicles for reasonable prices.

  20. egg_

    The younger generations aren’t even bothering to get a licence

    Doting Boomer parents’ “Taxis”?

  21. mh

    🍿🍿🍿

    MSNBC’s Joy Reid says Trump is using tanks at 4th of July celebration as a ‘threat’ to Americans

    The “AM Joy” host then pivoted to the “message” she believes the president is trying to send with his Fourth of July parade.

    “What is the message Donald Trump is trying to send by rolling tanks down Constitution Avenue? Who is that message to?” she asked.

    “It’s certainly not to tyrants because he likes tyrants, he loves tyrants. It’s not to Putin, it’s not to Kim Jong-Un, not to the Saudis. Is it to our friends, to Western democracies who he doesn’t particularly like, or is it to us? Is it to the resistance in this country? ‘I got tanks. I have this military armada.'”

    “The message is a threat, but it’s always a threat when you roll out your military. But it’s to whom is the threat, and I suspect that the threat is to his fellow Americans. And I hate to say that, but I think that Donald Trump styles himself a tyrant, not a defeater of tyrants.”
    https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/msnbc-joy-rid-trump-threat-fourth-july

  22. cohenite

    Avi Yemini:

    Tommy was thrown in prison last year for the “crime” of reporting on a rape gang trial outside the court house. Tommy was sentenced to 13 months in prison for that.
    The UK Court of Appeal quashed the original conviction. They said that Tommy’s arrest, prosecution, conviction and sentencing was illegal.
    Tommy served 10 weeks in prison — in solitary confinement — for nothing.
    And yet Theresa May has decided to prosecute him all over again, for exactly the same incident.
    I’m worried that if I don’t go to London to report from the court, the only thing we’ll hear about it is from the Tommy-haters in the mainstream media. Believe it or not, they’re actually worse in the UK than they are here in Australia!
    I believe that I have a duty to be Tommy’s voice in Australia, and for anyone else around the world who needs to hear these warnings.
    Because what happens today in the UK will happen tomorrow in Australia.

    https://rebeldonations.com/australians-for-tommy-robinson/

  23. rickw

    Farmer Gez and John Constantine, read a report by Ed Gannon on the Murray River, in particular Lake Albert and Alexandrina. Apparently a report was done in 2007 by Peter Gell or similar that depicted those lakes as freshwater, based on studies that went back 7 millenia. But the University of South Australia fiddled with this report to suggest those lakes were indeed saltwater which required water to be flushed down the Murray. 13 billion dollars of buybacks has been the result of this University intervention. Gannon put it mildly as ‘a national scandal.’ It’s more than that. Those at the University should be swinging from lampposts along with government officials who went along with it.

    Defund it, sell the assets, hang those responsible.

  24. notafan

    Under the project, white senior academics and management staff are assigned one of their black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) colleagues as a mentor in order to encourage “institutional change” at the university

    More and more like the USSR every day.

  25. Des Deskperson

    Folau used to be a ‘a “gentle, simple man”.?

    Sounds condescending to the point of being racist.

    A Kanaka who used to know his place. This nasty strain is detectable in quite a bit of the criticism of Folau.

  26. Mitch M.

    “Today’s report recommends we go further to include content that supports white nationalist ideology even if the terms ‘white nationalism’ and ‘white separatism’ aren’t explicitly used,” Sandberg said in a statement.

    If some of my FBFs are any indication FB’s censorship is becoming very haphazard and frustrating. It’s not just white nationalism that is being filtered, it seems that anything that moves beyond increasingly narrow parameters is being blocked. Anti-vaxxers are doomed, climate science critics will probably be next, alternative cancer cures are already targeted. This is heading towards a stultifying conformity which is very concerning because so many people now rely on social media to be informed.

  27. Mitch M.

    Doting Boomer parents’ “Taxis”?

    Uber and inner city living?

  28. MatrixTransform

    We only talk about Whisky here.

    Agggh.
    bugger convention, I just dont give a tosca

    bloody scots are pain in the proverbial
    taking the “e” outta whiskey because the scorts carnt fecking speel

    the seppos press that colour and valour dont have a “u” … but then they stick it right back into bourbon.

    on the other hand I’ll probably conform so that assorted prats dont keep correcting spelling

  29. Entropy

    Leftist paradises like Nth Korea, the USSR, Cuba, China and Venezuala seem to mark their big days with big military parades – so what is the problem?

    They aren’t the leftists in charge.

  30. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Another cure for MAGAism.
    https://imgur.com/gallery/IUBDxkm

    View that album every time you feel peer pressure to defend The Stable Genius against all evidence.

  31. Tom

    The family of a young girl who went viral for mocking Democratic New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez shut down all of her social accounts Wednesday, after receiving death threats and harassing phone calls.

    A tweet from the account purporting to belong to the little girl’s stepfather said she will not be doing any more content because the harassment and death threats “have gone too far” and threaten her and the family’s safety.

    “Ava will not be doing any more MINI AOC content,” the tweet said. “The Left’s Harassment and death threats have gone too far for our family. We have been getting calls on our personal phone numbers. For our safety and our child’s safety, we deleted all Mini AOC accounts.”

    The family should have seen it coming, but that doesn’t excuse the tactics of the gutter filth left against a parody that was 100% accurate.

  32. notafan

    You don’t need a car to get to gender unstudies classes.

    You do if if you are a tradie in the burbs.

    Perhaps draconian fines for parking five minutes too long and a million other petty things done by councils and state governments puts the young and inexperienced off driving too.

    All in the name of the green dream

  33. assorted prats dont keep correcting spelling

    Agggh. should be Arrgh.

  34. Bubbles

    Shame about Pastor Baird and the NAB. That holier than thou totalitarian arrogance would be a perfect match for new age banking arsehollery.

    The Bairds get more teat access than the equally smug and useless Beatty – perhaps not, but close. Same Party I guess.

  35. Pedro the Ignorant

    Sales of new vehicles in Australia fell almost 10 per cent in June compared to the same month in 2018, making it 15 successive months of decline.

    Not surprising.

    My little town has a lot of wealthy retirees, mostly from agri business, and it seems nearly all have two vehicles, a nice new(ish) Prado, Landcruiser or Range Rover that stays in the shed except for the occasional trip to Perth and the other is either a 10 year old Toyota ute or a dinky little Kia, used for running around town for shopping, CWA coffee/intelligence meetings or tip runs.

    Given the usage rate of the upper crust vehicles, they will still be under kilometres warranty until 2040.

    When they cark it, the old bangers will be dumped in the bush and another picked up for less than $5K.

  36. “The Left’s Harassment and death threats have gone too far for our family. We have been getting calls on our personal phone numbers. For our safety and our child’s safety, we deleted all Mini AOC accounts.”

    “Fuck Trump” t-shirts are okay.

  37. Top selling car in AU for 2019
    1st Toyota Hilux
    2nd Ford Ranger

    So the drop in car sales might have something to do with the POS sedan offerings.

  38. DrBeauGan

    egg_
    #3096978, posted on July 4, 2019 at 12:48 pm
    Maria?

    Definitely not. Spiky found her Facebook page and was favourably impressed. She pointed out that there is only one thing I have to offer a gorgeous 23 year old chick like Maria, and it isn’t sex.

    Given the poverty in Cuba, I don’t mind a bit. Feeding her ( and her daughter via doggy bags) is just a small price to pay for the company of a beautiful and lively girl.

    Tomorrow, I take them to the beach and I hope we all gorge ourselves sick on ice-cream.

    If all you blokes aren’t jealous, you jolly well should be.

  39. Mitch M.

    Perhaps draconian fines for parking five minutes too long and a million other petty things done by councils and state governments puts the young and inexperienced off driving too.

    Licence renewals are so expensive for a bit of plastic. Traffic infringement fines are ridiculous and points penalties can easily lead to licence suspension. In my day we learned to drive by having Dad teach us. Now what is it? Some documented driving experience hours? 30 hours or whatever. Mandatory driver instructor training which costs a bundle. I learned to ride a motorbike by borrowing my brother’s and riding it around the block a few times.

  40. Some History

    Folau’s prospects bolstered by landmark religious freedom ruling in Britain
    By John Steenhof
    July 4, 2019 — 11.50am

    Britain’s second highest court handed down a decision on religious freedom yesterday that will send chills down the collective spine of Rugby Australia. In contrast, Israel Folau and his team will be thanking God for divine providence that is akin to manna from heaven.

    Paywalled
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/folau-s-prospects-bolstered-by-landmark-religious-freedom-ruling-in-britain-20190704-p5240w.html

    The UK ruling was linked to upthread (got to the Court of Appeal).

  41. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    CWA coffee/intelligence meetings

    Never underestimate the power of the CWA, Pedro. They have a penchant for scheming and plotting that the Borgia Popes would envy, and an intelligence network that makes the Israelis look like rank amateurs…

  42. rickw

    Under the project, white senior academics and management staff are assigned one of their black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) colleagues as a mentor in order to encourage “institutional change” at the university

    I’m very unsure about the idea of assigning Asians, far to much like whites for my liking.

  43. stackja

    Michael Baird greyhounded?

  44. Bruce of Newcastle

    No need to go to Ringworld, you can now find the Map of Mars here:
    Map Of Mars: The Geology Of The Red Planet
    Cool! As long as there are no Pak Protectors under the surface.

  45. max

    About Hong Kong upthread: the CCP is undoubtedly using a slow but effective tactic it favoured in Tibet. Move in lots of loyal party cadres and deal with the opposition on the ground. Counter protests are already happening as is infiltration of protest marches. When the Occupy movement happened in 2014 triads were paid to beat up protestors and harass street occupations. There were enough protestors then to resist but how long can that last ?

    Could 1989 happen again ? I think it could. The CCP would be furious. Think of the outraged arrogance of a group of old Chinese men who think Shanghai can replace Hong Kong as a financial and shipping centre. And then there is Taiwan. Kill the monkey and the chickens will tremble. I think it’s just a matter of whether HK is strangled slowly and relatively peacefully or whether patience is exhausted and it’s done swiftly and brutally. If there is more public smashing and trashing it will be the latter.

  46. Top Ender

    I have come to the conclusion that Catallaxy posters cannot avoid stereotyping

    Where do we get these posters?

    I would like one or two for my wall.

    This one for the bathroom.

  47. MatrixTransform

    Agggh. should be Arrgh.

    🙂

    touché

  48. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Isaac el Matari appears in court over alleged Sydney tOrror plot
    Derrick Krusche, The Daily Telegraph
    July 4, 2019 9:44am
    Subscriber only

    A young man who proclaimed he was the “general commander of IS Australia” wanted to create a stronghold in the Blue Mountains to conduct guerrilla-style attacks on sites across Sydney, court documents say.

    The matter of Isaac el Matari, 20, was mentioned in Parramatta Local Court on Thursday after he was arrested during a series of raids that foiled the alleged terror plot that had listed police stations and churches as targets in the CBD.

    According to documents tendered to the court, the Greenacre man sent money offshore to buy a gun and gun parts and amassed US army clothes in the hope of creating a stronghold in the Blue Mountains to conduct guerrilla-style attacks in Sydney.

    El Matari had allegedly told others “we are tOrrorists” and self-proclaimed himself as the “general commander of IZ Australia”.

    Two Commando would have taken all of five minutes to reduce his “guerrilla base” to a pile of smoking ruins, surely?

  49. Mitch M.

    About Hong Kong upthread: the CCP is undoubtedly using a slow but effective tactic it favoured in Tibet. Move in lots of loyal party cadres and deal with the opposition on the ground. Counter protests are already happening as is infiltration of protest marches. When the Occupy movement happened in 2014 triads were paid to beat up protestors and harass street occupations. There were enough protestors then to resist but how long can that last ?

    When I watch ADV China I am left with the impression that China is heading down an increasingly totalitarian path. In one video serpentza mentioned the proliferation of Soviet style statutes. He is now abandoning China because of increasing actions against non-Chinese slowly driving them out of the country. When will the world stand up to China and say enough?

  50. Baird was unable to run NSW.
    He’d have had no hope of running NAB.
    Crikey – if a dickhead like that got near the top job, the share value would drop like a gay guy going off the top of a middle-eastern residential tower block.

  51. cohenite

    Cool! As long as there are no Pak Protectors under the surface.

    We need some Pak on Earth; I’m sure they’d be very gentle with the SJW and filth. I don’t think they’d like the RoP either.

  52. max

    When will the world stand up to China and say enough?

