Tuesday Forum: September 3, 2019

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1,946 Responses to Tuesday Forum: September 3, 2019

  1. Mother Lode

    One judge rules Australia?

    And in the darkness bind them.

  2. Mother Lode

    Sure as…top ‘o the page t’ you all!

  3. notafan

    Yes Arky

    worst ‘travel’ writing ever

  4. feelthebern

    The food in Cuba sounds just terrible.
    Sounds like a good business would be running a fishing boat.

  5. feelthebern

    Dr BG, can you go down to the docks & buy fish fresh off the boat?
    Or does that all go to party cronies?

  6. Tom

    It’s probably already been posted, but this is my read of the day. Hilarious:

    Longshot Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson suggested in a new interview that she was surprised to find liberals are “so mean” and even lie — lashing out at the party’s treatment of her spiritually tinged campaign.

    Williamson sat down with New Yorker editor David Remnick for a wide-ranging podcast conversation, in which she also denied being an anti-vaxxer. She was asked about her plan to take on President Trump with kindness and the politics of “love,” as well as the reception her campaign has gotten.

    “I know this sounds naïve,” Williamson said. “I didn’t think the left was so mean. I didn’t think the left lied like this. I thought the right did that, I thought we were better.”

    Williamson said “the haters in this country have been collectivized for political purpose” and added that liberal New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof would have been her ideal secretary of state before he condemned her candidacy.

    “But then I read that he can’t stand me, so he probably wouldn’t want to work for me,” Williamson said.

    Williamson also told The New Yorker that she is “not an anti-vaxxer” and admitted that vaccinations “save lives,” saying a “sloppy comment” resulted in her being labeled as an anti-vaxxer, which put a target on her for social media mockery.

    “I said that they were draconian. I said that they were Orwellian,” she said. “I would not say that [now]. It was a sloppy comment that a presidential candidate should not have said.”

    In a previous life, Williamson was a stoned hippy shopkeeper in Nimbin NSW specialising in aromatic oils and incense.

    1

  7. feelthebern

    She’s got a good rig for her age, Tom.

    Would have been an 8 at least in her prime.

  8. DrBeauGan

    Dr BG, can you go down to the docks & buy fish fresh off the boat?
    Or does that all go to party cronies?

    I dunno, feel. . You could in Sri Lanka, but I don’t know where to go looking here. Actually some of the food is good, and it’s very cheap. I found a really good butcher and got some great steak, but the next week it had all gone and some tough pork was all there was. The supermarkets are the same, the place has piles of sausages one day and none the next but wall to wall ground chicken instead. Their logistics are insane.

    The natives seem to be used to it, although Maria does complain. She blames the president of the Republic.

  9. notafan

    You could in Sri Lanka, but I don’t know where to go looking here. Actually some of the food is good, and it’s very cheap. I found a really good butcher and got some great steak, but the next week it had all gone and some tough pork was all there was.

    Does that mean the April 2019 article I posted about the 80 year old retired janitor who lined up for hours to get cheap government subsidized chicken only to miss out was not ‘fake news’ like you spluttered and gobbled last week?

  10. Apart from the obvious solution of removing ALL taxes, subsidies, excises etc from the electricity market, one option must surely be to mandate that contributors to the grid must supply on a 24 x 7 x 365.25 basis.
    So sure, we can use your ruinabaubles, only if you provide 24 x 7 x 365.25

  11. mh

    “I know this sounds naïve,” Williamson said. “I didn’t think the left was so mean. I didn’t think the left lied like this. I thought the right did that, I thought we were better.”

    It sounds naïve because it is naïve. If it was a 20 year old saying this you could wink and say live and learn.

    But she is about 72.

  12. feelthebern

    but I don’t know where to go looking here

    Follow your nose.
    When you smell fish, you’re getting close.

  13. Woolfe

    BENTONVILLE, AR—In a bold move intended to curb the thousands of deaths from vehicles each and every day, Walmart has decided to stop selling auto parts, sources confirmed Tuesday.

    https://babylonbee.com/news/walmart-discontinues-sale-of-auto-parts-to-prevent-car-accidents

    Yes I know, but its funny

  14. feelthebern

    But she is about 72.

    A good 72.
    In some ways she is more vibrant than Tulsi, who isn’t even 40.

  15. mh

    I heard Geoff Boycott last night saying Steve Smith is the best Test run getter in the world right now.

    I wonder what Smithy has to do to go from best run getter to best batsman?

  16. 1735099

    it will be so easy but no one has ever tried it before, and all those people we don’t like will suffer!

    Why are you quoting Trump?

  17. notafan

    Does the Murray Darling basin authority really employ over 400 people, mostly in Canberra?

    Barnaby Joyce get that department moved to a Murray river town immediately, and while you are at it cull cull cull.

  18. DrBeauGan

    Maria does imitations of the door to door bread sellers and their whistles and yells. She also does a creditable Michael Jackson dance imitation.

    I like it when she cooks for me, it’s better than the restaurant and I get a floor show as well.

  19. Bruce of Newcastle

    Longshot Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson suggested in a new interview that she was surprised to find liberals are “so mean” and even lie — lashing out at the party’s treatment of her spiritually tinged campaign.

    So, Marianne, if they are lying about you could they be lying about global warming, abortion, firearms, racism, qwertyism and Donald Trump too?

  20. feelthebern

    Hmmm….there appears to be some sock puppetry pending.

  21. Top Ender

    Poor little possums!

    Inmates settled for zilch
    JASON WALLS

    A GROUP of 88 current and former Don Dale and Alice Springs youth justice centre detainees involved in a class action against the Territory Government will not see a cent in compensation following a confidential settlement, the NT News can reveal.

    The parties reached a confidential settlement earlier this year and the Territory Government would not say at the time whether any taxpayer money would change hands as a result.

    Court documents obtained by the NT News reveal the class action did not include “any claim for damages or other monetary relief”.

    “Instead, the applicant seeks relief by way of declarations and injunctions in respect of alleged breaches by the Northern Territory of Australia and/or those in charge of the detention centres of duties owed by them,” the documents read.

    The court action was brought by Melbourne-based activist nun, Sister Brigid Arthur, on behalf of 88 youths held in the two detention centres or charged with an offence that could land them inside between August 9 and October 24 last year.

    It alleges breaches of care under the NT Youth Justice Act and the Commonwealth Racial Discrimination Act.

    A hearing set down for May 20 was then vacated after the parties agreed to the terms of the confidential settlement.

    NT News print edition

  22. John Constantine

    Their abc luv the revolt against the Nats and Littleproud over the murray darling basin plan.

    Their abc activist ‘wazza’ is pushing for them to vote abc stalinist independents.

    Who will then implement the deindustrialisation and rewilding of rural Australia.

    This is the danger of their abc, a billion dollars a year to swing rural seats to godless commo Tyranny.

  23. Top Ender

    And from the NT News article, who is Melbourne-based activist nun, Sister Brigid Arthur

    She is an original tilty head!

  24. zyconoclast

    Study shows rate of extreme inbreeding in the U.K. and possible health impacts of it

    A team of researchers has found a way to gauge the rate of extreme inbreeding (EI) in the U.K. and its possible health repercussions. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their study of data from the U.K. Biobank and what they found.

    The researchers began their study by noting that not a lot of research has been done surrounding EI, which they define as reproduction between people that are closely related, such as siblings or aunts or uncles. They note that EI is considered taboo in most societies, and is very often outlawed. This has led to limited information on the topic. To learn more about EI in the U.K., the researchers turned to the U.K. Biobank, which contains information from approximately 450,000 voluntary participants, all of whom have European ancestry.

    In sifting through the data in the Biobank, the researchers looked at genetic information, specifically, for large runs of homozygosity—an indicator of close family ties between parents. They report that they found 125 cases of individuals who they believed were the product of inbreeding—a rate of one in 3,652. That number differs significantly from police incest reports, which show a rate of one in 5,247.

    The researchers then looked at the health histories of those individuals and compared them with people in society at large. They report that they found that such individuals were at a slightly higher risk of a variety of health effects. They were on average slightly shorter, were less smart, and were less able to reproduce. They also were more likely to have lung function problems and were more likely to contract diseases than the average person.

    The researchers acknowledge that their dataset might have been somewhat limited—people who volunteer to be tested and have their data added to the Biobank tend to be wealthy, healthy and more highly educated. That could have skewed the results. If so, the researchers suggest it likely skews low, because those with more health problems due to inbreeding would not volunteer to as participants. They conclude by claiming that their study backs up claims of the ill health effects of inbreeding.

  25. Geriatric Mayfly

    The leftist media have spun the narrative that there is mass outrage at Boris Johnson calling Jeremy Corbyn a “big girl’s blouse” (a coward) for refusing to back an election, implying the comments were sexist and homophobic.

  26. zyconoclast

    Georgia: After 5 Years, Serial [email protected] Finally Caught After Trying To Become A Police Officer

    Clayton County, GA — For the last five years, a serial [email protected] has terrorized the state of Georgia. At least eight different cases of [email protected] and s3xual battery have been tied to 24-year-old Kenneth Bowen III. But until now, he has avoided getting caught. All that changed however, when the very department who was investigating his case, caught him after he began the process of becoming a cop.

    “Had he not attempted to join ranks in the Clayton County Police Department, it is questionable as to when we would have apprehended him,” Clayton County Police Chief Kevin Roberts said during a news conference last week.

  27. mh

    Big Tech & Big Brother meet at Facebook HQ to discuss how to ‘secure’ US elections

    Security teams for Facebook, Google, Twitter and Microsoft met with the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and the Director of National Intelligence’s office to coordinate a strategy to secure the 2020 elections.

    The tech platforms met with government officials at Facebook’s Menlo Park headquarters on Wednesday, the company has confirmed, boasting that Big Tech and Big Brother have developed a “comprehensive strategy” to get control of previous election-related “vulnerabilities” while “analyzing and getting ahead of new threats.”…

    https://www.rt.com/usa/468060-big-tech-government-election-security/

  28. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Maria does imitations of the door to door bread sellers and their whistles and yells. She also does a creditable Michael Jackson dance imitation.

    It’s hard to believe this endless drivel is being spewed out by the same arsehole who spent an entire day complaining about Elle and I engaging in a bit of harmless flirting at 3.00 am in the morning when we thought no one else was around. Apparently our chatter was beneath the purpose and dignity of this blog.

    But eight weeks of meaningless domestic drivel about everything from tattoos to pork chops is not.
    Apparently.

  29. zyconoclast

    Georgia: After 5 Years, Serial [email protected] Finally Caught After Trying To Become A Police Officer

    Clayton County, GA — For the last five years, a serial [email protected] has terrorized the state of Georgia. At least eight different cases of [email protected] and s3xual battery have been tied to 24-year-old Kenneth Bowen III. But until now, he has avoided getting caught. All that changed however, when the very department who was investigating his case, caught him after he began the process of becoming a cop.

    “Had he not attempted to join ranks in the Clayton County Police Department, it is questionable as to when we would have apprehended him,” Clayton County Police Chief Kevin Roberts said during a news conference last week.

  30. Geriatric Mayfly

    Oops! The post comment jumped the gun. That was from Breibart. If Bozza is seeking to undermine all this PC bullshit may his reign be long lasting. Also, he has refused to retract his comment about the daughters of the Prophet (PBUH) looking like letterboxes when fully attired.

  31. feelthebern

    The ABC are the useful idiots in the MDP story.
    The ABC thinks they can force an overhaul of the plan that will result in more “environmental” flows.
    Aint gunna happen.
    If anything, if the ABC is successful (along with other parties) to getting some form of overhaul, all it will do is line the pockets of rich city siders from Sydney & Melbourne who have knowingly bought dry land who want some form tax payer subsidised plan to get their grubby mitts back on permanent water rights.
    Fvck them I say.
    They can rent water from me.

  32. Kev

    ……at least another twelve days.
    Our country has descended to new depths

    Indeed it has. They should’ve gone home a long time ago not just in another twelve days.

  33. dover_beach

    Mordy always delivers for the Left.

  34. zyconoclast

    Harvard Medical School received a “C+” on a report issued Monday by advocacy group White Coats for Black Lives evaluating diversity, inclusion, and integration of minorities at 17 medical institutions across the country.

    The group’s Racial Justice Report Card evaluated schools including Yale University of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania, and Johns Hopkins. The report evaluates schools on metrics such as minority student and faculty representation, patient access, campus policing, and staff benefits. Last year, Harvard received a B- from the organization.

  35. notafan

    I was educated by the Brigidines

    they have lost the plot,

    according to the SMH back in 2005

    There are 231 Brigidine sisters in Australia and New Zealand. The average age of the nuns in NSW is 76.

    They must be down to under a hundred now, I think they stopped taking new vocations a long time ago.

  36. zyconoclast

    Luckily this type of mass migration used as a weapon only works in small specific location.

    How China Weaponizes Mass Migration Against Hong Kong
    Protesters say Beijing is forcing a ‘national identity’ on the island by surging in mainlanders loyal to the Communist party.

  37. Cassie of Sydney

    “Top Ender
    #3148774, posted on September 6, 2019 at 12:24 pm
    And from the NT News article, who is Melbourne-based activist nun, Sister Brigid Arthur

    She is an original tilty head!”

