Open Forum: September 21, 2019

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2,427 Responses to Open Forum: September 21, 2019

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  1. Rex Mango

    ABC Media watch directing salvo at local ABC Coffs Coast for banning Jacinta Price.

  2. Lazlo

    I would find any show about the funeral industry dull, unattractive and unenticing. Just my choice, silly of me, I know.

  3. Rex Mango

    Jippos used the wheel to build the pyramids, as that is how they got the dimensions as a function of pie (can’t remember the symbol).

  4. Arky

    humans were already casting metal alloys, constructing canals and sailboats, and even designing complex musical instruments such as harps.

    ..
    Only to get away from their missuses though.

  5. Rex Mango

    Media Watch really don’t like Paul Murray’s exclusive interview with Trump.

  6. JC

    I would assume the wheel was invented by more than one group of “initial people” so it’s non-invention in Australia implies a lack of creativity.

    Why would you assume that without evidence? Why not assume that one group came up with the idea which then spread out to the rest of the crew?

    Since the wheel led to many improvements in societies which had them, indigenous Australians were worse off without it.

    Isolation can be a shitty thing. But it also has its advantages in some ways.

    Having said that, aboriginals before the whites were a very wealthy group of people. Ultimately wealth was always be taken back to land (until very recently). Hunter gathers groupings are essentially very wealthy because to ply their trade across a very large area of land. Land to people ratio is very high.

    When the first white settlement occurred here, the diet of an aboriginal was much superior to the average diet of Brit. That’s according to Fatal Shore from what I recall. Think about that.

  7. Lazlo

    Hmm I would be careful taking Hughes’ (Trumble’s maternal Uncle) claims at face value.

  8. Lazlo

    The status of women here in 1788 was also a bit sub-optimal.

  9. max

    Big beat up and no doubt won’t cause the reaction that expose on live sheep transport would.

    The interview with the bolshie undertaker was hilarious. He just denied everything and marched off in high dudgeon, but then couldn’t leave it alone and kept arguing from the next room . The program is definitely worth watching for that alone.

  10. jupes

    Thinking about the current global climate lunacy; how utterly fucking stupid does the SFL’s decision to jump on to the global warming bandwagon look now?

    While the world works itself up into a suicidal “climate emergency” frenzy, the Moronic Fucking Liberals (MFLs) are offering policies that please no one and are disastrous for the economy. The left hate them because they won’t implement 100% ruinables (except for the NSW MFLs of course who are keen for it) and the rational people hate them for wasting billions of taxpayer dollars to achieve nothing but signal their virtue.

    On Outsiders on Sunday, Craig Kelly was asked twice by Rita and once by Latho about the MFL’s policies and Scott Morrison blaming CO2 for the drought, and he just avoided the question by answering his own imaginary question banging on about “lefties”. It was embarrassing.

    How smart would it be for the government to call bullshit on the whole stupid scam. Electricity would be cheap and reliable, the economy would grow and they could deliver a real budget surplus and hopefully make meaningful tax cuts. Instead the idiots want to meet their stupid ‘Paris targets”.

    Too. Stupid. To. Survive.

  11. JC

    Old School

    Frank’s link agrees with me. The wheel was likely invented once and it was so incredible that it was quickly adopted by whomever saw it.

    The success of the whole structure was extremely sensitive to the size of the axle. A thick axle would generate too much friction, while narrow one would reduce friction but would also be too weak to support a load. “They solved this problem by making the earliest wagons quite narrow, so they could have short axles, which made it possible to have an axle that wasn’t very thick,” Anthony told Life’s Little Mysteries.

    The sensitivity of the wheel-and-axle system to all these factors meant that it could not have been developed in phases, he said. It was an all-or-nothing structure.

    Whoever invented it must have had access to wide slabs of wood from thick-trunked trees in order to carve large, round wheels. They also needed metal tools to chisel fine-fitted holes and axles. And they must have had a need for hauling heavy burdens over land. According to Anthony, “It was the carpentry that probably delayed the invention until 3500 B.C. or so, because it was only after about 4000 B.C. that cast copper chisels and gouges became common in the Near East.”

    The invention of the wheel was so challenging that it probably happened only once, in one place. However, from that place, it seems to have spread so rapidly across Eurasia and the Middle East that experts cannot say for sure where it originated. The earliest images of wheeled carts have been excavated in Poland and elsewhere in the Eurasian steppes, and this region is overtaking Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq) as the wheel’s most likely birthplace. According to Asko Parpola, an Indologist at the University of Helsinki in Finland, there are linguistic reasons to believe the wheel originated with the Tripolye people of modern-day Ukraine. That is, the words associated with wheels and wagons derive from the language of that culture.

