Tuesday Forum: September 3, 2019

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1,946 Responses to Tuesday Forum: September 3, 2019

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  1. Exit Stage Right

    Just lurking and here I am.

  2. mh

    Ron Paul – Forget the Russians: It’s the Federal Reserve Seeking to Meddle in Our Elections

    If we want to enjoy the blessings of Liberty, we must audit and then end the Federal Reserve!

    The US Constitution never granted the federal government authority to create a central bank. The Founders, having lived through hyperinflation themselves, understood that government should never have a printing press at its disposal. But from the very beginning of America’s founding, the desire for a crony central bank was strong.

    In fact, two attempts were made at creating a permanent central bank in America prior to the creation of the Fed. Fortunately, the charter for The First Bank was allowed to expire in 1811, and President Andrew Jackson closed down the Second Bank in 1833.

    But, unfortunately, a third attempt was successful and the Federal Reserve was unconstitutionally created by Congress in 1913. Americans have been living under a corrupt and immoral monetary system ever since. The Federal Reserve is the printing press that has financed the creation of the largest government to ever exist. Endless welfare and endless military spending are both made possible by the Federal Reserve. The Fed can just print the money for whatever the US establishment wants, so those of us who long for a Constitutional and limited government have few tools at our disposal.

    Despite all the propaganda claiming “independence,” the Fed has always been a deeply political institution. Because the Fed is a government-created monopoly with key government-appointed employees, its so-called “independence” is a mere fiction. However, the US Congress created the Fed with legislation; it can also abolish the Fed with legislation.

    Last week, the facade of Federal Reserve “independence” was dealt a severe blow. Ironically, the person who broadcast to the world that the Fed is anything but “independent” was ex-New York Fed President Bill Dudley. Dudley wrote that, “Trump’s re-election arguably presents a threat to the United States’ and global economy, and if the goal of monetary policy is to achieve the best long-term economic outcome, the Fed’s officials should consider how their decisions would affect the political outcome of 2020.”

    The timing of Dudley’s threats to use Fed monetary policy to affect the outcome of a US election couldn’t come at a more striking time. After all, for more than two solid years Americans have been bombarded with fabricated stories about Russians rigging our elections. And yet here is a Federal Reserve official threatening to do the same exact thing – but this time for real!

    Whether it’s the mainstream media, the CIA, the FBI, or now the Federal Reserve, more and more Americans are waking up to the fact that there is a Deep State in America and its interests have nothing to do with American liberty. In fact, our liberty is what the Deep State wants to abolish.

    When it comes to the Federal Reserve, I stand firmly by my conviction that it needs to be audited and then ended as soon as possible.

    America’s Founders were not perfect. They were human beings just as capable of error as we are. But they had a remarkable understanding of the ideas of liberty. They understood that liberty cannot exist with a government that has access to a printing press. Sound money and liberty go hand-in-hand. If we want to enjoy the blessings of Liberty, we must audit and then end the Federal Reserve!

    This article first appeared at RonPaulInstitute.org.

  3. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Eighty years ago today, since Prime Minister Robert Menzies declared it his melancholy duty to inform Australians that they were at war with Germany.

  4. stackja

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #3146753, posted on September 3, 2019 at 12:15 pm

    Strictly speaking 9:15 tonight.

  5. Mater

    Eighty years ago today, since Prime Minister Robert Menzies declared it his melancholy duty to inform Australians that they were at war with Germany.

    That can’t be!
    According to the ABC opinion piece that Calli linked to, “John Curtin led the fight against fascists during World War II”.

  6. stackja

    mh
    #3146751, posted on September 3, 2019 at 12:06 pm

    Milton Friedman wrote that the Fed Res met many times before and during the ‘Great Contraction’. History records the result.

  7. notafan

    Did TAKFAS’s last thread get taken down?

  8. C.L.

    How is a man who kidnapped, drugged, r-aped and killed a nine year-old girl EVER released from jail? Additionally, this animal seriously molested 13 other boys and girls. And – and – he has said FU to police regarding the whereabouts of Samantha Knight’s body. She has never been found.

    Judge Button: Yeah, he’s good to go.

    This is degeneracy, pure and simple.

  9. stackja

    Mater
    #3146757, posted on September 3, 2019 at 12:24 pm

    Menzies then Fadden, Curtin arrived soon before Pearl Harbor. But lets not have facts spoil the narrative.

  10. Mother Lode

    According to the ABC opinion piece that Calli linked to, “John Curtin led the fight against fascists during World War II”.

    The ABC really is a trove.

    They will tell you that Whitlam was the PM who classified Aborigines as human not fauna, and how he brought…ahem…a certain war in SE Asia (I fear naming the country summons up a fiendish spirit), and was the one who took on the racist right wing White Australia Policy.

  11. mh

    From old thread

    As for the underground churches, the crackdown against them is intensifying.

    My friends have Chinese colleagues whose family members have received life sentences because of their faith.

    Arrests, brutal interrogations, imprisonments, disruption of meetings, beatings, destroying of “unauthorized” Bibles and Christian books are increasingly common. In one instance that was shared with me, those owning non-approved Bibles and other resources were hit with “stiff fines and the books earmarked for destruction. But not before they (the materials) were first dumped in piles on the street before they were carted off…followed by the pastor who was then sent to prison.”

    Something for Scott Morrison to reflect on when attending Hillsong.

  12. John Constantine

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49547189

    Argentina has imposed currency controls in an attempt to stabilise markets as the country faces a deepening financial crisis.

    The government will restrict foreign currency purchases following a sharp drop in the value of the peso.

    Firms will have to seek central bank permission to sell pesos to buy foreign currency and to make transfers abroad.

    Argentina is also seeking to defer debt payments to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to deal with the crisis.
    What has the government said?

    In an official bulletin issued on Sunday, the government said that it was necessary to adopt “a series of extraordinary measures to ensure the normal functioning of the economy, to sustain the level of activity and employment and protect the consumers”.

    The central bank said the measures were intended to “maintain currency stability”.

    It also said that while individuals can continue to buy US dollars, they will need to seek permission to purchase more than $10,000 (£8,223.50) a month.

    The measures will apply until the end of this year.

    Is this the end of Macri’s vision for Argentina?
    Argentina minister defends peso amid default risk

    What triggered the current crisis?

    Argentina has been struggling with a financial crisis, which was exacerbated by the president’s defeat in a recent primary poll.

    The peso fell to a record low last month after the vote showed that the business-friendly government of President Mauricio Macri is likely to be ousted in elections in October.

    Mr Macri was elected in 2015 on promises to boost Argentina’s economy with a raft of liberal economic reforms.

    But the country is in a deep recession. It has one of the world’s highest inflation rates, running at 22% during the first half of the year.

    Argentina’s economy contracted by 5.8% in the first quarter of 2019, after shrinking 2.5% last year. Three million people have fallen into poverty over the past year.
    How is the move likely to be received?

    Ordinary Argentines have traditionally had little faith in their own currency, preferring to convert their spare pesos into dollars as soon as they can.

    They don’t trust financial institutions much either, so they resort to what is locally known as the “colchón bank” – that is, stuffing their dollars under the mattress.

    Anecdotal stories abound of people keeping money buried in the garden, hidden in the walls or even stuffed in heating systems – occasionally with disastrous consequences if there is an unexpected cold snap.

    When you consider Argentina’s history of rampant inflation and currency volatility, they arguably have a point.

    But it does mean that any restrictions on people’s ability to buy dollars have an enormous psychological impact.
    How does this compare with previous crisis measures?

    The $10,000 ceiling for dollar transactions is certainly generous in comparison with past actions.

    People still have bad memories of the “corralito”, imposed in 2001, which stopped all withdrawals of dollars from bank accounts for a whole year.

    The only serious attempt to wean Argentines off their dollar dependency dates back to the 1990s under President Carlos Menem, when the peso’s value was fixed by law at parity with the dollar.

    But that put the financial system under severe strain, leading to the economic meltdown of 2001-02.
    How bad can Argentina’s crisis get?

    The country is struggling to stave off its fifth debt default in 30 years.

    Last week, it said it would seek to restructure its debt with the IMF by extending its maturity. This would give the country more time to pay back the money it owes to the IMF.

    Rating agencies, including Standard & Poor’s and Fitch, decided that amounted to a default and downgraded the country’s credit ratings.

    Whatever happens in Argentina, the risk of financial contagion is low, say analysts.

    Even in the rest of Latin America, markets are unlikely to suffer. The US-China trade war and the slowdown in global growth are much more of a threat.
    How will this affect Argentina’s forthcoming election?

    The move will probably help to slow down the depletion of Argentina’s foreign currency reserves in the run-up to the presidential election in October.

    But it is a policy reversal for Mr Macri, who lifted capital controls in December 2015.

    This sets “a worrying precedent”, according to Edward Glossop, Latin America economist at Capital Economics.

    Left-wing candidate Alberto Fernandez, the likely victor of next month’s vote, has advisers who are sympathetic to capital controls, he said.

  13. Dr Fred Lenin0

    John Curtin led the fight against socialist communist fascism ? I dont think the alpbc know the meaning of fascism ,Hitler, Stalin ,Mao ,Polpot ,the Kims , the Castros <Guevarra , they were all fascist murderers .
    Curtin fought against Hitlers German fascists while supportingStalins Russian fascists ,who were marginally greater murdereers than the Germans ,though not as thorough .
    How tough was he with the traitorous wharfie comrades when they refused to load ships to fight Hitler ,because he and Stalin were mates at the time ,part of the international sociialist aparat .
    Love to have seen the comrades try that stunt on Churchill ,straight to the gallows they would have gone . The UK comrades probably thought aout it but valued their hides too much to try it on .

  14. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7409257/Doctors-nurses-share-obvious-things-tell-CLUELESS-patients.html

    “No, I cannot tell you the race of your baby, from an ultrasound. You will have to wait until after your baby is born, to have an awkward conversation with one of your boyfriends.”

  15. Mother Lode

    Judge Button: Yeah, he’s good to go.

    “We can’t see how we can rehabilitate him, so we might as well let an unreformed peterfile loose on the public. We promise we will lock him up again if and when he hurts another kiddy, although since we have already determined that he cannot be rehabilitated, and rehabilitation is what prison is for, don’t get your hopes up for much of a sentence.”

  16. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Don’t hide bottles of 5-Hour Energy in your [email protected]’: Doctors and nurses share the incredibly obvious things they had to tell their CLUELESS patients

    Snap.

    “Probiotics are different to antibiotics. Probiotics will not cure syphilis.”

  17. Roger

    Argentina: once one of the 10 richest nations in the world by per capita income.

  18. Some History

    They live amongst us.

    When the “Democratic Socialist Convention” lives next door.

    Perth vegan demands neighbour stop cooking barbecues

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing balls and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”
    Ms Carden, a massage therapist, is also furious at cigarette smoke wafting into her yard and the sound of children playing with basketballs next door.
    “It’s been devastating, it’s been turmoil, it’s been unrest, I haven’t been able to sleep,” she said.
    But one neighbour invited 9News into the backyard, to show that he’s removed the barbecue and told his children to stop playing basketball.
    Ms Carden is so upset she has taken her neighbours to the State Administrative Tribunal and the Supreme Court.
    “It’s deliberate, that’s what I told the courts, its deliberate.”
    But a Supreme Court Judge and the State Administrative Tribunal have sided with her neighbours, dismissing her case.
    Her request to appeal the decisions has also been refused.
    Ms Carden says she won’t give up on her fight and will return to court soon.

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/perth-vegan-demands-neighbour-stop-cooking-barbecues-smoking-and-bouncing-balls/5a108bdb-142b-486a-a30d-28edd354d602

  19. Mark from Melbourne

    The Doomlord’s word-killer has caused much discussion over a long period… most all of it negative.