    There are many – perhaps the majority – of Westerners who side with China against Trump. They have no idea. China is a criminal enterprise. When Carrie Lam says HK protestors trashed the rule of law in HK she should have been mocked and hounded. There is no rule of law in China. e.g. No law of contract. Most Westerners have no idea of life in modern China. Party connections are everything.

  53. stackja

    max – party connection sometimes turn deadly.

  54. rickw

    When I watch ADV China I am left with the impression that China is heading down an increasingly totalitarian path. In one video serpentza mentioned the proliferation of Soviet style statutes. He is now abandoning China because of increasing actions against non-Chinese slowly driving them out of the country. When will the world stand up to China and say enough?

    The question is why switch direction when the trajectory has been towards greater wealth, freedom and power and prestige. My guess is that there are significant internal issues and that this is principally about attempting to contain them. At which the measures will almost certainly fail, if not become a self fulfilling prophecy. The Chinese don’t understand how to run a large country without resorting to brutality.

  55. Bubbles
    #3097022, posted on July 4, 2019 at 1:31 pm
    Not name dropping, it was too impressive for that. By sheer good luck, I was in Berlin about six weeks after the wall fall.
    It remains the most resiliant travel memories that I possess.
    The blackened and shell scarred Unter den Linden, the wasteland of the former Chancellery and other Nazi power center streets, the wrecked Reichstag, the neo-Stalinist kitch of Alexanderplatz.

    Can’t have been far behind you.
    Backpacked most of the Eastern Bloc over several months.
    East Germany was the final commo country in the passport.
    It was the only place I found Russians got anything like an even wrap.
    Every other occupied country loathed them.
    I’ve still got a picture of the War Memorial in Budapest for KIA Soviet troops – with “Not enough” (in Hungarian) graffittied onto it.
    This proved to be a most popular anecdote for me to recount in the East – except East Germany, where whenever I got around to mentioning it, there was genuine puzzlement & furrowed brows – they couldn’t work out where the sentiment came from.

    East Germany was also by far the best off of the Soviet occupied countries – I’d have put the living standard there to be at least double that of any other occupied country.
    It was the only country where the ambience was not totally depressing.

  56. old bloke

    I learned to ride a motorbike by borrowing my brother’s and riding it around the block a few times.

    A couple of driver’s license stories…

    Some years ago in Sydney, elder brother went to a suburban Police Station to get his motorbike licence. The sergeant told him to drive a short distance, just around the block actually, then come back to collect his licence. Brother inquired if the sergeant would accompany him, “No” was the reply, “You can ride around the block and if you come back alive, you’ve passed the test.”

    A sister in Darwin was driving for many years without a licence. She took some friends to Alice Springs and was pulled over for speeding. Asked to produce her licence, she confessed that she didn’t have one. “Right” said the policeman, “come with me to the station.” She was waiting at the police station while the policeman was busy filling in forms, he then called her over to the counter and said “Here’s your driver’s licence, and here’s your speeding fine, don’t do it again.”

  57. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Bernardi to gift seat to Libs

    South Australian independent Senator Cory Bernardi has confirmed to The Australian that he will leave the Senate before his term up and gift the seat to the Liberal Party.

    When Senator Bernardi leaves the parliament, the Coalition will only need to obtain three crossbench votes instead of four to pass its agenda when faced with opposition from Labor and the Greens.

    Senator Bernardi announced the decision after winding up his Australian Conservatives political party following its disappointing performance at the 2019 election.

    “I haven’t given a definitive timeline but will leave before (my) term is up,” he told The Australian. “When I do go, the seat will be filled by the Libs.”

    Breaking, from the Oz.

  58. rickw

    A couple of driver’s license stories…

    Old Australia, where policemen were just average blokes using their commonsense and discretion.

  59. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    FMD

    The Democrats have gone totally insane.

    Democrat Demands Prosecution Over Jokes, The Left Has Gone Full Authoritarian

    Frederica Wilson: People ‘Should Be Prosecuted’ For ‘Making Fun Of Members Of Congress’ Online

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/49109/frederica-wilson-people-should-be-prosecuted-ryan-saavedra

  60. Mitch M.

    Old Australia, where policemen were just average blokes using their commonsense and discretion.

    They didn’t dish out the maximum penalty possible, might let you off with a warning, and had considerable disgression in how they applied traffic infringements. I don’t blame the police, the demands for maximum penalties is government mandated and the result of so many traffic infringements arising from radars and cameras.

  61. Johno

    Sales of new vehicles in Australia fell almost 10 per cent in June compared to the same month in 2018, making it 15 successive months of decline.
    The main reason for this is that ‘bad’ cars aren’t made anymore. My wife had a Nissan Tiida that she drove for 7 years over rough rural ‘roads’.When she finished with it she gave it to our daughter,who still drives it and loves it. 280,000 on the clock. Oil changes and tyres plus one battery.Not bad for a 2007 car.

  62. Slayer of Memes

    I am somewhat pleased to see that Malcontent Termite is continuing to demonstrate why he is an utterly despicable personage, who deserves nothing but contempt from the vast majority of conservatives in this country.

    Remember when Malcontent (when referring to Abbott’s alleged ‘sniping’ from the backbenches over Mal’s disastrous leadership) said ‘former leaders should fade away into obscurity and never heard from again’..?

    Obviously he meant all OTHER former leaders, and not a ‘Potentially GREATEST’ leader like himself….

    … since we all know that Malcontent *never* sniped at Abbott from the safety of cabinet (let alone the backbench) after he was deposed the first time for his ineptitude… and definitely is not sniping away at Morrison after being deposed for his ineptitude a second time…

  63. Slayer of Memes

    Democrat Demands Prosecution Over Jokes, The Left Has Gone Full Authoritarian

    Frederica Wilson: People ‘Should Be Prosecuted’ For ‘Making Fun Of Members Of Congress’ Online

    Leftists: People who make fun of members of Congress should be prosecuted and jailed!!

    Also Leftists: OMG DONALD BLUMPF BABY BLIMP IS FUNNIEST SHIT EVAR!! teeheeheehee

  64. rickw

    Another cure for MAGAism.
    https://imgur.com/gallery/IUBDxkm

    View that album every time you feel peer pressure to defend The Stable Genius against all evidence.

    Millions of photos taken of DJT and they can only come up with 10 snapshots that fit their narrative?

  65. Mark A

    “I haven’t given a definitive timeline but will leave before (my) term is up,” he told The Australian. “When I do go, the seat will be filled by the Libs.”

    That’s a kick in the guts for the likes of Custard who worked tirelessly for the canute’s party.

    He could’ve at least named a party member as successor.

  66. feelthebern

    And just like that, Cory screws over everything person who contributed to the AC.

  67. feelthebern

    Every
    Not everything
    Damn iPad

  68. And just like that, Cory screws over everything person who contributed to the AC.

    Hey, he is a man of principles!

    And if you don’t like them, he has others.

  69. cohenite

    rickw

    #3097078, posted on July 4, 2019 at 2:58 pm

    Another cure for MAGAism.
    https://imgur.com/gallery/IUBDxkm

    View that album every time you feel peer pressure to defend The Stable Genius against all evidence.

    I love the photo with the Don looking one way and every one, snake-brained, swampified, arsehole leader looking the other way.

  70. notafan

    Cory knows a dead horse when he sees it.

  71. Atoms for Peace

    China’s only friends are the Norks. ’nuff said

  72. mh

    Colonel Crispin Berka
    #3097036, posted on July 4, 2019 at 1:44 pm
    Another cure for MAGAism.
    https://imgur.com/gallery/IUBDxkm

    View that album every time you feel peer pressure to defend The Stable Genius against all evidence.

    First one is JC’s avatar. No big deal.

  73. feelthebern

    Does Cory return all the AC money?

  74. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Now in bed with Attapuss cuddled in. I am so glad I still had my secret stash of codeine tablets from a hospital stay last year as I have been in miserable pain with this cauterised nose. When such pain hits you want to head for the hard stuff and not bugger around with anything else. Now feeling fuzzy in the head but generally happier.

  75. mh

    I remember when Stan Grant used to be a gentle, simple man.

    And white.

  76. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Hahaha. It’s a beautiful drug, I am telling Hairy, because it actually works.
    Beautiful, repeats Hairy with one of his grins.

  77. Boambee John

    Socrates at 1437

    East Germany was also by far the best off of the Soviet occupied countries – I’d have put the living standard there to be at least double that of any other occupied country.
    It was the only country where the ambience was not totally depressing.

    Saying I heard after the Wall fell: It took the Prussians to make communism (sort of) work, but even they could not make it popular.

  78. Tailgunner

    If we go to the beach I will meet the six year old daughter

    And see the puta in a g string.
    Go, BG!
    Pics, dude.
    Our Man in Havana is a good timeline.
    Great stuff.

  79. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Norks

    You can tell who the Yanks are here.

    Good lord that never gets old. Like their “fanny packs” and “shame caves”.

  80. A couple of driver’s license stories…

    Old Australia, where policemen were just average blokes using their commonsense and discretion.

    If the cops had to go out on patrol, they’d leave anything that you might want outside the police station on a clipboard for you to pick up.
    I waited to apply for my first Driver’s Licence coz I knew the cop was out on patrol & there’d be no point going in to the Police Station.

    Attended the station after he returned, & he seemed surprised I was there for my Driving Licence test.
    “But didn’t you pick it up? I typed it up before going out & left it pinned outside the door with everything else.”

    Yep, there it was still hanging outside the station door, where it had been for more than a week, streaked by rainfall, which had made some of the typed letters run.

  81. Dr Fred Lenin

    It seems the latest aboriginal dreamtimr story is that Sydney is the ooldest city in the world ,with a thriving shipbuilding industry 150,000 years ago ! They made bark canoes in Botany . The department of dreamtime stiry creation is busy ,the trees are there to prove it ? Or were the records written on bbark found ?

  82. 2dogs

    He’d have had no hope of running NAB.

    He couldn’t be worse than Fahour.

  83. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It seems the latest aboriginal dreamtimr story is that Sydney is the ooldest city in the world ,with a thriving shipbuilding industry 150,000 years ago

    For shame Fred, don’t you believe they invented the computer, antibiotics and landed on the moon?

  84. Black Ball

    Watching ABC Kids with the young uns and up pops acknowledgment of country or whatever, a new show for Aboriginal kids apparently. So I go to search for what it’s about, clicked on one link and this is what I found.
    https://www.abc.net.au/kidslisten/ideas/earlylearning/acknowledgement-of-country/9788018

    ‘ABC KIDS listen acknowledges Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the Traditional Custodians of lands, waterways and skies across Australia.’

    Is this what Julia Gillard had in mind with the carbon tax, repatriations so to speak for blacks? I couldn’t read it in full as before my shift I need to be in a relaxed state of mind, but this is frankly insane. So Glenfiddich is the drop Zulu after reading this bilge?

  85. Tailgunner

    Beautiful afternoon here in Yarragrad. Cold fingers from holding the pint glass briefly though.
    J. Setka fights on!
    To Albanese…
    “Come at me, bro! “

  86. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ‘More in common with Corbyn than Keating’

    Anthony Albanese asks Scott Morrison about readings from NAB suggesting the economy is as bad as “the bottom of the Global Financial Crisis.”

    The Prime Minister points out that NAB has also recorded a seven point rise in business confidence since he won the election.

    “Business confidence has been restored as a result of the re-election of this government and the reason it was under threat was because of the prospect of a Labour government,” he says.

    “As I looked down the front bench of the Labor Party, I see the same old faces. The same old faces in the same old arrogance in the same old class envy in the same old smugness which says we don’t think Australians should keep more of what they earn.

    Mr Morrison goes on to link the new Opposition Leader’s economic policies to far-left UK Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

    “This is a Labor Party which has more in common with Jeremy Corbyn than Paul Keating,” Mr Morrison says.

    From the Oz.

  87. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Heelllllooo, Gunner.

  88. Top Ender

    Berlin now has “The Wall” consciousness everywhere, and there seems to be a fair loathing of what the Soviets brought Germany.

    We were in the East sectors yesterday, walking down Karl Marx Allee – very wide boulevard lined a lot of the time with very oppressive looking blocks of flats – apartments would be too good for them.

    Had lunch at Cafe Sybil, which reminded me far too much of the cafe in 1984 – both book and movie – where Winston and Julia meet after they have agreed that yes, the State knows best.

