How unreliable energy has brought the lucky country to the brink of ruin. Look at the the choke point for unreliable energy

Australia is a very lucky country. Is there a country more blessed with resources to provide cheap and abundant energy? Vast amounts of coal, gas, uranium and a bit of mountain country for hydro. What more could we want?

Renewable energy of course, and we have wind and sun in abundance as well.

Australia also has a very special characteristic that is not shared by the nations and states on the mainland of Europe and North America. This is not so lucky. We do not have neighbours to help out if we are a bit short of power for any reason, like low winds at night.

So here we are in the age of RE and what is happening? We have to confront the choke point in the supply of unreliable energy without neighbours to help. We had no warning of this from overseas because in Europe and North America the choke point is a bother for states that went long on unreliables but it is not lethal (although it almost was in Germany, more than once).

So we should have been the last place on earth to go ahead with publicly funded unreliable energy in advance of storage facilities instead of setting records for the pace of development. As the Dutch commentator and wit Gert Jaap explained, we have put the horse of unreliable energy ahead of the cart of storage.

Lets see if the geniuses who got us into this pickle can find a way to get us out of it.

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70 Responses to How unreliable energy has brought the lucky country to the brink of ruin. Look at the the choke point for unreliable energy

  1. egg_

    The jackass of unreliable energy before the cart.

  2. struth

    Lets see if the geniuses who got us into this pickle can find a way to get us out of it.

    You speak ss if they didn’t have the intention of creating this “pickle” in the first place.

  3. Tim Neilson

    Somehow the blackouts will be blamed on fossil fuels. The “solution” will be vastly increased taxpayer funding and regulatory preferences for “renewables”.
    You now it makes sense.

  4. Leo G

    When Cicero said “we put the cart before the horse … in defiance of the old proverb”, he was using a metaphor to emphasise the importance of using judgement before making a commitment- alluding to judging the capacity of the horse before loading the cart.
    The metphor can be applied to RE by considering an unreliable horse that pulls a cart that carries a more reliable horse as well as the deliverable load. The horses must be frequently exchanged according to the way the wind is blowing.
    The counterpart of “geniuses who got us into this pickle” is the suggested lunatic mule skinner. I’m sure the fellow could readily be prompted to devise an even more lunatic way to spread the disarray.

  5. John Constantine

    “We Are Us”

    ‘The Ton’, australia’s beautiful people, have experienced one of the worlds greatest economic victories ever seen from this War on carbon.

    Like the superprofits of the munitions factories of the War profiteers of the military industrial complex.

    Not only have they superprofited from creating the problem, they will superprofit from the solution as well.

    Even if the solution is rationing the proles access to power/food/water/healthcare and freedom of internal movement.

  6. RobK

    Talking of bullshit….
    Reneweconomy has some good articles and some shockers such as https://reneweconomy.com.au/why-pay-thermal-generators-to-stay-online-its-totally-nuts-78477/
    With quotes such as:

    These numbers are just our projections. They get modified every 3 months as ITK subscribers can find out.
    We think they are some of the most aggressive forecasts in the market so more likely to be wrong than right. But we like them.

    This is some of the sloppiest analysis I’ve seen. It assumes subsidies as a given along with enabling infrastructure. The trouble is people swallow it.
    RTWT.

  7. egg_

    Lets see if the geniuses who got us into this pickle can find a way to get us out of it.

    Kruddy’s 2020 Summiteers?
    Cate Blanchett’s “defying gravity”?

  8. Herodotus

    The bulk of the population failed to grasp the inherent impossibility of constructing a nationwide network that sent a fibre-optic cable into every home. Boosters in the media set out to make anyone who did see the issues as luddites.
    The bulk of the population don’t have the grasp of physics and chemistry, combined with a sound historical basis in geology to resist the climate scam. Again, media boosters have jumped right onto the global bullshit train and helped to make most of our pollies scared to speak plainly about climate change or the inherent idiocy of wrecking our reliable and affordable power system in the mistaken belief that it will help adjust the planet’s thermostat.
    So here we are, watching a train wreck happen that didn’t need to happen.

