Dueling narratives – a confrontation of alarmists

On one hand Andy Pitman the primary climate modeler in the nation trashes the claim that droughts are linked to climate change.

“…as far as the climate scientists know there is no link between climate change and drought.”

“…there is no reason a priori why climate change should made the landscape more arid.“

On the other hand.

Prof Mark Howden, IPCC vice chair* and the director of the ANU Climate Change Institute, said Australia was already feeling the impacts of climate change, especially in summer, with recent repeated heatwaves.

“Climate change is already impacting our land systems, our agriculture, forests and biodiversity,” he said. “Those impacts will increase significantly in the future.”

Dr Pitman still has some way to go to achieve credibity.

Pitman follows this with: “this may not be what you read in newspapers…” No, Sir. And the 64 billion dollar question (which isn’t asked) is – why not? And what are you doing about that?

Does Andy Pitman keep trying to tell journalists the full and accurate story and they won’t print it? (Well, we know what that’s like.) Given his roles as Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, and as a Lead Author for the IPCC, does it bother him when he sees his specialty misreported over and over again? Since the taxpayer funds him, isn’t there an obligation to correct the record?; to flick an email to the ABC journalists who keep saying climate change is linked to drought, or drop a five minute phone call to Peter Hannam of the Sydney Morning Herald who is still getting it wrong? He may even want to call his own researcher at the centre where he is a director. Andrew King advised Hannam on that last link which is filled with “human fingerprints” of “drought” and emerging “greenhouse signals”. The article even says — completely incorrectly –“Australia is among the regions of the world where the drying trend is clearest”.

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16 Responses to Dueling narratives – a confrontation of alarmists

  1. Terry

    Always love the departure from reality inspired by a “Centre of Excellence” .

    Whenever the corporate/bureaucratic term is used, it almost always describes a “Cesspit of Retardation”.

  2. Since ‘centres of excellence’ are always populated with egg spurts, things are bound to get scrambled. So they are always walking on egg shells trying not look like bad yolks.

  3. Cynic of Ayr

    I may be wrong and Mr Pittman is indeed, an honest and true scientist.
    But, whenever I see that someone is wholly dependent on Government or University (same thing) to be handsomely compensated for a bit of thinking and writing, I am easily cynical of both purpose and action.
    Purpose being to draw attention to oneself, and action to be sure said attention is not overwhelming, thus putting compensation at risk.

  4. BoyfromTottenham

    Regardless of their reported comments about climate change issues, how do these hundreds (or thousands?) of taxpayer funded folk get away with ‘donating’ (as I understand it) their working time to the IPCC? As the IPCC activities of these folk are in plain sight, their employers must be fully aware of it. Do their employers turn a blind eye to this activity, or actively support their IPCC activities (which for a ‘Vice-Chair’ or ‘Lead Author’ must consume a fair amount of their time)? Either their employer should demand that the IPCC reimburses the organisation for the academics’ time, or ban the academic from undertaking these activities, except strictly in their own time and using their own facilities. Maybe the relevant federal minister should step in and ask these organisations to ‘please explain’.

  5. Regardless of their reported comments about climate change issues, how do these hundreds (or thousands?) of taxpayer funded folk get away with ‘donating’ (as I understand it) their working time to the IPCC?

    It’s part of accepted professional work processes and associations. This happens pretty much in any industry or profession. It’s not necessarily a bad thing.

  6. mem

    A couple of weeks ago the media was full of reports about how Greenland was melting faster then ever. Since then the news has been completely debunked as fake but do we hear any correction in the mainstream media? No. And do we get corrections from organizations such as the ARC Centre for Excellence. No.
    https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2019/08/13/greenland-meltdown-hoax/#comments

  7. Dr Fred Lenin

    Was it man made climate change that made Greenland green when the Vikings settled it in the 11th century ? Did government pollution taxes on housefires reduce the co2 so much Greenland became covered in ice and snow again ? The government tax take on pollution then would have been mothing like the tax take is now , even without carbon taxes .

  8. Lee

    A couple of weeks ago the media was full of reports about how Greenland was melting faster then ever. Since then the news has been completely debunked as fake but do we hear any correction in the mainstream media?

    Don’t worry, the ABC is on the job.
    Pfffttt!

  9. Herodotus

    Now that the IPCC has trundled down the path of gender politics it can be ignored completely.
    How do we convince idiotic Australian governments to do just that?

  10. Karabar

    Like Voltaire, I like to define the terms in a conversation.
    What the Hell is “climate change” anyhow? Where does one find this mythical substance?

  11. What the Hell is “climate change” anyhow? Where does one find this mythical substance?

    Probably the same place and often with the same results as where you find tree change.

  12. I_am_not_a_robot

    They can cherry-pick certain areas of the country and certain time periods in a confirmation biased way but it is indisputable that in the past 120 years Australia has got wetter, around 20% wetter — those data are easily accessible on the BoM site by any idiot, even a journalist.
    Sure parts of the continent are drier now than they were 40 years ago but in the limited overall data history the ’70s were unusually wet.
    Also I think rain gauge data must be harder to fiddle than temperature where anomalies are so tiny.

  13. Stanley

    And over in Tuvalu our PM is handing over other people’s money to Pacific Island states for crime-ate change matters, and the recalcitrant ungrateful Tuvalu PM wants Australia to close down coal. A trite hypocritical when “Tuvalu is almost solely reliant upon fossil fuels as its source of energy. The country has eight power stations, with the largest located at Fongafale. Generators at all eight power stations are diesel based, with electric power and transport being the largest users of diesel fuel”. After you, Tuvalu!

  14. I_am_not_a_robot

    Prof Mark Howden, IPCC vice chair* and the director of the ANU Climate Change Institute, said Australia was already feeling the impacts of climate change, especially in summer, with recent repeated heatwaves …

    What the good professor is doing is post hoc theorising:

    Generating hypotheses based on data already observed, in the absence of testing them on new data … The correct procedure is to test any hypothesis on a data set that was not used to generate the hypothesis (Wiki).

    Typically the alarmists pick on some undesirable or harmful climate-related event, particularly where people are badly affected, and attribute it to CC™ — disgraceful climate ambulance-chasers.

  15. duncanm

    @i_am_not_a_robot.

    Link busted — but see here:
    timeseries, or map.

    As you say, the laziest of Journo’s could look it up. Took me 30s from reading this post.

    But Hannan is not a journo. He’s an activist.

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