    Maybe reaction against the oppressions of Communism is why Berlin is beset with graffiti. Even some daubed walls of the River Spree, just along from the Bundestag, could be sighted on our boat ride yesterday afternoon.

  89. He’d have had no hope of running NAB.

    He couldn’t be worse than Fahour.

    Yeah… point.
    Likewise, Monty wouldn’t run NAB bust as swiftly as would Numbers.

  90. Tailgunner

    Plenty of babes on Swan St, as usual. I’m the only punter in the pub though.
    $11 a pint of Draught. $35 a pack of smokes.
    Lol’straya

  91. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    $11 a pint of Draught. $35 a pack of smokes.

    …good lord and there are fawning Australian conservative monarchists on another thread doubting if the Yanks were right to have their Boston Tea Party.

    We’re still a penal colony.

    Change my mind.

  92. Nick

    About Hong Kong upthread: the CCP is undoubtedly using a slow but effective tactic it favoured in Tibet. Move in lots of loyal party cadres and deal with the opposition on the ground. Counter protests are already happening as is infiltration of protest marches. When the Occupy movement happened in 2014 triads were paid to beat up protestors and harass street occupations. There were enough protestors then to resist but how long can that last ?

    While I agree with you as to what China is doing, it’s interesting to see that despite 20 years of subtle and not so subtle indoctrination about ‘loving the Motherland’, that most young haven’t been sucked in, quite the opposite.

    Could 1989 happen again ? I think it could.

    I think so too. The Chinese top brass don’t ‘think’ like us.

  93. Tailgunner

    Hey TE, I stayed on that river hostel boat near the Wall you mentioned.
    It was pretty fuckin’cool, man.
    I woke up in the morning, looked out a little round window and was looking at Honneker&??? kissing on the last decent section of Wall. Grimy part of town. Hot, designer/stylist girlfriend next to me…
    Good times.

  94. Well Cory didn’t hang around long…did he?

  95. Tailgunner

    TE, you’re going to check out some of the Nazi Megastructures while you’re in the ‘hood, right?

  96. $11 a pint of Draught. $35 a pack of smokes.

    Good deal alright.
    I don’t sell pints, but she’s $45 for a packet of smokes – 25’s naturally (I provide value y’see)

  97. Tailgunner

    Oh noes, Cassie…
    Forget the Nazi Megastructures, TE
    :d

  98. Tailgunner

    Battery gone,
    Later

  99. Tailgunner

    $35 from the VietMinh smoke shop, Socrates, not the pub!
    Those cigarette machines are worse than Daleks! The savvy player comes prepared.

  100. Tailgunner

    Rothmans 30s.
    Red, natch.

  101. Tailgunner

    4pm – $7 pints now.
    Yaay.
    ‘straya

  102. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Handels Gold, Gunner.

    I thought they were cheap Kraut crap compared to the Romeo y Julietta, but they have a mild and pleasant taste, easier on the part-time smoker.

  103. 4pm – $7 pints now.

    Pint = 570ml
    I’ve no idea what I charge for a glass of beer, but that’s seriously cheap.

  104. Rococo Liberal

    We’re still a penal colony.

    Change my mind.

    Just look at the fact that the US has rent control and also look at all the commie measures in the latest NY budget.
    America is the core of all identatitarian rubbish that infest the whole world. So don’t give us that bollocks about tea parties, matey. If Australia has problem they have their roots in the US not in our British heritage. It is the latter that keeps us from the whole left wing sludge that whole swathes of America are turning into these days.
    Imagine living in those lovely left wing cities of San Francisco or Seattle where the streets are full of homeless scum shitting everywhere.

  105. rickw

    I love the photo with the Don looking one way and every one, snake-brained, swampified, arsehole leader looking the other way.

    Yep! One of “the ten” simply emphasises the difference between DJT and the rest, yet they are so freaking dumb they think the difference is to his detriment.

  106. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Imagine a hotbed of “identarian” left-wing ideologues that voted for a brash, non-establishment alt right businessman as President.

    BTW

    We need to talk about Cuckanada and the EU’s leadership of progressive nonsense.

  107. dover_beach

    From Some History’s link:

    In Ngole v the University of Sheffield, the English Court of Appeal has decided: “The mere expression of religious views about sin does not necessarily connote discrimination.”

    Well, that is what we’ve being saying here forever but urban bugmen are loth to admit they are pig-ignorant of these matters and hopefully it will cost them a motza.

    However, the Court of Appeal disagreed and has found that the university discipline process was fundamentally flawed. The university took an entrenched position early on, adopted processes that lacked insight and imposed a sentence that lacked proportion.

    No, really, I can’t believe that urban bugmen institutions could be so tendentious, unhistorical, and injudicious.

  108. woolfe

    Hey didn’t Albosleezy tell us Setka would be gone by 7 July?

  109. Top Ender

    The only Nazi Megastructures I am not familiar with Tailgunner, are the Moon bases.

    Would want to check them out one day, but not so keen now I know astronomy and space flight were pioneered in Australia, many millennia ago.

  110. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    It would be cool to see crazy ole’ Himmlers whacky castle with the Black Sun mosaic etc.

    What a loon he was.

  111. Boambee John

    Farmer Gez and John Constantine, read a report by Ed Gannon on the Murray River, in particular Lake Albert and Alexandrina. Apparently a report was done in 2007 by Peter Gell or similar that depicted those lakes as freshwater, based on studies that went back 7 millenia. But the University of South Australia fiddled with this report to suggest those lakes were indeed saltwater which required water to be flushed down the Murray. 13 billion dollars of buybacks has been the result of this University intervention. Gannon put it mildly as ‘a national scandal.’ It’s more than that. Those at the University should be swinging from lampposts along with government officials who went along with it.

    Has this got some words transposed?

    Went on a paddleboat cruise on the lower Murray a couple of years ago. The indigenous section included rock art of a porpoise depicted among the food options available even well upstream. The accompanying comment was that the Murray was saltwater well upstream until the barrages were built.

    If the lower lakes were always saltwater, as the report was supposedly altered to by the Uni, why would freshwater flushing be necessary? Surely they were always saltwater until the barrages were built, and being changed to freshwater by the barrages is what caused the demand for freshwater flushing?

    Or have I missed something?

  112. Not Uh oh

    Boambee John
    #3097147, posted on July 4, 2019 at 4:28 pm
    swinging from lampposts along with government officials who went along with it.

    Has this got some words transposed?

    Or have I missed something?

    No you haven’t missed anything. Our posters have it arse about.

    The original report said the lake was salty but the amended report said fresh (or actually brackish).

  113. Tailgunner

    Himmlers whacky castle .Yes!
    TE, get out there and dig up the Runes!

  114. Boambee John

    Not Uh Oh

    Thanks. The judgement about lamp posts remains valid. Billions down the drain for no good purpose!

  115. Tailgunner

    And the V3 rockets.
    You know you wanna.

  116. egg_

    DrBG at the restaurant?

  117. Tailgunner

    Booted from the street tables in the (dying) sun by a man bun hipster.
    “Hey mate, we serve food here,you can’t smoke… we have a smoking are in there”
    I’m smoking&rolling a J with my pint&Jamiesons shot…
    And I was still one of the only punters.
    History of anti-smoking, get in here and explain this.
    Will we be in a box in an alley way to have a smoke shortly?
    I was mucho apologetic to the non-existant diners at 4,40
    And told him the Komsomol would be pleased with his efforts.
    And licked the joint paper.
    The revolution forgets nothing.

  118. mh

    Folau’s prospects bolstered by landmark religious freedom ruling in Britain

    Britain’s second highest court handed down a decision on religious freedom yesterday that will send chills down the collective spine of Rugby Australia. In contrast, Israel Folau and his team will be thanking God for divine providence that is akin to manna from heaven.

    In Ngole v the University of Sheffield, the English Court of Appeal has decided: “The mere expression of religious views about sin does not necessarily connote discrimination.”

    The factual similarities to Folau’s case are remarkable. Felix Ngole was a social work student at the University of Sheffield and a devout Christian. In 2014, he posted Bible verses about homosexuality on a public Facebook page as part of a political debate. Sheffield University accused Ngole of breaching a vague and broadly worded code of conduct.

    Through a hearing and two committee appeals, various bureaucratic apparatchiks repeatedly incanted that quoting Bible verses constituted “views of a discriminatory nature” and breached professional guidelines.

    As the British appeal court stated: “The university wrongly confused the expression of religious views with the notion of discrimination. The mere expression of views on theological grounds (e.g. that “homosexuality is a sin”) does not necessarily connote that the person expressing such views will discriminate on such grounds.”

    This lines up almost exactly with Folau’s case. Throughout his four-year ordeal, Ngole advised that he would never compromise his Christian beliefs. Ultimately, Sheffield University expelled him. A judge in Britain’s High Court confirmed this decision.

    However, the Court of Appeal disagreed and has found that the university discipline process was fundamentally flawed. The university took an entrenched position early on, adopted processes that lacked insight and imposed a sentence that lacked proportion.

    This will be uncomfortable reading for Rugby Australia.

    It’s not all bad news for the union. Decisions from Britain are not strictly binding on Australian courts, just instructive. Although difficult, the university might appeal to Britain’s Supreme Court.

    There are also plenty of differences between the two cases for Rugby Australia’s crack legal team to agitate in an attempt to blunt its force of application to Folau. It’s what lawyers do best and Rugby Australia has good lawyers

    There are other notable implications from this British decision for the Folau case. Ngole’s case took four long years before he finally obtained his vindication. Many have criticised Folau for raising such a big war chest of legal fees. His fundraising efforts may be both prescient and proportionate given that he might face a similar long, hard and expensive legal battle.

    The appeal court also took a distinctively different approach compared with the original judge. While the lower court judge gave a “full and meticulous” judgment that navigated a maze of dense common law principles and cases, the justices on appeal went to the heart of the matter.

    This was about a failure of common sense. At the outset of the matter in 2014, the university had overreached and overreacted. It effectively purported to restrict Ngole from expressing his religious views in any public forum. The implication was that a professional should only express controversial religious views in absolute privacy.

    The court rightly pointed out that, if correct, no Christian would be secure in any profession, let alone Muslims, Hindus or Buddhists. Further, Ngole’s expulsion was disproportionate, given that the posts were expressions of religious and moral views that were based on the Bible.

    This decision may resonate with an Australian court considering the termination of Folau, given our antipodean commitment to the Australian “fair go” for everyone.

    Rugby Australia chairman Cameron Clyne has already trapped Rugby Australia on the wrong side of the ruck with his injudicious media comments, and he has dragged sponsors with him.

    It isn’t quite the end of the Ngole dispute. It’s being remitted for a hearing before a new “fitness to practice” panel before the University of Sheffield. The appeal court said it could not “finally determine whether the appellant would have resisted the possibility of tempering the expression of his views or would have refused to accept guidance which would resolve the problem. This requires new findings of fact. This case should, therefore, be remitted for a new hearing before a differently constituted FTP Panel.”

    But the Ngole decision will sting like the opposition’s sprigs on the union’s back, adding to Folau’s pressure for an apology.

    Folau and his team have reason to be buoyed by this decision. It is a season of miracles. Here is a timely success story of a devout Christian besting a censorious bureaucracy.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/folau-s-prospects-bolstered-by-landmark-religious-freedom-ruling-in-britain-20190704-p5240w.html

  119. Top Ender

    I know what you mean Tailgunner. Berlin needs a decent tank museum.

    But it’s very much like the ending of the Indiana Jones movie…where did the Ark of the Covenant go?

    The answer is here:

  120. dopey

    My Licence must be the only one spelt wrong.

  121. Tailgunner

    Hey didn’t Albosleezy tell us Setka would be gone by 7 July?

    Tick, tock…
    We can do a reverse Alinsky with the brothers. A ready-made street army of deplorables.
    Forget Folau, Setka is what the Rothschilds don’t want you to see.
    Split the Lathams from the Browns.

  122. mh

    Folau’s prospects bolstered by landmark religious freedom ruling in Britain

    Britain’s second highest court handed down a decision on religious freedom yesterday that will send chills down the collective spine of Rugby Australia. In contrast, Israel Folau and his team will be thanking God for divine providence that is akin to manna from heaven.

    In Ngole v the University of Sheffield, the English Court of Appeal has decided: “The mere expression of religious views about sin does not necessarily connote discrimination.”

    The factual similarities to Folau’s case are remarkable. Felix Ngole was a social work student at the University of Sheffield and a devout Christian. In 2014, he posted Bible verses about homosexuality on a public Facebook page as part of a political debate. Sheffield University accused Ngole of breaching a vague and broadly worded code of conduct.