  9. Texas Jack

    Easy…

    Repeal the provisions that prevent nuclear under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, and change the ROIC profile of nuclear investment by offering a zero-rate of taxation on the profit of nuclear generators. Oh, and get rid of those subsidies for renewables Rafe reminds us not to forget!

  10. egg_

    media boosters have jumped right onto the global bullshit train and helped to make most of our pollies scared to speak plainly

    Beholden to Globalists.

  11. egg_

    NEW REPORT: THE ANGRIEST SUMMER
    07.03.19
    Greg Mullins

  12. egg_

    Even the RFS are jumping onto the bandwagon.

    N.E.W. R.E.P.O.R.T: T.H.E A.N.G.R.I.E.S.T S.U.M.M.E.R
    07.03.19
    G.r.e.g M.u.l.l.i.n.s

    Can’t link as gets stuck in the spaminator.

  13. Up The Workers!

    Yes, you could say that Australia is notionally “lucky” to have such a wealth of raw materials and mineral resources in the ground – but it is only ever going to be ‘lucky’ for us if we ever develop the nous to do the processing of those materials into consumer goods, here onshore.

    As things stand, we merely run a huge wholesale quarrying operation for other nations and we egregiously enrich them by digging up our resources and bulk-shipping them overseas at a rate of cents-to-the-ton, and then eventually buying back those former raw materials as watches, mobile phones, TV’s, laptops, cars, consumer devices made almost totally from our bulk raw materials, at a net cost to us of millions and millions of dollars to the ton.

    We’d do better if we exported our Greenies and Leftards to the world (Macquarie Island or Antarctica would be a good destination for starters – where they could preach interminably to the penguins about the Humpty Dumpty perils of “global warming”) and let those freeloading workshy parasites pox somebody else’s economy for a change.

  14. miltonf

    Let’s see- how to try and wreck a prosperous and productive society.
    1. Attack manufacturing with free trade dogma
    2.Attack mining and agriculture with globull warming lysenkoism

    The Canberra pubes and their pals have been at this for over 30 years.

  15. Mark M

    “Lets see if the geniuses who got us into this pickle can find a way to get us out of it.”

    AEMO slashes output of five big solar farms by half due to voltage issues

    https://reneweconomy.com.au/aemo-slashes-output-of-five-big-solar-farms-by-half-due-to-voltage-issues-42232/

    Curses … and here I was preparing for perfect weather, too.

  16. Crossie

    Renewable energy is not the only scam perpetrated on the Australian public, NBN is the other one. It was also initiated and brought to fruition by the same malefactors, Rudd and Turnbull. Just when technology was moving refining and improving mobile communications we had to go back to wires.

    That NBN is an enormously costly disaster was acknowledged even by NBN itself as it is now advertising subsidies for mobile phones to people who are sick and use monitoring devices to notify emergency services when they are needed. The idea is that these devices will switch over to mobile phones only in case of interruptions to NBN access.

    What are the chances that these devices will soon only be connected to mobile phones?

  17. Crossie

    miltonf
    #3155953, posted on September 15, 2019 at 8:05 am
    Let’s see- how to try and wreck a prosperous and productive society.
    1. Attack manufacturing with free trade dogma
    2.Attack mining and agriculture with globull warming lysenkoism

    The Canberra pubes and their pals have been at this for over 30 years.

    Our pollies are not even clever enough to have thought of this idiocy themselves, they are simply followers of their counterparts overseas. The overseas pollies are not very smart either, they are trying to appease the rich people’s kids who joined the new Green Church and insist everyone else must too. Now what other religion is in favour of forced conversions?

  18. Linden

    Seems to me that if you are looking for a business opportunity, how about becoming an expert installer of domestic home diesel power generator to ensure power security during a predicted black out or even an Aus- Net planned outage, happens a lot in the area where our business is located. Speaking to a customer the other day who has recently built a new home; told me that when the power went of the day before she just went and flicked the switch for diesel generator and every thing was hunky-dory,power restored all systems go.
    The MSM news of summer time black outs will convince many to go and buy one of this generators and they will be looking a tradie to install it. I guess sale of these units will tell the story. May become the home owners must have item, or as the old saying goes ‘keeping up with the Jones’.