    It occurs to me that it could also be used for good.

    Doomlord, I hereby request that the word “Vietnam” be placed on the list.

  20. Zyconoclast

    Argentina: once one of the 10 richest nations in the world by per capita income.

    That was a long time ago.

    Australia and NZ were there about way back when.

    Seems to be a pattern

  21. Some History

    They are amongst us.

    When the “Democratic Socia list Convention” lives next door.

    Perth vegan demands neighbour stop cooking barbecues

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing balls and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”
    Ms Carden, a massage therapist, is also furious at cigarette smoke wafting into her yard and the sound of children playing with basketballs next door.
    “It’s been devastating, it’s been turmoil, it’s been unrest, I haven’t been able to sleep,” she said.
    But one neighbour invited 9News into the backyard, to show that he’s removed the barbecue and told his children to stop playing basketball.
    Ms Carden is so upset she has taken her neighbours to the State Administrative Tribunal and the Supreme Court.
    “It’s deliberate, that’s what I told the courts, its deliberate.”
    But a Supreme Court Judge and the State Administrative Tribunal have sided with her neighbours, dismissing her case.
    Her request to appeal the decisions has also been refused.
    Ms Carden says she won’t give up on her fight and will return to court soon.

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/perth-vegan-demands-neighbour-stop-cooking-barbecues-smoking-and-bouncing-balls/5a108bdb-142b-486a-a30d-28edd354d602

  22. Arky

    Local council busy driving around my suburb this morning dropping off new recycling bins of half the capacity of the old ones.
    Good work, green morons.
    Your tax on landfills, combined with shutting down cheap electricity means recycling is both uneconomic, and the only viable way for householders to rid themselves of the copious amount of excess packaging your dumb mates in the crony corporations foist on us.
    I am not buying another appliance unless the shop selling it to me agrees to keep all the stupid packaging.
    I’m already asking shops if they have scissors to cut off those stupid shrink wrap thick plastic whatever the hell it is they put Chinese shit in these days:
    “Here, bin this for me, wilya mate”?

  23. Some History

    They are amongst us.

    When the “Democratic Socialist Convention” lives next door.

    Perth vegan demands neighbour stop cooking barbecues

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing balls and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”
    Ms Carden, a massage therapist, is also furious at cigarette smoke wafting into her yard and the sound of children playing with basketballs next door.
    “It’s been devastating, it’s been turmoil, it’s been unrest, I haven’t been able to sleep,” she said.
    But one neighbour invited 9News into the backyard, to show that he’s removed the barbecue and told his children to stop playing basketball.
    Ms Carden is so upset she has taken her neighbours to the State Administrative Tribunal and the Supreme Court.
    “It’s deliberate, that’s what I told the courts, its deliberate.”
    But a Supreme Court Judge and the State Administrative Tribunal have sided with her neighbours, dismissing her case.
    Her request to appeal the decisions has also been refused.
    Ms Carden says she won’t give up on her fight and will return to court soon.

    https://tinyurl.com/y5wetunw

  24. Arky

    You are correct, but sadly he served his time in full.

    ..
    Opponents of the death penalty might ponder the consequences of their morally weak squeamish girlishness in cases like this.

  25. John Constantine

    https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/perth-vegan-demands-neighbour-stop-cooking-barbecues/ar-AAGH2XI

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing balls and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.

    Cilla, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.

    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”

  26. Some History

    They are amongst us.

    When the “Democratic Socialist Convention” lives next door.

    Perth vegan demands neighbour stop cooking barbecues

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing balls and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.

    RTWT

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/perth-vegan-demands-neighbour-stop-cooking-barbecues-smoking-and-bouncing-balls/5a108bdb-142b-486a-a30d-28edd354d602

  27. John Constantine

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.

    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.

    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”

  28. Some History

    Perth vegan demands neighbour stop cooking barbecues

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing balls and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”
    Ms Carden, a massage therapist, is also furious at cigarette smoke wafting into her yard and the sound of children playing with basketballs next door.
    “It’s been devastating, it’s been turmoil, it’s been unrest, I haven’t been able to sleep,” she said.
    But one neighbour invited 9News into the backyard, to show that he’s removed the barbecue and told his children to stop playing basketball.
    Ms Carden is so upset she has taken her neighbours to the State Administrative Tribunal and the Supreme Court.
    “It’s deliberate, that’s what I told the courts, its deliberate.”
    But a Supreme Court Judge and the State Administrative Tribunal have sided with her neighbours, dismissing her case.
    Her request to appeal the decisions has also been refused.
    Ms Carden says she won’t give up on her fight and will return to court soon.

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/perth-vegan-demands-neighbour-stop-cooking-barbecues-smoking-and-bouncing-balls/5a108bdb-142b-486a-a30d-28edd354d602

  29. Some History

    They are amongst us.

    When the “Democratic Socialist Convention” lives next door.

    Perth veg an demands neighbour stop cooking barbecues

    RTWT

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/perth-vegan-demands-neighbour-stop-cooking-barbecues-smoking-and-bouncing-balls/5a108bdb-142b-486a-a30d-28edd354d602

  30. Arky

    so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish

    ..
    Now you know how your boyfriend feels.

  31. Some History

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”

    That’s the link:

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/perth-vegan-demands-neighbour-stop-cooking-barbecues-smoking-and-bouncing-balls/5a108bdb-142b-486a-a30d-28edd354d602

  32. calli

    Cilla hungry.

    Cilla want meat.

  33. Some History

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”

    That’s the link:

    https://tinyurl.com/y5wetunw

  34. Entropy

    I ond r what will be left of the Bahamas tomorrow. It sounds like it is all underwater. Including the airport.

  35. Bruce of Newcastle

    This collapse of the Argentine peso and debt problems are due to the recent election primaries…which showed very lefty Cristina Kirchner will almost certainly get back in as Vice Prez (with some guy as Prez, but he’ll be her man). Argies hate the IMF austerity and have short memories it seems.

    So you can blame this problem on the Left, again.

  36. feelthebern

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.

    Is there a better smell than a BBQ?
    Lynx should bring out a BBQ scented cologne.
    Would sell like the last snag at barbie.

  37. Some History

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”

    They are amongst us.

    When the “Democratic Socialist Convention” lives next door.

  38. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court

    The vegan wearing a leather mini skirt?

  39. feelthebern

    I still don’t understand how quickly it all went pear shaped for Macri.

  40. feelthebern

    I watch EM liquidity.
    There are some places that no one gives a shit about like Turkey.
    But lending into Argentina has been substantial.
    Up until early 2019 there didn’t appear to be any real liquidity concerns.
    Then BAM.
    Death spiral.

  41. Ellen of Tasmania

    For Cats, from James Corbett. Especially newcomers who many wonder about the name (15-ish mins):

  42. John Constantine

    https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/parenting/melbourne-woman-uses-sperm-donor-to-become-single-mum-aged-38-c-431099?fbclid=IwAR2mm1Jhdz_MDcp0bw4auv10aelknEkFTZBq2WvlwX3c7_RDk5O0FYuxY7M

    took a few weeks to find a donor who was as like me with blonde hair, blue eyes and tall – I narrowed the three-page spreadsheet down to two donors.

    “I was then given a five-page document on the donors medical history including their families which made it even harder as I wasn’t willing to have a child from a family of poor health.”

    Sarah said a few days later she found her “perfect match”.

    “My luck continued as I fell pregnant on the first round of IVF and only experienced a bit of nausea during the first trimester,” she said.

    spent her twenties and early thirties travelling and struggled to find the ‘right man’ after spending four years In London and Canada.

    ‘My life has completely changed, and I couldn’t be happier’

    “I wouldn’t say I was desperate to have a baby but after seeing my sisters with their kids I began to want it too,” she said. “I have been lucky enough to experience love once, but I have a habit of liking guys with an accent meaning they are never permanently living in Melbourne.

    “I was sick of dates that never led anywhere, and I couldn’t bare the thought of having a baby with a random and staying together for the sake of my child.

    “I would encourage women who are thinking about being a solo mum to look into it before it is too late and that it most definitely isn’t as hard as they think.

    “My life has completely changed, and I couldn’t be happier with my perfect little boy.”

  43. Some History

    Is it going to be “Malibu Meg”?

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry warned of ‘complications’ over dream to move to California

    MEGHAN MARKLE and Prince Harry’s reported house hunting in US celebrity beachside Malibu “comes with its own complications”, a royal expert has warned.

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/1172912/Meghan-Markle-news-Prince-Harry-Royal-Family-Duke-Duchess-Sussex-US-Malibu-home

  44. Percy Popinjay

    Why Economists Are Always Wrong

    I’m not having this – there are certain economists who are only wrong about everything 91.3% of the time. Some of them even frequent this blog.

  45. Some History

    Harry & Meg are vying for the title of the whacko royals.

    Meghan Markle hires crisis management firm that once represented Harvey Weinstein and Michael Jackson in bid to improve her damaged image

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9849833/meghan-markle-weinstein-jackson-pr/

  46. Beertruk

    “I was sick of dates that never led anywhere, and I couldn’t bare the thought of having a baby with a random and staying together for the sake of my child.

    No commitment.
    Does that mean she is now ‘married to the state for financial security?’

  47. John Constantine

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2019/09/02/argentinas-macri-gives-up-returns-to-kirchner-era-peso-policy/#30c5986c7ec3

    Close Argentina watchers called it: Mauricio Macri will no longer be president of this perennial crisis-wracked nation.

    Just two months left in his first term, Macri has ultimately ceded defeat this weekend. He reinstated the very currency control mechanisms used by his predecessor (and now Vice Presidential candidate) Cristina Kirchner.

    Yes, this is a sign of things to come.

    If Macri’s progress can be measured in single steps each year in office, he has gone four steps forward and four steps backward in his tenure.

    Over the last several months, Macri has installed Kirchner-era price controls on things like gasoline, and on Sunday by executive order he put limits on to the amount of dollars individuals and exporters can use.

    For example, Argentina commodity exporters (namely soymeal and soyoil) have to hold product domestically for a period of up to two weeks before receiving permission to sell abroad.
    Today In: Money

    Does the International Monetary Fund support such measures? You bet they do. They have to. Argentina is their biggest borrower, and with $56 billion and the IMF’s reputation on the line, the last thing that institution wants to be seen as right now is a lead weight.

  48. Fred

    Moeen Ali dropped by England. Usman Khawaja dropped by Australia.

    Could this be due to [email protected]? Or just that they’re crap?

  49. Percy Popinjay

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry warned of ‘complications’ over dream to move to California.

  50. Des Deskperson

    “According to the ABC opinion piece that Calli linked to, “John Curtin led the fight against fascists during World War II”.”

    One of Curtin’s main beefs against the Japanese is that they weren’t white.

  51. Bruce of Newcastle

    An anthem for Megan and Harry:

  52. egg_

    Time to go out and get us a whale or two.

    Apparently, Chrysler Imperial Crown leather seats are like new after 50 years, due to their original whale oil treatment.

  53. John Constantine

    Australian price controls on electricity and gas and water are attractive to the left.

    Controls on how much cash can be used in a lump sum attracts all politicals.

  54. egg_

    I’m not having this – there are certain economists who are only wrong about everything 91.3% of the time. Some of them even frequent this blog.

    Are you 100% certain?

  55. egg_

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry warned of ‘complications’ over dream to move to California

    Markle’s turning the Royals into a (bigger) Leftoid hypocritical sideshow.
    Only the rich can afford to be Socialists.

  56. John Constantine

    The single chick with the ivf baby is probably better off than the convoy of chicks that always were going to get around to kids but never won tattslotto to get the renovations perfect first and couldn’t squeeze much else in between holidays.