    And

    The invention of the wheel was so challenging that it probably happened only once, in one place.

  12. JC

    Thinking about the current global climate lunacy;

    It had mellowed down to the point where there was only one Gerbil Warming question on Q&A. Now, there’s what.. 30?

    What caused the most recent hysteria?

  13. Old School Conservative

    Why not assume that one group came up with the idea which then spread out to the rest of the crew?

    Went looking for an answer to your question.
    I found on the “Ancient Origins” web site that some researchers agree with you (“Some have suggested that due to the immense challenge that the invention of the wheel posed to mankind, it probably happened only once, and spread from its place of origin to other parts of the world.”) and some think differently (“others believe it developed independently in separate parts of the world at around the same time – Ljubljana, Mesopotamia, and the Eurasian steppes”).
    It’s complicated, as they say in the classics.

  14. Arky

    How smart would it be for the government to call bullshit on the whole stupid scam.

    ..
    No they should declare it an existential problem, promote the lie that we only have [pull random number out of arse] years to live, and the only viable solution is nuclear energy. Sign contracts before next election. Make the bomb at the same time.

  15. JC

    Went looking for an answer to your question.

    it’s actually an incredible invention. There will be wheels taken to the stars when we get around to figuring how we get there.

  16. Lazlo

    All trial and error, all bottom up, that’s how we evolve, not top down regulation.

  17. Rex Mango

    Jupes agree. Global warming is a religion. Once someone says they believe in such and such a god, then they are gone. The Libs by signing up to this madness can’t extract themselves. Just watching Insiders where Fran Kelly is giving Mark Butler a hard time about how much we are heating the planet (replace that with angels dancing on pins and it would be just as scientific), it is so moronic.

  18. Old School Conservative

    Snap JC.
    Busy searching and typing therefore duplicated posts.

  19. JC

    How smart would it be for the government to call bullshit on the whole stupid scam.

    I think it’s a done deal. The fight is a losing battle. There’s only one man standing in the way and he’s in his 70s occupying the White House.

  20. JC

    No biggie old school. it’s a very interesting part of human history.

  21. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Much career-building committee work in academia and in and around the public sector, especially if you are female and even more so if you are a Dean or VC, is not too hard to come by. People who are not just marking time avoid as much of it as possible.

    I’ll freely admit that as an academic I was just marking time. I am far too much of a maverick to make a good academic. Hence, I have a ‘committee’ CV as long as your arm and then some. Sad. I’ve wasted so much of my life on such nonsenses, and I can certainly recognise them in someone else. I know well the sort of women who flourish in such settings and push their way forward. It seemed to me, watcher on the sidelines, that they quite often had far more ambition than intellect.

    I’ve watched many times as such women, strident with feminist entitlement but bringing no substantive achievement to an appointment, proceed into Chancelleries to make some very bad decisions, driven as much by an unwarranted pride as held back by narrowness of vision. And always, as with some of the Chancellery men too, an overweening vanity of persona. I think with the Ridd situation we have a clear case in point.

    Mostly I wilted with the tedium of it all rather than flourishing profitably from the possibilities emergent, occupying myself instead with home and children. Even so, I became a Departmental Head without really trying. Heigh ho. 🙂

  22. Rex Mango

    Thing that strikes me about Insiders is Fran Kelly, Nikki Sava and PVO are seated infront of big panoramic view of Melbourne with centre being St Patrick’s Cathedral. Now all three of those people would consider Pell guilty as sin. Yet none seem to mind being filmed with the sight of his heinous crimes framing them.

  23. Hazmatic

    The problem with Dapin…

    Dr Dapin, for a Doctor he is, has little first-hand knowledge of Australian society during the 1960’s. Not because he turned 7 in 1970 and because he was a pom who only came to Australia in 1989. He was first employed as a subby for ‘Penthouse’ and went on to edit ‘Ralph’ magazines. Writing for ‘lads magazines’ is not necessarily a problem when it comes to writing Military History either. In fact, his journalistic skills are excellent.

    Particularly his commercial instincts.

    He has honed his writing skills to a fine art. He is a great storyteller. I can well and truly see Mark Dapin knocking Pete Fitzsimmons off the top of the tree in the “Christmas stocking filler Mil. Hist. Blockbuster” caper. Dapin also has a far more authentic Australian voice than Fitzsimmons.