  19. miltonf

    The old 32V farm systems were interesting- gen set plus a battery of 16 x 2V lead acid cells. Seems to have been more efficient the charge up the battery in one hit rather than have the generator turning all the time.

  20. Frank Walker from National Tiles

  21. Linden

    I wonder if people will think more about their own private power generator systems, even to the point of getting ‘off the grid’. Yeah I remember those old farm power set ups. Obviously there are some very technically advanced products available, that are designed to cut in out as power fluctuates without warning. Maybe the house of the future will have all this stuff built into it. One thing for sure, if there is uncertainty or simply power costs will make people looks for options, ones not appreciated by the government. After all Governments now seek total control, they don’t like people being independent.

  22. Bruce

    “So here we are, watching a train wreck happen that didn’t need to happen.”

    “Spillage’! It is all ultimately about the “spillage” and to whom it flows.

  23. egg_

    As things stand, we merely run a huge wholesale quarrying operation for other nations and we egregiously enrich them by digging up our resources and bulk-shipping them overseas at a rate of cents-to-the-ton, and then eventually buying back those former raw materials as watches, mobile phones, TV’s, laptops, cars, consumer devices made almost totally from our bulk raw materials, at a net cost to us of millions and millions of dollars to the ton.

    We ship 50 tonnes of dirt to get a 1 tonne of goods in return.

  24. Tel

    That NBN is an enormously costly disaster was acknowledged even by NBN itself as it is now advertising subsidies for mobile phones to people who are sick and use monitoring devices to notify emergency services when they are needed. The idea is that these devices will switch over to mobile phones only in case of interruptions to NBN access.

    What are the chances that these devices will soon only be connected to mobile phones?

    Fixed fiber has some advantages: high bandwidth, low latency; and some disadvantages: expensive, not-mobile, can be broken by someone digging or damage to junction box, etc.

    The network profile of a monitoring device is a terrible fit for fiber technology: you want to be able to move around, and it only sends ultra-low bandwidth sensor data, latency is not so important but reliability is important. There never was any case at all for NBN as a solution for these devices. It’s completely the wrong design.

    You know what else? There are ALREADY a range of emergency devices available that do the job on purely the mobile network, such as fall alerts for older people, and these are totally based on the mobile network.

  25. Linden

    Yes technology has always been the driver of change will continue to do so. Questions is why are so many petrified of it. MSM fake news about nuclear energy is staggering, they refuse to even acknowledge modern technological advances of anything to do with ‘nuclear science’ and just portray it as the ‘Gernobyl bogyman’.

  26. Leo G

    The bulk of the population failed to grasp the inherent impossibility of constructing a nationwide network that sent a fibre-optic cable into every home.

    Conversely, the bulk of the population failed to appreciate the absurdity of building a nationwide optical fibre network using the inernet’s packet switching as a backbone, but with rib connections between ISP and premises using the circuit switching methods characteristic of 19th century telephony.
    They failed to make the obvious comparison with packet switch optimised cellular networks.

  27. Linden

    Tel that very thing happened to my very old mother stilling living at home alone and independent. Got NBN put on, just the phone does not anything mobile phones etc. It wend down the only way she could contact somebody was through her emergency alert thingy, those people took steps for someone go around and see what was happening with her. She had no communications for a couple of days.

  28. Linden

    Sorry there Tel couple of typos, could not contact anybody. Exactly as you described.

  29. Dr Fred Lenin

    We will need to impose heavy taxes on home generators ,this is anti Gaia heresy , burning liquid fuel to thwartour green agenda ,must be stopped ,punitive taxing will put a stop to that blasphemy .
    This summer when blackouts ,caused by fossil fuel occur ,we will build more wind generators and solar farms . If 5,000 wind generstors dont supply any power on calm says ,build 10,000 more ,problem solved .
    As for NBN ,it will be a great moneymaker as tourists come to see what internet supply was in ancient times . . This plan will create over two green jobs .
    ( The soros World Domination Institoot )

  30. Fixed fiber has some advantages: high bandwidth, low latency; …

    NOT in my neighbourhood!