    If you never wanted kids and are happy that way, the world lets you make that choice these days, no worries. The left though have forced this way of life upon a lot of chicks that fell for the propaganda, then went on anti-depressants and got too befuddled to make the move before it was too late.

    Then comes eternal rage.

    Comrades

  57. cuckoo

    According to the ABC opinion piece that Calli linked to, “John Curtin led the fight against fascists during World War II

    I have it on good authority that Curtin relaxed by playing folksongs on a guitar which bore a label “this machine kills fascists”.

  58. Leigh Lowe

    Meghan Markle hires crisis management firm that once represented Harvey Weinstein and Michael Jackson in bid to improve her damaged image

    Consultant : “You can improve your image by not doing stupid shit. Here’s a list. That’ll be 50,000 quid please.”

  59. billie

    This farmer has a talking sheepdog and one day after putting all the sheep into a different paddock, they compare the count. 40 sheeps says the sheepdog, oh no, says the farmer, I only have 38 sheep. Yes, says the sheepdog, but I rounded them up.

    At least the sheepdog knows what it is doing ..

  60. cuckoo

    I see the loony Vegan is a “massage therapist”. SMH actually gave page space recently to an anti-5G botherer (the rayzzz!) named Mercy Wolf who gave her job description as part-time Uber driver and Julian Assange Activist.

  61. Mother Lode

    This collapse of the Argentine peso and debt problems are due to the recent election primaries…which showed very lefty Cristina Kirchner will almost certainly get back in as Vice Prez (with some guy as Prez, but he’ll be her man). Argies hate the IMF austerity and have short memories it seems.

    Time for another expedition to the Malvinas! Viva La Revolucion!

    When I say revolution here, I am not referring to a coup – just the way the Argies seem to go round and round the same cycle.

  62. feelthebern

    This collapse of the Argentine peso and debt problems are due to the recent election primaries…which showed very lefty Cristina Kirchner will almost certainly get back in as Vice Prez (with some guy as Prez, but he’ll be her man). Argies hate the IMF austerity and have short memories it seems.

    The Argies debt/liquidity started early 2019.
    But yes, they are now up shit creek post those elections.

  63. cuckoo

    Only the rich can afford to be Socialists.

    That’s the line I use on my lefty pals: that I wish I were rich enough to be a socialist.

  64. John Constantine

    In his presentation “Breaking the Wall of Knee Injuries in Female Sport”, Dr Fox will challenge the myth that differences in biology are the sole reason why women have a higher rate of ACL injury than men.

    While ACL injuries were 6.2 and 9.2 times higher in the AFLW’s first two seasons compared to the men’s game across the same years, this situation could dramatically change with a level playing field.

    “The 2019 AFLW season saw media headlines of a “knee crisis” after five anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the first five rounds, with some commentary declaring that females are “made differently” and “more prone to do knees,” Dr Fox said.

    “Media attention emphasising Australian Rules as dangerous for females due to their “biology’ may be misrepresenting a root cause of the ACL injury problem, perpetuating gender stereotypes that can restrict physical development and participation of females in sport.”

    Dr Fox said the relative infancy of female participation in Aussie Rules could partly explain the high rate of ACL injuries in AFLW, with many players having limited experience playing AFL as young children. This is in stark contrast to the typically lifelong developmental experience of male players.

    He said the significant pay gap between male and female players also meant AFLW players had additional challenges of managing training commitments with other employment – leading to reduced access to facilities, training opportunities and medical/athletic development staff.

  65. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    That’s the line I use on my lefty pals: that I wish I were rich enough to be a socialist.

    Yes, but your true Australian socialist believes in redistributing wealth at a national level, not an individual one.

  66. Dr Faustus

    Meghan Markle hires crisis management firm that once represented Harvey Weinstein and Michael Jackson in bid to improve her damaged image

    Improve her damaged image.
    Michael Jackson’s plastic surgeon?

  67. John Constantine

    Boris Johnson’s government is working on a £500 million plan to support farmers by purchasing slaughtered lambs and other livestock in the event of a no-deal Brexit, according to reports.

    It comes after a farmers’ union in Wales warned the prime minister that leaving the European Union without a deal would cause “civil unrest” in rural areas. Many British farmers are heavily reliant on trade with the EU and would face very expensive tariffs in a no-deal scenario, meaning many could go out of business.

    For example, farmers would face a 40% tariff on lamb exports to the EU in a no-deal scenario. Johnson said in Wales that British farmers would be better off if the UK left the EU in October, which he has called a “do or die” policy. He said the government was working on “interventions” that are aimed to support farmers’ incomes and added: “We’ll make sure they have the support they need.”

    Michael Gove, who is in charge of the civil service’s no-deal planning, is understood to be finalizing the plan, which would cost an estimated £500 million a year. It would see the government buy any lamb and beef, and some crops, at a set price. The payments would go some way to replacing the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy, which subsidizes farmers.

    World market for sheepmeat at highs because of the pig plague.

    If British lamb doesn’t go to europe, it will find a home in America or china, opening up european markets to Australian lamb.

    Why should British money go to brussels, then be paid to British producers after the europeans deduct handling charges?.
    British lamb don’t need no subsidy, just a trade deal with Trump.

  68. cuckoo

    Breaking the Wall of Knee Injuries in Female Sport

    Easily one of the worst titles for an academic paper, ever. Why didn’t he call it the Glass (Jaw) Ceiling?

    Just as No time to die has to be one of the worst ever titles for a Bond movie. Why didn’t they call it No time to live and let die another day

  69. Snoopy

    How many economies have the IMF and World Bank destroyed?

    The world would be much better off if the IMF and World Bank did not exist.

    Prove I’m not wrong.

  70. Mother Lode

    “I was sick of dates that never led anywhere, and I couldn’t bare the thought of having a baby with a random and staying together for the sake of my child.

    In a few years she be wondering why her little bundle of ‘Oh-look-at-me-do-the-Mummy-thing’ looks rather less like the blonde Adonis she selected and rather more like the doctor at the fertility clinic.

    These are degenerate times indeed if a woman can not even trust what is written on the plastic wrapper of her turkey baster.

  71. Leigh Lowe

    “I was sick of dates that never led anywhere, and I couldn’t bare the thought of having a baby with a random and staying together for the sake of my child.

    Bare indeed.

  72. feelthebern

    ATO loses its transfer pricing case against Glencore.
    & has to pick up Glencore’s costs as well.
    Nice work ATO.

  73. Some History

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, demanding they stop smoking, bouncing and even cooking barbecues in the backyard.
    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s northern suburbs said she’s fed up with the smell of meat cooking on the barbecue next door.
    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish, all I can smell is fish. I can’t enjoy my backyard, I can’t go out there.”
    They are amongst us.
    When the “Democratic Socialist Convention” lives next door.

    Point of personal privilege, Dilla, ve/ver. I am a highly-confused neurotic vegan. I demand that people not smoke or BBQ in their backyard and not let their rowdy kids loose in said backyard. It triggers my engsiety.

  74. bespoke

    Percy Popinjay
    #3146829, posted on September 3, 2019 at 1:26 pm
    Why Economists Are Always Wrong

    I’m not having this – there are certain economists who are only wrong about everything 91.3% of the time. Some of them even frequent this blog.

    They are shy creatures and only one dare to pop in and even then it’s to chicken for a stoush. Most have very tiny hands and double chins.

  75. feelthebern

    We are too hard on most economists.
    We are not talking about binary outcomes.
    The best you’ll get are the guys who get general trends more right than wrong.
    If they also jag a few inflection points, you’re on a winner.

  76. John Constantine

    Their report is being launched today at the ‘Global Table’ event in Melbourne.

    Senior Economic Advisor at CSIRO Futures, Dr Katherine Wynn, said that if Australia harnessed these opportunities, the food and agribusiness sector could successfully become a growth orientated, de-commoditised, value-adding and differentiated sector.

    “Achieving this growth will depend on continued innovation and investment by all players in the food industry,” Wynn said.

    “As consumer demand for healthy foods and foods with added health benefits increases, foods such as enriched yoghurt and fortified breakfast cereals are likely to claim a larger chunk of the $25 billion pie.”

    Global consumer trends for sustainable, ethical and healthy food products combined with growing demand from export markets buying into Australia’s reputation for clean and green products are driving this growth.

    Wynn, whose team drew on extensive research, consultations and economic analysis, said the health and wellness, sustainable solutions, and premium segments will see higher growth (3.6 per cent per annum, in real terms) compared to the food and agribusiness industry as a whole (2.4 per cent per annum).

    The goal to grow our share of emerging food markets complements the National Farmers’ Federation strategic target to reach $100 billion by 2030, with a growth rate of approximately four per cent per annum expected in farm gate output.

    Key opportunities fuelling this growth include the meat alternatives market – such as plant proteins and insect-based ingredients – as well as demand from export markets with large vegetarian populations such as India. The meat alternatives market also has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and water use.

    The research also shows that consumers are more willing to pay a premium for sustainable brands which could see greater economic as well as environmental benefits.

    Pandering to anxiety and hysteria the new growth path for food.

    Comrades.

  77. JC

    Hey Stack

    Do you like interest rates?

  78. vr

    ATO loses its transfer pricing case against Glencore.
    & has to pick up Glencore’s costs as well.
    Nice work ATO.

    Bern, Can you put a link to the news. I don’t subscribe to the OZ. I can’t find it anywhere else. Thanks!

  79. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Glencore triumphs over ATO in landmark transfer pricing case

    John Durie
    Senior Writer/Columnist
    @John_Durie
    2 hours ago September 3, 2019
    16 Comments

    Glencore has won a landmark transfer pricing case against the Australian Taxation Office which could impact the taxman’s ability to challenge other miners.

    In a decision handed down today Justice Jennifer Davies awarded costs against the ATO and dismissed its bill for $241m plus $1.9m in interest charges against the company.

    The case centred on the price Glencore’s trading arm paid for copper from its Cobar mine in the years 2007 to 2009 when it hit the company with a combined $241m assessment.

    This included an extra $72.2m based on the price the ATO thought should have been used as a reference in the transfer.

    Glencore claimed it used benchmark prices set by the London Metals Exchange.

    In her judgment Justice Davies went out of her way to attack some of the expert witnesses in the case noting: “It is not the role of the expert to be an advocate for the party calling them nor to express views or speculate on matters about which the expert does not have specialist knowledge.”

    “An expert should make it clear when a matter falls outside his or her expertise. Experts need to exercise particular caution to avoid making assertions of fact which have no foundation, otherwise they are seen to be advocating a case rather than providing objective and impartial assistance. Unfounded or speculative reasoning may also undermine or diminish the persuasiveness and cogency of the opinions expressed by the expert on matters on which she or she is qualified to give an opinion, eroding confidence in the accuracy, reliability and objectivity of such opinions.”

    The case was billed as a potential forerunner to a string of other transfer pricing cases from the ATO.

  80. JC

    feelthebern
    #3146861, posted on September 3, 2019 at 2:21 pm

    ATO loses its transfer pricing case against Glencore.
    & has to pick up Glencore’s costs as well.
    Nice work ATO.

    They’ll appeal like they always do. They’re like 10 monkeys on your back.

  81. JC

    That’s really a shocker of a case on the part of the ATO. Glencore is using the LME reference prices in order to be in good with the transfer pricing and it had to go to court. What a lousy bunch of arseholes the ATO are.

  82. feelthebern

    That’s what I thought JC.
    I thought it was the grey market pricing that brought companies undone.
    Not something like a publicly attainable reference price.

  83. feelthebern

    An expert should make it clear when a matter falls outside his or her expertise. Experts need to exercise particular caution to avoid making assertions of fact which have no foundation, otherwise they are seen to be advocating a case rather than providing objective and impartial assistance. Unfounded or speculative reasoning may also undermine or diminish the persuasiveness and cogency of the opinions expressed by the expert on matters on which she or she is qualified to give an opinion, eroding confidence in the accuracy, reliability and objectivity of such opinions.”

