Another rope-seller to the hangman

An article in the Fairfax papers today asks how we proceed to make sure that regions don’t suffer too much as a result of the inevitable triumph of renewables and the consequent demise of coal.  The article represents the views of the Global Compact Network Australia (GCNA), which is funded a hundred or so firms including the usual virtue signallers: BHP, Rio, Qantas, AGL, IKEA, Shell and so on as well as charity agitators like World Vision and Care.

For Australia the article sees closures in the coal areas as inevitable as a result of technology and low carbon policies’ “disruption” (see how the social engineers hijack the contemporary version of Schumpeterian language to describe a process that has nothing to do with entrepreneurial developments).

GCNA’s answer is to follow the German blueprint and not the American one. The latter in the Appalachians, we are told, subsidised coal but its inevitable closure left an economic wilderness as its legacy.  Germany in the Ruhr

‘ramped up its community and social infrastructure efforts. It built modern infrastructure, tertiary institutes, cultural and leisure industries. It played to the region’s logistical strengths, building up packaging and transport industries’ and, of course, ‘developed environmental jobs and eco-tourism’.

The article claims the $266 million package given for the Hazelwood closure is not nearly enough and wants to see coordination and far more spending.

Anyone following trade policy over the past 30 years will be aware, unlike the article’s author, of the colossal subsidies that Germany gave to shore up its increasingly uncompetitive coal mines. And the history of government promotion of particular areas is decidedly mixed – especially in Australia where the millions of dollars pumped into the Multifunctionpolis all got buried in a swamp near Adelaide.

Nowadays eco-tourism is the key to resurrecting any area being killed by government agriculture, mining and energy policies.  The Victorian Government and its economic advisers even see it as the salvation of gold mining, on which they are attempting a pre-emptive strike by closing off land to economic and those recreational activities they deem as too intrusive.  Invariably, eco-tourism’s promoters have some Roussauian agenda of returning us all to the idyllic noble savage.

But what of GCNA itself?

It offers 10 principles that its funders must accept. Like the British Labour Party constitution of yesterday, the first few of these are about being kind to children, old people and puppies. In the Labour Party’s case then came Clause Four, “the nationalisation of all the means of production and distribution”.  For GCNA then comes the Precautionary Principal for the environment followed by other such carbon emissions and efficiency supressing commitments.

GCNA is yet another Sorosian mechanism that would transform the current economy to the green planned version and elevate the social elites to their rightful position in control of the commanding heights.  Its funding is dominated by the stakeholder relations and social responsibility business representatives who now control the agitational resources of major firms.  Their support offers good immediate PR but promotes the fundamentally anti-business, pro-government interventionist philosophy that is undermining the forces of competition and property rights on which modern economic growth has been founded.

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21 Responses to Another rope-seller to the hangman

  1. stackja

    GCNA is just socialism under another name.

  2. Dr Fred Lenin

    The word guillotine comes to mind as a cure for this crime against humanity ,the guillotine is a permanent cure for criminality ,there is no recividism .

  3. Tom

    All aboard Australia’s centrally planned fascist economy! The Third Reich is alive!

  4. Tim Neilson

    ramped up its community and social infrastructure efforts. It built modern infrastructure, tertiary institutes, cultural and leisure industries. It played to the region’s logistical strengths, building up packaging and transport industries’ and, of course, ‘developed environmental jobs and eco-tourism’.

    Do these numpties really believe that a national economy can consist virtually solely of people driving electric cars around from one enviro-curated eco-tourism site to another?

    Surely they understand that some actual production is required?

  5. Bushkid

    Yes, yes, yes, all that re-training and refocusing on eco-tourism and education and training facilities, barista training and “tech industries” etc that’s supposed to be the economy of the future is all very well.

    There is, however, one small point that they seem to overlook.

    For any eco-tourism, tech, services etc venture to survive, the population has to have disposable income to spend on it.

    Without viable industries, and the businesses that flow from industry, agriculture and mining, there is stuff-all (a technical term, you understand) disposable income to be had – or spent.

    Welcome to dystopia.