    As Dr Dapin explains in first chapter of his latest book ‘The Myths I helped make’. His first encounter with Vietnam Veterans was the Vietnam Veteran Motorcycle Club in Kingston Qld in 2007. There “Mutha”, “Headhunter”, “Padre” and “Huck” regaled Dapin with all kinds of stories. Now for all their good work in advocacy and fundraising, it is still fair to suggest that the VVMC are not a representative sample of Vietnam Veterans. In the same way that the group of Vietnam Veterans who rose to become Queensland Governor or Governor General a group that includes Peter Arnison, Peter Cosgrove, Michael Jeffrey (curiously the current QLD Governor Paul De Jersey could have been liable for Vietnam service but took the CMF route instead…) represent the opposite spectrum of an equally unrepresentative sample. In language that the PhD student will understand, if you asked Paul De Jersey for a primary source, he’s probably not going to say tomato. Both these groups are ‘outriders’.

    If a myth is defined as widely held but false belief or idea. The idea that “every Nasho who served in Vietnam was a volunteer” is not a myth at all, it is merely a misapprehension. Dapin admits as much his chapter titled, ‘The Myths I helped make’. Dapin just made it up. And that’s the problem with Dapin.

    The official position from The National Servicemen’s Association of Australia from at least 2005 was that
    “Most units gave National Servicemen the choice of active service and most volunteered. Of them, two died in Borneo and 210 in Vietnam. They included six who enlisted upon call-up or re-enlisted and three voluntary National Servicemen. The casualty rate amongst National Servicemen was lower than amongst enlisted regulars.”

    Ironically, ‘The National Servicemen’s Association of Australia,’ was formed in Toowoomba in 1987. Their official position then and now is MOST not EVERY. Perhaps Dapin might have avoided the misapprehension simply by visiting their website?

    “The Nashos who arrived in Vietnam mostly either wanted or accepted their posting. The Australian Army recognised the menace for their men in having to serve with unwilling or disaffected soldiers and was able, because so many nashos wanted to go to Vietnam, to post reluctant soldiers to units in Australia.” (MacGibbon.) The Army had that luxury because only 1/3rd of the total National Servicemen conscripted ever served in Vietnam. The Army had a huge pool to choose from. The data from the AAWFA and Dapin’s own research confirm this.

    The RSM of 7RAR was a fine soldier, Reg Bandy. If anyone had the bottle to front him to plead their reluctance, he would have left them behind. He had choices. Spoiled for choice.

  24. Rex Mango

    The way Insiders has St Patrick’s framed in such a prominent position is almost like a subliminal boast by the ABC of ‘Yeah we got ole George big time didn’t we!’

  25. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Invention of the wheel? Plenty of scope for independent invention. Just chop up a log and watch it roll. It’s how Stonehenge was built, although pulley systems also helped.

  26. Oh come on

    Trump’s demeanour when talking about Australia seems measured, even calculated. I don’t think there’s much warmth there despite Morrison’s waffle about mateship and mates. We’re a pawn.

    No this is silly. Let’s not get into armchair psychology. From a diplomatic perspective, the Yanks (led by Trump) went out of their way to flatter the Australians. That is no small thing. The fact that Morro has been temporarily invited into Trump’s unconventional orbit – that is no small thing, either.

    Which clever clogs said that nations don’t have friends, only interests? I could look it up, but who cares – it’s true, whoever said it. To use a financial metaphor; the respective credit scores of Australia and the US are considered by the other to be very high. That underlying trust takes many, many, many decades of working closely together for both consider it a functional and symbiotic relationship. This relationship sometimes has to be nourished with visits that involve a triple serving of mutual appreciation and back-slapping. It’s just part of the deal.

  27. JC

    The Oz has a daily quiz. I try to do the quiz and the quick crossword to keep the old noggin active.

    But FMD, the daily quiz is crap. A quiz should be something where there’s a reasonable chance of getting right answers.

    How the fuck would know this though.

    The inaugural season of the World Rally Championship was held during which decade?

    How many games did the Gold Coast Suns win during the 2019 AFL season?

    Those are some of the questions

  28. JC

    These

    Which one of these Big Bash League teams wears a magenta uniform?

    Simon Helberg is one of the main stars in which TV series?

  29. Arky

    Just chop up a log and watch it roll.