    She looks like an alien from Lost in Space.

  38. egg_

    Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault
    #3148779, posted on September 6, 2019 at 12:27 pm

    Our man in Havana is becoming a tycoon, peasant!

  39. Knuckle Dragger

    Sister Brigid, the Brigidine educated at St. Brigid’s.

    Her motto, as depicted in TE’s link:

    ‘We need to talk with a united voice.’

    Translated: ‘No departure from the narrative is tolerated.’

  40. zyconoclast

    I know there are problems with BMI, but I doubt all the 30+ guys are body builders

    The US Navy’s combat readiness is being questioned following the release of the latest Medical Surveillance Monthly Report, which claims that at least one in five Navy service members are considered obese.

    While the Marines registered the lowest percent of members classified as obese at 8.3%, it was determined that a shocking 22% of those within the Navy had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or above, the threshold for obesity according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The Medical Surveillance Monthly Report also found the rates of obesity within the ranks of the Army and Air Force to be 17.4% and 18.1%, respectively.

  41. egg_

    Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault
    #3148779, posted on September 6, 2019 at 12:27 pm

    Our man in Havana is becoming a tycoon, peasant!

  42. egg_

    She is an original tilty head!

    Richard Dawkins in drag?

  43. bespoke

    Let it go Peter anger like that will turn you into a numberwang.

  44. feelthebern

    More geriatric filth at the Cat I say.

  45. Stimpson J. Cat

    Hey,
    is it true that Essendon are a bunch of needle using drug cheats who literally pull hair like a bunch of girls?
    Can anyone confirm?
    Asking for an Economist friend.
    😁

  46. feelthebern

    Considering how racist Australians are, can someone please tell me where I can read the stories today about Nic Nat getting booed last night ?

  47. Sinclair Davidson

    Nic Nat was being booed in the Davidson household after he threw Merrett into the fence.

  48. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I’m not angry, Bespoke. I’m vindictive. There is a difference.
    Anger dissipates. Vindictiveness requires retribution.

  49. Some History

    Slow news day.

    Latest from Clementine Fjord.

    https://tinyurl.com/y3zmvtm8

  50. liliana

    ……at least another twelve days.
    Our country has descended to new depths

    sugar bowl and ants comes to mind.

    It’s embarrassing how pathetic we are. Who is paying for all these appeals and when they get paid by 60 Minutes for an exclusive interview do we get some of our taxes back?

  51. areff

    Nic Nat was being booed in the Davidson household after he threw Merrett into the fence.

    Racists!

  52. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Hairy this morning exchanging cricket chit chat with a neighbour. Lots of numbers involved and speculations about who might achieve them or who once did. I didn’t understand a word of it.

    Happy there in my blissful ignorance. I wish he would be quieter though coming to bed at 2am.

  53. Sinclair Davidson

    areff – Yep. I’m so ashamed.

    Baroness Doom and No.2 son both reckon your boys will lose tomorrow. I hope not – the guy across the road from me has decked out his whole house in Doggies colours. It is quite a sight.

  54. calli

    Wow. Clemmie’s just discovered that women write lies about other women to sell magazines?

    Remarkable.

  55. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I think Dr. BG should pay a year’s rent on a streetfront café for Maria to exercise her cooking talents making big vats of food for cheap sale. She could sell t-shirts or whatever as a sideline from those premises. He could send her some desirable clothing from Australia, if duty is not horrendous on those sent as ‘presents’. In Sri Lanka in the bad old days clothing from the West was highly desired and people would offer to buy it from you everywhere. Even in a Colombo 3 (high status area at that time) household, a woman offered to buy my jeans.

  56. Stimpson J. Cat

    Nic Nat was being booed in the Davidson household after he threw Merrett into the fence.

    Imagine a White Man purposely pulling the hair of a noble Ethic Man in 2019.
    Outrageous Colonial Cultural Follicle Appropriation!!!
    I mean I could possibly understand if Merritt was bald, but no.
    He’s just a cowardly dog.

  57. egg_

    I keep getting spaminated

    Ditto.

  58. notafan

    Dark Ages

    not so dark

    The fire which severely damaged Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris earlier this year showed how vulnerable medieval churches are to this threat. This would have even been more true in the Middle Ages, and new research about an Austrian cathedral shows how the prepared against outbreaks of fire.

    Records reveal how a medieval cathedral was protected against fire

  59. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Clemmie’s just discovered that women write lies about other women to sell magazines?

    FIFY

  60. areff

    I’m decked out in Bulldogs scarf and wandering around Sydney.

    This city, footy is wasted on them. They don’t have a clue.

  61. Some History

    …the hair of a noble Ethic Man in 2019.

    Who is this pillar of rectitude, “Ethic Man”? 🙂

  62. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I think Dr. BG should set Maria up with a year’s rent on a streetfront café at local rentals where she could sell cheap food from vats; capitalizing on her talents. She could use the premises to sell crap t-shirts allied with her friend, or even Western clothing as a sideline, usually popular in third world shitholes. Dr. BG could send her some of this if the duty wasn’t prohibitive.

  63. dover_beach

    Even as digital media continues to change the face of journalism, the outpost that houses all of Australia’s tabloid rags manages to cling on for dear life.

    And although they’ve always been a cesspool of misogyny, low-grade commentary and concern trolling, it seems the effort to stay afloat in an uncertain media landscape has seen the bar lowered even further.

    LOL! Ford is puffing up digital media as a bastion against ‘low-grade commentary and concern trolling’. The woman is shameless, but we knew that.

  64. Nic Nat was being booed in the Davidson household after he threw Merrett into the fence.

    You leave me no choice.
    I will report this to my neighbourhood speech awareness officer.

    1. You have no right to boo in your household. Especially if children are present.
    2. Diminutive bumber personnel should not prod/annoy sleeping giants.

  65. feelthebern

    This city, footy is wasted on them. They don’t have a clue.

    Piss off then.
    If you didn’t enjoy the Roosters Bunnies game last night there is something wrong with you.

  66. 1735099

    Compulsory drug testing of individuals in receipt of the OAP and DVA disability benefits is long overdue.

  67. areff

    Oh, and by the way, Sinc: If Saxon feels inclined to paint a thick blue stripe and a red one on Elsie, he should go right ahead.

    She is, of course, a Cats supporter but will endure the indignity as the price of free meals and backyard mice on tap.

  68. feelthebern

    Hopefully, in time, all TVs will have booing detectors.
    If you boo inappropriately, you can see report to the local plod, or you can wait for them to turn up & womp you with their club.
    This is what Triggs demanded.

  69. Sinclair Davidson

    This city, footy is wasted on them. They don’t have a clue.

    Well yes. Sydney has almost no redeeming features – except, unlike Melbourne, it still has some pretty good bookshops. But even that is changing. Once upon a time I could not walk past a bookshop.

  70. feelthebern

    Still a few “book shops” down the Cross.

  71. Hopefully, in time, all TVs will have booing detectors.

    In light of my recent hacking and review of Telstra and Optus NBN router security, I can confirm that this is now viable (for anyone who wishes to implement).

  72. feelthebern

    Sinc & areff at the local bookshop.

  73. Stimpson J. Cat

    Who is this pillar of rectitude, “Ethic Man”? 🙂

    He’s like Ethnic Man but far more noble.

  74. Some History

    Hopefully, in time, all TVs will have booing detectors.

    In the meantime, you’ll be surveilled by the “BOOS BUS”.

  75. C.L.

    I started walking past bookshops when books became a luxury.
    Price-wise, they’re like jumbo cigarettes now.

  76. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    i

    t still has some pretty good bookshops.

    What’s a “book”?

  77. Sinclair Davidson

    If Saxon feels inclined to paint a thick blue stripe and a red one on Elsie, he should go right ahead.

    Don’t think he has ever seen her. I only ever saw her the once I dropped Jeeves off at your place and she came out of hiding to hiss at him.

  78. feelthebern

    When you say bookshops, you’re not talking about those places where people jerk off to the Japanese cartoons are you?

  79. Sinclair Davidson

    When you say bookshops, you’re not talking about those places where people jerk off to the Japanese cartoons are you?

    There is more than one kind of bookstore?

  80. Percy Popinjay

    Latest from Clementine Fjord.

    Who’s finally twigged that most of the “stories”, “scoops”, etc, published in rags like Wymminses Day and No Idea are fabrications.

    Nothing get past that lard encrusted frame of hers.

  81. Stimpson J. Cat

    Compulsory drug testing of individuals in receipt of the OAP and DVA disability benefits is long overdue.

    Oh I agree.
    But we need to go further.
    All military personnel and ex-military personnel on any form of benefits should be included and also have mandatory psych Evals every six months.
    It’s the only way to be sure.

    😁

  82. Stimpson J. Cat

    There is more than one kind of bookstore?

    I love how people assume Essendon supporters can actually read.

  83. Sinclair Davidson

    I love how people assume Essendon supporters can actually read.

    Just looking at the pictures.

  84. RobK

    ….cheats who literally pull hair like a bunch of girls?
    Can anyone confirm?

    Saw it with me own eyes on the tele.

  85. Cassie of Sydney

    “Sinclair Davidson
    #3148837, posted on September 6, 2019 at 1:17 pm
    This city, footy is wasted on them. They don’t have a clue.

    Well yes. Sydney has almost no redeeming features – except, unlike Melbourne, it still has some pretty good bookshops. But even that is changing. Once upon a time I could not walk past a bookshop.”

    Sinc…my favourite bookshop here in Sydney is Abbeys in York Street.

  86. Percy Popinjay

    Compulsory drug testing of individuals with any interest in the ALPFL is long overdue.

  87. Sinclair Davidson

    Yes – Abbeys is good and Kinikunia too.

  88. Notafan:

    Trains are not the solution.
    not unless they replace pretty much all our roads with train lines

    I’m a little surprised the Greens haven’t gone down the whole Arkology route.

  89. Top Ender

    Mordy’s out of control!

    A Tamil family’s fight to stay in Australia will last at least another fortnight after a Federal Court judge extended an injunction preventing the government from removing a two-year-old girl from the country.

    In Melbourne, judge Mordy Bromberg extended the injunction until an interlocutory application is heard on September 18.

    oz – breaking news…

  90. Stimpson J. Cat

    Compulsory drug testing of individuals with any interest in the ALPFL is long overdue.

    I think we can all agree that mandatory drug testing of all Essendon players AND supporters would be a step in the right direction.
    They have a history.
    And lest anyone say that I am biased,
    in the interests of fairness The West Coast Eagles players AND supporters as well.
    Cocaine is a hell of a drug.
    😁

  91. feelthebern

    Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

    Rick James? Chappelle?

  92. Percy Popinjay

    She could sell t-shirts or whatever as a sideline from those premises

    The first batch of t-shirts could include this or this.

    Should go down a treat with the natives.

  93. Tom

    My best to Baroness Doom, Your Doomlordship. Her Ladyship should drop by the Cat sometime for some fine gourmet scones with severely whipped cream served every afternoon tea time by the Kittehs.

  94. Top Ender

    So how is Mordy’s judgement not contempt of court?

    The High Court, specifically.

    It seems “The court heard earlier this week that Tharunicaa, the youngest child of the Sri Lankan family, failed a protection assessment.”

    What has that got to do with their overall status in Australia?

  95. Thanks Stimp.
    How about a caption competition for the hair pulling photo?

  96. Roger

    Mordy’s out of control!

    Country shoppers are also judge shoppers.

    Imagine that!

  97. Top Ender

    Go woke, go broke!

    Should take it out of their head honchos’ salaries.

    James Cook University has been ordered to pay reef scientist Peter Ridd $1.2 million for unlawfully dismissing him after he publicly criticised the institution’s climate change science.

    Federal Court Judge Salvatore Vasta on Friday handed down the penalty following hearings earlier this year.

    He ordered the Townsville university to pay Dr Ridd $1,094,214.47 as compensation for loss of employment because of the unlawful sacking.

    Further, JCU will have to pay $125,000 as a way of penalty.

    Oz

  98. Diogenes

    Nota,
    what a fascinating link to an interesting site.
    It always amazes me how many students would choose Medieval History, rather than Modern or Ancient if it were offered at HSC level

  99. bespoke

    Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault
    #3148813, posted on September 6, 2019 at 12:56 pm
    I’m not angry, Bespoke. I’m vindictive. There is a difference.
    Anger dissipates. Vindictiveness requires retribution.

    It will lead you down the same path plus it’s petty and self serving.

  100. Roger

    James Cook University has been ordered to pay reef scientist Peter Ridd $1.2 million for unlawfully dismissing him after he publicly criticised the institution’s climate change science.

    JCU will drag this out.

  101. Sinclair Davidson

    I think JCU will appeal. Just on the size of the payout.

  102. Stimpson J. Cat

    How about a caption competition for the hair pulling photo?

    Drug crazed junkie Essendon player Merret screaming incoherently:
    “You see Woosha, I told you it’s a wig!!!!……oh shit.”

  103. Fisky

    Most of us feel the pressure of population growth during our daily commute to and from work.