    Liberty quote.

  84. Mother Lode

    An expert should make it clear when a matter falls outside his or her expertise. Experts need to exercise particular caution to avoid making assertions of fact which have no foundation, otherwise they are seen to be advocating a case rather than providing objective and impartial assistance. Unfounded or speculative reasoning may also undermine or diminish the persuasiveness and cogency of the opinions expressed by the expert on matters on which she or she is qualified to give an opinion, eroding confidence in the accuracy, reliability and objectivity of such opinions.”

    Liberty quote.

    Should apply to judges as well.

  85. JC

    Incredible demand, Bern. Basically the ATO wanted to set their own transfer pricing. Market reference points like the LME… no biggie we will ignore it.

    This agency is totally out of control.

    At least once a week one the ATO senior arseholes is talking to the media threatening some group of taxpayers.

    Just get a load of this fuckwit sitting under a tree. Casually sitting under a tree threatening Australian citizens.

  86. feelthebern

    Should apply to judges as well.

    +1000

  87. Bruce of Newcastle

    Key opportunities fuelling this growth include the meat alternatives market

    Bacon? That’s a nice alternative. I also like other alternatives like lamb chops, snags, steak and chunky meat pies. All good meat alternatives.

    Maybe CSIRO can be defunded and the money used to support a worthy cause like Meat & Livestock Australia.

  88. JC

    Just think… the ATO’s expert witnesses were so bad, so fucking deplorable, so totally outrageous even the judge had a go at them. This is how out of control this agency has become.

  89. feelthebern

    Who were their experts?
    Who were the ATO lawyers & what was the tab?
    Who were Glencore’s lawyers & what was the tab?

  90. Bruce

    John Constantine:

    “People still have bad memories of the “corralito”, imposed in 2001, which stopped all withdrawals of dollars from bank accounts for a whole year.”

    Viz. the proposed 10K cash limit law:

    Australia – the New Argentina. See also “Veneztralia”.

  91. Stimpson J. Cat

    An expert should make it clear when a matter falls outside his or her expertise.

    So this is like an Economist talking about making money or a Libertarian talking about daily life, yes?

    Ha ha ha ja ja!!!!

  92. Mother Lode

    Maybe CSIRO can be defunded and the money used to support a worthy cause like Meat & Livestock Australia.

    Maybe the CSIRO could be turned into meat substitutes.

    They are already half way there.

    For years they have been producing science substitutes. Looks like science (lots of numbers and graphs), feels like science (lots of great hefty reports), even sounds like science (lots of precise predictions) – but not science.

  93. Leigh Lowe

    feelthebern

    #3146894, posted on September 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm

    Who were their experts?
    Who were the ATO lawyers & what was the tab?
    Who were Glencore’s lawyers & what was the tab?

    What odds the ATO “experts” were ANU academics with a socialist bent.

  94. Top Ender

    My comment Rejected yesterday at the Oz

    Pretty sad really. To think a 16 year old with no advanced education can give us some new enlightenment is ridiculous.

    The people behind Greta manipulating her should be ashamed of themselves.

    My comment Accepted today at the Oz

    Dunno about the headline: Petty officer Kristina Keneally is all at sea on illegal boat arrivals

    In my Navy time, a Petty Officer was a very skilled capable individual, the equivalent of a sergeant, whose wisdom could be trusted as infallible.

    KK is more like a raw recruit with delusions of grandeur.

    These moderators are crazy.

  95. Herodotus

    From Mark Steyn today:
    Happy Labo(u)r Day! That’s what the day used to be about: putting the “u” in Labor. You can’t spell labour without you, and without you and your labour this planet would be a primitive state of nature, red in tooth and claw. Consider the words of Peter J McGuire, General Secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, proposing the very first Labor Day a mere century-and-a-third ago. The new day would be an occasion, he said, to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold”.
    What a crazy! All the grandeur we behold comes from man and his work? What fossil fuel is he inhaling? Today, rude nature is the state we aspire to, and you can’t even delve and carve a Keystone pipeline underneath it, out of sight. Labor itself, in the sense Mr McGuire used the term, is morally dubious among our elites, and, down at the other end, simply unknown.
    A statistic from my book “After America”:
    One fifth of British children are raised in homes in which no adult works. Just under 900,000 people have been off sick for over a decade, claiming ‘sick benefits’, week in, week out for ten years and counting.
    By 2012, one tenth of the adult population had done not a day’s work since Tony Blair took office on May 1st 1997 – a decade and a half earlier. In such households, the weekday ritual of rising, dressing, and leaving for gainful employment is entirely unknown. In many parts of America, the “conversation”, as they say on MSNBC, is between the dependent class and the governing class that ministers to them and keeps them (more or less) in line. If you’re a convenience store owner in, say, Ferguson, Missouri, your low-skilled service jobs are the only labor on offer, and, for your pains, you get burned and looted by the dependent class while your 911 calls go unanswered by the governing class, both of which you fund.
    There’s a glimpse of the world to come, for those who wish to ponder it.

  96. Tintarella di Luna

    This agency is totally out of control.

    At least once a week one the ATO senior arseholes is talking to the media threatening some group of taxpayers.

    Cranston, his 2 kids and 12 of their mates and let’s not forget deputy taxation commissioner Petroulias who’s still at it as this story goes

  97. egg_

    The best you’ll get are the guys who get general trends more right than wrong.

    Energy prices appear to be a square of renewables penetration – can they work with exponential trends, at all?

  98. Black Ball

    Anyone go and hear John Kerry today in Melbourne?

  99. Whalehunt fun

    Laugh-a-minute-movie

    Read this ABC whiney snivelling after watching one if the funniest and most fanciful dope crazy dream movies ever made.

    The movie was hilarious with whine-Meister Goodes starring but the ABC opinion piece is just as deluded and just as funny. I felt I am getting my money’s worth with the ABC today.

  100. Tintarella di Luna

    Independent Always: Nine raises ire of journalists over Liberal Party fundraiser:

    Nine Entertainment has raised the ire of its print journalists over a Liberal Party fundraiser that the media company held at its Willoughby headquarters on Monday night.

    Australia’s biggest media union said journalists from The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and The Australian Financial Review, which were inherited from Nine’s $4 billion merger with Fairfax Media in December, are concerned “about the impact on their newspapers’ Charter of Editorial Independence” following the event.

    The Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance said the house committees at the three metropolitan mastheads have written to Nine chief executive Hugh Marks and managing director of publishing Chris Janz “to inform them of their objections to the nature of the event and its impact on their editorial independence.”

    The Liberal Party fundraiser at Nine’s headquarters has “raised the question of where the Nine newspapers’ political loyalties lie”, the house committees said in their letter to Mr Marks and Mr Janz, according to MEAA.

    “The former Fairfax mastheads have a long history of political independence. If this has changed and we are now associated with the Liberal Party, this should be conveyed to staff,” they said.

    The house committees also said fundraisers for Labor or other political parties “would be of equal concern”.

    “We strongly object to our reputation for independent journalism being compromised by the hosting of party political fundraisers. This can only serve to make the job of working journalists more difficult.

    “Our mastheads have done much to expose the corrupting influence of money on politics. It is vitally important that we remain independent of the political process,” the house committees said in their letter to Mr Marks and Mr Janz.

    A Nine spokesperson said the company, which is in the midst of taking full control of Macquarie Media, “took the opportunity last night to present our case to the Liberal Party at their business forum”, and will do the same at a Labor Party event and dinner with their leader on Tuesday.

    “We participate actively in our democracy and speak to all parties to press our case around regulation and other political issues that concern our business and the ability of our people to perform their role,” the spokesperson said.

    Nine’s management and board have been “clear and strong in the support of the Charter of Editorial Independence”, the spokesperson said, adding that editorial impartiality is also “integral” to its television business.

    The Liberal Party wasn’t immediately available for comment.

  101. John Constantine

    https://www.theepochtimes.com/colorado-voters-may-exit-from-national-popular-vote-compact_3065783.html

    Colorado voters will have an opportunity in 2020 to withdraw their state’s ratification of a plan that will guarantee that the winner of the national popular vote in future presidential elections becomes president of the United States.

    The office of Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, a Democrat, announced Aug. 29 that opponents of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact filed enough voter signatures to place a referendum on the November 2020 ballot to repeal state legislation implementing the plan. If passed, the measure would reverse the national popular vote enabling legislation that Gov. Jared Polis, a Democrat, signed March 15 after state lawmakers approved it.

    Those seeking repeal of the law gathered almost 229,000 signatures to put the issue on next year’s ballot, well beyond the minimum of 124,000 signatures required, The Hill reported. The last time Colorado voters faced a referendum to repeal legislation approved by the state legislature was 1932, when voters reversed a tax on oleomargarine, according to Griswold.

  102. areff

    Good heavens! Look at this joyless, desiccated vegan (AAP copy):

    A Perth vegan has taken her neighbours all the way to the Supreme Court, furious about the meat and smoke smells emanating from their backyard barbecues.

    Cilla Carden, from Girrawheen, in Perth’s north, said she was fed up with the smell of meat cooking on barbecues next door.

    “They’ve put it there so I smell fish – all I can smell is fish,” she told Nine News.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=53&v=fd6feA9Hi_0

    “I can’t enjoy my backyard; I can’t go out there.”

    Ms Carden, a massage therapist, is also angry about cigarette smoke that wafts over the fence, and the noise from her neighbours’ children playing basketball.

    “It’s been devastating, it’s been turmoil, it’s been unrest, I haven’t been able to sleep,” she said.

  103. Dr Fred Lenin

    It is not true that the garbos in Sussex Street Sydney have complained to their bosses that heaps of perfectly good Aldi bags are being thrown out at alp HQ ,only having been used only once .
    there are no reports that the same problem exists at Liberal [HQ with Davud Jones bags ?

  104. Tintarella di Luna

    Lols all round particularly this from the Independents Always –

    “We strongly object to our reputation for independent journalism being compromised by the hosting of party political fundraisers. This can only serve to make the job of working journalists more difficult.

    Best laugh of the day – I doubt Australia politics has ever been so thoroughly examined and discussed in Tuscany – then we look at Italian politics and realise perhaps it ain’t so bad after all and are happy to return

  105. areff

    Spaminator ate the AAP copy accompanying this clip. G_d only only knows why.

  106. Leigh Lowe

    The Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance said the house committees at the three metropolitan mastheads have written to Nine chief executive Hugh Marks

    Note that the journos don’t have shop stewards.
    They have a “President of the House Committee”.

  107. Leigh Lowe

    Stinkin’ hot in Phoenix today.

  108. Nicole from the National Broads in Bands Network keeps calling me.

  109. Leigh Lowe

    Nicole from the National Broads in Bands Network keeps calling me.

    Rang Telstra yesterday about roamin’ charges on Mrs’s L’s phone.
    Tried to sell me a home broadband plan.
    Helloooo.
    I am not home so don’t care.

  110. P

    Spaminator ate the AAP copy accompanying this clip. G_d only only knows why.

    Because of the ‘bouncing b a l l s’ in the URL. (I think)

  111. Des Deskperson

    ‘At least once a week one the ATO senior arseholes is talking to the media threatening some group of taxpayers.

    Just get a load of this fuckwit sitting under a tree. Casually sitting under a tree threatening Australian citizens.’

    Jordan should have resigned after the Cranston episode. Instead he came out and said how ‘fond’ he had been of Cranston; what one would expect, I suppose, from such an arrogant – although dumb – and inbred organisation.