    ..
    Good point, PT.
    It probably wasn’t a one off invention, as such, but an evolution of rollers.

  30. Rex Mango

    Have spoken to and worked with lots of Vietnam veterans and make it a point of quizzing them about conscription. They always told me they were given a choice. When speaking to those that didn’t go and you tell them this, they become very angry, which tells me something.

  31. JC

    It probably wasn’t a one off invention, as such, but an evolution of rollers.

    You need an axle and it has to be stable. You ought to know this as you’re rebuilding an old car. FFS. Smarten up. 🙂

    Where’s arma when you need him? You’d get a tongue lashing from him over this.

  32. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    JC an axle is just a stick. Not too hard.

  33. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I gotta get to bed.

  34. Steve trickler

    Akira! ( :



    2020. Back to the Future had its moment.

  35. Arky

    An axle is just a roller with a bearing surface: ie – shoved into a hole.
    I don’t give the guy much credit for inventing the hole.

  36. Arky

    Hey, what did you invent?
    I invented the hole you shove the roller in to stop it going out the back of the thing you are moving.
    Big deal.

  37. jupes

    How many games did the Gold Coast Suns win during the 2019 AFL season?

    Three.

    I know because I had $10 on them at 5000 to 1 for the premiership. They won three out of their first four games then lost all the rest.

  38. JC

    An axle is just a roller with a bearing surface: ie – shoved into a hole.
    I don’t give the guy much credit for inventing the hole.

    The axle is what gives utility to the wheel, you oaf. Without the axle there’s no real use for a wheel – at least of the sort used to transport.

  39. JC

    I know because I had $10 on them at 5000 to 1 for the premiership. They won three out of their first four games then lost all the rest.

    Lol.

  40. jupes

    Rex stop trying to raise the succubus.

  41. As for inventing the wheel. Were they going to use wheel to hook it up to donkeys and kangaroos? You really are a fucking moron, Ronery. A compete and utter dickhead.

    Erm, there weren’t any Donkeys in Australia for about a hundred years after 1788, never mind before.
    #fakenews on Donkeys in Aboriginal Australia comment brought to you by the “New York Times.”

  42. Snoopy

    Ms Harriet Climate-Striker flew to NYC. Right?

    Has there ever been so many fucked up children? You shouldn’t blame Boomers for this. But you will.

  43. JC

    Hey, what did you invent?
    I invented the hole you shove the roller in to stop it going out the back of the thing you are moving.
    Big deal.

    I was nine (ish). I saw my dad trying to do up a screw and it kept falling because there was a space between the screw hole and limited by not being able to hold it with the other hand to keep it in place. So I suggested he get a piece of tin, wind it into a cylinder, put the screw in, then place it over the hole and screw it up. It fucking worked. Sheer genius. I should have been a mechanical engineer. One of the great ones.

  44. JC

    Erm, there weren’t any Donkeys in Australia for about a hundred years after 1788,

    Yes we know, dickface. It was meant as a joke. Now go pour drinks you mirthless loser.

  45. Arky

    I am always amazed at how right I am about almost everything, while others have to do years of research to discover what is just obvious to me

    ..
    The wheel may have been the most important of all human inventions, but there has never been agreement on how this momentous discovery came about.

    A new analysis concludes that the first real wheel was developed as a result of frustrating, slow and laborious efforts to move cargoladen platforms by using what might be called the father of the wheel – the roller.

    The teamsters of old who used rollers for such heavy transport had to carry them repeatedly from back to front as their ”truck” moved forward. Thus, it is proposed, the next innovation was to set the rollers in notches. The fixed rollers, at the front and rear ends of the platform, then evolved into axles with enlarged ends. At that point, there it was: the four-wheeled vehicle.

    This analysis, which appears in the March issue of La Recherche, a French counterpart of Scientific American, is in opposition to the belief that the first carts were two-wheeled ancestors of the chariot.

  46. Arky

    So no one invented the wheel.
    They had rollers, some lazy sod cut notches in the thing they were moving, and put some mammoth grease in them, then later some other dude made the ends of the rollers fatter.
    Voila! The wheel.

  47. Nob

    JC
    #3165496, posted on September 23, 2019 at 11:47 pm
    Thinking about the current global climate lunacy;

    It had mellowed down to the point where there was only one Gerbil Warming question on Q&A. Now, there’s what.. 30?

    What caused the most recent hysteria?

    Good question.

    It’s like they’re all having their period at once.

