The Price of Policy

Nassim Taleb speaks and writes about Skin in the Game – when those that make decisions are immune from the downside of those decisions.

For a perfect case-study, have a read of this very sad article in National Review – California’s Ban on School Suspensions Invites Another ParklandParkland being a school shooting that occurred in February 2018.

TAFKAS does not want to start a conversation around guns policies; a conversation about social justice policy is more pertinent.  Here are some snippets, but please do read for Catself.

The Parkland shooter was a known-wolf. Before the massacre was over, students knew who did it. He was considered so dangerous when he attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that school administrators banned him from bringing a backpack and frisked him every day for fear that he’d bring a deadly weapon.

But the Broward County school district had embarked on a quest to fight the “school-to-prison pipeline” by lowering suspensions, expulsions, and arrests. And school principals responded by systematically sweeping disturbing behavior under the rug. If one individual in the Broward school district made one responsible decision about the killer, the tragedy could have been averted. But you can’t even call what happened a “failure,” because each obviously irresponsible decision makes perfect sense given the policies.

and

Anti-discipline advocates claim that they are fighting the “school-to-prison pipeline.” In reality, their policies increase the flow. The idea that not holding kids accountable for their actions will make them more law-abiding as adults is idiotic. If we tell juveniles there are no consequences for misbehavior, we set them up for failure in the workplace. And we put them at risk for a hard reckoning when they find that behavior that didn’t even get them suspended in school gets them a felony charge when they hit age 18.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to The Price of Policy

  1. stackja

    How much misbehavior is tolerated? Sydney suburbs seem the same.

  2. feelthebern

    Considering the data collections by state, federal agencies, social media, schools, I am surprised there isn’t enough data to pinpoint who the at risk youth are.
    In my opinion, all the above know, but do nothing about it.

  3. Bruce of Newcastle

    And we put them at risk for a hard reckoning when they find that behavior that didn’t even get them suspended in school gets them a felony charge when they hit age 18.

    Straight out of Starship Troopers.
    Heinlein knew about the wokerati even before they were invented.

  4. Tim Neilson

    And we put them at risk for a hard reckoning when they find that behavior that didn’t even get them suspended in school gets them a felony charge when they hit age 18.

    That will be solved by “progressive” judges deciding that that “hard reckoning” would thus be unfair so they should be let off completely.

  5. FelixKruell

    Taking away the only real leverage schools have against violent or serially misbehaving students and their parents – great idea.

  6. Fisky

    Banning school suspensions was one of the really dumb Obama-era policies that encapsulated that Age of Stupid perfectly.

  7. max

    Teaching that children education is government responsibility.
    Teaching; No Heaven and Hell only “Reason”
    Teaching; No Right or wrong
    Teaching; No self responsibility
    Killing people around world in undeclared wars
    Waging war on drugs
    Teaching that “Thou shalt not steal, except by majority vote.” Is Ok.

  8. Karabar

    The Age of Stupid could be called the Age of Unexpected Consequences.
    Or is it unexpected?
    If a plan is being executed to destroy civilisation, then this is a part of it.

  9. TAFKAS:

    But the Broward County school district had embarked on a quest to fight the “school-to-prison pipeline” by lowering suspensions, expulsions, and arrests. And school principals responded by systematically sweeping disturbing behavior under the rug.

    That sounds disturbingly like the solution McNamara used to deal with the drugs in the US Army in SE Asia.
    And I suspect it will be as effective.

  10. pbw:

    The price of follicy.

    One for the Catictionary, and I’m stealing it.

  11. Thefrollickingmole

    It’s deliberate.
    How do you think school testing is looking with this going on.
    Far less racial/social disparity if everyone is shit.

  12. Faye

    I think I read back when it happened that if a school records low misdemeanors that that school receives more government money.

  13. Megan

    Only pain and/or consequences can change behaviour in my long experience, including in classrooms. In Victoriastan there are not even consequences happening once your’re out of school and and in court.

  14. Megan:
    Issue teachers with cattle prods.
    The surly bastards will sit up and take notice.

  15. classical_hero

    Spare the rod, spoil the child.

  16. Megan

    Issue teachers with cattle prods

    When I started in the classroom, roughly 40 kids per class, we were still allowed to smack the naughty ones. Never had to do it much but also never had problems with discipline either.
    A cattle prod would be minimum issue these days, I’m sure.

  17. John A

    Faye #3159840, posted on September 19, 2019 at 6:10 pm

    I think I read back when it happened that if a school records low misdemeanors that that school receives more government money.

    Sounds plausible as part of the policy mix to achieve the manufactured outcome.

    Just like the policy mix created by the Clinton Administration, presented to the US banking system to “incentivise” them to lower their lending standards, so people with dubious ability to repay could buy homes, later to default when the loans ceased to be concessional and they had to pay up, all of which led to the so-called GFC in 2008.

  18. Yohan

    Its worse than what this post says. The Obama administration started tying school funding programs directly to the reductions in police disciplinary actions.

    So schools had a financial incentive to not report students behavior that could result in expulsions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.