    The story from inside ATO is that Jordan has a second – trophy? – family and needs the money. I dunno how true this is, but the view is that he wants to hang on in the job as long as he can. As a statuary officer, he can only, for all practical purposes, be sacked for serious misconduct.

  112. JC

    Leigh Lowe
    #3146924, posted on September 3, 2019 at 4:34 pm

    Stinkin’ hot in Phoenix today.

    Leigh, that’s flyover.

  113. areff

    Actual headline:

    Woman killed by ‘aggressive rooster’ highlights dangers of varicose veins

    Cleary, all roosters must wear hi-viz vests and muzzles if we are to be safe.

  114. stackja

    Yak Dut released from prison despite string of violent offences

    A thug who kicked a cop in the head and threatened to bash a Coles worker boasted to police: “I will get away with anything because I’m black”. Today he walked free from court despite admitting a string of new crimes.
    SHANNON DEERY, Herald Sun
    Subscriber only

    an hour ago


    Magistrate Jonathan Klestadt placed Dut on a second community corrections order and directed he complete 50 hours of unpaid community work on top of that imposed by the County Court.

    “You’ve spent almost a year and a half on remand in relation to more serious offending,” he told him.

    “If that doesn’t give you a very good reason to stay out of trouble in the future, if that hasn’t altered your outlook about your place in the community, then unfortunately you are going to spend a lot more time in police cells and jails in the future.”

  115. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    then unfortunately you are going to spend a lot more time in police cells and jails in the future.”

    Deportation not an option?

  116. Tintarella di Luna

    Petty officer Kristina Keneally is all at sea on illegal boat arrivals

    More like Maggie Lafayette to Captain Horatio Pugwash

  117. Bruce of Newcastle

    Australia’s biggest media union said journalists from The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and The Australian Financial Review…are concerned “about the impact on their newspapers’ Charter of Editorial Independence” following the event.

    Ah so the ALPBC’s ugly sisters are upset that Nein is now in the headlights of the Right for bias because of their cozy little kolkhoz eh? Acquiring a scrawny dog gets you fleas every time.

  118. Leigh Lowe

    JC

    #3146938, posted on September 3, 2019 at 4:53 pm

    Leigh Lowe
    #3146924, posted on September 3, 2019 at 4:34 pm

    Stinkin’ hot in Phoenix today.

    Leigh, that’s flyover.

    I am not there.
    Just sayin’ it is hot there today.
    Just making small talk.

  119. Bruce of Newcastle

    Petty officer Kristina Keneally is all at sea on illegal boat arrivals

    More like a statuesque statue attached to the bowsprit of the new Chinese aircraft carrier “Labor”.

  120. Knuckle Dragger

    Geez, it’s cold in Irktusk today.

  121. calli

    It’s pleasantly mild in the land of the lotus eaters.

  122. Bruce of Newcastle

    It’s pleasantly mild

    Indeed it was. I treadlied a fair distance and had to stop for a large water dragon sitting in the middle of the shared path. He moved off a couple metres and let me admire him for a while, then he scrambled down to the stream just below. This warm sunshine after the rain would be water dragon heaven.

  123. Percy Popinjay

    More like Maggie Lafayette to Captain Horatio Pugwash

    Master Bates and Seaman Staines were unavailable for comment.

  124. Tintarella di Luna

    Master Bates and Seaman Staines were unavailable for comment.

    🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

  125. Black Ball

    Will Seaman Staines be commandeering one of those submarines when they get built Percy? 😂😂

  126. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Geez, it’s cold in Irktusk today.

    Warm enough in Hanoi.

  127. Cassie of Sydney

    I know we all like to get stuck into both ScoMo and Gerry Harvey but I have to say that they have both impressed over the last few days. I admire Morrison’s refusal to bow to the activists over the Tamils and I admire Gerry Harvey for speaking up against the Radio 2GB and Alan Jones boycott and his spray today about the bullshit corporate leftist activism that is plaguing companies.

  128. Tintarella di Luna

    I admire Morrison’s refusal to bow to the activists over the Tamils and I admire Gerry Harvey for speaking up against the Radio 2GB and Alan Jones boycott and his spray today about the bullshit corporate leftist activism that is plaguing companies.

    As Minister for Immigration Prime Minister Scott Morrison dealt with all this emotion and all this chicanery for a long time backed to the hilt by the law and by Prime Minister Tony Abbott. The activists will find a new cause once the deportation is done, the sooner the better. What a farce

  129. Bruce of Newcastle

    Warm enough in Hanoi.

    Hanoi Jane is still at it, with an oped in WaPo Friday. She’s scared for democracy or something, which is odd for someone who seems not to like democracy very much.

    Not surprised that WaPo gives her space to spout. Their tagline “Democracy Dies in Darkness” is clearly plan, not a motto.

  130. Entropy

    Yeah but it’s gerry GST Harvey.

  131. mh

    Black Ball
    #3146913, posted on September 3, 2019 at 4:09 pm
    Anyone go and hear John Kerry today in Melbourne?

    That John Kerry?

    The one that should have been prosecuted under the Logan Act, except Republicans are so fvcking weak? That one?

  132. mh

    At least once a week one the ATO senior arseholes is talking to the media threatening some group of taxpayers.

    Just get a load of this fuckwit sitting under a tree. Casually sitting under a tree threatening Australian citizens.

    The Commish is sitting on a tree stump. I wonder what the symbolism is there?

  133. calli

    Why go for bullshit corporate activism when you have crony capitalism?

    As in everything, capitalism will always be the biggest earner.

    Gerry’s smart. He understands the GWGB phenomenon.

  134. Atoms for Peace

    It must be nice to reside in a country that has solid baseline power based on nuclear and hydro and thus have the luxury of demanding that everyone embraces intermittent renewables. Well done Sweden.

  135. classical_hero

    John C, the next presidential election, the people of Colorado are going to be disenfranchised because President Trump will win the popular vote.

  136. Frank

    Yeah but it’s gerry GST Harvey.

    No Amazon for you Harvey, the swine.

  137. JB of Sydney/Shanghai

    This didn’t work before, so I’ll try again.
    Useful for Cats in Shanghai.

    http://www.smartshanghai.com/articles/community/2019-easter-services-in-shanghai

  138. Atoms for Peace

    Hanoi Jane must be petrified at the thought that her memory will be hero to zero within 12 months of her passing.

  139. MatrixTransform

    have the luxury of demanding that everyone embraces intermittent renewables.

    I got a 6kW solar a couple months ago.
    scammed $2225 in rebate
    thanks Dan (and all Victorians that dont have solar)

    and to date the best output has been 28kWh.
    So its sunny in Melb today and the clarity was awesome and I’m bangin’ on at lunchtime to my mate about setting the Chateau Chelsea export record.

    nup

    I set up port forward through the router to gather and record data every minute from my inverter.
    checked the logs and the damn thing was shutting down on voltage for most of the day
    18 kWh net … wtf?

    I’m gonna leave the air conditioner on tomorrow

  140. 2dogs

    What a load of tripe.

    The skills kids need for the 21st century are the 3 D’s – Design, Development (programming), and Diagnostics.

  141. MatrixTransform

    4D’s mate … dont forget Data

  142. MatrixTransform

    What aspect of Data?

    Big Data mate … everybody wants data

    Was also joking about data to my mate today whilst commissioning water pulse meters and some ultrasonic heat meters.

    got a building that uses 4500 litres of water a day, on a garden, 4 days a week and all of it runs straight off into the gutter.

    …they keep buying the data

    they pay us to install them and then pay us again later for the data.

    there’s like 50 water meters and 100 electrical meters and we stash it in the cloud on an Amazon server and they can log in view the graphs.

    Squiggabytes of it

    they love that stuff.

  143. MatrixTransform

    word is they’re gonna spend $4M redesigning that garden.

    because… feelings.

    …and data

  144. zyconoclast

    Sydney’s ‘monster’ magpie shot dead after 40 complaints and three years of attacks

    An “aggressive” and “uncharacteristically territorial” magpie in Sydney’s north west has been shot dead after a council decision that has split the local community.

    The Animal Justice Party’s local branch said people were disgusted an iconic Australian species had been targeted.

    Member Heidi Vasilevskis said the bird’s death would put a whole family of magpies at risk.

    “This parent bird was a food source for new chicks … I am outraged and upset beyond words,” she said.

    “I truly fear for the future of our unique and precious animal life.”

  145. Atoms for Peace

    Matrix. We have approx 8 kWH on the roof ( 2 systems ) and the 6 kWH generated 3.85 today . Include the 1.5 and we are probably at 4.5 ish. I’ve been smashing the pool pump all day as it has a new filter and a week to catch up. Too bad about that pesky sunset..

  146. Atoms for Peace

    1 dead maggie vs how many birds at the altar of wind turbines.

  147. Tel

    The skills kids need for the 21st century are the 3 D’s – Design, Development (programming), and Diagnostics.

    Depends very much on career track … one of the fundamental features of complex societies and division of labour is that increasing levels of specialization require distinct skills.

    Soft skills are great if you want to go for any of these: pocket stuffer, grifter, sweet talker, spiv, scam artist, con man, bagman, trickster, or politician.

  148. mh

    Great news re the magpie being shot dead. Some common sense!

    Many swoop, but only a small percentage strike. Just take out the few dangerous ones that keep striking.

  149. Tel

    Have we got any machinists left?

    Order one in a box from eBay!

  150. MatrixTransform

    Soft skills are great if you want to go for any of these: pocket stuffer, grifter, sweet talker, spiv, scam artist, con man, bagman, trickster, or politician.

    got another building where some bad design choices were made 20 years ago

    They have some very large change-over valves on their condenser water systems that carry massive flows and the valves have a huge pressure drop.

    as far as I can tell there’s absolutely no need for it.

    I did beer coaster calc and flow x pd x time = energy (more or less)

    adds up to something like $75000 per year in electricity.

    do they pay to change the valves?

    nup.

    they pay for the data though

  151. feelthebern

    I can operate a lathe.
    Well I could back in the 90’s.
    Now they have computer interfaces don’t they?

  152. MatrixTransform

    Have we got any machinists left?


    this guy is funny

  153. mh

    1 dead maggie vs how many birds at the altar of wind turbines.

    Excellent point.

  154. feelthebern

    There’s a tax payer funded doco in this Silence of the Magpie saga.

  155. JC

    The other day, wifey and I were taking a walk and she was close to attacked by a couple of Rosellas. That’s when a tennis racket would be useful.

  156. John Constantine

    Council bans common household item from recycling bins
    Tom Flanagan
    News Reporter
    Yahoo News Australia3 September 2019

    A council in Victoria has told residents they are no longer allowed to put glass in their recycling bins.

    The decision from Macedon Ranges Shire Council comes after the collapse of recycling giant SKM which has caused widespread waste issues across Victoria.

    “At its Ordinary Council Meeting on 28 August Council endorsed plans to remove glass from the current mixed recycling household bin collection service,’ council revealed.

    A major stumbling block for SKM was that shards or fragments of glass regularly contaminated other recyclables such as cardboard.

    This meant SKM struggled to sell on stockpiles of recycled materials with potential buyers unwilling to clean it up themselves.
    Recycling bins won’t be able to take glass anymore in Macedon Ranges. Source: AAP, file.
    View photos
    Recycling bins won’t be able to take glass anymore in Macedon Ranges. Source: AAP, file.

    “Small pieces of glass can become embedded in paper and cardboard in recycling bins and contaminate the other recyclables,” the council, north of Melbourne, said.

    Macedon Ranges Shire Council revealed they have managed to find a recycling company willing to process their recycling if council can ensure it isn’t contaminated.

    This request has led council to prohibiting any glass being placed into recycling bins.

    The big yellow bin problem: Australia’s ‘toxic’ recycling crisis exposed

    Incredible images inside warehouse reveal extent of Victoria’s waste crisis

    Residents must instead transport their glass items, such as beer and wine bottles and glass jars, even if unbroken, to transfer stations in Kyneton, Woodend and Romsey.