    Through a hearing and two committee appeals, various bureaucratic apparatchiks repeatedly incanted that quoting Bible verses constituted “views of a discriminatory nature” and breached professional guidelines.

    As the British appeal court stated: “The university wrongly confused the expression of religious views with the notion of discrimination. The mere expression of views on theological grounds (e.g. that “homosexuality is a sin”) does not necessarily connote that the person expressing such views will discriminate on such grounds.”

    This lines up almost exactly with Folau’s case. Throughout his four-year ordeal, Ngole advised that he would never compromise his Christian beliefs. Ultimately, Sheffield University expelled him. A judge in Britain’s High Court confirmed this decision.

    However, the Court of Appeal disagreed and has found that the university discipline process was fundamentally flawed. The university took an entrenched position early on, adopted processes that lacked insight and imposed a sentence that lacked proportion.

    This will be uncomfortable reading for Rugby Australia.

    It’s not all bad news for the union. Decisions from Britain are not strictly binding on Australian courts, just instructive. Although difficult, the university might appeal to Britain’s Supreme Court.

    There are also plenty of differences between the two cases for Rugby Australia’s crack legal team to agitate in an attempt to blunt its force of application to Folau. It’s what lawyers do best and Rugby Australia has good lawyers

    There are other notable implications from this British decision for the Folau case. Ngole’s case took four long years before he finally obtained his vindication. Many have criticised Folau for raising such a big war chest of legal fees. His fundraising efforts may be both prescient and proportionate given that he might face a similar long, hard and expensive legal battle.

    The appeal court also took a distinctively different approach compared with the original judge. While the lower court judge gave a “full and meticulous” judgment that navigated a maze of dense common law principles and cases, the justices on appeal went to the heart of the matter.

    This was about a failure of common sense. At the outset of the matter in 2014, the university had overreached and overreacted. It effectively purported to restrict Ngole from expressing his religious views in any public forum. The implication was that a professional should only express controversial religious views in absolute privacy.

    The court rightly pointed out that, if correct, no Christian would be secure in any profession, let alone Mus lims, Hindus or Buddhists. Further, Ngole’s expulsion was disproportionate, given that the posts were expressions of religious and moral views that were based on the Bible.

    This decision may resonate with an Australian court considering the termination of Folau, given our antipodean commitment to the Australian “fair go” for everyone.

    Rugby Australia chairman Cameron Clyne has already trapped Rugby Australia on the wrong side of the ruck with his injudicious media comments, and he has dragged sponsors with him.

    It isn’t quite the end of the Ngole dispute. It’s being remitted for a hearing before a new “fitness to practice” panel before the University of Sheffield. The appeal court said it could not “finally determine whether the appellant would have resisted the possibility of tempering the expression of his views or would have refused to accept guidance which would resolve the problem. This requires new findings of fact. This case should, therefore, be remitted for a new hearing before a differently constituted FTP Panel.”

    But the Ngole decision will sting like the opposition’s sprigs on the union’s back, adding to Folau’s pressure for an apology.

    Folau and his team have reason to be buoyed by this decision. It is a season of miracles. Here is a timely success story of a devout Christian besting a censorious bureaucracy.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/folau-s-prospects-bolstered-by-landmark-religious-freedom-ruling-in-britain-20190704-p5240w.html

  123. Boambee John
    #3097154, posted on July 4, 2019 at 4:51 pm
    Not Uh Oh

    Thanks. The judgement about lamp posts remains valid. Billions down the drain for no good purpose

    Yep, absolutely agree. Jennifer Marohassy wrote a very good article about this back in 2012 titled ‘Plugging the Murray River’s Mouth’ Easy reading and highly recommended. But hey, what would she know.

  124. stackja

    John Setka takes fight against Anthony Albanese to Supreme Court

    John Setka is taking his fight against Labor all the way to the top, with the CFMEU boss launching Supreme Court action to halt Anthony Albanese’s move to expel him from the party.
    Rebekah Cavanagh, Herald Sun
    Subscriber only

    34 minutes ago

    Union boss John Setka has launched Supreme Court action to stop Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese’s bid to boot him from the Labor party.

    In a writ filed with the court today, Mr Setka says the ALP national executive does not have the power to expel him under the national constitution.

    The CFMEU secretary is seeking an injunction from the court to prohibit Mr Albanese moving the motion at a planned executive meeting on July 15.

    All 22 members of the party’s national executive, including ALP national secretary Noah Carroll, Mr Albanese, Tim Ayres, Stephen Baker and Kim Carr, were named as defendants.

    The national executive was due to vote tomorrow, but it has been pushed back 10 days after Mr Setka wrote to Mr Carroll earlier this week asking for more time, claiming the process was “completely unclear”.

    Mr Albanese has moved to expel Mr Setka saying his conduct, including a number of expletive-laden outbursts and public attacks, had brought the entire ALP into disrepute.

    Pressure for him to step down also came after he was last week put on a good behaviour bond and ordered to pay $1000 to charity after pleading guilty to using a carriage service to harass his wife.

  125. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    John Setka takes fight against Anthony Albanese to Supreme Court

    how bizzaro setka and izzie seem to have something in common

  126. bespoke

    mh
    #3096953, posted on July 4, 2019 at 12:19 pm
    Dr BG,

    Strike while the iron is hot.

    How long doe’s the blue pill take to work?

  127. Tailgunner

    $1000 to charity after pleading guilty to using a carriage service to harass his wife.

    #JusticeforJohn
    Take that, byaaitch!
    ‘straya
    but the Soviet want to take my wheels for unknowingly driving “unlicenced”
    The Deplorable wagon gone and maybe cop another 3/6/12 without a licence.
    $27k penalty on me, plus costs for a tradesman to get my gear around for however long.
    #justiceinYarragrad

  128. egg_

    John Setka takes fight against Anthony Albanese to Supreme Court

    how bizzaro setka and izzie seem to have something in common

    Getting a fair go from the Feudal Leftoids?

  129. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    If we go to the beach I will meet the six year old daughter

    perito cochino!

  130. Mother Lode

    I remember shooting the shit (think skeets) with someone in the later hours, of all place, in front of the Atomic Bomb museum in Hiroshima, about China.

    This was almost 20 years ago.

    Anyway, with the signs of increasing wealth in China she opined that they would become a democracy. I argued that they would stabilise where they were more attached to what they had desirous of what they might get. People brought up under the Chinese regime would likely have less attachment to ‘free speech’ and freedom to make choices on near everything because they had no significant exercise of them.

    I wonder how many people think democracy is a kind of default setting – rather than a precarious balance that requires constant attention even while it is being enjoyed.

    Certainly many on the left think you can shut people up, take their property, demonise them, coerce them, re-edumacate them, but democracy persists ultimately unassailable.

    There are two kinds of people who understand the nature of democracy – the right who wish to preserve it, and the fanatics who wish fervently to destroy it.

    Sadly the MSM and our political leaders are a third type.

  131. Top Ender

    The Mocker is in fine form today:

    Self-loathing activists have created a parallel university

    THE MOCKER

    According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, the noun “university” is derived from the Latin expression universitas magistrorum et scholarium, which roughly translated is a “community of teachers and scholars”. I am curious as to what is Latin for “a community of taxpayer-subsidised, freeloading, self-loathing activists bent on universities succumbing to primitivism,” as that would best describe where today’s tertiary institutions are headed.

    Admittedly, the once great humanities departments have long been lost to academic charlatans, but this malaise has spread to the STEM faculties — you know, the ones that still impart information that is actually useful. Last week The Australian reported that science lecturers at the University of New South Wales have been told it was inappropriate to assert that indigenous people have been in Australia for 40,000 years.

    The reason for this, lecturers were informed, is that assigning a date, irrespectively of how scholarly that estimation would be, “tends to lend support to migration theories and anthropological assumptions’’. Well yes. Much like the balcony railing on a high-rise building tends to lend support to the theory of gravity and metallurgical assumptions, I suppose.

    Some indigenous people, the guidelines further specified, “see this sort of measurement and quantifying as inappropriate”. It would be cynical of course to suggest it more likely than not that indigenous people on the whole could not care less about this practice, and that the document was compiled by various well-remunerated diversity consultants whose primary aim was to justify their existence.

    Sadly, this idiocy is not confined to the HR department. The UNSW science faculty research centre declared last year that indigenous people “arrived soon after 50,000 years ago, effectively forever, given that modern human populations only moved out of Africa 50,000 to 55,000 years ago”. Note to the person who wrote this: the planet is over 4.5 billion years old, and it is laughable to suggest that 50,000 years equates to “effectively forever”. To put things in perspective and based on the calendar of the earth being only one year old, Homo Sapiens emerged around 11.36pm on December 31.

    As ludicrous as the UNSW mentality is, it provides fantastic opportunity for the budding entrepreneur. Imagine, for example, tendering for a university catering contract to feed, say, 5000 students for a year. You secure it by significantly undercutting your competitors. When the time comes to feed the mass of students, simply produce five loaves and two fish while you invoke Matthew 14:13-21 and declare yourself a doctrinaire Christian. How dare others deny the well-documented miracle and suggest this is insufficient to feed the multitude? This is blasphemy!

    It gets even better. UNSW encourages lecturers to promote a court in “ethnoscience” and the “science of indigenous knowledge”, involving “traditional indigenous knowledge about the natural world, including astronomy, weather, medicine, geography and mathematics,” together with “ways in which indigenous knowledge can inform and benefit Western science”.

    These are extraordinary claims, but this revisionism is part of a wider movement that claims many Western achievements should in fact be attributed to indigenous Australians. “Aborigines invented democracy”, wrote author and indigenous woman Melissa Lucashenko for Meanjin in 2015. “As a result, the many First Nations here were able to enjoy millennia of what Bunurong writer Bruce Pascoe has called ‘the Great Australian Peace’.”

    That wasn’t quite the phrase that observers of the First Fleet used when they documented the appalling, widespread and brutal treatment of indigenous women by their menfolk. But to speak of that now is to invite criticism, even if you are an eminent Australian historian. Professor Geoffrey Blainey, wrote University of Newcastle professor John Maynard in 2015, “has been unable to let go of his fixation with the supposed violence of Aboriginal life”.

    Students of indigenous history, at least those wishing to gain approval of their tutors, would be well-advised to ignore Blainey and instead quote from Pascoe’s best-selling book Dark Emu. Among Pascoe’s claims are that indigenous people cultivated crops, constructed villages, and designed complex dams.
    “Many academic experts also believe Dark Emu romanticises pre-contact indigenous society as an Eden of harmony and pacifism,” wrote Richard Guilliatt in The Weekend Australian in May, “when in fact it was often a brutally tough survivalist way of life. It’s a criticism most are reluctant to air publicly, given the sensitivity of contradicting a popular indigenous historian”.

    In UNSW’s indigenous studies course outline, students are advised they will “learn about the history of colonial ‘scientific’ practices that disempowered indigenous people and led to environmental damage and unsustainable practices”. Presumably lecturers will avoid mentioning that more than 85 per cent of Australia’s mega fauna became extinct after the ancestors of indigenous people arrived in Australia. As Herald-Sun columnist Andrew Bolt noted when SBS reported those findings, the broadcaster conveniently omitted any references to the noun “Aboriginal” in that article, instead using terms such as “early Australians” and “early humans”.

    In fairness to these institutions, they are following a worldwide trend. A few years ago I holidayed in Canada, a beautiful country with lovely people, aside from its insufferable prime minister, Justin Trudeau, whom I can only surmise entered politics because he was too flamboyant to continue working as a drama teacher. While visiting a museum in Vancouver, I was bemused by the excessive curatorial tiptoeing in reference to Canadian native tribes, otherwise known as ‘First Nations’ peoples. A young museum guide of that demographic solemnly informed us that he possessed esoteric and magical skills that science could never explain. Perhaps anticipating my question, he added he could not elaborate on or disclose this knowledge as it would be “dangerous” in the hands of an outsider. My fellow palefaces lapped it all up.

    In November, the chair of Universities Australia and vice-chancellor of Monash University, professor Margaret Gardener, reacted indignantly to the federal government’s review into freedom of speech on campus. “Australian universities have been on the public record through the ages affirming our longstanding commitment to informed evidence-based discussion and vigorous debate,” she stated. Through the ages, maybe. Not the present. It was once heresy to dispute the church’s teachings that planets and stars orbited the earth. Now universities promote the philosophy that victimhood and primitivism are at the centre of our universe.