    Sydney has the longest commute times, followed by Melbourne.

    Marg Prendergast is coordinator general at Transport for NSW. She told Four Corners our reliance on cars will have to change.

    “We’re doing everything we can to put public transport as a real option, because single car drivers are just not going to fit on the road in years to come,” she says.

    Another wonderful effect of our Big Australia ponzi immigration – no car for you!

  104. Stimpson J. Cat

    Vindictiveness requires retribution.

    Don’t online bully nerds with Math monogrammed shirts please.

  105. Bruce of Newcastle

    Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

    It’s also amphibious!

    Hurricane Dorian washes up bricks of cocaine on Florida beaches

    More than a dozen bricks have been found so far, with the first brick discovered Tuesday by a passerby at Paradise Beach Park in Melbourne, according to NBC News. The beach-goer alerted a police officer on foot patrol that a suspicious package had washed ashore, and when the officer examined it, he found the bundle “wrapped in a way that was consistent with narcotics.”

    The contents of the package, bundled in black and wrapped tightly with tape, was tested and determined to be a kilo of coke. A spokeswoman for the Melbourne Police Department said it would be destroyed.

    Maybe if more of this sort of thing happened Greens would like hurricanes better.

  106. notafan

    It is Diegenes

    I think it is pretty obvious why medieval history doesn’t get much of a run in schools.

    Their fish farms had nothing on the original eel trap.


    fencing
    another great blog from a medievalist

  107. Don’t online bully nerds with Math monogrammed shirts please.

    Ψ

    That is a deep sigh (psi).

  108. Stimpson J. Cat

    James Cook University has been ordered to pay reef scientist Peter Ridd $1.2 million

    You could buy a lot of hockey sticks with that money.

  109. Top Ender

    More ammo for the cause!

    Why Nazism Was Socialism and Why Socialism Is Totalitarian

    By George Reisman

    My purpose today is to make just two main points: (1) To show why Nazi Germany was a socialist state, not a capitalist one. And (2) to show why socialism, understood as an economic system based on government ownership of the means of production, positively requires a totalitarian dictatorship.

    The identification of Nazi Germany as a socialist state was one of the many great contributions of Ludwig von Mises.

    When one remembers that the word “Nazi” was an abbreviation for “der Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiters Partei — in English translation: the National Socialist German Workers’ Party — Mises’s identification might not appear all that noteworthy. For what should one expect the economic system of a country ruled by a party with “socialist” in its name to be but socialism?

    Nevertheless, apart from Mises and his readers, practically no one thinks of Nazi Germany as a socialist state. It is far more common to believe that it represented a form of capitalism, which is what the Communists and all other Marxists have claimed.

    The basis of the claim that Nazi Germany was capitalist was the fact that most industries in Nazi Germany appeared to be left in private hands.

    What Mises identified was that private ownership of the means of production existed in name only under the Nazis and that the actual substance of ownership of the means of production resided in the German government. For it was the German government and not the nominal private owners that exercised all of the substantive powers of ownership: it, not the nominal private owners, decided what was to be produced, in what quantity, by what methods, and to whom it was to be distributed, as well as what prices would be charged and what wages would be paid, and what dividends or other income the nominal private owners would be permitted to receive. The position of the alleged private owners, Mises showed, was reduced essentially to that of government pensioners.

    De facto government ownership of the means of production, as Mises termed it, was logically implied by such fundamental collectivist principles embraced by the Nazis as that the common good comes before the private good and the individual exists as a means to the ends of the State. If the individual is a means to the ends of the State, so too, of course, is his property. Just as he is owned by the State, his property is also owned by the State.

    But what specifically established de facto socialism in Nazi Germany was the introduction of price and wage controls in 1936. These were imposed in response to the inflation of the money supply carried out by the regime from the time of its coming to power in early 1933. The Nazi regime inflated the money supply as the means of financing the vast increase in government spending required by its programs of public works, subsidies, and rearmament. The price and wage controls were imposed in response to the rise in prices that began to result from the inflation.

    The effect of the combination of inflation and price and wage controls is shortages, that is, a situation in which the quantities of goods people attempt to buy exceed the quantities available for sale.

    Shortages, in turn, result in economic chaos. It’s not only that consumers who show up in stores early in the day are in a position to buy up all the stocks of goods and leave customers who arrive later, with nothing — a situation to which governments typically respond by imposing rationing. Shortages result in chaos throughout the economic system. They introduce randomness in the distribution of supplies between geographical areas, in the allocation of a factor of production among its different products, in the allocation of labor and capital among the different branches of the economic system.

    In the face of the combination of price controls and shortages, the effect of a decrease in the supply of an item is not, as it would be in a free market, to raise its price and increase its profitability, thereby operating to stop the decrease in supply, or reverse it if it has gone too far. Price control prohibits the rise in price and thus the increase in profitability. At the same time, the shortages caused by price controls prevent increases in supply from reducing price and profitability. When there is a shortage, the effect of an increase in supply is merely a reduction in the severity of the shortage. Only when the shortage is totally eliminated does an increase in supply necessitate a decrease in price and bring about a decrease in profitability.

    As a result, the combination of price controls and shortages makes possible random movements of supply without any effect on price and profitability. In this situation, the production of the most trivial and unimportant goods, even pet rocks, can be expanded at the expense of the production of the most urgently needed and important goods, such as life-saving medicines, with no effect on the price or profitability of either good. Price controls would prevent the production of the medicines from becoming more profitable as their supply decreased, while a shortage even of pet rocks prevented their production from becoming less profitable as their supply increased.

    As Mises showed, to cope with such unintended effects of its price controls, the government must either abolish the price controls or add further measures, namely, precisely the control over what is produced, in what quantity, by what methods, and to whom it is distributed, which I referred to earlier. The combination of price controls with this further set of controls constitutes the de facto socialization of the economic system. For it means that the government then exercises all of the substantive powers of ownership.

    This was the socialism instituted by the Nazis. And Mises calls it socialism on the German or Nazi pattern, in contrast to the more obvious socialism of the Soviets, which he calls socialism on the Russian or Bolshevik pattern.

    Of course, socialism does not end the chaos caused by the destruction of the price system. It perpetuates it. And if it is introduced without the prior existence of price controls, its effect is to inaugurate that very chaos. This is because socialism is not actually a positive economic system. It is merely the negation of capitalism and its price system. As such, the essential nature of socialism is one and the same as the economic chaos resulting from the destruction of the price system by price and wage controls. (I want to point out that Bolshevik-style socialism’s imposition of a system of production quotas, with incentives everywhere to exceed the quotas, is a sure formula for universal shortages, just as exist under all around price and wage controls.)

    At most, socialism merely changes the direction of the chaos. The government’s control over production may make possible a greater production of some goods of special importance to itself, but it does so only at the expense of wreaking havoc throughout the rest of the economic system. This is because the government has no way of knowing the effects on the rest of the economic system of its securing the production of the goods to which it attaches special importance.

    The requirements of enforcing a system of price and wage controls shed major light on the totalitarian nature of socialism — most obviously, of course, on that of the German or Nazi variant of socialism, but also on that of Soviet-style socialism as well.

    We can start with the fact that the financial self-interest of sellers operating under price controls is to evade the price controls and raise their prices. Buyers otherwise unable to obtain goods are willing, indeed, eager to pay these higher prices as the means of securing the goods they want. In these circumstances, what is to stop prices from rising and a massive black market from developing?

    The answer is a combination of severe penalties combined with a great likelihood of being caught and then actually suffering those penalties. Mere fines are not likely to provide much of a deterrent. They will be regarded simply as an additional business expense. If the government is serious about its price controls, it is necessary for it to impose penalties comparable to those for a major felony.

    But the mere existence of such penalties is not enough. The government has to make it actually dangerous to conduct black-market transactions. It has to make people fear that in conducting such a transaction they might somehow be discovered by the police, and actually end up in jail. In order to create such fear, the government must develop an army of spies and secret informers. For example, the government must make a storekeeper and his customer fearful that if they engage in a black-market transaction, some other customer in the store will report them.

    Because of the privacy and secrecy in which many black-market transactions can be conducted, the government must also make anyone contemplating a black-market transaction fearful that the other party might turn out to be a police agent trying to entrap him. The government must make people fearful even of their long-time associates, even of their friends and relatives, lest even they turn out to be informers.

    And, finally, in order to obtain convictions, the government must place the decision about innocence or guilt in the case of black-market transactions in the hands of an administrative tribunal or its police agents on the spot. It cannot rely on jury trials, because it is unlikely that many juries can be found willing to bring in guilty verdicts in cases in which a man might have to go to jail for several years for the crime of selling a few pounds of meat or a pair of shoes above the ceiling price.

    In sum, therefore, the requirements merely of enforcing price-control regulations is the adoption of essential features of a totalitarian state, namely, the establishment of the category of “economic crimes,” in which the peaceful pursuit of material self-interest is treated as a criminal offense, and the establishment of a totalitarian police apparatus replete with spies and informers and the power of arbitrary arrest and imprisonment.

    Clearly, the enforcement of price controls requires a government similar to that of Hitler’s Germany or Stalin’s Russia, in which practically anyone might turn out to be a police spy and in which a secret police exists and has the power to arrest and imprison people. If the government is unwilling to go to such lengths, then, to that extent, its price controls prove unenforceable and simply break down. The black market then assumes major proportions. (Incidentally, none of this is to suggest that price controls were the cause of the reign of terror instituted by the Nazis. The Nazis began their reign of terror well before the enactment of price controls. As a result, they enacted price controls in an environment ready made for their enforcement.)

    Black market activity entails the commission of further crimes. Under de facto socialism, the production and sale of goods in the black market entails the defiance of the government’s regulations concerning production and distribution, as well as the defiance of its price controls. For example, the goods themselves that are sold in the black market are intended by the government to be distributed in accordance with its plan, and not in the black market. The factors of production used to produce those goods are likewise intended by the government to be used in accordance with its plan, and not for the purpose of supplying the black market.

    Under a system of de jure socialism, such as existed in Soviet Russia, in which the legal code of the country openly and explicitly makes the government the owner of the means of production, all black-market activity necessarily entails the misappropriation or theft of state property. For example, the factory workers or managers in Soviet Russia who turned out products that they sold in the black market were considered as stealing the raw materials supplied by the state.

    Furthermore, in any type of socialist state, Nazi or Communist, the government’s economic plan is part of the supreme law of the land. We all have a good idea of how chaotic the so-called planning process of socialism is. Its further disruption by workers and managers siphoning off materials and supplies to produce for the black market, is something which a socialist state is logically entitled to regard as an act of sabotage of its national economic plan. And sabotage is how the legal code of a socialist state does regard it. Consistent with this fact, black-market activity in a socialist country often carries the death penalty.

    Now I think that a fundamental fact that explains the all-round reign of terror found under socialism is the incredible dilemma in which a socialist state places itself in relation to the masses of its citizens. On the one hand, it assumes full responsibility for the individual’s economic well-being. Russian or Bolshevik-style socialism openly avows this responsibility — this is the main source of its popular appeal. On the other hand, in all of the ways one can imagine, a socialist state makes an unbelievable botch of the job. It makes the individual’s life a nightmare.

    Every day of his life, the citizen of a socialist state must spend time in endless waiting lines. For him, the problems Americans experienced in the gasoline shortages of the 1970s are normal; only he does not experience them in relation to gasoline — for he does not own a car and has no hope of ever owning one — but in relation to simple items of clothing, to vegetables, even to bread. Even worse he is frequently forced to work at a job that is not of his choice and which he therefore must certainly hate. (For under shortages, the government comes to decide the allocation of labor just as it does the allocation of the material factors of production.) And he lives in a condition of unbelievable overcrowding, with hardly ever a chance for privacy. (In the face of housing shortages, boarders are assigned to homes; families are compelled to share apartments. And a system of internal passports and visas is adopted to limit the severity of housing shortages in the more desirable areas of the country.) To put it mildly, a person forced to live in such conditions must seethe with resentment and hostility.

    Now against whom would it be more logical for the citizens of a socialist state to direct their resentment and hostility than against that very socialist state itself? The same socialist state which has proclaimed its responsibility for their life, has promised them a life of bliss, and which in fact is responsible for giving them a life of hell. Indeed, the leaders of a socialist state live in a further dilemma, in that they daily encourage the people to believe that socialism is a perfect system whose bad results can only be the work of evil men. If that were true, who in reason could those evil men be but the rulers themselves, who have not only made life a hell, but have perverted an allegedly perfect system to do it?

    It follows that the rulers of a socialist state must live in terror of the people. By the logic of their actions and their teachings, the boiling, seething resentment of the people should well up and swallow them in an orgy of bloody vengeance. The rulers sense this, even if they do not admit it openly; and thus their major concern is always to keep the lid on the citizenry.

    Consequently, it is true but very inadequate merely to say such things as that socialism lacks freedom of the press and freedom of speech. Of course, it lacks these freedoms. If the government owns all the newspapers and publishing houses, if it decides for what purposes newsprint and paper are to be made available, then obviously nothing can be printed which the government does not want printed. If it owns all the meeting halls, no public speech or lecture can be delivered which the government does not want delivered. But socialism goes far beyond the mere lack of freedom of press and speech.