    4G Mobile is lower latency and roughly twice the speed (actual) of a top tier residential NBN connection.

  31. Tel

    Linden #3156030, have you got a recommendation of a good brand to buy? I mean, regarding the emergency alert thingy. I like the concept, but not sure which one is good. I presume you subscribe to a complete service, where they have a central office and people available to travel. Like road service for old people … is that it?

    I’m really nervous about knowing who to trust in that game. Potentially they could be very helpful, but they are sitting on a database of information about highly vulnerable people which would be a huge temptation for misuse. How would you know if someone quietly sold the client database on the darknet somewhere?

  32. Frank Walker from National Tiles

    4G Mobile is lower latency and roughly twice the speed (actual) of a top tier residential NBN connection.

    Yeah I’ve never really had connection problems watching podcasts on a 4G phone.

    When 5G comes out everywhere, the NBN will be a sad joke.

  33. Harry Schilling

    Go Australia! Here’s a different thought. This crap started with Howard’s Liberal Party when it decided to make the public service “business centers” and “profit centers” and hold the departments “accountable”. They never were “accountable” in any shape or form. Oh! They had divisional budgets, but the budgets didn’t mean much. What happens when a public service department becomes “unprofitable”? Nothing!!! It just gets more money and maybe a change in the top seat, of which that person can’t be sacked anyway; just reposted. The public service started to run the government and both parties let it happen. The public service started competing with private industry and because there was an unlimited pot of money, private industry couldn’t compete. Then the public servants, convinced of their own brilliance at being able to make a “profit” determined that any legislation coming out of Canberra was a good thing…like RET’s, renewable subsidies, green policies, etc., and to hell with the private battler.
    Good luck with the blackouts. Highly deserved. I hope the first places blacked out are the suburbs of Red Hill and Manika in Canberra and I hope they’re down for days, followed shortly by every capital city.

  34. Leo G

    When 5G comes out everywhere, the NBN will be a sad joke.

    5G (to the extent that it uses mm band wireless to the premises) provides the fibre to the street node system that the NBN should have been.

  35. egg_

    We will need to impose heavy taxes on home generators

    Smart meters will dob you in?

  36. We will need to impose heavy taxes on home generators

    I wonder if you can still buy a 19th century steam engine?
    I could fire it up with coal instead of wood!

    I don’t know if they can used to make electricity but they look great!

  37. mem

    Tel
    #3156047, posted on September 15, 2019 at 9:48 am

    Linden #3156030, have you got a recommendation of a good brand to buy? I mean, regarding the emergency alert thingy. I like the concept, but not sure which one is good. I presume you subscribe to a complete service, where they have a central office and people available to travel. Like road service for old people … is that it?

    Tel there are a number of options to consider
    1. If you have a medical condition you can get your doctor to sign a statement then you can register with your Telco provider as a priority customer which means that you can get them to deliver a temporary mobile phone that operates just like a normal phone and uses your current number during prolonged outages. It also means you get reconnected quicker.
    2 My 94 year old neighbour is linked into a service with a button thingy that you press every morning. If you don’t press then people (three contacts) you have nominated and trust and are local are phoned. The contact then goes to the home where there is an installed key lock to which they have been given a code to use to enter the premises and check on the person. (I could get the name of this service if you wanted).
    3. Red Cross in Victoria has a volunteer 7 day a week telephone call service to frail and living alone people. (I just recently completed five years as a volunteer so I know how good it is) If the person doesn’t respond then there are several vetted contacts to ring. If no one able to rouse then police are called to check. This service also acts as a telephone support service and over time callers get to know whether someone needs a bit of a chat and a cheer-up. The service is free but you need doctor’s referral. It may operate in other states but not sure about this.

  38. RobK

    Smart meters will dob you in?
    Probably. I often wonder how long it will be before google Maps and Tomtom will be used to issue speeding tickets and other traffic infringements.