    So what subjects can future students expect? My prediction is Gaslighting 101, which begins with unlearning the indoctrination of whiteness. Students will be taught to despise themselves and everything associated with Western Civilisation. By the end of this course students will be able to provide informed discourse on themes such as hegemony, imperialism, racism, disenfranchisement, and genocide. Pretty straightforward really. Recognise your unconscious bias, check your privilege and defer to those in the intersectionality hierarchy.

    Then there’s Virtual Orchidectomy 203, which will explain why it is insufficient for male students to renounce their “toxic masculinity”, given there is no other kind. Students will explore theories such as whether ‘Sir’ Isaac Newton was in fact a trans-woman lesbian, and they will be subjected to bouts of abuse by guest lecturer Clementine Ford as she explains why feminism is a kinder and gentler philosophy. Required pre-course reading: ‘Tony Abbott’s women in white a symbol of what’s to come,’ Sydney Morning Herald, 2015, by Deakin University research fellow Dr Michelle Smith.

    In Technocracy 203 students will learn why government by experts, particularly scientists, academics and human rights officials, is the leadership our society requires. Required pre-course listening: ABC Radio National podcast ‘The Minefield’, 2019 — otherwise known as Grandiloquence Central — where hosts Waleed Aly and Scott Stephens ask ‘Is democracy an impediment to addressing climate change?’

    Religion of Peace 401 will take students through the many misunderstandings about Islam. As part of this students will be regularly bussed to Gosford Anglican Church to gaze at billboard messages as they recite Father Rod Bower’s platitudinous homilies concerning the burqa.

    As for what universities choose to teach about indigenous history, perhaps they will take inspiration from the Uluru Statement from the Heart, released in 2017, which among other things called for a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of truth-telling about Australia’s history and colonisation. Regrettably, I suspect this “truth-telling” will be more of a narrative reinforcement.

    But if universities still have a problem acknowledging unpalatable facts about indigenous history or keeping the pseudo out of science, government should give them a simple message when their vice-chancellors demand taxpayer funding. Tell ‘em they’re Dreaming.

    THE MOCKER
    The Mocker amuses himself by calling out poseurs, sneering social commentators, and po-faced officials.

    Link if you can scale the paywall and comment

  132. Leigh Lowe

    The Senior Labor Figure will enjoy his pie tonight.
    Albo is running to jump on the running board of the tax cuts bus as it leaves the depot, and doesn’t see the Setka bus coming the other way.
    Splat.

  133. Tailgunner

    John C, where is that list of isolated, elderly farmers with Ar15s in the locker?
    The revolution needs some firepower.
    Why should the meccans get all the hardware?

  134. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    John Setka takes fight against Anthony Albanese to Supreme Court

    Just what Albanese needs? Fight you barstewards, fight! I hate peace!

  135. Nick

    John Setka takes fight against Anthony Albanese to Supreme Court

    Gee, I hope none of the judges are ‘Tories’ lol

  136. Top Ender

    The Mocker is in fine form today:

    Self-loathing activists have created a parallel university

    THE MOCKER

    According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, the noun “university” is derived from the Latin expression universitas magistrorum et scholarium, which roughly translated is a “community of teachers and scholars”. I am curious as to what is Latin for “a community of taxpayer-subsidised, freeloading, self-loathing activists bent on universities succumbing to primitivism,” as that would best describe where today’s tertiary institutions are headed.

    Admittedly, the once great humanities departments have long been lost to academic charlatans, but this malaise has spread to the STEM faculties — you know, the ones that still impart information that is actually useful. Last week The Australian reported that science lecturers at the University of New South Wales have been told it was inappropriate to assert that indigenous people have been in Australia for 40,000 years.

    The reason for this, lecturers were informed, is that assigning a date, irrespectively of how scholarly that estimation would be, “tends to lend support to migration theories and anthropological assumptions’’. Well yes. Much like the balcony railing on a high-rise building tends to lend support to the theory of gravity and metallurgical assumptions, I suppose.

    Some indigenous people, the guidelines further specified, “see this sort of measurement and quantifying as inappropriate”. It would be cynical of course to suggest it more likely than not that indigenous people on the whole could not care less about this practice, and that the document was compiled by various well-remunerated diversity consultants whose primary aim was to justify their existence.

    Sadly, this idiocy is not confined to the HR department. The UNSW science faculty research centre declared last year that indigenous people “arrived soon after 50,000 years ago, effectively forever, given that modern human populations only moved out of Africa 50,000 to 55,000 years ago”. Note to the person who wrote this: the planet is over 4.5 billion years old, and it is laughable to suggest that 50,000 years equates to “effectively forever”. To put things in perspective and based on the calendar of the earth being only one year old, Homo Sapiens emerged around 11.36pm on December 31.

    As ludicrous as the UNSW mentality is, it provides fantastic opportunity for the budding entrepreneur. Imagine, for example, tendering for a university catering contract to feed, say, 5000 students for a year. You secure it by significantly undercutting your competitors. When the time comes to feed the mass of students, simply produce five loaves and two fish while you invoke Matthew 14:13-21 and declare yourself a doctrinaire Christian. How dare others deny the well-documented miracle and suggest this is insufficient to feed the multitude? This is blasphemy!

    It gets even better. UNSW encourages lecturers to promote a court in “ethnoscience” and the “science of indigenous knowledge”, involving “traditional indigenous knowledge about the natural world, including astronomy, weather, medicine, geography and mathematics,” together with “ways in which indigenous knowledge can inform and benefit Western science”.

    These are extraordinary claims, but this revisionism is part of a wider movement that claims many Western achievements should in fact be attributed to indigenous Australians. “Aborigines invented democracy”, wrote author and indigenous woman Melissa Lucashenko for Meanjin in 2015. “As a result, the many First Nations here were able to enjoy millennia of what Bunurong writer Bruce Pascoe has called ‘the Great Australian Peace’.”

    That wasn’t quite the phrase that observers of the First Fleet used when they documented the appalling, widespread and brutal treatment of indigenous women by their menfolk. But to speak of that now is to invite criticism, even if you are an eminent Australian historian. Professor Geoffrey Blainey, wrote University of Newcastle professor John Maynard in 2015, “has been unable to let go of his fixation with the supposed violence of Aboriginal life”.

    Students of indigenous history, at least those wishing to gain approval of their tutors, would be well-advised to ignore Blainey and instead quote from Pascoe’s best-selling book Dark Emu. Among Pascoe’s claims are that indigenous people cultivated crops, constructed villages, and designed complex dams.
    “Many academic experts also believe Dark Emu romanticises pre-contact indigenous society as an Eden of harmony and pacifism,” wrote Richard Guilliatt in The Weekend Australian in May, “when in fact it was often a brutally tough survivalist way of life. It’s a criticism most are reluctant to air publicly, given the sensitivity of contradicting a popular indigenous historian”.

    In UNSW’s indigenous studies course outline, students are advised they will “learn about the history of colonial ‘scientific’ practices that disempowered indigenous people and led to environmental damage and unsustainable practices”. Presumably lecturers will avoid mentioning that more than 85 per cent of Australia’s mega fauna became extinct after the ancestors of indigenous people arrived in Australia. As Herald-Sun columnist Andrew Bolt noted when SBS reported those findings, the broadcaster conveniently omitted any references to the noun “Aboriginal” in that article, instead using terms such as “early Australians” and “early humans”.

    In fairness to these institutions, they are following a worldwide trend. A few years ago I holidayed in Canada, a beautiful country with lovely people, aside from its insufferable prime minister, Justin Trudeau, whom I can only surmise entered politics because he was too flamboyant to continue working as a drama teacher. While visiting a museum in Vancouver, I was bemused by the excessive curatorial tiptoeing in reference to Canadian native tribes, otherwise known as ‘First Nations’ peoples. A young museum guide of that demographic solemnly informed us that he possessed esoteric and magical skills that science could never explain. Perhaps anticipating my question, he added he could not elaborate on or disclose this knowledge as it would be “dangerous” in the hands of an outsider. My fellow palefaces lapped it all up.

    In November, the chair of Universities Australia and vice-chancellor of Monash University, professor Margaret Gardener, reacted indignantly to the federal government’s review into freedom of speech on campus. “Australian universities have been on the public record through the ages affirming our longstanding commitment to informed evidence-based discussion and vigorous debate,” she stated. Through the ages, maybe. Not the present. It was once heresy to dispute the church’s teachings that planets and stars orbited the earth. Now universities promote the philosophy that victimhood and primitivism are at the centre of our universe.

    So what subjects can future students expect? My prediction is Gaslighting 101, which begins with unlearning the indoctrination of whiteness. Students will be taught to despise themselves and everything associated with Western Civilisation. By the end of this course students will be able to provide informed discourse on themes such as hegemony, imperialism, racism, disenfranchisement, and genocide. Pretty straightforward really. Recognise your unconscious bias, check your privilege and defer to those in the intersectionality hierarchy.

    Then there’s Virtual Orchidectomy 203, which will explain why it is insufficient for male students to renounce their “toxic masculinity”, given there is no other kind. Students will explore theories such as whether ‘Sir’ Isaac Newton was in fact a trans-woman lesbian, and they will be subjected to bouts of abuse by guest lecturer Clementine Ford as she explains why feminism is a kinder and gentler philosophy. Required pre-course reading: ‘Tony Abbott’s women in white a symbol of what’s to come,’ Sydney Morning Herald, 2015, by Deakin University research fellow Dr Michelle Smith.

    In Technocracy 203 students will learn why government by experts, particularly scientists, academics and human rights officials, is the leadership our society requires. Required pre-course listening: ABC Radio National podcast ‘The Minefield’, 2019 — otherwise known as Grandiloquence Central — where hosts Waleed Aly and Scott Stephens ask ‘Is democracy an impediment to addressing climate change?’

    Religion of Peace 401 will take students through the many misunderstandings about Is lam. As part of this students will be regularly bussed to Gosford Anglican Church to gaze at billboard messages as they recite Father Rod Bower’s platitudinous homilies concerning the burqa.

    As for what universities choose to teach about indigenous history, perhaps they will take inspiration from the Uluru Statement from the Heart, released in 2017, which among other things called for a Makarrata Commission to oversee a process of truth-telling about Australia’s history and colonisation. Regrettably, I suspect this “truth-telling” will be more of a narrative reinforcement.

    But if universities still have a problem acknowledging unpalatable facts about indigenous history or keeping the pseudo out of science, government should give them a simple message when their vice-chancellors demand taxpayer funding. Tell ‘em they’re Dreaming.

    THE MOCKER
    The Mocker amuses himself by calling out poseurs, sneering social commentators, and po-faced officials.

    Link if you can scale the paywall and comment

  137. Seco

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3096804, posted on July 4, 2019 at 9:16 am
    This scientific finding could actually cause a war.

    Scholars say Philistine genes help solve biblical mystery (via Drudge)

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Goliath the Greek? Human remains from an ancient cemetery in southern Israel have yielded precious bits of DNA that a new study says help prove the European origin of the Philistines — the enigmatic nemeses of the biblical Israelites.

    The Philistines mostly resided in five cities along the southern coast of what is today Israel and the Gaza Strip during the early Iron Age, around 3,000 years ago. In the Bible, David fought the Philistine giant Goliath in a duel, and Samson slew a thousand of their warriors with the jawbone of an ass.

    Now, a study of genetic material extracted from skeletons unearthed in the Israeli coastal city of Ashkelon in 2013 has found a DNA link. It connects the Philistines to populations in southern Europe during the Bronze Age.

    The study, spearheaded by researchers from Germany’s Max Planck Institute and Wheaton College in Illinois, was published Wednesday in the research journal Science Advances.

    If it comes out that the Palestinians are really Greeks the head explosions could well become real explosions. Does the Max Planck Institute have insurance for fatwas?

    I don’t get it Bruce, an atheist friend of mine who went on a huge anti Christian rant one night over Folau said he’d read the Bible “cover to cover” and it’s complete fiction. Surely there’s not actual historical truth in the Bible? I might have to mention this to him.

    Just on reading the Bible, I hadn’t read it before but am now listening to it via audio book. I’m now in the Book of Chronicles after near 30 hours of listening. The Bible is a massive read, if my friend says he’s read it “cover to cover” when he’s always been a rabid atheist I think he might be telling porkies.