    A socialist government totally annihilates these freedoms. It turns the press and every public forum into a vehicle of hysterical propaganda in its own behalf, and it engages in the relentless persecution of everyone who dares to deviate by so much as an inch from its official party line.

    The reason for these facts is the socialist rulers’ terror of the people. To protect themselves, they must order the propaganda ministry and the secret police to work ’round the clock. The one, to constantly divert the people’s attention from the responsibility of socialism, and of the rulers of socialism, for the people’s misery. The other, to spirit away and silence anyone who might even remotely suggest the responsibility of socialism or its rulers — to spirit away anyone who begins to show signs of thinking for himself. It is because of the rulers’ terror, and their desperate need to find scapegoats for the failures of socialism, that the press of a socialist country is always full of stories about foreign plots and sabotage, and about corruption and mismanagement on the part of subordinate officials, and why, periodically, it is necessary to unmask large-scale domestic plots and to sacrifice major officials and entire factions in giant purges.

    It is because of their terror, and their desperate need to crush every breath even of potential opposition, that the rulers of socialism do not dare to allow even purely cultural activities that are not under the control of the state. For if people so much as assemble for an art show or poetry reading that is not controlled by the state, the rulers must fear the dissemination of dangerous ideas. Any unauthorized ideas are dangerous ideas, because they can lead people to begin thinking for themselves and thus to begin thinking about the nature of socialism and its rulers. The rulers must fear the spontaneous assembly of a handful of people in a room, and use the secret police and its apparatus of spies, informers, and terror either to stop such meetings or to make sure that their content is entirely innocuous from the point of view of the state.

    Socialism cannot be ruled for very long except by terror. As soon as the terror is relaxed, resentment and hostility logically begin to well up against the rulers. The stage is thus set for a revolution or civil war. In fact, in the absence of terror, or, more correctly, a sufficient degree of terror, socialism would be characterized by an endless series of revolutions and civil wars, as each new group of rulers proved as incapable of making socialism function successfully as its predecessors before it. The inescapable inference to be drawn is that the terror actually experienced in the socialist countries was not simply the work of evil men, such as Stalin, but springs from the nature of the socialist system. Stalin could come to the fore because his unusual willingness and cunning in the use of terror were the specific characteristics most required by a ruler of socialism in order to remain in power. He rose to the top by a process of socialist natural selection: the selection of the worst.

    I need to anticipate a possible misunderstanding concerning my thesis that socialism is totalitarian by its nature. This concerns the allegedly socialist countries run by Social Democrats, such as Sweden and the other Scandinavian countries, which are clearly not totalitarian dictatorships.

    In such cases, it is necessary to realize that along with these countries not being totalitarian, they are also not socialist. Their governing parties may espouse socialism as their philosophy and their ultimate goal, but socialism is not what they have implemented as their economic system. Their actual economic system is that of a hampered market economy, as Mises termed it. While more hampered than our own in important respects, their economic system is essentially similar to our own, in that the characteristic driving force of production and economic activity is not government decree but the initiative of private owners motivated by the prospect of private profit.

    The reason that Social Democrats do not establish socialism when they come to power, is that they are unwilling to do what would be required. The establishment of socialism as an economic system requires a massive act of theft — the means of production must be seized from their owners and turned over to the state. Such seizure is virtually certain to provoke substantial resistance on the part of the owners, resistance which can be overcome only by use of massive force.

    The Communists were and are willing to apply such force, as evidenced in Soviet Russia. Their character is that of armed robbers prepared to commit murder if that is what is necessary to carry out their robbery. The character of the Social Democrats in contrast is more like that of pickpockets, who may talk of pulling the big job someday, but who in fact are unwilling to do the killing that would be required, and so give up at the slightest sign of serious resistance.

    As for the Nazis, they generally did not have to kill in order to seize the property of Germans other than Jews. This was because, as we have seen, they established socialism by stealth, through price controls, which served to maintain the outward guise and appearance of private ownership. The private owners were thus deprived of their property without knowing it and thus felt no need to defend it by force.

    I think I have shown that socialism — actual socialism — is totalitarian by its very nature.

    In the United States at the present time, we do not have socialism in any form. And we do not have a dictatorship, let alone a totalitarian dictatorship.

    We also do not yet have Fascism, though we are moving towards it. Among the essential elements that are still lacking are one-party rule and censorship. We still have freedom of speech and press and free elections, though both have been undermined and their continued existence cannot be guaranteed.

    What we have is a hampered market economy that is growing ever more hampered by ever more government intervention, and that is characterized by a growing loss of individual freedom. The growth of the government’s economic intervention is synonymous with a loss of individual freedom because it means increasingly initiating the use of physical force to make people do what they do not voluntarily choose to do or prevent them from doing what they do voluntarily choose to do.

    Since the individual is the best judge of his own interests, and at least as a rule seeks to do what it is in his interest to do and to avoid doing what harms his interest, it follows that the greater the extent of government intervention, the greater the extent to which individuals are prevented from doing what benefits them and are instead compelled to do what causes them loss.

    Today, in the United States, government spending, federal, state, and local, amounts to almost half of the monetary incomes of the portion of the citizenry that does not work for the government. Fifteen federal cabinet departments, and a much larger number of federal regulatory agencies, together, in most instances with counterparts at the state and local level, routinely intrude into virtually every area of the individual citizen’s life. In countless ways he is taxed, compelled, and prohibited.

    The effect of such massive government interference is unemployment, rising prices, falling real wages, a need to work longer and harder, and growing economic insecurity. The further effect is growing anger and resentment.

    Though the government’s policy of interventionism is their logical target, the anger and resentment people feel are typically directed at businessmen and the rich instead. This is a mistake which is fueled for the most part by an ignorant and envious intellectual establishment and media.

    And in conformity with this attitude, since the collapse of the stock market bubble, which was in fact created by the Federal Reserve’s policy of credit expansion and then pricked by its temporary abandonment of that policy, government prosecutors have adopted what appears to be a particularly vengeful policy toward executives guilty of financial dishonesty, as though their actions were responsible for the widespread losses resulting from the collapse of the bubble. Thus the former head of a major telecommunications company was recently given a twenty-five year prison sentence. Other top executives have suffered similarly.

    Even more ominously, the government’s power to obtain mere criminal indictments has become equivalent to the power to destroy a firm, as occurred in the case of Arthur Andersen, the major accounting firm. The threatened use of this power was then sufficient to force major insurance brokerage firms in the United States to change their managements to the satisfaction of New York State’s Attorney General. There is no way to describe such developments other than as conviction and punishment without trial and as extortion by the government. These are major steps along a very dangerous path.

    Fortunately, there is still sufficient freedom in the United States to undo all the damage that has been done. There is first of all the freedom to publicly name it and denounce it.

    More fundamentally, there is the freedom to analyze and refute the ideas that underlie the destructive policies that have been adopted or that may be adopted. And that is what is critical. For the fundamental factor underlying interventionism and, of course, socialism as well, whether Nazi or Communist, is nothing but wrong ideas, above all, wrong ideas about economics and philosophy.

    There is now an extensive and growing body of literature that presents sound ideas in these two vital fields. In my judgment, the two most important authors of this literature are Ludwig von Mises and Ayn Rand. An extensive knowledge of their writings is an indispensable prerequisite for success in the defense of individual freedom and the free market.

    https://mises.org/profile/george-reisman

  110. zyconoclast

    ‘Bold’ scheme launches to power every property on SA’s Eyre Peninsula with solar

    An ambitious plan to power every property in one region of South Australia with solar has been labelled an Australian first — but experts are divided over whether it will work.

  111. Incoherent Rambler:

    Apart from the obvious solution of removing ALL taxes, subsidies, excises etc from the electricity market, one option must surely be to mandate that contributors to the grid must supply on a 24 x 7 x 365.25 basis.
    So sure, we can use your ruinabaubles, only if you provide 24 x 7 x 365.25

    The other thing there is the quality of the electricity needs to be supervised. If this means the ruinabaubles must install some method of keeping the power to a certain frequency and voltage, then tough bikkies.

  112. calli

    Marg Prendergast is coordinator general at Transport for NSW. She told Four Corners our reliance on cars will have to change.

    “We’re doing everything we can to put public transport as a real option, because single car drivers are just not going to fit on the road in years to come,” she says.

    Hey, news flash Moron Marg.

    Taking buses off north west suburbs routes because new railway would have to be the dumbest thing I’ve witnesses in Decades of Dumb. Many, many people now using cars because railway stations are…far apart.

    Co-ordinate that!, halfwit.

  113. Top Ender

    Why Nazism Was Socialism and Why Socialism Is Totalitarian

    11/11/2005
    George Reisman

    My purpose today is to make just two main points: (1) To show why Nazi Germany was a socialist state, not a capitalist one. And (2) to show why socialism, understood as an economic system based on government ownership of the means of production, positively requires a totalitarian dictatorship.

    The identification of Nazi Germany as a socialist state was one of the many great contributions of Ludwig von Mises.

    When one remembers that the word “Nazi” was an abbreviation for “der Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiters Partei — in English translation: the National Socialist German Workers’ Party — Mises’s identification might not appear all that noteworthy. For what should one expect the economic system of a country ruled by a party with “socialist” in its name to be but socialism?

    Nevertheless, apart from Mises and his readers, practically no one thinks of Nazi Germany as a socialist state. It is far more common to believe that it represented a form of capitalism, which is what the Communists and all other Marxists have claimed.

    The basis of the claim that Nazi Germany was capitalist was the fact that most industries in Nazi Germany appeared to be left in private hands.

    What Mises identified was that private ownership of the means of production existed in name only under the Nazis and that the actual substance of ownership of the means of production resided in the German government. For it was the German government and not the nominal private owners that exercised all of the substantive powers of ownership: it, not the nominal private owners, decided what was to be produced, in what quantity, by what methods, and to whom it was to be distributed, as well as what prices would be charged and what wages would be paid, and what dividends or other income the nominal private owners would be permitted to receive. The position of the alleged private owners, Mises showed, was reduced essentially to that of government pensioners.

    De facto government ownership of the means of production, as Mises termed it, was logically implied by such fundamental collectivist principles embraced by the Nazis as that the common good comes before the private good and the individual exists as a means to the ends of the State. If the individual is a means to the ends of the State, so too, of course, is his property. Just as he is owned by the State, his property is also owned by the State.

    But what specifically established de facto socialism in Nazi Germany was the introduction of price and wage controls in 1936. These were imposed in response to the inflation of the money supply carried out by the regime from the time of its coming to power in early 1933. The Nazi regime inflated the money supply as the means of financing the vast increase in government spending required by its programs of public works, subsidies, and rearmament. The price and wage controls were imposed in response to the rise in prices that began to result from the inflation.

    The effect of the combination of inflation and price and wage controls is shortages, that is, a situation in which the quantities of goods people attempt to buy exceed the quantities available for sale.

    Shortages, in turn, result in economic chaos. It’s not only that consumers who show up in stores early in the day are in a position to buy up all the stocks of goods and leave customers who arrive later, with nothing — a situation to which governments typically respond by imposing rationing. Shortages result in chaos throughout the economic system. They introduce randomness in the distribution of supplies between geographical areas, in the allocation of a factor of production among its different products, in the allocation of labor and capital among the different branches of the economic system.

    In the face of the combination of price controls and shortages, the effect of a decrease in the supply of an item is not, as it would be in a free market, to raise its price and increase its profitability, thereby operating to stop the decrease in supply, or reverse it if it has gone too far. Price control prohibits the rise in price and thus the increase in profitability. At the same time, the shortages caused by price controls prevent increases in supply from reducing price and profitability. When there is a shortage, the effect of an increase in supply is merely a reduction in the severity of the shortage. Only when the shortage is totally eliminated does an increase in supply necessitate a decrease in price and bring about a decrease in profitability.

    As a result, the combination of price controls and shortages makes possible random movements of supply without any effect on price and profitability. In this situation, the production of the most trivial and unimportant goods, even pet rocks, can be expanded at the expense of the production of the most urgently needed and important goods, such as life-saving medicines, with no effect on the price or profitability of either good. Price controls would prevent the production of the medicines from becoming more profitable as their supply decreased, while a shortage even of pet rocks prevented their production from becoming less profitable as their supply increased.

    As Mises showed, to cope with such unintended effects of its price controls, the government must either abolish the price controls or add further measures, namely, precisely the control over what is produced, in what quantity, by what methods, and to whom it is distributed, which I referred to earlier. The combination of price controls with this further set of controls constitutes the de facto socialization of the economic system. For it means that the government then exercises all of the substantive powers of ownership.

    This was the socialism instituted by the Nazis. And Mises calls it socialism on the German or Nazi pattern, in contrast to the more obvious socialism of the Soviets, which he calls socialism on the Russian or Bolshevik pattern.

    Of course, socialism does not end the chaos caused by the destruction of the price system. It perpetuates it. And if it is introduced without the prior existence of price controls, its effect is to inaugurate that very chaos. This is because socialism is not actually a positive economic system. It is merely the negation of capitalism and its price system. As such, the essential nature of socialism is one and the same as the economic chaos resulting from the destruction of the price system by price and wage controls. (I want to point out that Bolshevik-style socialism’s imposition of a system of production quotas, with incentives everywhere to exceed the quotas, is a sure formula for universal shortages, just as exist under all around price and wage controls.)