    If that is unfeasible, residents are told to put their glass in their normal bins, sending it to landfill.

    Deakin University lecturer in hazards material management Dr Trevor Thornton told Yahoo News Australia last month that residents were uneducated on how to recycle properly, which contributed to such contamination.

    Big australia has made us such a wealthy nation that we can afford to drive our empty stubbies down to the stubby dump in our cars, because that makes economic sense in bizzaro councilworld.

    Or go for re-education.

    Comrades.

  157. JC

    Telstra needs to die. It should be the corporate equivalent of body dissection.

  158. feelthebern

    I had a possum shitting all over my back yard up until recently.
    Now that’s moved on, I have a crackle of cockatoos shitting all over the place.
    The dog knows she’s beat.
    She stays inside when the local wildlife have flocked to the tree in the middle of the yard.
    I suppose I should be thankful that cows can’t climb trees.

  159. mh

    There’s a tax payer funded doco in this Silence of the Magpie saga.

    Just how to work Tony Abbott into the story.

  160. JC

    Just how to work Tony Abbott into the story.

    And Trump.

  161. calli

    Fitzie could write a book.

    Plucky Laconic Larrikin Aussie Magpies at Vinegar Hill

    H/t Mother Lode

  162. 2dogs

    I’ve just spotted a huge flaw in the The European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill 2019.

    Clearly, the result of hasty preparation and not paying attention to detail.

    See if you can spot it. I’ll spill the beans later if it passes the Commons in its current form.

  163. feelthebern

    Local hero magpie murdered.
    Only in ScoMo’s Australia.

  164. feelthebern

    I can’t read that 2dogs.
    Words.

  165. JC

    Family of dead Maggie in shock. Blame Tony Abbott and Donald Trump for death of loved father of 37.

  166. Frank

    Council bans common household item from recycling bins

    So that settles it then, a a splintered bottle in every yellow bin, just for spite.

  167. feelthebern

    KKK announces candle vigil for murdered migrant.

  168. calli

    We feed the buggers. The Montagues and the Capulets.

    And they’re at it again because breeding season.

    For some odd territorial reason, the boundary between the two fiefdoms is bang in the middle of our back patio. So we get swooping, clacking, loud squawking and other menacing behaviours.

    Nature red in beak and wing.

  169. Tel

    … as far as I can tell there’s absolutely no need for it.

    If you search far enough you will find some combination of building regulations that between all of them create a requirement for doing things by the most difficult way possible. I might be a touch cynical.

    … adds up to something like $75000 per year in electricity.

    20 years ago governments loved the idea of more people paying more tax … errr ahem I mean using more electricity.

  170. feelthebern

    I really don’t mind the cockatoos.
    They are better than an alarm clock in the morning.

  171. JC

    Calli

    Just poison the fuckers. I don’t recommend shooting them because you would end up with the SWAT team breaking through the door.

    I had possums running along the roof and would wake me up. No more. A couple of boxes of rat poison did the trick and haven’t heard the arseholes for a few years now.

  172. areff

    red in beak and claw indeed.

  173. Arky

    Question:
    I have been watching a bunch of videos with various economist types explaining negative interest rates.
    Hopeless.
    Either to simple aimed at total mongs, or full of jargon and shit.
    So I want to know if my basic take on negative interest rates is right.
    In the normal course of events, if someone wanted you to take care of, say, a million bucks for ten years and their only requirement was that you give it back at the end, you would think: “Yeeha”. Good deal, because you can buy various things, like real estate and company stocks, most of which will go up in value over that time. Which is why people compete to look after money, and why it costs to borrow.
    So if the situation is that interest rates are negative, doesn’t that mean that the general expectation is that it will be bloody hard to find anything likely to go up in value? That is: that the values of all these assets one usually invests in is going to be going down a lot, for quite some time?

  174. JC

    Bern

    If they aren’t yelping they’re eating profusely. They’re like the bird equivalent of drama queen fat chicks.

  175. mh

    And Trump.

    The other night I was listening to Sports Radio being broadcast from the UK. There had been some racist tweets attacking two Man Utd players who had both missed penalties, both of them black. FMD, one of the reporters was blaming the rise of populist, western leaders for these tweets. (Trump).

    So who was to blame 30 or 40 years ago when an avalanche of bananas would descend onto an
    English soccer field when a black player ran out?

  176. JC

    There are only two types of birds I like – eagles and hawks. Majestic creatures.

  177. JC

    So who was to blame 30 or 40 years ago when an avalanche of bananas would descend onto an
    English soccer field when a black player ran out?

    Noooo. They actually threw bananas at them?

  178. Cassie of Sydney

    “JC
    #3147033, posted on September 3, 2019 at 7:47 pm
    There are only two types of birds I like – eagles and hawks. Majestic creatures.”

    I like kookaburras.

  179. Arky

    Don’t everyone answer me at once.
    It’s not like it’s an economics blog.

  180. areff

    7.30 headlining a profile of a gay soccer player.

    Aren’t they all?

  181. mh

    Noooo. They actually threw bananas at them?

    One famous incident where a local black kid made his debut for Chelsea. This was his dream. Ran out to an avalanche of bananas from Chelsea fans. Only played a few minutes before the coach had to bring him off the field.

  182. custard

    I see that the Australian Medical Association has declared climate change a medical emergency. Presumably we will start to see emergency departments inundated with people affected by this newly identified medical condition.
    Symptoms include skin peeling off after being glued to roads. Early onset clues are facial expressions of shock and horror that the climate predictions of ten years ago were completely inaccurate.
    The ABC is reported to be opening a dedicated news channel to the emergency.

  183. candy

    So if the situation is that interest rates are negative, doesn’t that mean that the general expectation is that it will be bloody hard to find anything likely to go up in value?

    The very low interest rates we have in Australia mean someone has bungled the economy badly, imo.
    Normal is working hard, saving money, getting reasonable interest, contribute to your own retirement, perhaps spend a little and keep the economy going round.

    That is situation normal, not what Australia has.

  184. Mater

    Residents must instead transport their glass items, such as beer and wine bottles and glass jars, even if unbroken, to transfer stations in Kyneton, Woodend and Romsey.
    If that is unfeasible, residents are told to put their glass in their normal bins, sending it to landfill.

    The same council has issued a smaller than average normal bin because…recycling, and as of 2020 they are moving to fortnightly rubbish collection.

    General rubbish bins will only be collected every two weeks in the Macedon Ranges as an ambitious new council service is geared up for rollout.

    What a f*ckfight!

  185. custard

    The Guardian story says

    “Climate change will cause higher mortality and morbidity from heat stress,” the AMA president says. “Climate change will cause injury and mortality from increasingly severe weather events. Climate change will cause increases in the transmission of vector-borne diseases. Climate change will cause food insecurity resulting from declines in agricultural outputs. Climate change will cause a higher incidence of mental ill-health.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/sep/03/australian-medical-association-declares-climate-change-a-health-emergency

  186. Arky

    Australia should be the cheapest country in the world to throw shit into giant holes in the ground.
    Yarra Ranges idiots: Get ready for an increase in illegal dumping.

  187. Tintarella di Luna

    Will the AMA address the distress of elderly poor Australians afflicted by hypothermia due to incapacity to heat their homes?

  188. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’m taking food along on treadly route I did today. Yesterday a male magpie started swooping, so I hopped off bike and chucked some mince onto the path. Mrs Magpie, who was quite friendly, said thanks and scoffed it. Eventually much wilder Mr Magpie came down and had some too – a safe 15m or so away from me.

    Today on the same route they were there again and the male looked like having a go. The female again accepted some food, and while he didn’t come down after a short while the male decamped to the tree they probably are nesting in. I count that as a victory!

    It’s an experiment. That route can be like Iraq on a day when the USAF is particularly irate. If I can associate food with bicycles it might save we treadliers from being air struck multiple times along it.

  189. Tel

    So if the situation is that interest rates are negative, doesn’t that mean that the general expectation is that it will be bloody hard to find anything likely to go up in value?

    If you consider that gold is money, then gold itself never pays a dividend (it doesn’t produce baby gold bars when you leave it alone), but it does cost for security, storage, etc. Thus, on the whole gold becomes slightly less gold … that’s negative interest rates.

    If you are talking about the fiat currency in your wallet … the reserve banks of the world have already promised to deliver 2% consumer price inflation … so in real terms simply holding cash in your hand is already delivering 2% negative interest rates. However, they want to go one better and also inflict nominal interest rates on you as well.

  190. Arky

    Essentially the same thing.
    Cold and foggy in winter, trees, and lots of feral types with piecings and those wooley hats with ropey bits hanging down by the ears.

  191. Mother Lode

    Is the AMA announcing outbreaks of diseases that AGW is causing, or airy predictions of doom that will be conjured up by AGW in the future?

    The reverence for learnedness that was once the due of medical practitioners is only a very faint memory.

    Now they are shopkeepers with prescription pads.

  192. custard

    The Guardian story also said

    These effects are already being observed internationally and in Australia.”

    Bullshit

  193. Mater

    The same council has issued a smaller than average normal bin because…recycling, and as of 2020 they are moving to fortnightly rubbish collection.

    But don’t worry. They have their priorities sorted!

    Council to raise the rainbow flag with pride

  194. egg_

    Perth Vegan Takes Neighbours to Court Over BBQ Cooking

    We must surely be merging with their parallel Clown Universe.

  195. 2dogs

    So if the situation is that interest rates are negative, doesn’t that mean that the general expectation is that it will be bloody hard to find anything likely to go up in value? That is: that the values of all these assets one usually invests in is going to be going down a lot, for quite some time?

    The nominal interest rate is the officially set figure; it doesn’t imply any market expectation.

    The Central Bank does this in the hope that people can find something better to invest in, and thereby stimulate the economy.

  196. egg_

    Petticoat officer Kristina Keneally is all at sea on illegal boat arrivals

    FTFY

  197. candy

    The AMA could not be more out of touch with the health needs of their general population of patients if they tried.

    I think it might be an example of IT’s “corporatism” if I am understanding him right.

  198. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Science Cats

    Opinions please about the SAFIRE Project?

    https://www.safireproject.com/

  199. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Residents must instead transport their glass items, such as beer and wine bottles and glass jars, even if unbroken, to transfer stations in Kyneton, Woodend and Romsey.

    What the actual fuck?

    I’d be inclined to dump them in the skip behind the local.

  200. Mater

    I’d be inclined to dump them in the skip behind the local.

    Hold my beer!

  201. candy

    The Central Bank does this in the hope that people can find something better to invest in, and thereby stimulate the economy.

    The economy is stimulated when people get a reasonable wage, not what we have here in Australia, and can save and spend a little.
    And stimulated by people near retirement who can save and get reasonable interest, and then have some for retirement and some for spending, through their bank/credit union of choice.

    I really don’t think these issues ever change much through the passage of time over a century even. It is human nature. Work, save, spend a little, have some for retirement What could be simpler?

  202. Old Lefty

    The Nine hacks and their union are trying to justify their protest against the Liberals fundraiser by saying that they’d object to the same on behalf of Labor and other parties. A bit disingenuous. The don’t mention the Greens (for whom they and the ABC are uncritical boosters). And they (and the ABC) regard Labor, with the exception of the Andrews Stalinist pervert thuggocracy in Yarragrad) as reactionary criminal sellouts to capitalist imperialism – ‘social fascists’, in 1930s Comintern-speak.

    Don’t be fooled if the ABC and Nine-Fairfax occasionally sound cool towards China. That’s because, nearly thirty years afy the collapse of the Soviet Union, they still cling to the Soviet-era Moscow line.