  138. bespoke

    Watched the last show of The Big Bang Theory last. Although the actors are full on SJW’s it was irreverent and un PC, I doubt will see another series like it again.

  139. Mother Lode

    they (Chinese society) would stabilise where they were more attached to what they had than desirous of what they might get.

  140. feelthebern

    Watched the last show of The Big Bang Theory

    You sick son of a bitch.

  141. John Constantine

    In yarragrad today.

    https://www.standard.net.au/story/6255918/12-year-old-caught-driving-heavy-truck/?fbclid=IwAR0TsVooGkf8CAW_CemahFdJtTH35S9LZKMk9u4AF1vGhkDHG2ZuGxSWjig

    12-year-old Warrnambool boy caught driving truck said he was doing ‘school holiday work’ for his dad

    The boy is expected to be charged with unlicensed driving and fined up to $800.

    “Sometimes we catch fairly young drivers behind the wheel of a paddock bomb but not a truck,”

    Big Australia has made us so wealthy we can do this.

    The proles must remember we aren’t in Kansas anymore.

    Once all vehicles have in cabin cameras and artificial intelligence uber alles, that will put a stop to kids doing school holiday work forever.

    Comrades.

  142. candy

    Setka might be counting on getting Shorten back or Plibersek maybe. He must have the support of some high up types.

    Albanese, whatever his skills are and it’s too early to tell, appears more likeable face to face and seems to engage.
    Hard work being a Labor opposition leader though. Extreme elements. I wonder if he has ticker.
    PM Morrison has a lot of bluster and Albanese needs to sit tight through it.

  143. Nick

    aside from its insufferable prime minister, Justin Trudeau, whom I can only surmise entered politics because he was too flamboyant to continue working as a drama teacher.

    LMAO

  144. Nick

    12-year-old Warrnambool boy caught driving truck said he was doing ‘school holiday work’ for his dad
    The boy is expected to be charged with unlicensed driving and fined up to $800.

    No doubt a different outcome would have awaited the lad, had he been indigenous and ‘borrowed’ the vehicle.

  145. Leigh Lowe

    97193, posted on July 4, 2019 at 5:45 pm

    12-year-old Warrnambool boy caught driving truck said he was doing ‘school holiday work’ for his dad

    I wouldn’t like to count the number of times I might have taken a sneaky trip down a backroad in a tractor or ute before the age of 18.

  146. dover_beach

    Just on reading the Bible, I hadn’t read it before but am now listening to it via audio book. I’m now in the Book of Chronicles after near 30 hours of listening. The Bible is a massive read, if my friend says he’s read it “cover to cover” when he’s always been a rabid atheist I think he might be telling porkies.

    The Bible is so rich in allusions, insight, etc. that you really need a master interpreter to appreciate it in its fullness. I listened to a podcast that simply looked at Aquinas’s Commentary on John’s Gospel focussing on nothing more than Christ’s question to Peter, asked three times, Do you love me? and it was moving and brilliant.

  147. bespoke

    eelthebern
    #3097188, posted on July 4, 2019 at 5:37 pm
    Watched the last show of The Big Bang Theory

    You sick son of a bitch.

    😎 Kaley Cuoco and Sarah Michelle Gellar in the same show.

  148. dover_beach

    I wouldn’t like to count the number of times I might have taken a sneaky trip down a backroad in a tractor or ute before the age of 18.

    I used to drive my dad’s car back to the house from the bus stop after school when 16. Never a problem.

  149. John Constantine

    Is the mouth of the Yarra river where the river enters the bay, or where the bay meets Bass Strait?.

    Is the mouth of the Murray where the river flows into the estuary, or where the estuary meets the great southern ocean?.

  150. Tailgunner

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3096804, posted on July 4, 2019 at 9:16 am
    This scientific finding could actually cause a war.

    Sheesh, Bruce…
    Excellent work.
    Gonna upset some folks!

  151. Tailgunner

    Piss off with your parlour games, John.
    How are the sheep/troop carrier testings going?

  152. wivenhoe

    How long doe’s the blue pill take to work?

    ?? I give up, what is the blue pill??

  153. Tailgunner

    Wivenhoe, go and re-watch the Matrix please.
    Ffs

  154. slackster

    Maybe reaction against the oppressions of Communism is why Berlin is beset with graffiti. Even some daubed walls of the River Spree, just along from the Bundestag, could be sighted on our boat ride yesterday afternoon.

    Some great street art I saw in East Berlin:

    https://imgur.com/a/TmulZQK
    https://imgur.com/a/9JVGObV

  155. wivenhoe

    Wivenhoe, go and re-watch the Matrix please.

    gee I know I am unedumecated and stuff, bt now you confuse me again. firstly, what is the Matrix. then how an I re-watch something that I have never heard of, and never seen in the first place?

  156. Geriatric Mayfly

    The Bible is so rich in allusions, insight, etc. that you really need a master interpreter to appreciate it in its fullness.

    Granted DB. But side notes, or footnotes, were the cause of much discord when the Bible was eventually freed from its Latin chains. Conflict over different interpretations in these explanatory notes, led to the printing of some Bibles without any such additions at all.

  157. Cassie of Sydney

    Pauline on Credlin…..she is speaking about Cory..she says he has made a political decision because he knows he will struggle to win his seat at the next election. She says that Cory doesn’t believe his time was up…it’s just that he has had to face the writing on the wall. What a loser.

  158. Entropy

    Tailgunner
    #3097157, posted on July 4, 2019 at 5:00 pm
    Booted from the street tables in the (dying) sun by a man bun hipster.
    “Hey mate, we serve food here,you can’t smoke… we have a smoking are in there”
    I’m smoking&rolling a J with my pint&Jamiesons shot…
    And I was still one of the only punters.
    History of anti-smoking, get in here and explain this.
    Will we be in a box in an alley way to have a smoke shortly

    This explains the futur of smokers from the UK perspective. It’s brilliant, but I don’t know how to embed YouTube so here is the link .

  159. Notafan

    The Bible was never really in Latin chains.

    Vernacular Bibles have always been around

    What changed was people, who like to think they know better than the Church., And of course mass printing meant more know it all’s.

  160. John Constantine

    The revolution that hurts them may be the revolution where gaming and esports overthrow hollywood and movies.

    Downloading pirated hollywood movies is a revolutionary act!.

    https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/buried-treasure-high-school-gamers-at-forefront-of-esports-growth-20190417-p51f18.html

  161. Cassie of Sydney

    The whole Al Jazeera sting didn’t harm Pauline…did it? That’s what Cory was lacking…notoriety, oomph and cut through,

  162. wivenhoe

    bespoke thank you so much for a straight answer to what was a serious question.

  163. Notafan

    How can you fine a 12 year old?

  164. Old Lefty

    Meanwhile. Victorian justice never disappoints. Here is CJ Kidd discussing the Pell case and posing for a friendly pic with …Jon Faine: hard-line leftist loudmouth, Catholic-basher who advocates arson attacks on Churches)* and veteran Pell-hater. Not exactly calculated to ally concerns about he case. He might as well have posed for a trophy pic with Milligan.

    https://twitter.com/abcmelbourne/status/1123002499982430208

    (and proudly retweeted on the County Court Twitter page).

    Meanwhile, the Supreme Court is about to referee an ALP factional brawl between Co-Premier Setka and Albo.

  165. Old Lefty

    And anyone who says the Bible is all fiction and contains no history is an ignorant fool who should actually read some history.

  166. zyconoclast

    Crikey – if a dickhead like that got near the top job, the share value would drop like a gay guy going off the top of a middle-eastern residential tower block.

    I was doing predictive reading and this is what appeared was,

    “would drop like a gay guy in a bath house with wall to wall glory holes.”

    or

    “would drop like a gay guy about to get run through by the bath house rugby team.”

  167. Geriatric Mayfly

    Vernacular Bibles have always been around

    But were they available to the masses? The printing press changed all that, and the clergy’s monopoly over
    the Bible’s message was doomed thenceforth. I guess, the appended side notes were seen as a last ditch effort to keep the common reader on the straight and narrow.

  168. Mitch M.

    Pauline on Credlin…..she is speaking about Cory..she says he has made a political decision because he knows he will struggle to win his seat at the next election. She says that Cory doesn’t believe his time was up…it’s just that he has had to face the writing on the wall. What a loser.

    Cory had a shot at changing conservative politics so give him a break. He failed but then most such attempts to change do fail and condemning those attempts discourages others having a go at the future. Politics has become so constrained I’d rather respect the attempt than condemn the failure.

  169. dover_beach

    GM, by master interpretater I mean some one intimately familiar with the book and the commentaries as well, as opposed to someone that isn’t, like a first time reader that isn’t even familiar with the Christian tradition. So much of what they read will simply pass them unnoticed.

  170. bespoke

    wivenhoe
    #3097218, posted on July 4, 2019 at 6:27 pm
    bespoke thank you so much for a straight answer to what was a serious question.

    It won’t happen again though it’s just not natural for me. 😁

  171. Roger

    The Bible was never really in Latin chains.

    Vernacular Bibles have always been around

    Why, the Bible was even written in the vernacular of the people of its time and place; Hebrew (and a smattering of Aramaic) in the OT and Koine Greek in the NT.

  172. Roger

    The Bible was never really in Latin chains.

    Vernacular Bibles have always been around

    Why, the Bible was even written in the vernacular of the people of its time and place; H#brew (and a smattering of Aramaic) in the OT and Koine Greek in the NT.

  173. bespoke

    Notafan
    #3097214, posted on July 4, 2019 at 6:23 pm
    What changed was people, who like to think they know better than the Church., And of course mass printing meant more know it all’s.

    Mmm I may have to think about that one before I get into trouble.

  174. cohenite

    Feelthebern
    #3097188, posted on July 4, 2019 at 5:37 pm
    Watched the last show of The Big Bang Theory

    What happened?

  175. Notafan

    I don’t understand the ‘monopoly’. People might have not read the Bible but they certainly heard it.

    It was sixty odd years after the first Gutenberg that Luther nailed his theses to the door.

    Catholic understanding of the word hasn’t changed, just improved.

    What good has come of the disputation?

    So much for so simple a plough boy could

  176. Mitch M.

    What changed was people, who like to think they know better than the Church., And of course mass printing meant more know it all’s.

    The problem with that argument is that there are so many Churches and experts who come to differing conclusions. Which church, which expert is to be trusted? It’s like reading nutrition research.

  177. wivenhoe

    It won’t happen again though it’s just not natural for me. 😁

    Well then I am grateful that you stepped out of your natural in this instance and improved my understanding.

  178. Cassie of Sydney

    “Cory had a shot at changing conservative politics so give him a break.”

    Give him a break….why? He has spat the dummy…unceremoniously I might add. Cory could have retired as leader and instead handed the reins of the party to someone else…someone younger…..someone with more oomph….but NO….instead he has petulantly shut it down and left quite a few people high and dry….people who supported the party and people who stood as candidates…some of whom I know personally.

  179. None

    At SMH:

    Britain’s second-highest court handed down a decision on religious freedom yesterday that will send chills down the collective spine of Rugby Australia. In contrast, Israel Folau and his team will be thanking God for divine providence that is akin to manna from heaven.

    In Ngole v the University of Sheffield, the English Court of Appeal has decided: “The mere expression of religious views about sin does not necessarily connote discrimination.”

    The factual similarities to Folau’s case are remarkable. Felix Ngole was a social work student at the University of Sheffield and a devout Christian. In 2014, he posted Bible verses about homosexuality on a public Facebook page as part of a political debate. Sheffield University accused Ngole of breaching a vague and broadly worded code of conduct.

    Through a hearing and two committee appeals, various bureaucratic apparatchiks repeatedly incanted that quoting Bible verses constituted “views of a discriminatory nature” and breached professional guidelines.

    As the British appeal court stated: “The university wrongly confused the expression of religious views with the notion of discrimination. The mere expression of views on theological grounds (e.g. that “homosexuality is a sin”) does not necessarily connote that the person expressing such views will discriminate on such grounds.”

    This lines up almost exactly with Folau’s case. Throughout his four-year ordeal, Ngole advised that he would never compromise his Christian beliefs. Ultimately, Sheffield University expelled him. A judge in Britain’s High Court confirmed this decision.

    However, the Court of Appeal disagreed and has found that the university discipline process was fundamentally flawed. The university took an entrenched position early on, adopted processes that lacked insight and imposed a sentence that lacked proportion.

    This will be uncomfortable reading for Rugby Australia.