    At most, socialism merely changes the direction of the chaos. The government’s control over production may make possible a greater production of some goods of special importance to itself, but it does so only at the expense of wreaking havoc throughout the rest of the economic system. This is because the government has no way of knowing the effects on the rest of the economic system of its securing the production of the goods to which it attaches special importance.

    The requirements of enforcing a system of price and wage controls shed major light on the totalitarian nature of socialism — most obviously, of course, on that of the German or Nazi variant of socialism, but also on that of Soviet-style socialism as well.

    We can start with the fact that the financial self-interest of sellers operating under price controls is to evade the price controls and raise their prices. Buyers otherwise unable to obtain goods are willing, indeed, eager to pay these higher prices as the means of securing the goods they want. In these circumstances, what is to stop prices from rising and a massive black market from developing?

    The answer is a combination of severe penalties combined with a great likelihood of being caught and then actually suffering those penalties. Mere fines are not likely to provide much of a deterrent. They will be regarded simply as an additional business expense. If the government is serious about its price controls, it is necessary for it to impose penalties comparable to those for a major felony.

    But the mere existence of such penalties is not enough. The government has to make it actually dangerous to conduct black-market transactions. It has to make people fear that in conducting such a transaction they might somehow be discovered by the police, and actually end up in jail. In order to create such fear, the government must develop an army of spies and secret informers. For example, the government must make a storekeeper and his customer fearful that if they engage in a black-market transaction, some other customer in the store will report them.

    Because of the privacy and secrecy in which many black-market transactions can be conducted, the government must also make anyone contemplating a black-market transaction fearful that the other party might turn out to be a police agent trying to entrap him. The government must make people fearful even of their long-time associates, even of their friends and relatives, lest even they turn out to be informers.

    And, finally, in order to obtain convictions, the government must place the decision about innocence or guilt in the case of black-market transactions in the hands of an administrative tribunal or its police agents on the spot. It cannot rely on jury trials, because it is unlikely that many juries can be found willing to bring in guilty verdicts in cases in which a man might have to go to jail for several years for the crime of selling a few pounds of meat or a pair of shoes above the ceiling price.

    In sum, therefore, the requirements merely of enforcing price-control regulations is the adoption of essential features of a totalitarian state, namely, the establishment of the category of “economic crimes,” in which the peaceful pursuit of material self-interest is treated as a criminal offense, and the establishment of a totalitarian police apparatus replete with spies and informers and the power of arbitrary arrest and imprisonment.

    Clearly, the enforcement of price controls requires a government similar to that of Hitler’s Germany or Stalin’s Russia, in which practically anyone might turn out to be a police spy and in which a secret police exists and has the power to arrest and imprison people. If the government is unwilling to go to such lengths, then, to that extent, its price controls prove unenforceable and simply break down. The black market then assumes major proportions. (Incidentally, none of this is to suggest that price controls were the cause of the reign of terror instituted by the Nazis. The Nazis began their reign of terror well before the enactment of price controls. As a result, they enacted price controls in an environment ready made for their enforcement.)

    Black market activity entails the commission of further crimes. Under de facto socialism, the production and sale of goods in the black market entails the defiance of the government’s regulations concerning production and distribution, as well as the defiance of its price controls. For example, the goods themselves that are sold in the black market are intended by the government to be distributed in accordance with its plan, and not in the black market. The factors of production used to produce those goods are likewise intended by the government to be used in accordance with its plan, and not for the purpose of supplying the black market.

    Under a system of de jure socialism, such as existed in Soviet Russia, in which the legal code of the country openly and explicitly makes the government the owner of the means of production, all black-market activity necessarily entails the misappropriation or theft of state property. For example, the factory workers or managers in Soviet Russia who turned out products that they sold in the black market were considered as stealing the raw materials supplied by the state.

    Furthermore, in any type of socialist state, Nazi or Communist, the government’s economic plan is part of the supreme law of the land. We all have a good idea of how chaotic the so-called planning process of socialism is. Its further disruption by workers and managers siphoning off materials and supplies to produce for the black market, is something which a socialist state is logically entitled to regard as an act of sabotage of its national economic plan. And sabotage is how the legal code of a socialist state does regard it. Consistent with this fact, black-market activity in a socialist country often carries the death penalty.

    Now I think that a fundamental fact that explains the all-round reign of terror found under socialism is the incredible dilemma in which a socialist state places itself in relation to the masses of its citizens. On the one hand, it assumes full responsibility for the individual’s economic well-being. Russian or Bolshevik-style socialism openly avows this responsibility — this is the main source of its popular appeal. On the other hand, in all of the ways one can imagine, a socialist state makes an unbelievable botch of the job. It makes the individual’s life a nightmare.

    Every day of his life, the citizen of a socialist state must spend time in endless waiting lines. For him, the problems Americans experienced in the gasoline shortages of the 1970s are normal; only he does not experience them in relation to gasoline — for he does not own a car and has no hope of ever owning one — but in relation to simple items of clothing, to vegetables, even to bread. Even worse he is frequently forced to work at a job that is not of his choice and which he therefore must certainly hate. (For under shortages, the government comes to decide the allocation of labor just as it does the allocation of the material factors of production.) And he lives in a condition of unbelievable overcrowding, with hardly ever a chance for privacy. (In the face of housing shortages, boarders are assigned to homes; families are compelled to share apartments. And a system of internal passports and visas is adopted to limit the severity of housing shortages in the more desirable areas of the country.) To put it mildly, a person forced to live in such conditions must seethe with resentment and hostility.

    Now against whom would it be more logical for the citizens of a socialist state to direct their resentment and hostility than against that very socialist state itself? The same socialist state which has proclaimed its responsibility for their life, has promised them a life of bliss, and which in fact is responsible for giving them a life of hell. Indeed, the leaders of a socialist state live in a further dilemma, in that they daily encourage the people to believe that socialism is a perfect system whose bad results can only be the work of evil men. If that were true, who in reason could those evil men be but the rulers themselves, who have not only made life a hell, but have perverted an allegedly perfect system to do it?

    It follows that the rulers of a socialist state must live in terror of the people. By the logic of their actions and their teachings, the boiling, seething resentment of the people should well up and swallow them in an orgy of bloody vengeance. The rulers sense this, even if they do not admit it openly; and thus their major concern is always to keep the lid on the citizenry.

    Consequently, it is true but very inadequate merely to say such things as that socialism lacks freedom of the press and freedom of speech. Of course, it lacks these freedoms. If the government owns all the newspapers and publishing houses, if it decides for what purposes newsprint and paper are to be made available, then obviously nothing can be printed which the government does not want printed. If it owns all the meeting halls, no public speech or lecture can be delivered which the government does not want delivered. But socialism goes far beyond the mere lack of freedom of press and speech.

    A socialist government totally annihilates these freedoms. It turns the press and every public forum into a vehicle of hysterical propaganda in its own behalf, and it engages in the relentless persecution of everyone who dares to deviate by so much as an inch from its official party line.

    The reason for these facts is the socialist rulers’ terror of the people. To protect themselves, they must order the propaganda ministry and the secret police to work ’round the clock. The one, to constantly divert the people’s attention from the responsibility of socialism, and of the rulers of socialism, for the people’s misery. The other, to spirit away and silence anyone who might even remotely suggest the responsibility of socialism or its rulers — to spirit away anyone who begins to show signs of thinking for himself. It is because of the rulers’ terror, and their desperate need to find scapegoats for the failures of socialism, that the press of a socialist country is always full of stories about foreign plots and sabotage, and about corruption and mismanagement on the part of subordinate officials, and why, periodically, it is necessary to unmask large-scale domestic plots and to sacrifice major officials and entire factions in giant purges.

    It is because of their terror, and their desperate need to crush every breath even of potential opposition, that the rulers of socialism do not dare to allow even purely cultural activities that are not under the control of the state. For if people so much as assemble for an art show or poetry reading that is not controlled by the state, the rulers must fear the dissemination of dangerous ideas. Any unauthorized ideas are dangerous ideas, because they can lead people to begin thinking for themselves and thus to begin thinking about the nature of socialism and its rulers. The rulers must fear the spontaneous assembly of a handful of people in a room, and use the secret police and its apparatus of spies, informers, and terror either to stop such meetings or to make sure that their content is entirely innocuous from the point of view of the state.

    Socialism cannot be ruled for very long except by terror. As soon as the terror is relaxed, resentment and hostility logically begin to well up against the rulers. The stage is thus set for a revolution or civil war. In fact, in the absence of terror, or, more correctly, a sufficient degree of terror, socialism would be characterized by an endless series of revolutions and civil wars, as each new group of rulers proved as incapable of making socialism function successfully as its predecessors before it. The inescapable inference to be drawn is that the terror actually experienced in the socialist countries was not simply the work of evil men, such as Stalin, but springs from the nature of the socialist system. Stalin could come to the fore because his unusual willingness and cunning in the use of terror were the specific characteristics most required by a ruler of socialism in order to remain in power. He rose to the top by a process of socialist natural selection: the selection of the worst.

    I need to anticipate a possible misunderstanding concerning my thesis that socialism is totalitarian by its nature. This concerns the allegedly socialist countries run by Social Democrats, such as Sweden and the other Scandinavian countries, which are clearly not totalitarian dictatorships.

    In such cases, it is necessary to realize that along with these countries not being totalitarian, they are also not socialist. Their governing parties may espouse socialism as their philosophy and their ultimate goal, but socialism is not what they have implemented as their economic system. Their actual economic system is that of a hampered market economy, as Mises termed it. While more hampered than our own in important respects, their economic system is essentially similar to our own, in that the characteristic driving force of production and economic activity is not government decree but the initiative of private owners motivated by the prospect of private profit.

    The reason that Social Democrats do not establish socialism when they come to power, is that they are unwilling to do what would be required. The establishment of socialism as an economic system requires a massive act of theft — the means of production must be seized from their owners and turned over to the state. Such seizure is virtually certain to provoke substantial resistance on the part of the owners, resistance which can be overcome only by use of massive force.

    The Communists were and are willing to apply such force, as evidenced in Soviet Russia. Their character is that of armed robbers prepared to commit murder if that is what is necessary to carry out their robbery. The character of the Social Democrats in contrast is more like that of pickpockets, who may talk of pulling the big job someday, but who in fact are unwilling to do the killing that would be required, and so give up at the slightest sign of serious resistance.

    As for the Nazis, they generally did not have to kill in order to seize the property of Germans other than J ews. This was because, as we have seen, they established socialism by stealth, through price controls, which served to maintain the outward guise and appearance of private ownership. The private owners were thus deprived of their property without knowing it and thus felt no need to defend it by force.

    I think I have shown that socialism — actual socialism — is totalitarian by its very nature.

    In the United States at the present time, we do not have socialism in any form. And we do not have a dictatorship, let alone a totalitarian dictatorship.

    We also do not yet have Fascism, though we are moving towards it. Among the essential elements that are still lacking are one-party rule and censorship. We still have freedom of speech and press and free elections, though both have been undermined and their continued existence cannot be guaranteed.

    What we have is a hampered market economy that is growing ever more hampered by ever more government intervention, and that is characterized by a growing loss of individual freedom. The growth of the government’s economic intervention is synonymous with a loss of individual freedom because it means increasingly initiating the use of physical force to make people do what they do not voluntarily choose to do or prevent them from doing what they do voluntarily choose to do.

    Since the individual is the best judge of his own interests, and at least as a rule seeks to do what it is in his interest to do and to avoid doing what harms his interest, it follows that the greater the extent of government intervention, the greater the extent to which individuals are prevented from doing what benefits them and are instead compelled to do what causes them loss.

    Today, in the United States, government spending, federal, state, and local, amounts to almost half of the monetary incomes of the portion of the citizenry that does not work for the government. Fifteen federal cabinet departments, and a much larger number of federal regulatory agencies, together, in most instances with counterparts at the state and local level, routinely intrude into virtually every area of the individual citizen’s life. In countless ways he is taxed, compelled, and prohibited.

    The effect of such massive government interference is unemployment, rising prices, falling real wages, a need to work longer and harder, and growing economic insecurity. The further effect is growing anger and resentment.

    Though the government’s policy of interventionism is their logical target, the anger and resentment people feel are typically directed at businessmen and the rich instead. This is a mistake which is fueled for the most part by an ignorant and envious intellectual establishment and media.

    And in conformity with this attitude, since the collapse of the stock market bubble, which was in fact created by the Federal Reserve’s policy of credit expansion and then pricked by its temporary abandonment of that policy, government prosecutors have adopted what appears to be a particularly vengeful policy toward executives guilty of financial dishonesty, as though their actions were responsible for the widespread losses resulting from the collapse of the bubble. Thus the former head of a major telecommunications company was recently given a twenty-five year prison sentence. Other top executives have suffered similarly.