    Synchronised.

  48. Leigh Lowe

    Earlier, in relation to Thomas Cook, there was a suggestion that low-cost carriers were cutting Thomas Cook’s lawn.
    They are not just low cost, they are gougers who work on the “base line, plus, plus, plus” model.
    Recently we flew with Volotea which is based in Barthelona. We had little choice because both ends of the trip were relatively minor airports.
    Booked months ago, got baggage allocation for 20 kgs (over 15 kg is extra) booked seats and printed boarding passes.
    They fucking bombard you with emails for days beforehand offering you priority boarding (ie extra hand luggage), seat upgrades, whatever, at a price.
    Then, two days out, I get a notification that my seat allocation had changed. I look it up. Mrs L still in row 5, but I am moved to row 15.
    Would you like to sit with your partner? That will be 10 Euro please. So I pay up to secure the vacant seat next to me for Mrs L.
    Why not simply move both of us? Well, they don’t make 10 Euro that way.
    So I run around getting hotel reception to print new boarding passes. Why not get them at the airport on check-in you ask? Well, they charge you 15 Euro for printing.
    And if you bust your 20 kg baggage limit … ker-ching… 50 Euro thanks.
    Xunts.

  49. JC

    The teamsters of old who used rollers for such heavy transport had to carry them repeatedly from back to front as their ”truck” moved forward.

    Oh yea. So they would have had a bunch of these things and kept moving them from the rear back to the front. The sort of axle was to keep them together.

    Then

    The fixed rollers, at the front and rear ends of the platform, then evolved into axles with enlarged ends. At that point, there it was: the four-wheeled vehicle.

    Okay got it. The axle kept was what kept a whole bunch of rollers together and the allowed the stuff happening in the action asp per above then then evolved to the second quote.

    Here’s the thing though, the axle would have been stationary and the wheel moved around it. it wouldn’t have lasted that long because either the axle or the wheel hole at the center would have used up quickly.

  50. JC

    Start again

    Okay got it. The axle was what kept a whole bunch of rollers together and that allowed the stuff happening in the action (as per above), then that evolved as per the second quote.

  51. Arky

    Here’s the thing though, the axle would have been stationary and the wheel moved around it.

    ..
    You can have a fixed axle with the wheel moving on the axle bearing surface, like a modern car, or a wheel fixed to the axle and the axle moving in a bearing surface in the chassis, like a door knob.
    The later must have come first.

  52. Steve trickler

    Another edition of fuckwits on the road.



    Educational.

  53. JC

    You can have a fixed axle with the wheel moving on the axle bearing surface, like a modern car,

    But there are bearings in which the axle is encased in modern times. There were no roller bearings in ancient times.

    What did they used for wagons like a few hundred years ago? Lookee here. Ingenious

  54. Nob

    Leigh Lowe
    #3165535, posted on September 24, 2019 at 12:52 am
    Earlier, in relation to Thomas Cook, there was a suggestion that low-cost carriers were cutting Thomas Cook’s lawn.
    They are not just low cost, they are gougers who work on the “base line, plus, plus, plus” model.
    Recently we flew with Volotea which is based in Barthelona. We had little choice because both ends of the trip were relatively minor airports.
    Booked months ago, got baggage allocation for 20 kgs (over 15 kg is extra) booked seats and printed boarding passes.
    They fucking bombard you with emails for days beforehand offering you priority boarding (ie extra hand luggage), seat upgrades, whatever, at a price.
    Then, two days out, I get a notification that my seat allocation had changed. I look it up. Mrs L still in row 5, but I am moved to row 15.
    Would you like to sit with your partner? That will be 10 Euro please. So I pay up to secure the vacant seat next to me for Mrs L.
    Why not simply move both of us? Well, they don’t make 10 Euro that way.
    So I run around getting hotel reception to print new boarding passes. Why not get them at the airport on check-in you ask? Well, they charge you 15 Euro for printing.
    And if you bust your 20 kg baggage limit … ker-ching… 50 Euro thanks.

    Don’t be a mug Leigh.

    Budget airlines – of which Thomas Cook is/was one – build their charges from the base up, unlike the established legacy airlines who charge everybody full price from the top down whether they have baggage or not.

    In the end, you add up everything from baggage, seats, food, transport to/from and see if it’s worth it.