  39. Roger

    Lets see if the geniuses who got us into this pickle can find a way to get us out of it.

    Still apt, because our leaders never fail to live up to it:

    Australia is a lucky country run mainly by second rate people who share its luck. It lives on other people’s ideas, and, although its ordinary people are adaptable, most of its leaders (in all fields) so lack curiosity about the events that surround them that they are often taken by surprise.

    Donald Horne, The Lucky Country, 1964.

  40. Roger

    When 5G comes out everywhere, the NBN will be a sad joke.

    Maladroit Blight Trumble Esquire’s legacy.

  41. Leo G

    Why worry about the choke point?

    We are soooo lucky to have the same kind of geniuses planning the distribution of population in our cities, and who in their incomprehensible wisdom promote the distributed system of very high density high-rise enclaves- feeding congestion hotspots into the same transport system that coincidently suffers from the failure of planners to understand that congestion increases in proportion to the product of journey distance and trip frequency (ie population).
    Perhaps it is time that we also start a program of selective choking.

  42. Fat Tony

    The use of generators in residential areas will be subject to Local Council noise restrictions.

    Check them out – in Qld:

    7.00am to 7.oopm max 5 dBA above background noise
    7.00pm to 10.00pm max 3 dBA above background noise
    10.00pm to 7.00am no noise heard.

    It will have to be a vewy qwiet generator……

  43. shady

    The way they’ll get us out of a pickle is to ration supply and call it saving.

  44. Linden

    Tel, sorry I don’t know which one or what business company she uses, had it for a long time now, and they are very good. Best I can do is ask her when I speak next and I’ll let you know. Point is here, they are telling folks like her to get a mobile phone, another phone bill more crap and of course they would want direct debit billing etc and on it goes. Mum is a product of the great depression, does not waste anything, re knits old jumpers into socks and stuff like that. She would rather spend her time doing that than trying to work out how to make a mobile work and it would probably havoc with her hearing aids in any case.

  45. Linden

    There was a very interesting article in the Australian newspaper at least 5 to 6 yrs ago authored by a US editor of an IT Magazine saying exactly that, and he went on to explain how and why. The young ones are into the portability of the wireless technology and could not give a stuff about NBN fixed line PC and so on. He also said by the time they finish it, it will be more or less obsolete; it won’t take long to see if he is right I guess.

  46. egg_

    miltonf
    #3155981, posted on September 15, 2019 at 8:50 am

    Uncle’s farmhouse was 32V battery til the ’60s – my mum recalled that the electric clothes iron and even an electric frypan were battery powered.

  47. Entropy

    We got our old man an Apple Watch series 4 with fall detection. A lot of those other systems are expensive, require someone to push a button, or work on scheduled non response. The watch detects a fall, and if the wearer doesn’t press the watch if a fall alert is triggered, after a minute it alerts the emergency services and next of kin. If it is an LTE version, you don’t need the iPhone in Bluetooth or wireless range, otherwise the iPhone needs to be in range, which tbh is usually the case.

    It definitely works, and it doesn’t need the NBN or expensive plans beyond what you have anyway with the mobile phone. The only neg is the old man is still fairly active and a false positive can occur if, for example he is shovelling with his left hand.

  48. Entropy

    I looked into a lithium/ solar system big enough to be off grid. For our 20kwh average day house it was about $50k because you need to cover poor generation days, especially anywhere near the coast. A smaller system with diesel generator backup is cheaper. Just run for an hour to top up the batteries.

  49. Entropy

    Linden, you get hearing aids that can be controlled by your phone. Absolutely brilliant and so beneficial even people not comfortable with tech learn to use it.
    You can set it up differently according to geolocation for them too. Eg in their church set up to auto connect to TTY, a setting for their local shopping centre, restaurants a setting for watching tv ( even linking to the TV, etc.

  50. John Constantine

    Activists almost have ‘too much information’

    Ben Pennings from Galilee Blockade said they now had almost “too much information” from insiders after their “dob in a contractor” campaign.