    Even more ominously, the government’s power to obtain mere criminal indictments has become equivalent to the power to destroy a firm, as occurred in the case of Arthur Andersen, the major accounting firm. The threatened use of this power was then sufficient to force major insurance brokerage firms in the United States to change their managements to the satisfaction of New York State’s Attorney General. There is no way to describe such developments other than as conviction and punishment without trial and as extortion by the government. These are major steps along a very dangerous path.

    Fortunately, there is still sufficient freedom in the United States to undo all the damage that has been done. There is first of all the freedom to publicly name it and denounce it.

    More fundamentally, there is the freedom to analyze and refute the ideas that underlie the destructive policies that have been adopted or that may be adopted. And that is what is critical. For the fundamental factor underlying interventionism and, of course, socialism as well, whether Nazi or Communist, is nothing but wrong ideas, above all, wrong ideas about economics and philosophy.

    There is now an extensive and growing body of literature that presents sound ideas in these two vital fields. In my judgment, the two most important authors of this literature are Ludwig von Mises and Ayn Rand. An extensive knowledge of their writings is an indispensable prerequisite for success in the defense of individual freedom and the free market.

    https://mises.org/profile/george-reisman

  114. Stimpson J. Cat

    ‘Bold’ scheme launches to power every property on SA’s Eyre Peninsula with solar

    There is far more chance of developing a clean safe form of energy produced from South Australian hyphenated surnames than this clownshow.

  115. calli

    Don’t online bully nerds with Math monogrammed shirts please.

    DrBeau’s symbol just means he’s resistant to pipe smoking. We know he’s a cigar man.

  116. Stimpson J. Cat

    In my judgment, the two most important authors of this literature are Ludwig von Mises and Ayn Rand.

    Ayn Rand?
    Ha ha ha ja ja!!!!

  117. Roger

    An ambitious plan to power every property in one region of South Australia with solar has been labelled an Australian first — but experts are divided over whether it will work.

    Let me guess:

    Experts in renewables vs. electrical engineers.

  118. Liliana:

    It’s embarrassing how pathetic we are. Who is paying for all these appeals and when they get paid by 60 Minutes for an exclusive interview do we get some of our taxes back?

    I asked that the other day.
    Silence.

  119. notafan

    TE

    that sounds much like present day Cuba, including the ration cards,

  120. Notafan:
    The picture of the reconstructed Notre Dame Cathedral shows what a piss poor job they did on it. I knew they’d stuff up the roof as well, but that’s just ‘orrible.
    Multicoloured wood parquetry roofing?
    Disgraceful.

  121. Stimpson J. Cat

    Why Nazism Was Socialism and Why Socialism Is Totalitarian

    No one cares about this in 2019.
    It is redundant.
    The two issues that are fundamentally important in 2019 are Immigration, and Government Regulation of Corporations like Alphabet Inc, Facebook, etc.

  122. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    James Cook University has been ordered to pay reef scientist Peter Ridd $1.2 million

    $1.2 million is not a great deal of compensation for what Ridd has been through emotionally, for his loss of reputation due to their slanders, and for the many future years of tenured salary that he has lost, as well as past salary not paid, all due to his principled stance on academic freedom of enquiry.

    JCU should count themselves lucky it was not ten million. They should get out while they are ahead, their Senate should dismiss asap the current hopeless denizens of the Chancellery, and set about restoring the international reputation of the University, which these incompetent and vindictive people, not Ridd, have brought into disrepute.

  123. feelthebern

    What was the costs situation in the Ridd case?

  124. Cassie of Sydney

    “liliana
    #3148816, posted on September 6, 2019 at 12:59 pm
    ……at least another twelve days.
    Our country has descended to new depths

    sugar bowl and ants comes to mind.

    It’s embarrassing how pathetic we are. Who is paying for all these appeals and when they get paid by 60 Minutes for an exclusive interview do we get some of our taxes back?”

    Great comment Liliana.

  125. notafan

    Winston I don’t think that is where they are at

    The spire has not yet been rebuilt and the cover over the nave is probably temporary

    https://www.npr.org/2019/08/20/752565861/notre-dame-repair-crews-are-back-to-work-but-paris-lead-concerns-remain

  126. Stimpson J. Cat

    Okay, I’m confused.

    Taking The Piss Confirmed!!!!
    😂

  127. bespoke

    Okay, I’m confused.

    Join the club, Nota.

  128. bespoke

    Okay, I’m confused.

    Welcome to my world.

  129. notafan

    Winston

    Can be hard to tell around here

    I blame the usual suspects

  130. Rococo Liberal

    The proper expression is ”extracting the urine”

  131. Stimpson J. Cat

    The proper expression is ”extracting the urine”

    I struggled at first, thinking it was some bizarre nursing lingo.
    But at last my damaged synapses sparked with the blinding light of sheer brilliance.

  132. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Bern, the IPA sent an email with all details, but I have dumped my one and Hairy is at the gym so I can’t ask him to check his one re the costs. Can’t trust that I would remember all details correctly, so best someone else offers a breakdown of the $1.2m and costs awarded if they have these details written somewhere.

  133. I thought the bit about the parquetry roofing was a bit of a signal…

  134. Sinclair Davidson

    The Institute of Public Affairs has welcomed the decision of the Federal Circuit Court in relation to Dr Peter Ridd’s case against James Cook University.

    Today, it was announced in the Federal Circuit Court that Dr Ridd will receive $1,219,214.47 in damages following the Court’s decision in April that Dr Ridd was unlawfully sacked.

    Damages awarded $1.2 million is comprised of approximately $167,000 for past wages and superannuation lost, $835,000 for future wages and superannuation lost, $90,000 for general damages and $125,000 as pecuniary penalty.

    “The sum awarded reflects the appalling nature of JCU’s treatment of Dr Ridd and vindicates Peter Ridd’s fight for academic freedom, free speech and integrity of climate science and peer review,” said Gideon Rozner, Director of Policy at the IPA.

    “James Cook University must now rethink its stated plans to prolong this ugly dispute by appealing the decision. Dr Ridd won this case on all 17 counts. It is time for JCU to accept the decision and move on.”

    “The very fact that an Australian university is willing to force the weight of an entire administration backed by taxpayer funds to stifle an academic’s freedom of speech sends a massive chilling effect to any academic engaging in public debate in Australia.”

    “James Cook University’s shameful actions prove without doubt there is a crisis of free speech at Australian Universities.

    A freedom of information request lodged by the Institute of Public Affairs with James Cook University revealed that the University has already spent at least $630,000 on legal fees in the Dr Peter Ridd case.

    “Dragging this matter to a higher court would be unfair not only to Dr Ridd, but to JCU’s students who expect the university to spend its resources on teaching and research, not pointless legal frolics.”

    “It is time for JCU’s council to step in to restore sanity, and save the university from spending millions of taxpayer dollars to exert control over a fine and sincere 30-year employee.”

    “If not, Education Minister Dan Tehan must intervene and tell JCU to withdraw its appeal because it is an inappropriate expenditure of taxpayer funds and will do irreparable harm to the international reputation of Australia’s higher education sector,” Mr Rozner said.

  135. cohenite

    Don’t know if this has been mentioned; at last some good news; I like Ridd; he stays the distance; unlike say bolta who let mordy’s stinking decision stand:

    Earlier today, it was announced in the Federal Circuit Court that Dr Ridd will receive $1,219,214 in damages following the Court’s decision in April that Dr Ridd was unlawfully sacked.

    The damages of $1.2 million comprised of approximately $167,000 for past wages and superannuation lost, $835,000 for future wages and superannuation lost, $90,000 for general damages and $125,000 as pecuniary penalty.

    The IPA has just put out a media release calling on JCU to immediately rule out any appeal, as well as welcoming today’s judgment. You can read the media release by clicking here.

    In the media release I outline that the significant sum awarded reflects the appalling nature of JCU’s treatment of Peter and vindicates his fight for academic freedom, free speech and integrity of climate science and peer review.

    The very fact that an Australian university has been willing to force the weight of an entire administration backed by taxpayer funds to stifle an academic’s freedom of speech sends a massive chilling effect to any academic engaging in public debate in Australia.

    James Cook University’s shameful actions prove without doubt there is a crisis of free speech at Australian Universities. Dr Ridd won this case on all 17 counts. It is time for JCU to accept the decision and move on.

    If not, Education Minister Dan Tehan must intervene and tell JCU to withdraw its appeal because it is an inappropriate expenditure of taxpayer funds and will do irreparable harm to the international reputation of Australia’s higher education sector.

    I really do hope that this is the end of the matter. But as the IPA has reported previously, JCU has indicated on numerous occasions that it intends to appeal.

    Under court rules, JCU now has 21 days to lodge their appeal. We will let you know the minute there are further developments.

  136. Geriatric Mayfly

    Mugabe gone. Good riddance.

  137. JC

    In today’s WSJ. I reckon these clowns are well on their way to destroying this company and maybe too late for the lazy management to do anything about it.

    It may be time to take the big G out of Google. The company called Google has turned itself into a generic metaphor for our politicized times. In addition to being the name of a U.S. technology company, “google” should become a lowercase word for a psychological syndrome—such as attention-deficit disorder, paranoia or dissociative identity disorder. A person with google disorder would be diagnosed as being in the grip of an uncontrollable political mania.

    During the company’s early years, in keeping with what it called its culture of “openness” and the notion that employees should “bring their whole selves to work,” Google allowed thousands of internal message boards to proliferate. This must have seemed like a good idea at the time since Google employees are supersmart and presumably full of interesting, innovative thoughts.

    Over time, the conversations on these text-based message boards turned toxic—as they do on message boards everywhere—with participants carving each other up in paroxysms of resentment and retribution. As the Journal reported last year, Google basically turned into a political nut house.

    Google employees quickly sorted themselves into subsets with names such as Googlers for Animals, Black Googler Network, Activists at Google, Militia at Google, and Sex Positive at Google.

    A few weeks ago, in attempt to do something about this epidemic outbreak of google syndrome, Google released a statement called “Community Guidelines,” a set of directives that are supposed to explain to the company’s more than 100,000 employees—known as Googlers—how they should talk to each other.
    Opinion Live: America’s Political Realignment and the 2020 Election

    Join Paul Gigot in Los Angeles on Wednesday, October 1 for a discussion with Opinion columnists and political experts on the current state of the 2020 election field. Register with WSJ+.

    For example, the guidelines state: “Don’t troll, name call, or engage in ad hominem attacks—about anyone. This includes making statements that insult, demean, or humiliate.” Then, amazingly, there’s this: “While sharing information and ideas with colleagues helps build community, disrupting the workday to have a raging debate over politics or the latest news story does not. Our primary responsibility is to do the work we’ve each been hired to do, not to spend working time on debates about non-work topics.”

    Our primary responsibility is to do the work we’ve each been hired to do. No other company one can think of—not U.S. Steel or General Motors , IBM or anyone—has felt it necessary to tell its employees their job is to do their job. Until now.

    Google’s originating motto was “Don’t be evil.” Now it is “Don’t troll.” Something went wrong.

    What happened at Google, culminating with this extraordinary statement instructing its employees on the fundamentals of human interaction, makes Google sound like “Lord of the Flies,” William Golding ’s meditation on the fine line between civilized and savage behavior.

    Rather than “innovative” discourse, Googlers instead used their extraordinary workplace freedom to launch personal assaults and group mobbings. Two self-identified conservative Googlers (in hindsight, a mistake), James Damore and Kevin Cernekee, charged that the in-house mobs and a cowering management cost them their jobs.

    People—what we’ll call normal people—ask all the time how it happened that so much in our politics and culture went off the rails so quickly. Historians may conclude the answer was the google syndrome—a generalized descent into obsessional thinking.

    One of the striking things about the Google memo is how much of it sounds like a second-grade teacher talking to 7-year-olds. “Be responsible,” it says. “Be helpful. Be thoughtful.”

    But these aren’t 7-year-olds. The employees at tech companies such as Google or Facebook are high-IQ 20- and 30-somethings. They have somehow become so infantilized and dumbed down in their political and cultural obsessions, so unable to converse at anything above the level of a playground, that the adults at Google, or what’s left of them, felt obliged to issue this rudimentary guide. Well, it’s a start on the long road back.

    It’s worth noting that this generation of “smart” employees would have been in school when colleges were creating “safe spaces” and visits to campus mental-health clinics were proliferating. Campus administrators began to indulge and even encourage any vaporous political idea that students thought up, such as “microaggression.” Why be surprised now when they think their boutique political obsessions are as important as “the work we’ve been hired to do”?

    Google’s “community guidelines” might look like a phenomenon of recently rich young adults trapped inside the Silicon Valley bubble, but they have more political resonance than that.

    As the memo makes clear, these people aren’t using work hours to talk about how to raise their children. It’s a “raging debate over politics.” The issues roaring across Google’s message board on gender, race, saving the planet, identity or inequality are a mirror image of the tensions inside the Democratic Party between the Biden-Klobuchar-Delaney moderates and the Sanders-Warren-Buttigieg progressives.

    A constant question is whether the party’s progressives have “gone too far” to be electable in 2020. Put it this way: If Google’s pliable management had to step in to protect the company from being undermined by progressive compulsions, wait until Donald Trump gets a shot at a Democratic candidate who sounds like an escapee from Google’s message boards.