  203. Mater

    Residents must instead transport their glass items, such as beer and wine bottles and glass jars, even if unbroken, to transfer stations in Kyneton, Woodend and Romsey.

    The nearest one is forty minutes drive. Every household will be doing the same. Environmentalism at it’s finest.

  204. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    So if the situation is that interest rates are negative, doesn’t that mean that the general expectation is that it will be bloody hard to find anything likely to go up in value? That is: that the values of all these assets one usually invests in is going to be going down a lot, for quite some time?

    Arky. This might seem like skipping ahead. Forget deposit rates.

    Ask yourself when was the last time that mortgage holders in Australia faced negative real interest rates, or very close to it.

    They’re not good times.

  205. Some History

    The same council has issued a smaller than average normal bin because…recycling, and as of 2020 they are moving to fortnightly rubbish collection.
    But don’t worry. They have their priorities sorted!
    Council to raise the rainbow flag with pride

    From the link:

    “The date of 17 May is also significant as it commemorates the World Health Organisation’s decision in 1990 to declassify homosexuality as a mental disorder.”

  206. Arky

    The nominal interest rate is the officially set figure; it doesn’t imply any market expectation.

    The Central Bank does this in the hope that people can find something better to invest in, and thereby stimulate the economy.

    Not altogether:

    A Danish bank has launched the world’s first negative interest rate mortgage – handing out loans to homeowners where the charge is minus 0.5% a year.

    Negative interest rates effectively mean that a bank pays a borrower to take money off their hands, so they pay back less than they have been loaned.

    Jyske Bank, Denmark’s third largest, has begun offering borrowers a 10-year deal at -0.5%, while another Danish bank, Nordea, says it will begin offering 20-year fixed-rate deals at 0% and a 30-year mortgage at 0.5%.

  207. Arky

    If a bank is offering you a mortgage on a million dollar property at -0.5% it must have the expectation that in ten years the property will be worth less than $950 000, surely?

  208. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    “The date of 17 May is also significant as it commemorates the World Health Organisation’s decision in 1990 to declassify homosexuality as a mental disorder.”

    Terrible optics.

  209. Bruce of Newcastle

    Opinions please about the SAFIRE Project?

    1. I suspect they’d use more energy for the electrodes that generated by the fusion plasma.
    2. This bit reeks:

    The spherical visible plasma double layers work as a transforming capacitor trapping ions, electrons and molecules, generating energy densities analogous to the Sun. They appear to be the means by which nature produces extremely high energies. The implication? High energy production.

    You operate at that sort of plasma temperature and you don’t have molecules. You have ionised atoms and electrons and nothing else. Anyone who is a chemist with experience of ICP and ICPMS would know that. It makes me pretty sceptical.

  210. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    They mightn’t have much of a chance Arky.

    They have cash flow and liquidity requirements because of their leverage and the inflationary environment can shift. Banks don’t want to overvalue assets used as collateral so maybe their price expectation is not that important.

    Negative nominal rates don’t necessarily mean negative real rates and negative real rates can happen with “normal” nominal rates. Fixed assets aren’t appreciating now because of the interest rate and the positive nominal and real rate is not determined by fixed assets that physically depreciate in a non-capital good market.

  211. Arky

    It makes me pretty sceptical.

    ..
    Still more likely than EM-Drive.

  212. Arky

    Fixed assets aren’t appreciating now because of the interest rate and the positive nominal and real rate is not determined by fixed assets that physically depreciate in a non-capital good market.

    ..
    Sorry, you have lost me. I have read that twice and aren’t parsing it into Arky.
    Please rephrase.

  213. Tel

    A Danish bank has launched the world’s first negative interest rate mortgage – handing out loans to homeowners where the charge is minus 0.5% a year.

    Looks like a Guardian article so be suspicious to start with … but in the fine print they mention that after fees and charges are taken into account it still comes out in favour of the bank.

    Shocked?!?

  214. John Constantine

    Substantially negative interest rates and the end of cash are last gasp attempts to create a profitless boom.

    [Like the one we already got]

    How else can we support massive expansion of the State Sector than by forcing the proles to spend money they don’t have and can never repay?. If the proles the State already has do not squander enough money, our State will import vast herds of the worlds poorest proles and give them squanderdollars to stimulate the squanderconomy.

    Bizzaro world negative interest rates means borrowing ten million dollars at negative half a percent rates gives you fifty grand a year tax free, because you can just spend the tax free capital you don’t have to pay back.

    If you own a home, just take a negative interest rate mortgage on it to pay the rates.

    If it worked, the Tyrant for life of all the chicoms would be doing negative rates on his OBOR scheme.

    Comrades.

  215. Old School Conservative

    Jones and Credlin are interviewing retired Rear Admiral Guy Griffiths, WWII veteran.
    9ty-bloody-6 and as sharp as a tack.
    Unbelievable.

  216. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Look at Smolyaninov’s 2008 paper Arky. He’s pretty much proven that Unruh radiation exists.

    Mc Culloch’s explanation makes sense in this context. (Mc Culloch was right about dark matter, it was always total bull, better imaging is showing more and more dimly lit mass, showing the GR equations only need mild tweaking by Mc Culloch’s method – so you have better data and a near-perfect fit for regression modelling of the theory.

    Rational Wiki is not rational and it hardly counts as scientific literature.

    Nor is Reddit.

    http://physicsfromtheedge.blogspot.com/2019/07/evidence-for-unruh-radiation.html

  217. Arky

    Well, I’m struggling to understand why interest rates would ever go negative, except in bygone times where banks had expenses in physically storing the stuff and getting robbed and shit.

  218. John Constantine

    https://blogs.imf.org/2019/02/05/cashing-in-how-to-make-negative-interest-rates-work/

    How low can you go?

    In a cashless world, there would be no lower bound on interest rates. A central bank could reduce the policy rate from, say, 2 percent to minus 4 percent to counter a severe recession. The interest rate cut would transmit to bank deposits, loans, and bonds. Without cash, depositors would have to pay the negative interest rate to keep their money with the bank, making consumption and investment more attractive. This would jolt lending, boost demand, and stimulate the economy.

    When cash is available, however, cutting rates significantly into negative territory becomes impossible. Cash has the same purchasing power as bank deposits, but at zero nominal interest. Moreover, it can be obtained in unlimited quantities in exchange for bank money. Therefore, instead of paying negative interest, one can simply hold cash at zero interest. Cash is a free option on zero interest, and acts as an interest rate floor.

    Because of this floor, central banks have resorted to unconventional monetary policy measures. The euro area, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, and other economies have allowed interest rates to go slightly below zero, which has been possible because taking out cash in large quantities is inconvenient and costly (for example, storage and insurance fees). These policies have helped boost demand, but they cannot fully make up for lost policy space when interest rates are very low.

    Breaking through zero

    One option to break through the zero lower bound would be to phase out cash. But that is not straightforward. Cash continues to play a significant role in payments in many countries. To get around this problem, in a recent IMF staff study and previous research, we examine a proposal for central banks to make cash as costly as bank deposits with negative interest rates, thereby making deeply negative interest rates feasible while preserving the role of cash.

    The proposal is for a central bank to divide the monetary base into two separate local currencies—cash and electronic money (e-money). E-money would be issued only electronically and would pay the policy rate of interest, and cash would have an exchange rate—the conversion rate—against e-money. This conversion rate is key to the proposal. When setting a negative interest rate on e-money, the central bank would let the conversion rate of cash in terms of e-money depreciate at the same rate as the negative interest rate on e-money. The value of cash would thereby fall in terms of e-money.

  219. Arky

    Look at Smolyaninov’s 2008 paper Arky.

    ..
    Concentrate Dot, I’m asking about interest rates.

  220. Top Ender

    Sort of like the Cat:

    The Peculiar Blindness of Experts

    Credentialed authorities are comically bad at predicting the future. But reliable forecasting is possible.
    DAVID EPSTEIN – JUNE 2019

    The bet was on, and it was over the fate of humanity. On one side was the Stanford biologist Paul R. Ehrlich. In his 1968 best seller, The Population Bomb, Ehrlich insisted that it was too late to prevent a doomsday apocalypse resulting from overpopulation. Resource shortages would cause hundreds of millions of starvation deaths within a decade. It was cold, hard math: The human population was growing exponentially; the food supply was not. Ehrlich was an accomplished butterfly specialist. He knew that nature did not regulate animal populations delicately. Populations exploded, blowing past the available resources, and then crashed.

    In his book, Ehrlich played out hypothetical scenarios that represented “the kinds of disasters that will occur.” In the worst-case scenario, famine rages across the planet. Russia, China, and the United States are dragged into nuclear war, and the resulting environmental degradation soon extinguishes the human race. In the “cheerful” scenario, population controls begin. Famine spreads, and countries teeter, but the major death wave ends in the mid-1980s. Only half a billion or so people die of starvation. “I challenge you to create one more optimistic,” Ehrlich wrote, adding that he would not count scenarios involving benevolent aliens bearing care packages.

    The economist Julian Simon took up Ehrlich’s challenge. Technology—water-control techniques, hybridized seeds, management strategies—had revolutionized agriculture, and global crop yields were increasing. To Simon, more people meant more good ideas about how to achieve a sustainable future. So he proposed a wager. Ehrlich could choose five metals that he expected to become more expensive as resources were depleted and chaos ensued over the next decade. Both men agreed that commodity prices were a fine proxy for the effects of population growth, and they set the stakes at $1,000 worth of Ehrlich’s five metals. If, 10 years hence, prices had gone down, Ehrlich would have to pay the difference in value to Simon. If prices went up, Simon would be on the hook for the difference. The bet was made official in 1980.

    In October 1990, Simon found a check for $576.07 in his mailbox. Ehrlich got smoked. The price of every one of the metals had declined. In the 1960s, 50 out of every 100,000 global citizens died annually from famine; by the 1990s, that number was 2.6.

    Ehrlich’s starvation predictions were almost comically bad. And yet, the very same year he conceded the bet, Ehrlich doubled down in another book, with another prediction that would prove untrue: Sure, his timeline had been a little off, he wrote, but “now the population bomb has detonated.” Despite one erroneous prediction after another, Ehrlich amassed an enormous following and received prestigious awards. Simon, meanwhile, became a standard-bearer for scholars who felt that Ehrlich had ignored economic principles. The kind of excessive regulations Ehrlich advocated, the Simon camp argued, would quell the very innovation that had delivered humanity from catastrophe. Both men became luminaries in their respective domains. Both were mistaken.

    When economists later examined metal prices for every 10-year window from 1900 to 2008, during which time the world population quadrupled, they saw that Ehrlich would have won the bet 62 percent of the time. The catch: Commodity prices are a poor gauge of population effects, particularly over a single decade. The variable that both men were certain would vindicate their worldviews actually had little to do with those views. Prices waxed and waned with macroeconomic cycles.

    Yet both men dug in. Each declared his faith in science and the undisputed primacy of facts. And each continued to miss the value of the other’s ideas. Ehrlich was wrong about the apocalypse, but right on aspects of environmental degradation. Simon was right about the influence of human ingenuity on food and energy supplies, but wrong in claiming that improvements in air and water quality validated his theories. Ironically, those improvements were bolstered through regulations pressed by Ehrlich and others.

    Ideally, intellectual sparring partners “hone each other’s arguments so that they are sharper and better,” the Yale historian Paul Sabin wrote in The Bet. “The opposite happened with Paul Ehrlich and Julian Simon.” As each man amassed more information for his own view, each became more dogmatic, and the inadequacies in his model of the world grew ever more stark.

    The pattern is by now familiar. In the 30 years since Ehrlich sent Simon a check, the track record of expert forecasters—in science, in economics, in politics—is as dismal as ever. In business, esteemed (and lavishly compensated) forecasters routinely are wildly wrong in their predictions of everything from the next stock-market correction to the next housing boom. Reliable insight into the future is possible, however. It just requires a style of thinking that’s uncommon among experts who are certain that their deep knowledge has granted them a special grasp of what is to come.