    It’s not all bad news for the union. Decisions from Britain are not strictly binding on Australian courts, just instructive. Although difficult, the university might appeal to Britain’s Supreme Court.

    There are also plenty of differences between the two cases for Rugby Australia’s crack legal team to agitate in an attempt to blunt its force of application to Folau. It’s what lawyers do best and Rugby Australia has good lawyers.

    There are other notable implications from this British decision for the Folau case. Ngole’s case took four long years before he finally obtained his vindication. Many have criticised Folau for raising such a big war chest of legal fees. His fundraising efforts may be both prescient and proportionate given that he might face a similar long, hard and expensive legal battle.

    The appeal court also took a distinctively different approach compared with the original judge. While the lower court judge gave a “full and meticulous” judgment that navigated a maze of dense common law principles and cases, the justices on appeal went to the heart of the matter.

    This was about a failure of common sense. At the outset of the matter in 2014, the university had overreached and overreacted. It effectively purported to restrict Ngole from expressing his religious views in any public forum. The implication was that a professional should only express controversial religious views in absolute privacy.

    The court rightly pointed out that, if correct, no Christian would be secure in any profession, let alone Muslims, Hindus or Buddhists. Further, Ngole’s expulsion was disproportionate, given that the posts were expressions of religious and moral views that were based on the Bible.

    This decision may resonate with an Australian court considering the termination of Folau, given our antipodean commitment to the Australian “fair go” for everyone.

    Rugby Australia chairman Cameron Clyne has already trapped Rugby Australia on the wrong side of the ruck with his injudicious media comments, and he has dragged sponsors with him.

    It isn’t quite the end of the Ngole dispute. It’s being remitted for a hearing before a new “fitness to practice” panel before the University of Sheffield. The appeal court said it could not “finally determine whether the appellant would have resisted the possibility of tempering the expression of his views or would have refused to accept guidance which would resolve the problem. This requires new findings of fact. This case should, therefore, be remitted for a new hearing before a differently constituted FTP Panel.”

    But the Ngole decision will sting like the opposition’s sprigs on the union’s back, adding to Folau’s pressure for an apology.

    Folau and his team have reason to be buoyed by this decision. It is a season of miracles. Here is a timely success story of a devout Christian besting a censorious bureaucracy.

    John Steenhof is managing director of Human Rights Law Alliance Limited. HRLA is an independent sister organisation to the Australian Christian Lobby.

  180. Herodotus

    “UNSW encourages lecturers to promote a court in “ethnoscience” and the “science of indigenous knowledge”, involving “traditional indigenous knowledge about the natural world, including astronomy, weather, medicine, geography and mathematics,” together with “ways in which indigenous knowledge can inform and benefit Western science”.

    They forgot their aeronautics industry and space exploration. As for Astronomy, go bow your heads Keppler, Galileo and many others.

  181. Chris

    Two Commando would have taken all of five minutes to reduce his “guerrilla base” to a pile of smoking ruins, surely?

    No.
    IMO the hard boys of Swanbourne would get the nod if the civil power requested that sort of assistance, just because the pols would want the brand recognition.

    However, a holiday camp for wannabes is more likely to get a raid from the NSW Plod, keen to demonstrate that the post-action learnings workshop and interpretive dance seminar after Man Monis, has cured them of being f***ing useless.

  182. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    They forgot their aeronautics industry and space exploration. As for Astronomy, go bow your heads Keppler, Galileo and many others.

    Yet never discovered how to boil water?

  183. Chris

    They forgot their aeronautics industry and space exploration. As for Astronomy, go bow your heads Keppler, Galileo and many others.

  184. Geriatric Mayfly

    GM, by master interpretater I mean some one intimately familiar with the book and the commentaries as well, as opposed to someone that isn’t, like a first time reader that isn’t even familiar with the Christian tradition.

    I appreciate your desire to get full value from text. But for the Old Testament at least, would you choose a Jooish scholar or a learned Christian? (Not Benny Hinn of course) I am sure both would bring you considerable enlightenment, but the different perspectives may leave you puzzled.

  185. wivenhoe

    Give him a break….why? He has spat the dummy…unceremoniously I might add. Cory could have retired as leader and instead handed the reins of the party to someone else…someone younger…..someone with more oomph….but NO….instead he has petulantly shut it down and left quite a few people high and dry….people who supported the party and people who stood as candidates…some of whom I know personally.

    same here Cassie. I am, or was a paid up member, stood at the polling booth, and for what. just so dissapointed

  186. cohenite

    “ways in which indigenous knowledge can inform and benefit Western science”.

    What a bunch of bullshit; there is literally nothing informative or beneficial to Western science from the indigenes.

  187. Chris

    oops – putting grins in angel brackets makes them invisible.
    (Help! Angel investors need for bolding budget! Margot, call the office!)

  188. Chris

    Yet never discovered how to boil water?

    60,000 years delivers three new uses for the stick.
    In violence against women.

  189. Mark A

    Cassie of Sydney
    #3097217, posted on July 4, 2019 at 6:24 pm

    The whole Al Jazeera sting didn’t harm Pauline…did it? That’s what Cory was lacking…notoriety, oomph and cut through,

    What I read on R Bosi’s FB page there was a lot more to it than that.
    Cory’s whole management style was autocratic, involving only a small clique of people with little input from members to start with.

    Not to mention the selection of candidates for top positions.

  190. Nick

    ways in which indigenous knowledge can inform and benefit Western science”.

    People should be given a choice between either using a Western hospital, or an adjacent cave that contains a lemon scented possum and a stone.

  191. Mitch M.

    instead he has petulantly shut it down and left quite a few people high and dry….people who supported the party and people who stood as candidates…some of whom I know personally.

    That’s happened many times in Australian politics. He could have kept it going even though the effort was futile. That would have created more resentment. Is that what you wanted, for him to keep going when obviously it was going nowhere? The situation is not unlike what happens in business start ups. Many fail, many lose a lot of money but that’s the game. We place our bets and fight for the outcome we want but we don’t always win and in business start ups losing is common. If you want to shut down any attempt to change Australian politics feel free to ridicule and mock those who fail.

  192. bespoke

    Did you see that dover? I improved someone’s understanding.

  193. None

    We have hundreds of thousands of manuscripts of the Bible. The earliest are fragments from the gospels preserved on papyrus dated to the late 2nd century. Compared to some of the Greek and Latin classics the number is astonishing. The reason why there was so many is because the books of the Bible were copied profusely particularily this of the New Testament and the early Christians were great networkers. Following the legalization of Christianity in the Roman Empire this copying seemed to boom and necessitated some sort of quality control. Until the rise of Islam Christian leaders in the east would encourage people to read the scriptures at home with their families. As Christianity spread so did literacy driven by the desire to read the Bible in one’s own language and Christians were responsible for developing the written language of quite a number of regions in the east (e.g. Armenia)
    The West had its hands full dealing with masses of illiterte barbarians intended to latinize rather than indigenuze. This idea of interpretation being solely in the hands of the select few was a much later developmen and this, mostly in the West and certainly not a healthy one in the longer term as we all know. The impact of the Bible on literacy and language exploded with the reformation, rocket propelled by printing. The Luther Bible standardized and stabilized German language and orthography. The influence of the King James translation on English persists to this day We still use idioms drawn directly from its pages
    And so on and so on.

  194. Mark A

    bespoke
    #3097254, posted on July 4, 2019 at 7:06 pm

    Did you see that dover? I improved someone’s understanding.

    Another miracle.

  195. Cassie of Sydney

    “Mark A
    #3097251, posted on July 4, 2019 at 6:59 pm

    What I read on R Bosi’s FB page there was a lot more to it than that.
    Cory’s whole management style was autocratic, involving only a small clique of people with little input from members to start with.

    Not to mention the selection of candidates for top positions.”

    Yep…and his autocratic manner has been confirmed by his autocratic decision to shut down the party.

    Whilst I also think that One Nation suffers from similar issues…as in Pauline can and does make disastrous candidate choices…the difference is that Pauline, unlike Cory, is well liked and the more leftists attack her….as with the whole Al Jazeera sting….the more people support her. Pauline is not haughty, not distant, not elitist. It is sad and and I now regret voting for the AC in the recent federal election. I have NO regrets about voting for Mark Latham in the recent state election.

  196. None

    We have hundreds of thousands of manuscripts of the Bible. The earliest are fragments from the gospels preserved on papyrus dated to the late 2nd century. Compared to some of the Greek and Latin classics the number is astonishing. The reason why there was so many is because the books of the Bible were copied profusely particularily this of the New Testament and the early Christians were great networkers. Following the legalization of Christianity in the Roman Empire this copying seemed to boom and necessitated some sort of quality control. Until the rise of Islayyym Christian leaders in the east would encourage people to read the scriptures at home with their families. As Christianity spread so did literacy driven by the desire to read the Bible in one’s own language and Christians were responsible for developing the written language of quite a number of regions in the east (e.g. Armenia)
    The West had its hands full dealing with masses of illiterte barbarians intended to latinize rather than indigenuze. This idea of interpretation being solely in the hands of the select few was a much later developmen and this, mostly in the West and certainly not a healthy one in the longer term as we all know. The impact of the Bible on literacy and language exploded with the reformation, rocket propelled by printing. The Luther Bible standardized and stabilized German language and orthography. The influence of the King James translation on English persists to this day We still use idioms drawn directly from its pages
    And so on and so on.

  197. Bruce of Newcastle

    People might have not read the Bible but they certainly heard it.

    The other fun thing is the sheer number of ancient copies of the New Testament that were produced, especially compared with the extant manuscripts of the classics we have*.

    Author: manuscripts

    Caesar: 10
    Plato: 7
    Thucydides: 8
    Tacitus: 20
    Suetonius: 8
    Homer (Iliad): 643
    New Testament: 24,000

    The cost of copying on papyrus or vellum would have been very high, yet thousands were made dating back to a few decades after the last writings of the apostles. So a lot of people would have had the chance to read the New Testament even before printing came along.

    * The data appears to be from F.F.Bruce ch2. This link to Google books may or may not work. I can’t vouch for the first link as I have no idea who they are, but the table in it is a useful summary.

  198. Geriatric Mayfly

    The Arabs bided their night time watches gazing at the heavens and naming constellations. Other cultures followed populating the firmament with animals and heroes from their mythologies. Where is the great goanna, the rainbow serpent, the cockatoo, the dingo etc etc etc? 60,000 years of staring at the stars and no imagination ever took hold.

  199. None

    Cory went on and on about building a movement for the longer term and not a personality cult. So if he wanted to quit he should have consulted with the members as to whether they wanted to continue and if they did you should have handed it over for the membership to vote for another leader. I assume that as a registered party they had procedures for changing leaders blah blah blah. Somewhere in the back of my mind I wondered whether Corey set up that Conservative party as a bit of a fullback so that if Turnbull continue down his fuckwitted path a conservatives in the LNP would have somewhere to go if it just got to rotten for them. Once Turnbull was gone there was no need for the conservatives. That’s possibly a bit too much conspiracy theory on my part but that always play it on the back of my mind.

  200. Bruce of Newcastle

    People might have not read the Bible but they certainly heard it.

    The other fun thing is the sheer number of ancient copies of the New Testament that were produced, especially compared with the extant manuscripts of the classics we have*.

    Author: manuscripts

    Caesar: 10
    Plato: 7
    Thucydides: 8
    Tacitus: 20
    Suetonius: 8
    Homer (Iliad): 643
    New Testament: 24,000

    The cost of copying on papyrus or vellum would have been very high, yet thousands were made dating back to a few decades after the last writings of the apostles. So a lot of people would have had the chance to read the New Testament even before printing came along.

    * The data appears to be from F.F.Bruce “The New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable?” ch2. You can find it at Google books (no link because the spam monster ate the comment with one). I can’t vouch for the first link as I have no idea who they are, but the table in it is a useful summary.

  201. None

    I think Aboriginals did have their own names for certain constellations – I do recall herning about the big emu …

  202. Chris

    What I read on R Bosi’s FB page there was a lot more to it than that.
    Cory’s whole management style was autocratic, involving only a small clique of people with little input from members to start with.

    Not to mention the selection of candidates for top positions.

    Initially I thought reckon the media as a whole actively chose to not report ANYTHING about AC so they would die stillborn.
    After Cory’s recent actions, I think he was just incompetent.