    Can you imagine what the hell is going on, on those message boards. The work week, the real work week would be about 10 hours if they’re lucky.

  138. notafan

    I thought the bit about the parquetry roofing was a bit of a signal…

    After all those actual proposals including a swimming pool on the roof and a minaret?

  139. zyconoclast

    I thought Afrophobia was a a rational fear of this

    South Africa shuts embassy in Nigeria after reprisal attacks
    Pretoria closes diplomatic missions as Nigeria encourages its citizens to return home amid anti-foreigner violence.

    South African Foreign Affairs Minister Naledi Pandor said on Thursday the embassy was closed temporarily after threats led to fears for staff safety.
    “There is Afrophobia we are sensing that exists, there is resentment and we need to address that,” Pandor told Reuters news agency.

  140. cohenite

    Hannity very good on the alarmist idiocy of the demorats.

  141. Geriatric Mayfly

    It’s a pity Zimbabwe can’t celebrate as things are not much better under the regime that replaced the Old Gorilla.

  142. Stimpson J. Cat

    In today’s WSJ. I reckon these clowns are well on their way to destroying this company and maybe too late for the lazy management to do anything about it.

    The new YouTube policies are the equivalent of market suicide.
    They are going to be in very big trouble indeed.
    Hello, Bitchute!!!!

  143. max

    nota, thanks for the link to the medieval historian’s blog. Much appreciated.

  144. Leigh Lowe

    I thought the bit about the parquetry roofing was a bit of a signal…

    It’s time the flooring guys fought back against the ceiling guys.
    Everytime anyone ever talks about the Sistine Chapel it is all ceiling, ceiling, ceiling.
    No-one ever says “nice floor tiles”.

  145. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Peter, re:
    >> spent an entire day complaining about Elle and I engaging in a bit of harmless flirting at 3.00 am in the morning

    Public Displays Of Affection can be upsetting to those who are deprived and envious of the same.
    And quite straightforwardly people who cannot change their own feelings about a behaviour will prefer to change others’ behaviour.

  146. Pyrmonter

    @ Sinc

    The minister should tell a University what to do in respect of academic employment? Was this about academic freedom, or not?

  147. Leigh Lowe

    Mugabe gone. Good riddance.

    The first President of Zimbabwe was Canaan Banana.
    He served jail time for sodomy.
    I’m saying no more.

  148. zyconoclast

    McDonald’s just launched its first new type of restaurant since the drive-thru — here’s what it’s like to eat there

    -McDonald’s recently launched its first “McDonald’s to Go” restaurant in London – a restaurant that has no seating areas and only serves takeout.
    -It’s the first new format for a McDonald’s restaurant since the drive-thru.
    -The new restaurant replaces cashiers with electronic touchscreens and is completely stripped of decor and furniture.
    -I visited the new McDonald’s to see what it was like firsthand.

    As technology becomes more integrated into our everyday lives, businesses are having to rapidly adapt to consumer demand for speed and efficiency.

    McDonald’s is no exception.

    The fast food chain is reportedly opening a fleet of new restaurants that aim to feed its customers faster by exclusively serving takeout.

    The new fleet has been dubbed McDonald’s first new restaurant format since it introduced the drive-thru in the 1970s. Inside the restaurant, orders are placed on touchscreens, and there are no tables, chairs, or decor. The menu is also stripped down to the chain’s staple items like Big Macs, McNuggets, and fries.

    I ventured to the first McDonald’s of its kind, located on Fleet Street in the heart of London, to see what it was like.

    Here’s what the experience was like.

    From the outside of the restaurant, you wouldn’t immediately guess this was a McDonald’s. Only the familiar golden “M” really gives it away. When we got a bit closer, it was clearly marked as a “to-go” version.

    Walking inside, the first things in sight were the touchscreens along the wall. The interior was otherwise completely featureless — the walls were finished in dull grey, the floor was plain, and it reminded me a bit of walking into an oversize ATM vestibule.

    The station with straws and napkins was the only other thing in the customers’ space. The customer space of the restaurant is much smaller than that of a regular McDonald’s – roughly the size of a small garage. After ordering at the touchscreens, customers move sideways to the collection point, with the kitchen visible behind.

    The touchscreens were simple to use, with easy instructions and pictures. Once you’ve paid, you take your receipt to the collection point and wait for your number. Unlike other McDonald’s, you can only order on the touchscreens and they only take card.

    This menu has apparently been stripped down, but I spotted all of McDonald’s most familiar offerings on there, like Big Macs and McNuggets. We settled for a pair of burgers and Diet Cokes.

    Armed with our numbered receipt, we moved to the collection point. One of the company’s aims with this new setup is to feed its customers faster, but it didn’t feel as though the food arrived any more quickly than normal.

    With no seating, customers all stand looking up at the order board as though they’re at a train station. It wasn’t crowded when we went, but the layout seemed like it was designed for customers to order, collect, and leave as quickly as possible — there’s no other option.

    I would rate the overall experience as thoroughly predictable. After all, nobody ever visits McDonald’s for the chat, so we didn’t feel we were missing out on anything. The food was quick, familiar, and left us with just one big question — where to sit and eat it.

    Fortunately, we found ourselves a bench in a nearby churchyard. They might find this quiet spot getting a bit busier in the next few weeks.

  149. Leigh Lowe

    @ Sinc

    The minister should tell a University what to do in respect of academic employment? Was this about academic freedom, or not?

    Yeah, nah.
    It is a matter of telling the fuckwits at JCU not to throw good (taxpayers money) after bad, having been smashed on all 17 grounds involved.
    Or, maybe better, tell them to go right ahead, but the Feds will extract any further costs from cuts to the chancellor and VC level salaries.

  150. John Constantine

    https://www.bendigoadvertiser.com.au/story/6365955/fires-in-five-quarry-hill-homes-after-power-surge-causes-blackout/

    Customers whose property has been damaged by unauthorised voltage variations may be entitled to compensation under industry guidelines.

    An unauthorised voltage variation is when voltage is either higher or lower than levels set by the Essential Services Commission. Australia’s standard electricity supply has a voltage of 230.

    Power companies are not required to compensate customers who experience loss or damage in the case of electricity outages, such as if food spoils because a fridge or freezer is not working.

    Inspectors will be working with Powercor customers to check equipment to make sure it is safe to restore power.

  151. Stimpson J. Cat

    If not, Education Minister Dan Tehan must intervene and tell JCU to withdraw its appeal because it is an inappropriate expenditure of taxpayer funds and will do irreparable harm to the international reputation of Australia’s higher education sector.

    Agreed.
    Almost as much of a waste of money as getting paid $50 grand of taxpayer cash to
    “investigate Non-Government Organizations”.

    Ha ha ha ja ja ja ha!!!!

  152. Public Displays Of Affection can be upsetting …

    Waving it around for all to imagine.
    I’m shocked.

  153. Helen

    My comment rejected by the Australian in relation to Harry and Markle nt taking Archie to Balmoral becasue he is too little (at 4 months – never mind he wasnt too little to go see Uncle Elton)

    Harry has been grasstrated – what happens when you let a loony greeny wife walk all over you. He should put her over his lap and give her a good spanking. This is the fellow who did two turs of duty, a soldier, a man’s man, now has vegan days and given up smoking and become a Klimate Krusader, all in the name of love. He should have stuck with the lovely South African girl. Cant wait for the divorce.

  154. Sinclair Davidson

    The minister should tell a University what to do in respect of academic employment?

    A bit silly.

    But the Minister can, and should, ask the university to justify the “Research environment” in terms of the ARC funding requirements and in light of the adverse court finding.

  155. cohenite

    DICTATOR ‘DEAD’ Robert Mugabe dead: Former Zimbabwe leader dies aged 95

    And there you have it folks: there is no justice.

  156. Tom

    Hannity very good on the alarmist idiocy of the demorats.

    Except his show is unwatchable because he presents it like a school marm’s finger-wagging lecture about bad behaviour in which the audience are treated like idiots.

  157. bespoke

    Colonel Crispin Berka
    #3148944, posted on September 6, 2019 at 3:21 pm
    Peter, re:
    >> spent an entire day complaining about Elle and I engaging in a bit of harmless flirting at 3.00 am in the morning

    Public Displays Of Affection can be upsetting to those who are deprived and envious of the same.
    And quite straightforwardly people who cannot change their own feelings about a behaviour will prefer to change others’ behaviour.

    A lot more the the story then you may know or want to.

  158. Stimpson J. Cat

    No-one ever says “nice floor tiles”.

    This is why the Byzantine tradies cracked the shits and started putting them on the roof.
    So they had to see them.
    Learn some history Bro.
    😁

  159. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    And quite straightforwardly people who cannot change their own feelings about a behaviour will prefer to change others’ behaviour.

    Welcome to The Cat Collective, Colonel.
    Aka The Glass Is Half Empty Group.
    Aka The Liberal party Admiration Society.

  160. Stimpson J. Cat

    Public Displays Of Affection can be upsetting to those who are deprived and envious of the same.

    No they are perfectly fine normally it’s only a problem if it’s really old people or alphabets.
    Then it can be quite confronting, if not traumatic.
    😁

  161. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    A lot more the the story then you may know or want to.

    Yeah.
    No mention of my “allegedly dying wife” all alone in the (non-existent) upstairs bedroom.
    Surely you remember her, Bespoke? You know, the one who’s “allegedly dead” now.

  162. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    it’s only a problem if it’s really old people or alphabets.

    You left out Libertarians and Baby Boomers.

  163. Stimpson J. Cat

    However, I am aware that most of you are very very old people with little to look forward to, apart from reading my scintillating posts, so I am prepared to make an exception to the rules of society and allow you to publicly hold hands.

    But that’s it.

  164. RobK

    “It makes a lot of sense to mine the sunshine that falls on our roof because it’s going to be there for the next 10,000 years.
    Right.
    I have some premium US and Japanese solar panels struggling to get to 20 years before moisture ingress causes separation of the layers.
    Many roofs that have solar panels also are at increased risk to developing leaks.

  165. Zyconoclast

    it’s only a problem if it’s really old people or alphabets.

    What about old people and alphabets, together, at the same time…?

  166. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Okay Stimpy, I’m holding my hands. But I can’t see how that will help.
    Makes it bloody difficult to type, though.

  167. Stimpson J. Cat

    What about old people and alphabets, together, at the same time…?

    Absolutely Haram.

  168. feelthebern

    George Carlin on the baby boomers.

  169. Stimpson J. Cat

    Now don’t get me wrong.
    I love The Alphabets and The Acronyms.
    A lot of them are just great wonderful people.
    But they should be doing more constructive things with their time like make up tutorials or fashion designing or inventing new dances or flower arrangement or cracking U-Boat codes.
    Very creative people when they can focus on a positive outcome.
    😁

  170. Stimpson J. Cat

    Okay Stimpy, I’m holding my hands. But I can’t see how that will help.
    Makes it bloody difficult to type, though.

    Try focusing instead on how she would “allegedly” want you spending your time and energies and everything will become simple.
    Namaste.

  171. Harry has been grasstrated – what happens when you let a loony greeny wife walk all over you. He should put her over his lap and give her a good spanking. This is the fellow who did two turs of duty, a soldier, a man’s man, now has vegan days and given up smoking and become a Klimate Krusader, all in the name of love. He should have stuck with the lovely South African girl. Cant wait for the divorce.

    Correct me where I’m wrong, but wasn’t she a Zimbo?

  172. Colonel Crispin Berka

    A lot more the the story then you may know or want to.

    Yes, admittedly I have never seen the exchange in question which is why I am unable to take sides.
    I was putting forward a merely descriptive explanation of why the blowback happens.
    Given that all of this was text I imagine I would just scroll past or do other things if I figured out something unpleasant was happening. At 3am.

    As to why all the non-youthful and non-heteronormative relationships are palpably confronting to us normies, I can only assume it is our automatic mental task to retrieve memories associated with kissing when we see it happening, and also as a socially-programmed way of imagining a situation from another person’s perspective – a skill which is clearly useful to society most of the time even if it isn’t nice for each individual all of the time. Imagining the situation from the participants’ perspective is exactly like imagining doing what they are doing. This could, by the sounds of it, be very “Eeewww!” Somebody squirt some cold water on them.

    And so there is the very essence of the culture war; an ongoing fight about whose totally arbitrary and subjective beliefs, thoughts, hopes, preferences, perceptions, and feelings are to be tolerated, protected, supported, advocated, and even ultimately backed up by force and guns, versus whose totally arbitrary and subjective beliefs, thoughts, hopes, preferences, perceptions, and feelings are to be dismissed, disdained, disowned, disrupted, and perhaps ultimately destroyed. And nobody can say they have an objective basis to any of it, because you cannot argue from an ‘is’ to a ‘should’.

  173. Black Ball

    Good afternoon.
    Get home from daily duties and indeed find that the mannequin episode of Seinfeld is screening. Knuckle Dragger, it is one of the better episodes, along with The Puerto Rican Day and Keith Hernandez.

  174. Stimpson J. Cat

    Harry has been grasstrated – what happens when you let a loony greeny wife walk all over you.