    Printing your own boarding pass saves employing people at the airport. You wanna pay for that? Why? The hotel will do it for free. Just email it to reception. Budgets typically don’t have their own ground staff except at their base airports (even then, only sometimes) so they employ ground staff from Servisair or some such local contractor who charge by the half-hour. Same for the self check-in kiosks – they have to pay, so will charge you. The more you have people turning up checked-in with boarding pass ready, light on luggage etc, the more you can shave costs and reduce turnaround times and therefore offer cheaper prices to customers.

    Priority boarding is a waste of money with most of these – usually it just means first on the bus, no guarantee of first on the plane.

    Changing seat allocation is a new one on me – normally they don’t allocate at all unless you pre-pay . You just turn up on the day and take your chances. Mrs & me still usually end up together by use of sharp elbows and stepping lively. Or if not, not a big deal for us. They’re all fairly short flights. Still, that’s a weird one and I’ve been using European budgets for 20 years or more.

    Anyway, like I said , you add up everything from baggage, seats, food, transport to/from and see if it’s worth it.

    Usually still way cheaper than the alternatives.

  55. Top Ender

    they caused uneven weight distribution while their owners were using their jetpacks.

    That’s an appalling thing to say.

    You mean they were causing glowball warminge even back then?

  56. Arky

    These budget airlines sound like a nightmare.
    Why would you do that to yourself?
    Pay for a proper airline you cheap bastards.

  57. Arky

    On horse cart axles, I read that Napoleon’s soldiers ate the grease out of the axles on the way back from Moscow.
    Some kind of animal fat I guess. Or maybe whale grease.

  58. Arky

    Have to be starving to eat dirty whale fat out of a cart axle.

  59. Top Ender

    There is only one thing to say about why you’d want ancient wheels.

    Wheelbarrow!

    Wot, no Bunnings?

  60. jupes

    I should have been a mechanical engineer. One of the great ones.

    Speaking of great engineers, I was in Bristol last week and walked over the Clifton suspension bridge designed by a bloke named Isambard Kingdom Brunel in the 19th century. He also designed the SS Great Britain, one of the first steamships which is now a tourist attraction in Bristol. There is a statue of him there so I assumed he was a local Bristol engineer. Not so. Next we took a trip to Bath where we learned that Brunel had designed the unique raised railway station there.

    Took a train to London next. Got off at Paddington and guess who had a statue on the platform? He had also designed Paddington Station. Subsequently we took a boat ride up the Thames to Greenwich. It was pointed out that the Blackfriars bridge had been designed by the great man’s son.

    I’d never heard of Brunel until then but it seemed I couldn’t get away from his many works while I was there. Brunel died at 53. It’s amazing how much could be achieved back in those days by men if they had the brains a will.

  61. Win

    Peter Beattie is doing what Peter Beattie has always done but now his behaviour is open to scrutiny by others others and not contained ,swept under the carpet by the Courier and channel Nein.

  62. Top Ender

    Thunberg meltdown!

    Environment activist Greta Thunberg broke down in tears while speaking at the U.N. Climate summit in New York on Monday

    The 16-year-old called out the leaders gathered there saying: ‘I shouldn’t be up here. I should be back in school. You have stolen my dreams and childhood’

  63. Nob

    Arky
    #3165545, posted on September 24, 2019 at 1:31 am
    On horse cart axles, I read that Napoleon’s soldiers ate the grease out of the axles on the way back from Moscow.
    Some kind of animal fat I guess. Or maybe whale grease.

    Usually sheep or cattle fat but they used all sorts.

    So many animals saved by the oil industry!

    You’re welcome.

  64. Nob

    jupes
    #3165548, posted on September 24, 2019 at 1:54 am

    I’d never heard of Brunel until then

    What? Shocking failure of the education system.

    He’s one of the giants on whose shoulders the modern world stands.

    Greta and her train-loving acolytes should prostrate themselves in front of his statue.

    His dad and his son were also great engineers.

  65. Leigh Lowe

    Nob at 1:16.
    I get the plus, plus, plus ticket model but, for the two locations we were flying between there were fuck all options.
    Yeah, hotel reception will print boarding passes for free, but who wants to fuck around on the net re-doing seat allocation then running around getting it printed.
    By the time I rooted around with their shit website and got reprints, I lost 45 minutes.
    It’s a fucking stunt.
    They know a good proportion of passengers on holidays will miss the change in amongst all the promo shit they send, and ker-ching – cough up at the airport.
    Point is, I had almost no choice, but next time I do have a choice, it won’t be Volotea.