  203. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ok the spam monster is being a pain. Here’s a summary of ancient manuscripts that we have found:

    Author: manuscripts

    Caesar: 10
    Plato: 7
    Thucydides: 8
    Tacitus: 20
    Suetonius: 8
    Homer (Iliad): 643
    New Testament: 24,000

    The data is from F. F. Bruce. I’ll try a link to the website with a useful summary table if the monster lets me post this comment.

  204. Bruce of Newcastle

    Caesar: 10
    Plato: 7
    Thucydides: 8
    Tacitus: 20
    Suetonius: 8
    Homer (Iliad): 643
    New Testament: 24,000

  205. bespoke

    Mmm I may have to think about that one before I get into trouble.

    Free kick:

    #that has’t stopped you before…
    #think?
    #

  206. Roger

    If you want to shut down any attempt to change Australian politics feel free to ridicule and mock those who fail.

    Mitch, I don’t see ridicule and mockery here (although being the Cat I may have missed it) but criticism born of justified disappointment.

    When Cory’s latest missive arrived in my Inbox this afternoon my first impulse was to bin it.

  207. Bruce of Newcastle

    Well I tried listing the historical documents we have but it keeps going to sp*m.
    Link.

  208. None

    The trouble with Corey was that he was good at whining, at picking what things were wrong, but really bad in translating that into action.
    Also thinking Lyle Shelton as a communications manager was 100% disaster. It basically pegged the AC to his former employer the ACL which rightly or wrongly is perceived as a very narrow interest group. Corey needed a broader base.

  209. Bruce of Newcastle

    Yay, that worked. The original data is from F.F. Bruce apparently. “The New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable?” ch2, which you can find at Goolag books.

  210. None

    Frankly and I’ve said this before I thought the WA team was the strongest team in AC. And I’m not just saying that cause custard posts here.

  211. Roger

    Much angst on The Dumb tonight re homelessness, and not without cause (although nobody, as far as I noticed, mentioned the impact of government regulations – at all three levels – on housing supply).

    They then turned to refugees, who are initially accommodated in motels at the tax payers’ expense before being supported into subsidised private rental accommodation and thereafter, almost inevitably it would seem in most instances, into public housing.

    Nobody made the connection.

  212. Gab

    Should anyone care, the Douay-Rheims Bible is the most translation we have today.

  213. one old bruce

    The thing ALP trained folks get, and idealists and ‘conservatives’ don’t, is that politics is like a game of chess. – Probably the game itself arose among those who had experienced ‘the game of power’. You have to see many moves ahead, know your pieces and their limits, have long term and short term strategies.

    I’ll go out on a limb here and say ‘illiterate barbarians’ -our ancestors- knew quite a lot about the game of power from way way back, millennia of experience. And those ancient instincts are still in play in the ALP/Unions dynamic. Which is why they put up a good game. We talk about Imperial Rome and the backstabbing rulers, but the ‘primitive’ Atlantic tribes had ways of creating and maintaining power. I personally don’t think we’ll ever get beyond these roots. While ideologies come and go, the tribes survive and thrive.

  214. Leigh Lowe

    The tax cut legislation shows that ScoMo and the Terminator have a pretty good chance of getting stuff through the Senate.
    They need 4 of 6 cross-benchers on any given day.
    In other words they can do without 2 x PHON or 2 x Centre Alliance or both of Lambie and Bernardi.
    Pauline will be smarting that she has been left high and dry on tax cuts and will be keen to play PHON into whatever comes up next.

  215. Bruce of Newcastle

    The numbers in the table at the link are very interesting. We don’t have many manuscripts of the classics, presumably due to cost. But as None mentioned there are thousands of copies and fragments of the NT on vellum and papyrus that have been found, dating from only a few decades after the apostles died. So even before printing came along many people would have been able to read the Bible, especially the NT, even from quite early in the timeline.

    (Someone pls shoot the sp*m m0nster.)

  216. one old bruce

    So yeah, Mark Latham may be the best we can hope for now.

  217. Frank

    The bible, never read it. Apparently the big guy dies in the end though, too many spoilers around. It sort of cruels you on wanting to put the effort in.

  218. Geriatric Mayfly

    I think Aboriginals did have their own names for certain constellations – I do recall herning about the big emu …

    One must always take care that these imaginings are not the dreaming of the Southbank and Ultimo tribes.

  219. dover_beach

    The problem with that argument is that there are so many Churches and experts who come to differing conclusions. Which church…

    The one to which Christ entrusted the keys.

  220. Mitch M.

    Roger
    #3097273, posted on July 4, 2019 at 7:20 pm
    If you want to shut down any attempt to change Australian politics feel free to ridicule and mock those who fail.

    Mitch, I don’t see ridicule and mockery here (although being the Cat I may have missed it) but criticism born of justified disappointment.

    Fair enough Roger but I’d rather see a constructive criticism that highlights what went wrong, perhaps the first such criticism being that Cory was too much front and centre(autocratic) and where was the rest of the party? I can’t even recall Cory getting any media traction and that was a huge failing. The longstanding concern I had is that the ACs may end up becoming a de facto Christian dominated outfit and in Australian politics that does not auger well for electoral success. I read comments that when people attended AC meetings it was more like a Christian gathering than a general public gathering. However I don’t think the general public was aware of that. I think Cory’s change of heart had more to do with Morrison replacing Turnbull and thereby very much diminishing the reason Cory started the ACs. If Turnbull had remained PM the ACs may have done much better but only if they had developed a much more potent media and policy platform.

  221. Mater

    Mater
    #2784334, posted on August 8, 2018 at 6:50 pm

    …I believe a significant portion of old Labor voters share a lot of our views (or a lot closer to our’s than the new ALP) but have been raised to hate anything associated with the words Conservative, Liberal, Coalition and Tory…in that order.

    That’s why I think the Australian Conservatives have made a mistake with their name. These people just cannot bring themselves to even read the policies of, let alone vote for anyone associated with any of these four words. In their mind, the name alone demonstrates evil and the antithesis of their working class roots.

    One Nation doesn’t suffer this affliction.

  222. vlad

    I tried to watch Tom Gleeson’s Logie speech and gave up after three minutes.

    It’s a lot easier to be a taxpayer-funded puncher-down than it is to entertain people.

  223. Gab

    Apparently the big guy dies in the end though,

    Wrong. The “big guy” wins.

  224. rickw

    I wouldn’t like to count the number of times I might have taken a sneaky trip down a backroad in a tractor or ute before the age of 18.

    I drove on public roads from home to the bus stop and back for my entire time at high school. 70mph in an FB with a red motor on corrugated gravel roads rain hail or shine!

  225. Gab

    Smart man.

    “Alaska’s governor and legislature are against public funding of abortion. However, the Alaska Supreme Court ruled that tax payers had to pay for abortions.

    To deal with that problem, the governor used his gubernatorial power and deducted from the Court’s budget the amount that had to go to pay for abortions.”

  226. Tel

    Initially I thought reckon the media as a whole actively chose to not report ANYTHING about AC so they would die stillborn.
    After Cory’s recent actions, I think he was just incompetent.

    If you look at the other minor parties, people like Pauline Hanson know how to get a headline. Walk into Parliament wearing Iran-style full covering head to toe and then talk about afterwards why it’s a complete security nightmare. That gets headlines.

    Just do a duck-duck search on “Stuntman Xenophon” and there’s a long list of headline grabbing that he got up to.

    Then search on “The Human Headline” and by gum another Australian Senator pops up.

    I like the Cory Bernardi podcast, he covers a lot of interesting points, I also like Bosi. Most Australians put only a tiny bit of thought into who they vote for, and they don’t search the field particularly hard. It’s difficult enough explaining how preferences work.

  227. max

    Lizzie, if you’re around, an excellent program on SBS now on restoring beautiful old houses in Ireland. Last week was really interesting. The point was made that splendid old country estates in Ireland were often left neglected because they carried memories of absentee landlords, occupation and religious exclusion. Some people are drawn to Model A restoration. Others to old houses.

  228. dover_beach

    I appreciate your desire to get full value from text. But for the Old Testament at least, would you choose a Jooish scholar or a learned Christian? (Not Benny Hinn of course) I am sure both would bring you considerable enlightenment, but the different perspectives may leave you puzzled.

    For the OT, a learned Christian of course. It’s ordered differently, includes some different books, etc.

  229. Dave in Marybrook

    I’ve got to say, the central premise that Australia’s First Peoples Nations People(TM) navigated the starry sky by the negative areas of blackness between the stars- the Dark Emu- is so self-evidently preposterous that it makes me think of Carrol’s Cheshire Cat.
    The whole reason that many traditions constructed constellations around the brightest stars is because that’s what you can see in the worst of conditions- moving clouds, dust, humidity, sea air, and the smoke of a burning landscape- and the rest can be mentally filled in from there. The “negative space” trope is certainly an impressive idea, like the Drawing on the Right Side Of the Brain method- but like Chatwin’s Songlines it’s an obvious plant- including the Hindmarsh Island style backwardsa reasoning as to why it was hidden from white man until the learned elders deemed worthy to share it.
    I’m not surprised that academia and the museum clique has taken the dummy- what with ever-increasing money and students coming in, new content has to be literally manufactured. But like the Stolen Generations(tm) and Welcome To Country(tm), I reserve the right to “take a knee”.

  230. rickw

    12-year-old Warrnambool boy caught driving truck said he was doing ‘school holiday work’ for his dad
    The boy is expected to be charged with unlicensed driving and fined up to $800.

    Two blokes I know had their father killed in a horse riding accident. They were around 15 & 16 and wanted to keep the farm going. The locals coppers gave them the nod to drive trucks to the sale yards and silo, “but don’t let us catch you driving anywhere else!” (1960’s Australia)

  231. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    There are still minor parties to vote for in Australia.

    I refuse to vote for major parties (obviously including the Greens).

    There is a lot against big government, but a lot more for it and the new voting Senate rules suck.

    I wish Singo still had the Wukkas Party, the ACP and LDP probably would not have needed to exist.

    Freedom is like Buddhism. I don’t care about the vehicle, if it fails, get a new one. The principles are why you form a party in the first instance.

    The AC might have had some legs if Cory pissed off and left it alone.

    Their NSW Party launch for the Federal Election, in my opinion, was disastrous.

    As much as I hate fake chummy, fake “men/women/post op trannies of da peoples” (and commies), it is better than the extremely elitist ACP platform launch.

    They may as well have had Robert Holmes a Court and Trumble recreating the “revolutions go down and stock prices rise” of the junkers toasting each other from post-WWI revolutionary Germany.

    Bad optics.

  232. Tel

    The bible, never read it. Apparently the big guy dies in the end though, too many spoilers around. It sort of cruels you on wanting to put the effort in.

    There’s a fight at the end, with a rag and a rock.

    Its rider was holding a pair of scales in his hand. Then I heard what sounded like a voice among the four living creatures, saying, “A quart of wheat for a day’s wages, and three quarts of barley for a day’s wages, and do not damage the oil and the wine!”

    Yeah, and money gets devalued, and inflation gets right out of hand. Ain’t pretty.

  233. Gab

    Geriatric Mayfly, here’s a great resource if you are interested in commentary – that is trustworthy – on the Old and New Testaments. https://sensusfidelium.us/bible-catechesis/

  234. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    https://www.patheos.com/blogs/religionprof/2012/12/revelation-2215-no-dogs-go-to-heaven.html

    No Doggos or salvation after final judgment?

    If it’s a no dogs rule then Papa Frank may as hand over the keys to the Vatican to the ibn Sauds.

    I will be very disappointed if Yaweh is a cat person.

  235. rickw

    What a time, one of the most measured and sensible politicians you can listen to is Vad?!

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UB8V3irkNQA

  236. cohenite

    To deal with that problem, the governor used his gubernatorial power and deducted from the Court’s budget the amount that had to go to pay for abortions.”

    That is Trumpian.

  237. Leigh Lowe

    Electrical safety alert.
    Detected a singeing smell in our hallway and one of our lights had blown.
    Open up the wall sconce which has one of those ridiculous looped Trumble globes installed vertically (fixing point at the bottom and globe pointing up). There was a good 10mm of insect carcasses and sundry shit which had smoked up and blown the “globe”. An orthodox globe shape would shed this debris and not collect it.

  238. Empire 5:5

    That is Trumpian.

    We the people. Welcome to the new Nationalist-International order.

  239. Fisky

    Tax cuts pass the Senate. Huge defeat for Albo. Zero authority or credibility. Maybe next time you should respect the election result from the start dumbo!

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