    I actually think it’s wonderful.
    It’s proof that real, fundamental, meaningful, positive change in a human life is possible.
    He’s come a long way from being a literal inbred uniform wearing Nazi.
    Inspiring stuff.
    😁

  175. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    how she would “allegedly” want you spending your time and energies

    I’d tell you if I could, Stimpy. But unfortunately I can’t.
    The mere mention of oral sex sends the Cat Collective into paroxysms of righteous indignation.
    Besides, it’s a bit hard to do by yourself.

  176. Tailgunner

    I’m tempted to attend the pro leftist rally down the road soon.
    A Harry style 1940’s uniform would get me over the line.

  177. Stimpson J. Cat

    And nobody can say they have an objective basis to any of it, because you cannot argue from an ‘is’ to a ‘should’.

    Exactly.
    It’s like, why “should” I include diagrams to explain my highbrow humor to old people?

    😁

  178. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I’m tempted to attend the pro leftist rally down the road soon.

    Liberal Party branch meeting?

  179. Tailgunner

    But my Nukes Now! sign is just a pleasant memory…
    Could I get a slab of Pepsi’s and hand them out to honour the nationalist gas, CO2?

  180. calli

    💋💋💋

    That’ll trigger ‘em.

    Oh, plus a 👵🏻

  181. Tailgunner

    Liberal Party branch meeting?
    Nah, I think they’re called extinction 2020 or something.

  182. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Exactly.
    It’s like, why “should” I include diagrams to explain my highbrow humor to old people?

    I don’t know which example of your humour you’re referring to.
    Could you draw me a picture?

  183. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Nuke o’clock, Gunner?

  184. calli

    That’s meant to be a granny. She looks much nicer on my iPad. That one looks rather grumpy.

  185. Tailgunner

    Frank, stop that.
    Thorium is a gateway drug.

  186. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Tailgunner
    #3148991, posted on September 6, 2019 at 4:22 pm

    Liberal Party branch meeting?
    Nah, I think they’re called extinction 2020 or something.

    Not much difference.

  187. Geriatric Mayfly

    Mr Mugabe, born 21 February 1924, was a communist and nationalist revolutionary.

    The old coot died in a Singapore hospital. What is it with the Left and Commos, who are always banging on about health and education and seldom add anything to the improvement of either. Literacy rates in Zim were among the highest in Africa until the Mugrot set in. Of health standards, say no more.

  188. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Yeah it is a gateway drug.

    To other drugs.

    …and your mind, man.

  189. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Nah, I think they’re called extinction 2020 or something.

    Extinction Rebellion.
    As I said, Liberal Party branch meeting.

  190. Tailgunner

    Ball bearings all over Flinders&Swanston?
    Genius,Frank!!
    Tram stoppers well call them.
    I’ve got enough black hoodies to blend in.
    And black facemask.
    One man counter propaganda.
    Climateers go too far! Police horse put down!
    Perfect.

  191. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    That would actually be counter agit-prop.

  192. Stimpson J. Cat

    I don’t know which example of your humour you’re referring to.

    Use your vitreous humors to work it out.

  193. areff

    it’s a bit hard to do by yourself.

    Yoga

  194. Tailgunner

    Stimpson, is denim a climate friendly material?
    Asking for a fake-antifa friend.

  195. Tailgunner

    counter agit-prop

    Hehe.
    Like it.

  196. Tailgunner

    As I said, Liberal Party branch meeting.

    Peter, are Bondy’s AK-47s still hanging around anywhere over there?
    Lightly guarded state warehouse perchance?
    The next indigenous uprising may need them…

  197. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Nuke o’clock, Gunner?

    Dot,
    You have posted that video at least twenty times now.
    Thorium reactors have been around for half a century now, without going anywhere.
    Give it up.

  198. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    What if you’ve made friends with ASIO spooks and special branch wallopers, none of whom like or are interested in ANTIFA?

    “That gunner was hardcore, he had all of Gramsci and Abbie Hoffman’s books, he also promised to become an abstinent vegan holy monk for climate justice, ready to spill his blood and that of others to fight the patriarchy!”

  199. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Dunno, Tailgunner.
    You tell me.

  200. calli

    On Mugabe and that clean, quiet Singapore hospital.

    Screwtape may have got his wish.

    How much better for us if all humans died in costly nursing homes amid doctors who lie, nurses who lie, friends who lie, as we have trained them, promising life to the dying, encouraging the belief that sickness excuses every indulgence, and even, if our workers know their job, withholding all suggestion of a priest lest it should betray to the sick man his true condition! And how disastrous for us is the continual remembrance of death which war enforces. One of our best weapons, contented worldliness, is rendered useless. In wartime not even a human can believe that he is going to live forever.

    Not all is as it appears.

  201. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Anyone else here agree with Chapelle on abortion?

  202. RobK

    is denim a climate friendly material?
    Some of da youf wearing low-riders seem to waddle like a duck, does that count?

  203. So there is a gathering of Klimatears in the city? Eh? All in one place?

    Do any of you ex-military old guys remember how to dial up a B52 strike?

  204. calli

    Denim is one of the most polluting of textiles to produce. The process is hidden away in the third world so the tender sensibilities of westerners need not be offended.

  205. Bruce of Newcastle

    Asking for a fake-antifa friend.

    Don’t ever be caught with fast food.

    Buttigieg says those who eat burgers, use plastic straws are ‘part of the problem’ on climate change

    If you eat hamburgers or use plastic drinking straws, consider yourself part of the climate-change problem. That was the assessment of Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg on Thursday during an appearance on CNN’s “New Day.”

    Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Ind., told host Alisyn Camerota he thinks many people view climate issues from “the perspective of guilt.”

    But he wants you to butt out of his flying habits.

    Buttigieg defends use of private planes for campaigning (4 Sep)

    Buttigieg and his traveling aides regularly fly private, and the South Bend, Indiana, mayor spent more money on private air travel than any other candidate in the second quarter of 2019.

    Asked on Wednesday about that travel, Buttigieg said he is “interested in de-carbonizing the fuel that goes into air travel” but that he flies private because “this is a very big country and I’m running to be president of the whole country.”

    He should have a word with Greta. She can advise him of all sorts of nice green ways he could travel. And while he’s in transit we won’t have to hear from him for a while at least.

  206. Tailgunner

    You have posted that video at least twenty times now

    Hehe.
    Yeah,dot

  207. Tailgunner

    My Russian Girls one is far more well received, dude

  208. Tailgunner

    Denim is one of the most polluting of textiles to produce

    Thank you 🙂
    So Stimpsonesque denim outfit could become a potential nationalist agit-prop weapon? Like a yellow vest…
    Damn, dog…he’s done it again.
    Shirtless for a lot of it.

  209. JC

    Some of our species shouldn’t be alive. They’re too evil to live.

    A 74-year-old father who repeatedly raped and sexually abused his daughter so badly she developed dissociative identity disorder, will likely die behind bars after he was sentenced to 45 years in jail.

    XXXXXX will be eligible for parole in 33 years, when he is 107 years old. He pleaded guilty in March to 25 charges of rape, buggery and indecent assault against his daughter, Jeni, in Sydney’s west between 1974 and 1981. She was aged just four when her father first abused her.

    XXXXX who has been behind bars for the last two and a half years, closed his eyes as Judge Sarah Huggett read out the intricate details of his “demeaning and cruel” offences in Downing Centre District Court. Sitting in his prison greens with his arms crossed, he remained indifferent

    Crossed out his name as it doesn’t deserve recognition. I wouldn’t call it an illness as it’s just pure evil.

  210. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    he is “interested in de-carbonizing the fuel that goes into air travel”

    I’ve got an old hang glider if he’d like to borrow it.

  211. Stimpson J. Cat

    Stimpson, is denim a climate friendly material?

    No.
    The sight of my arse and shapely calves encased in denim can cause temperatures to rise and widescale dangerous swoonage.**

    **according to some Catallaxy Women allegedly.

  212. dover_beach

    And nobody can say they have an objective basis to any of it, because you cannot argue from an ‘is’ to a ‘should’.

    Oh yes you can.

  213. Tailgunner

    Nah, I’m not going to counter protest.
    It’s about to fukn hail here in oblast é121
    The extinction mob can have at it.
    I’m going to the pub with me Lannisters colours on.
    And a MAGA hat.
    Gotta work tomorrow.
    #OvertimeonTrump

  214. Tailgunner

    I wouldn’t call it an illness as it’s just pure evil.

    MKUltra style.
    The crew from Eyes Wide Shut have her now.

  215. bundyrum

    Frank be careful posting IOTP videos, you will get the head prefect (the open borders loon)upset.

    Here scooby, here boy.

  216. Tailgunner

    widescale dangerous swoonage

    That’s a tinder profile phrase right there.
    Stolen.

  217. Anthony

    Has George Pell lodged an Appeal to the High Court yet?

  218. Tailgunner

    How about a mini oil spill amongst the climate chaos?
    As a solo mission, one so inclined could cause MSM focus.
    Alone.
    Force multiplier.

  219. Tailgunner

    My mate, Martin Sellner, says
    “Go where the cameras are”
    Hehe.
    Create anti propaganda. For them.

  220. Anon Mahnà

    Sitting in his prison greens with his arms crossed, he remained indifferent

    The reporter, one might fairly assume, does not know how the felon felt. A corrected version:

    Sitting in his prison greens with his arms crossed, he seemed indifferent

  221. Twostix

    I have some premium US and Japanese solar panels struggling to get to 20 years before moisture ingress causes separation of the layers.
    Many roofs that have solar panels also are at increased risk to developing leaks.

    Our house has solar panels which were on when we bought it (added $0.00 to the value of the place for the previous owners).

    We just learned they havent been working for two months ot ooks like the inverter.

    And while I was up there I saw there are nasty rust spots forming on the roof where the rain drips off of the panels and hits the tin.

    So they’ll end up costing the house thousands. That retarded bugmen are foisting this on us all is desrving of a day of the rope.

  222. Stimpson J. Cat

    Oh yes you can.

    Dover,
    just because it is in your nature to link to this post, again, doesn’t necessarily mean you should.
    😁

  223. Shy Ted

    Maria needs to be selling (by modelling) wet T-shirts. If she does it properly she’ll make a fortune. And might even get Beaugy over the line.

  224. calli

    Big southerly buster just ripped through nw Sydney. Trees down everywhere, including onto a poor woman driving past just up the street. Car’s a write-off but she’s okay.

    It’s a mess.

  225. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    It’s a mess.

    Get used to it. It is the future.

  226. Leigh Lowe

    Windy in Asbury Park NJ, also.
    No trees down, but.
    Probably due to there not being many trees to start with.

  227. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    bundyrum
    #3149036, posted on September 6, 2019 at 4:50 pm

    Frank be careful posting IOTP videos, you will get the head prefect (the open borders loon)upset.

    Here scooby, here boy.

    That particular video is good.

    The ones where the macrobusiness/CEC nuts have their say, less so.

  228. Leigh Lowe

    We’ll all be rooned said Hanrahan.

    “It’ll get worse before it gets worser.”

    Jesus H Christ.

  229. bespoke

    Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault
    #3148967, posted on September 6, 2019 at 3:49 pm
    A lot more the the story then you may know or want to.

    Yeah.
    No mention of my “allegedly dying wife” all alone in the (non-existent) upstairs bedroom.
    Surely you remember her, Bespoke? You know, the one who’s “allegedly dead” now.

    The world is filled with people who exploit personal tragedy as an excuse to be a jerk or gain a free pass. No real man or women does this, I loath those that do and there enablers.

  230. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    “It’ll get worse before it gets worser.”
    Jesus H Christ.

    That’s about the size of it, Lo Lowe.
    But nothing to do with any Messiah, just a natural (currently) 150 year cycle.

  231. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    Rogan is becoming unbearable. Pushing global warming bullshit each episode.

    Listen here you drug fucked ex MMA man cum weak as piss hippie.

    If no one dies from climate by 2030, then shut up. The glimate models are fucked. The predictions are within the margin of error.

    Also met a nice young fella through work, turned out to be insufferable company at lunch, “Scomo is such a door shunt because he brought coal into Parliament”…(I thought to myself, welp, he just hasn’t watched my thorium vid).

  232. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    This blog isn’t even real. Face the fact that you’re a sad fucker and the rest of us are Chinese bots or NSA spooks.

  233. Helen

    SATP, yeah my bad, he MET Chelsy Davy in Caoe Town but she is born Zim.

  234. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I loath those that do and there enablers.

    And I loathe people who can’t spell.

  235. Diogenes

    Armed with our numbered receipt, we moved to the collection point. One of the company’s aims with this new setup is to feed its customers faster, but it didn’t feel as though the food arrived any more quickly than normal.

    To make it even quicker they could return to the chutes of old, instead of pfys* literally throwing food into boxes

    *pimply faced yoofs

  236. calli

    Get used to it. It is the future.

    Indeed it is.

    Clay strata, very large eucs, roads and services criss-crossing the root zone, drainage patterns interrupted.

    But big trees. They are sacred.

    Until they drop on a passer-by.

  237. calli

    NSA spooks.

    Curses! The horrid unmasking continues apace.

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