  66. Mark A

    Nob
    #3165554, posted on September 24, 2019 at 2:53 am

    jupes
    #3165548, posted on September 24, 2019 at 1:54 am

    I’d never heard of Brunel until then

    What? Shocking failure of the education system.

    True, we learned all about useless politicians but nothing or very little about those quiet achievers who made the world livable.

    At least those of us who studied engineering fared a little better but not by much. 😒

  67. Mark A

    How do you tell Rambo fillums apart?
    They are numbered.
    (hope I didn’t trigger nums)

  68. Nob

    Leigh Lowe
    #3165555, posted on September 24, 2019 at 3:06 am
    Nob at 1:16.
    Point is, I had almost no choice, but next time I do have a choice, it won’t be Volotea.

    Yeah, well you do have a choice – use some better-serviced but far less convenient airport pair that wouldn’t otherwise be closed down if it were not for Volotea et al.

    The last minute seat change thing still strikes me as weird though. Regular budget travellers are used to this shit and not so easily caught – ask anyone from Bergamo or Pescara or any of the small Italian cities that collectively make Ryanair Italy’s largest airline and were not being serviced otherwise.

  69. egg_

    None
    #3164475, posted on September 23, 2019 at 12:36 am
    Matrix it’s usually egg that disintegrates into some paranoid blubbering mess. I see you suffer from the same affliction. Go to bed, you misogynist.

    The old charmer at her best.
    That’s when I’m not having sex with Dot isn’t it?*
    Which way is the wind blowing with the Beetrooter nowadays, now that he’s shacked up with his Mistress?

    *Fruitcake

  70. egg_

    I thought I recognised the traces of a Moral Compass in you, Knuckles So you’re a country lad as well then? Mr N was a boarder, altar boy, the whole lot ( got better coin playing footy though. Wasn’t a bad cricketer either). He has no time for namby popes either. As he’s quite a horseman he does well with dames and crusades.

    He obviously never went the brown, unless you’re a hypocrite.

    altar boy

    Queer?

  71. egg_

    Thanks for the invite Lizzie, but we respectfully decline.

    An acid tongue who hides behind a keyboard.

  72. egg_

    That’s when I’m not having sex with Dot isn’t it?

    I was chatting with Calli at the time – methinks the old turd likes to be the centre of (male) attention.
    Quelle surprise.

  73. None

    Did the Ambien wear off to quickly this morning egg? And as always your first comment every time has something to do with sodomy. What do you have against gay sex, egg? Too icky for you? Hypocrite.

  74. egg_

    The old female troll’s gone to bed after another bender, the old male’s yet to waken.

  75. egg_

    there is no market for ex SAS guys. Believe it or not many of them do it tough once they leave the ADF.

    They have a support group where they all cry on each other’s shoulders on TV.

  76. None

    So egg which is it. Are you cyberstalking me or are you threatening me? Take your meds.

  77. egg_

    Which way is the wind blowing with the Beetrooter nowadays

    The Beetrooter chronicles would be worth reposting, if only for Cardimona’s benefit.

  78. egg_

    Are you cyberstalking me

    Taking my name in vain you old hag.
    Up early?

  79. egg_

    Did the Ambien wear off to quickly this morning egg? And as always your first comment every time has something to do with sodomy. What do you have against gay sex, egg? Too icky for you? Hypocrite.

    The sodomy bot is off and running.

  80. egg_

    The old nurse reeks of Grigs with its Pharmacology references.

  81. egg_

    Hawke have up the booze and the women to get to high office. Joyce ised high office for both.

    One a Beetrooter always a Beetrooter.

  82. egg_

    desreagard last post wrong forum

    LMFAO.
    Been to the Healesville Earth Station when it was in operation (wooden framework to blend in with the burbs) – now used by CSIRO IIRC.
    One of our many unique and varied Earth Stations.
    Global’s dish on the Network 7 building in Sydney is interesting.

  83. egg_

    JC
    #3164944, posted on September 23, 2019 at 4:06 pm
    egg_
    #3164936, posted on September 23, 2019 at 3:57 pm

    A plussing spasm for the next few hours.

    A pussing spasm?
    The Cat has a reputation as the Geriatric Ward, after all.

    -2.4

    Other than posturing and number scoring, there was fvck all content in your posts all night.
    Some posters are the glue that holds the place together and increases blog traffic, others are destructive and turn people off.