    “They’re telling us about which companies are bidding for Adani work, they’re telling us about Adani sites, but they’re also telling us really sensitive stuff which, for want of a better word, is ‘where the bodies are buried’,” he said.

    “We’re getting information about industrial sites, how companies can be affected, what their favourite sponsorships are, about their venues, what their brands are that they care about, where they’re most easily convinced.

    “Any company siding with Adani is taking massive risks with regards to their brand and reputation and maybe even their profits.”

    ‘Activists will stop at nothing to destroy jobs’

    QRC chief Ian Macfarlane said the industry had seen “nothing as concentrated and as organised” as the current campaign against would-be Adani contractors.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-15/adani-contractor-staffer-leaking-to-environmental-protesters/11511410

    A worker at a company bidding for an Adani contract has told the ABC she is leaking inside information to environmental activists so they can target her employer.

    Sue*, a long-time mining services industry worker who has asked to remain anonymous, said she was willing to risk her career for “the opportunity to provide information that could help to stop the [Carmichael] mine proceeding”.

    “I saw it as an opportunity to do something that might help, something proactive, because as somebody with concerns about these sorts of things, you can find yourself feeling powerless,” Sue said.

    “So when you come across something that you see you can contribute, you jump on board.”

    Hysterical quota diversity hire with political psychosis sabotages her employer, because it makes her feel special.

    Comrades.

  51. mem

    Let’s see if the ABC journalists has more integrity than the leaker towards her employer otherwise she might find herself banged up for industrial espionage.

  52. Rockdoctor

    Fat Tony

    Bloody ‘ell. That’s an eye opener. Didn’t realised it existed. Good luck enforcing in NQ or FNQ. After Cyclones gensets are quite a common noise, had to have mine going between 8am & 8pm this year for the week we lost power earlier in the year.

  53. yackman

    Article in the Oz this weekend quotes a number of eight Snowy 2’s (2,000 MW?) are required to utilise the excess generation anticipated during the day from planned solar. ie. 16,000 MW if I understand correctly. This assumes that the “choke points” are removed by transmission solutions and of course that water is available for pumped storage. Given the additional capital investment required costs must increase as a result.

  54. Old School Conservative

    Linden
    #3156129, posted on September 15, 2019 at 11:39 am
    He also said by the time they finish it, it will be more or less obsolete;

    There is actually a time frame for the NBN rollout to be finished?
    Wow.

  55. yackman

    Re Gensets; a 13 HP Honda unit is seriously loud and has been used when power was out for 3 plus days but not in an urban area.

  56. Fat Tony

    Gen sets through the day prob be ok – as long the laws are not enforced.

    The night rule – if it can be heard, you’re fukt.

    The rules are there – waiting to be enforced.

    And don’t forget – the ones who don’t have a gen set will be complaining about the noise of those who do

  57. Snoopy

    A smaller system with diesel generator backup is cheaper. Just run for an hour to top up the batteries.

    Yes, and the genset size can easily be matched to the more constant load.

  58. Dr Fred Lenin

    Dont even think about urban home generators ,waste of money , The authorities cant let them happen ,they will affect Australias image amongst globalist green fascists ,and draw public attention to the deficiencies they have created by their slavish copying of overseas wankers theories . They will bring in draconian noise level regulation , air polution from the small motors burning fossil fuel and public shaming for not suffering like the rest from the coal fired inefficiency and breakdowns .( stopping generating for
    servicing ) . The polliemaggots will persist with this insanity untill the voters threaten their illustrious careers by voting against them , globalism can be defeated at the ballot box ,and socialist cronyism by the removal of taxpayers money from them ,without other peoples money they oerish .

  59. Bruce

    How “clever” is it to replace separate phone and data (and “Cable TV) services with a unitary system?

    ZERO backup during “emergencies.

    How much MORE ludicrous to rely on standard household mains services to power up the new “magic box” that now delivers” these services,?

    Who will get the contract to “salvage’ the copper phone network cabling?

    When fires and floods wipe out wireless repeater towers, what are you going to do: send “Lassie” (or Skippy) for help?