    The idea for the most important study ever conducted of expert predictions was sparked in 1984, at a meeting of a National Research Council committee on American-Soviet relations. The psychologist and political scientist Philip E. Tetlock was 30 years old, by far the most junior committee member. He listened intently as other members discussed Soviet intentions and American policies. Renowned experts delivered authoritative predictions, and Tetlock was struck by how many perfectly contradicted one another and were impervious to counterarguments.

    Tetlock decided to put expert political and economic predictions to the test. With the Cold War in full swing, he collected forecasts from 284 highly educated experts who averaged more than 12 years of experience in their specialties. To ensure that the predictions were concrete, experts had to give specific probabilities of future events. Tetlock had to collect enough predictions that he could separate lucky and unlucky streaks from true skill. The project lasted 20 years, and comprised 82,361 probability estimates about the future.

    The result: The experts were, by and large, horrific forecasters. Their areas of specialty, years of experience, and (for some) access to classified information made no difference. They were bad at short-term forecasting and bad at long-term forecasting. They were bad at forecasting in every domain. When experts declared that future events were impossible or nearly impossible, 15 percent of them occurred nonetheless. When they declared events to be a sure thing, more than one-quarter of them failed to transpire. As the Danish proverb warns, “It is difficult to make predictions, especially about the future.”
    Even faced with their results, many experts never admitted systematic flaws in their judgment. When they missed wildly, it was a near miss; if just one little thing had gone differently, they would have nailed it. “There is often a curiously inverse relationship,” Tetlock concluded, “between how well forecasters thought they were doing and how well they did.”

    Early predictions in Tetlock’s research pertained to the future of the Soviet Union. Some experts (usually liberals) saw Mikhail Gorbachev as an earnest reformer who would be able to change the Soviet Union and keep it intact for a while, and other experts (usually conservatives) felt that the Soviet Union was immune to reform and losing legitimacy. Both sides were partly right and partly wrong. Gorbachev did bring real reform, opening the Soviet Union to the world and empowering citizens. But those reforms unleashed pent-up forces in the republics outside Russia, where the system had lost legitimacy. The forces blew the Soviet Union apart. Both camps of experts were blindsided by the swift demise of the U.S.S.R.

    One subgroup of scholars, however, did manage to see more of what was coming. Unlike Ehrlich and Simon, they were not vested in a single discipline. They took from each argument and integrated apparently contradictory worldviews. They agreed that Gorbachev was a real reformer and that the Soviet Union had lost legitimacy outside Russia. A few of those integrators saw that the end of the Soviet Union was close at hand and that real reforms would be the catalyst.

    The integrators outperformed their colleagues in pretty much every way, but especially trounced them on long-term predictions. Eventually, Tetlock bestowed nicknames (borrowed from the philosopher Isaiah Berlin) on the experts he’d observed: The highly specialized hedgehogs knew “one big thing,” while the integrator foxes knew “many little things.”

    Hedgehogs are deeply and tightly focused. Some have spent their career studying one problem. Like Ehrlich and Simon, they fashion tidy theories of how the world works based on observations through the single lens of their specialty. Foxes, meanwhile, “draw from an eclectic array of traditions, and accept ambiguity and contradiction,” Tetlock wrote. Where hedgehogs represent narrowness, foxes embody breadth.

    Incredibly, the hedgehogs performed especially poorly on long-term predictions within their specialty. They got worse as they accumulated experience and credentials in their field. The more information they had to work with, the more easily they could fit any story into their worldview.

    Unfortunately, the world’s most prominent specialists are rarely held accountable for their predictions, so we continue to rely on them even when their track records make clear that we should not. One study compiled a decade of annual dollar-to-euro exchange-rate predictions made by 22 international banks: Barclays, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, and others. Each year, every bank predicted the end-of-year exchange rate. The banks missed every single change of direction in the exchange rate. In six of the 10 years, the true exchange rate fell outside the entire range of all 22 bank forecasts.

    In 2005, Tetlock published his results, and they caught the attention of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, or IARPA, a government organization that supports research on the U.S. intelligence community’s most difficult challenges. In 2011, IARPA launched a four-year prediction tournament in which five researcher-led teams competed. Each team could recruit, train, and experiment however it saw fit. Predictions were due at 9 a.m. every day. The questions were hard: Will a European Union member withdraw by a target date? Will the Nikkei close above 9,500?

    Tetlock, along with his wife and collaborator, the psychologist Barbara Mellers, ran a team named the Good Judgment Project. Rather than recruit decorated experts, they issued an open call for volunteers. After a simple screening, they invited 3,200 people to start forecasting. Among those, they identified a small group of the foxiest forecasters—bright people with extremely wide-ranging interests and unusually expansive reading habits, but no particular relevant background—and weighted team forecasts toward their predictions. They destroyed the competition.

    Tetlock and Mellers found that not only were the best forecasters foxy as individuals, but they tended to have qualities that made them particularly effective collaborators. They were “curious about, well, really everything,” as one of the top forecasters told me. They crossed disciplines, and viewed their teammates as sources for learning, rather than peers to be convinced. When those foxes were later grouped into much smaller teams—12 members each—they became even more accurate. They outperformed—by a lot—a group of experienced intelligence analysts with access to classified data.

    One forecast discussion involved a team trying to predict the highest single-day close for the exchange rate between the Ukrainian hryvnia and the U.S. dollar during an extremely volatile stretch in 2014. Would the rate be less than 10 hryvnia to a dollar, between 10 and 13, or more than 13? The discussion started with a team member offering percentages for each possibility, and sharing an Economist article. Another team member chimed in with historical data he’d found online, a Bloomberg link, and a bet that the rate would land between 10 and 13. A third teammate was convinced by the second’s argument. A fourth shared information about the dire state of Ukrainian finances, which he feared would devalue the hryvnia. A fifth noted that the United Nations Security Council was considering sending peacekeepers to the region, which he believed would buoy the currency.

    Two days later, a team member with experience in finance saw that the hryvnia was strengthening amid events he’d thought would surely weaken it. He informed his teammates that this was exactly the opposite of what he’d expected, and that they should take it as a sign of something wrong in his understanding. (Tetlock told me that, when making an argument, foxes often use the word however, while hedgehogs favor moreover.) The team members finally homed in on “between 10 and 13” as the heavy favorite, and they were correct.

    In Tetlock’s 20-year study, both the broad foxes and the narrow hedgehogs were quick to let a successful prediction reinforce their beliefs. But when an outcome took them by surprise, foxes were much more likely to adjust their ideas. Hedgehogs barely budged. Some made authoritative predictions that turned out to be wildly wrong—then updated their theories in the wrong direction. They became even more convinced of the original beliefs that had led them astray. The best forecasters, by contrast, view their own ideas as hypotheses in need of testing. If they make a bet and lose, they embrace the logic of a loss just as they would the reinforcement of a win. This is called, in a word, learning.

    This article is adapted from David Epstein’s book Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World. It appears in the June 2019 print edition with the headline “The Peculiar Blindness of Experts.”

  221. John Constantine

    They have to construct a way for cash to devalue faster than the negative interest rate to spur consumption.

    To illustrate, suppose your bank announced a negative 3 percent interest rate on your bank deposit of 100 dollars today. Suppose also that the central bank announced that cash-dollars would now become a separate currency that would depreciate against e-dollars by 3 percent per year. The conversion rate of cash-dollars into e-dollars would hence change from 1 to 0.97 over the year. After a year, there would be 97 e-dollars left in your bank account. If you instead took out 100 cash-dollars today and kept it safe at home for a year, exchanging it into e-money after that year would also yield 97 e-dollars.

    At the same time, shops would start advertising prices in e-money and cash separately, just as shops in some small open economies already advertise prices both in domestic and in bordering foreign currencies. Cash would thereby be losing value both in terms of goods and in terms of e-money, and there would be no benefit to holding cash relative to bank deposits.

    This dual local currency system would allow the central bank to implement as negative an interest rate as necessary for countering a recession, without triggering any large-scale substitutions into cash.

  222. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    You need to understand why interest rates exist Arky.

    It is the current price of future production.

    Capital goods production lowers the long term, real interest rate (in terms of the cost of capital).

    What is the implication of this if the rates are artificially lowered?

    What it does is that it subsidises cheap credit for public sector spending, private bank recapitalisations; at the cost of long term, likely permanent higher real interest rates (as the cost of capital).

    Monetary economics is the capstone discipline Arky.

    Read as much as you can.

    I recommend von Mises, but it is bloody long.

    I highly recommend this book.

    https://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/1176051%5D

    The capitalist alternative : an introduction to neo-Austrian economics / Alexander H. Shand ; foreword by G.L.S. Shackle

    I also recommend Wicksell, Fettler and even New Keynesians/Neo Keynesians [Kaleckians]. The hysteresis idea of the Neo Keynesians is actually pretty good.

    The real business cycle theory that won Prescott and Kydland the nobel prize is a small scale, simplified econometric model that is analogous to a very basic version of the Austrian Business Cycle Theory.

    The seminal papers are:

    “Time to Build and Aggregate Fluctuations,” with F. Kydland, Econometrica 50 (November 1982): 1345-70.

    Rules Rather than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans
    Finn E. Kydland and Edward C. Prescott
    Journal of Political Economy
    Vol. 85, No. 3 (Jun., 1977), pp. 473-492

  223. mh

    Hurricane Dorian downgraded to Cat 3.

    Storm in a tea cup. The fake news will still have their reporters ready for action

    https://images.app.goo.gl/RvpyMnFCEGAj9iWX6

  224. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Arky
    #3147085, posted on September 3, 2019 at 8:53 pm

    Well, I’m struggling to understand why interest rates would ever go negative, except in bygone times where banks had expenses in physically storing the stuff and getting robbed and shit.

    Demurrage. Brid fucking loved it.

  225. John Constantine

    https://www.austriancenter.com/imf-negative-interest-cash/

    The effect, as the IMF writes, would be that cash would “be losing value both in terms of goods and in terms of e-money, and there would be no benefit to holding cash relative to bank deposits.”

    This idea of course is marketed as being “for the greater good” of avoiding a recession, with all the ugly consequences. In its core however, it is nothing but another attack on private property. For years, European citizens have been suffering from being silently expropriated, as their savings have been slowly dripping away thanks to a combination of low interest rates and inflation. On April 26, the ECB discontinued the 500 euro bill, a measure taken to allegedly fight terrorism and tax fraud. The IMF is already thinking about the next step.

    What will happen if the penalty of 3 percent does not deliver on its promise, and the Eurozone still slides in a recession? Who is to say that the next step will not be a penalty of 6 or even 10 percent? It is a dangerous road the IMF is walking on here, proposing to enable, if necessary, massive expropriation in the name of supposed economic growth. Cash is under attack from all sides – the new ideas of the IMF shows this once more. It is essential to stop initiatives like this dead in its tracks. We must remain vigilant. After all, cash is freedom.

    Once the State punts the survival of the political elite upon forceful expropriation of proles private property, the State requires a monopoly upon Force.

    Gun grabbing, food and electricity rationing and the end of cash are requirements for the survival of Tyranny.

    Comrades.

  226. Bruce of Newcastle

    They have to construct a way for cash to devalue faster than the negative interest rate to spur consumption.

    Easy peasy. Charge the punters to hold their money in the bank via negative interest rate and limit cash to $10,000 so they can’t put it under a mattress. The victims will fall over themselves to get their money out of the country and into US dollars, thereby causing the currency to devalue rapidly.

    Oh wait, that’s what ScoMo is doing already, isn’t it?

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