  6. DaveR

    Memo to the left and the virtue-signalling corporates (who continue to use fossil fuels anyway): there is no transition to renewables underway. And there wont be for decades to come, when all the woke corporate directors have long since gone.

    As the short-term cost to shareholders mounts (“No long-term cost to shareholders” says BHP’s Mackenzie – a clear indication there are real short-term costs), I see shareholder activism starting in earnest.

    Perhaps BHP shareholders will lead the way, as the company is begrudgingly forced to admit their “woke initiatives” are costing $100m here, $100m there…….

  7. Dr Fred Lenin

    Destroy industry ,reduce the tax take ,where does the money to keep the elites come from ?
    To destroy socialism you simply remove the taxpsyer funding they get ,end of story!

  8. Genghis

    I hope you are following the collapse in wind turbine constructions in Germany. It looks like old turbines taken off grid will not be replaced this year. huge drop in construction for last year as well.

  9. Howard Hill

    There is, however, one small point that they seem to overlook.

    For any eco-tourism, tech, services etc venture to survive, the population has to have disposable income to spend on it.

    This has always baffled me. Where do all the little people get all this money to spend on eco holidays and eco technological, revolutionary, coal powered electric cars, when they have no jerbs?

  10. Howard Hill:
    Silly boy.
    The Government will give it to them!

  11. Howard Hill

    The Government will give it to them!

    Good and hard, I bet!

  12. I_am_not_a_robot

    GCNA is a subsidiary of the UN Global Compact that has 10 platitudes, oops I should say principles, number 7 says inter alia: “businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges … where there is a threat of serious or irreversible damage to health or the environment, even if the threat is not fully understood or established, prevention is better than cure”.
    It is impossible to prove there is no risk in any venture, that is a recipe for stagnation and decay.

  13. Roger

    The UN.

    Makes sense now.

    Watermelonism on a grand scale.

  14. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Nuclear power now!

    LFTRs in 5 minutes – Thorium Reactors

  15. Pyrmonter

    Alan

    Leaving the merits of your piece aside, that Soros snipe is beneath you, it’s the stuff of anti-Semitic conspiracy theory.

  16. I_am_not_a_robot

    BHP, Rio, Qantas, AGL, Shell etc. wouldn’t exist if GCNA ‘principles’ had obtained at the time of their kick-off … oh that could be whole idea.

  17. Tel

    Now it’s become “anti-Semitic” to notice how much Soros money ends up with these leftwing extremist groups?

    How would you recommend I stop seeing that? What exactly puts this guy beyond criticism for what he’s done?

  18. Nighthawk The Elder

    The taxpayer funded $266 million Hazelwood closure package so generously handed out by Dan the man should be subject to the most severe audit possible. Exactly what value did this money add to the Latrobe Valley economy? How many real jobs did it actually create? What was actually achieved of lasting benefit to the local community?

    What we do know is this money was used to create another useless navel gazing body called the Latrobe Valley Authority, who spent most of their time simply regurgitated and rebranding old announcements. (Seriously, they read like a script from Utopia). That’s when they weren’t giving out around $750K to a company that soon after went into receivership leaving loacal businesses in debt to the tune of $1M. (Search for Steelvision for more information). Should be subject to a Royal Commission.

    Where the rest of the $266M went, no-one really knows. All we do know is there is bugger all to show for it.

  19. Frank Walker:
    I’ve noticed you putting up the Thorium Reactor video, so just to help with the effort here’s a lecture on the Thorium Reactor + the Rare Earths issue.

  20. Bruce

    Howard: “Where do all the little people get all this money to spend on eco holidays”

    Aye, there’s the rub.

    The “little people” are NOT intended to have ANY role other than as subservient fore-lock tuggers to the “enlightened” class. Their “eco-holidays” will have the distinct stench of “Arbeit Macht Frei” about them.

    In a twist to the old bolshevist mocking of “capitalism: “Be silent, SERVE and DIE”.

    I have yet to see ANY evidence that any other objective is actually sought.

    No wonder the bolshevist scum are in such a pally relationship with the head-lopping, black rock worshipers.

  21. John A

    Roussauian agenda of returning us all to the idyllic noble savage.

    Of which there have been no known examples – EVAH!

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