    This whole rock-show reeks of “constructive dependency”.

    2-way radio? That will be next on the “hit-list”; more great chunks of the spectrum sold to the highest bidder.

  60. Nob

    Frank Walker from National Tiles
    #3156059, posted on September 15, 2019 at 10:13 am
    4G Mobile is lower latency and roughly twice the speed (actual) of a top tier residential NBN connection.

    Yeah I’ve never really had connection problems watching podcasts on a 4G phone.

    When 5G comes out everywhere, the NBN will be a sad joke

    Possibly but I was talking to a CityFibre guy in the UK and he said the 5g towers will need to be on a fibre network to run at full capacity without buffering etc restraints.

    They’re laying fibre in selected UK towns and cities, with connections at every residential and business doorway/gate. Then it’s up to the premises whether they want to connect.

    https://www.cityfibre.com/gigabit-cities/

    I couldn’t really see the point as existing “FTTC” (fibre to the cabinet, then copper to the house) in the UK is good enough for most small businesses’and residents’ current needs. He said the next generation of internet use will really use the new capacity. I’m still none the wiser but they’ve invested, or at least borrowed and spent, billions on this project.

    One thing Australians would really notice is the speed at which their many small teams work.
    They descend on a residential street block, set up barriers, dig trench, lay cables and connectors etc, test, restore pavements and footpaths and move on within a week. All very professional.

    The crews told me the local councils like to boast about becoming a “gigabit city” but the everyday low-level harassment they get from council officials is unbelievable. Fines every day if a barrier or cone is out of place.

  61. RobK

    This is some of the sloppiest analysis I’ve seen. It assumes subsidies as a given along with enabling infrastructure. The trouble is people swallow it.

    Fine.
    They can learn the hard way, or the other hard way.

  62. Fat Tony:

    The rules are there – waiting to be enforced.

    And don’t forget – the ones who don’t have a gen set will be complaining about the noise of those who do

    I’ve already organised my two neighbours for a fridge at my place and a lead to both houses for lights etc.
    I can run two power boards from the genset and each neighbour will drop a small beer fridge at my place.

  63. Eyrie

    Fat Tony, no probs with noise in Toowoomba. Enough barking dogs everywhere that the council doesn’t want to do anything about. High background noise even at night.

  64. Eyrie

    Genset, batteries, inverter. You don’t need 32 volt system or other antique tech. Charge batteries during day from genset or solar if available, off at night. Maybe a couple of hours of TV and otherwise your only load at night is fridge/freezer. Should be quite doable as the load is predictable and only for 12 hours and only if the solar is unavailable do you run the genset during the day.
    Now, how to convince the usual mains connected solar inverter that it is still connected to the grid. I’m thinking a small battery powered sine wave inverter connected to its usual mains input.

  65. egg_

    Eyrie
    #3156572, posted on September 16, 2019 at 7:28 am

    Probably the setup that Di Natale is running – in preparation for Climageddon.

  66. yarpos

    “When 5G comes out everywhere, the NBN will be a sad joke.”

    only if everywhere actually means cities and large centres. 5G is accelerating up the hype curve and many realities have yet to dawn.

  67. yarpos

    “Genset, batteries, inverter. You don’t need 32 volt system or other antique tech. Charge batteries during day from genset or solar if available, off at night. Maybe a couple of hours of TV and otherwise your only load at night is fridge/freezer. Should be quite doable as the load is predictable and only for 12 hours and only if the solar is unavailable do you run the genset during the day.
    Now, how to convince the usual mains connected solar inverter that it is still connected to the grid. I’m thinking a small battery powered sine wave inverter connected to its usual mains input.”

    Great for tech hobbyists but pretty irrelevant for the general community who have $ to burn, and few skills or comfort with this stuff and just want some back up. Its pretty simple and affordable to get your house wired for manual changeover to a generator and we have found a 3.5kVA gen will keep AC, fridge, lights and fans running for the times the grid goes away. We have outages about 2-3 times a year and I expect that will only get worse and wider scale once the joys of increasing unreliables gets overlayed.

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