  84. egg_

    Wasn’t the 97% number from a questionnaire sent out to some 2500 so called “climate scientists” of whom all but 77 thought it was too fucking stupid to bother with and 75 of those, whose work depended on funding replied that humans were the main cause? 75/77 is 97% , right?

    It should be termed “four-fifths of five-eighths of fvck all”.
    Just like the AGW “signal”.

  85. egg_

    Nutmeg was widely used for medicinal purposes.

    And in recipes using ricotta and eggs

    A mild sedative IIRC – hence used in eggnog.

    The Italians make hot ‘donut holes’ coated in cinnamon sugar and nutmeg – to die for.

  86. bespoke

    Some posters are the glue that holds the place together and increases blog traffic, others are destructive and turn people off.

    I know my place egg_ 😁

  87. egg_

    Jippos used the wheel to build the pyramids, as that is how they got the dimensions as a function of pie (can’t remember the symbol).

    Did Geometry with ropes and pegs in the ground?
    c/- DrBG

  88. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    The Italians make hot ‘donut holes’ coated in cinnamon sugar and nutmeg

    My great grandmother used to say “it can’t go on your hips until it has been passed your lips”.
    I have found this is generally true, especially of hot donuts. An exception, at least for me, are apple slices. I have only to gaze longingly at an apple slice and it adds two inches to my waistline.

  89. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    A new generation of marxists steps onto the stage
    Greta Thunberg tells world leaders at UN: ‘You have stolen my dreams and childhood’
    ‘All you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!’ says Swedish teenager

  90. Herodotus

    The BBC was still in Full Retread mode regarding climate change and Thunberg at the UN overnight.
    “This is wrong”. Correct.
    “I should be in school”. Good soo far.
    But nothing sensible after that. Right off the deep end.
    How dare they indeed, those who have misused the poppet of doom to promote their huge scam.

  91. Twostix

    ‘I shouldn’t be up here. I should be back in school. You have stolen my dreams and childhood’

    She’s talking to her parents, I presume.

  92. egg_

    ‘All you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!’ says Swedish teenager

    She’ll probably fizzle out like AOC’s Green Nude Eel.

  93. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    who said economic marxism was dead
    Elite private schools vent outrage at Labour’s ‘incredulous’ plan to abolish them
    ‘It will be an act of unprecedented vandalism,’ warns representative of country’s most expensive fee-paying schools

  94. egg_

    Camels were almost unknown in Egypt until the end of the pharaonic period. The wheel was probably introduced into Egypt by the Hyksos, an Asiatic people who invaded the country and ruled it in the fifteenth and sixteenth dynasties. The Hyksos most likely had horse-drawn chariots, which were used in warfare.

  95. Cardimona

    Cats, I got a pro-Ridd letter into the Townsville paper today…

    Ridd for JCU top job

    HOW very disappointing to read that JCU will appeal against its crushing court defeat by Professor Ridd (News online, 10/9).

    JCU unlawfully sacked Professor Peter Ridd for “not behaving in a collegial manner” when he questioned the accuracy of reef science that costs us billions.

    As a taxpayer-funded university JCU must conform to the proper scientific method. Anyone unsure what that it is can search Wikipedia for “scientific method”.

    The scientific method applies rigorous scepticism and double checks experimental results; which is what got Professor Ridd sacked.

    JCU was established under Queensland legislation, which states; “The university’s functions are … to provide education at university standard”.

    But is JCU actually providing education at a “university standard” when it seems to be led by individuals who have disavowed the scientific method?

    In fact, Judge Vasta described JCU’s conduct as bordering on “paranoia and hysteria fuelled by systemic vindictiveness”. Ouch!

    What has led to this?

    Follow the money. Populist politicians want to be seen to be saving the world so they shovel our money at credentialed folk who claim to know how to do so.

    Unis get a chunk of those research grants to help pay some very generous salaries.

    This results in publicists dramatising research results and feeding them to journalists who turn them into attention-grabbing headlines to sell their products. Again it’s our money because we’re the media consumers.

    Given the global embarrassment already caused, JCU’s vice-chancellor should step down now or be sacked by JCU’s University Council, which should then appoint Professor Ridd as vice-chancellor before stepping down themselves.

  96. None

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3165604, posted on September 24, 2019 at 6:31 am

    You need to watch the vid at Zippy’s link (https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/labour-conference-private-schools-abolish-corbyn-policy-headteachers-a9116656.html) where a dude asks a Labour witch about her sending her child to private school. It’s hilarious.

  97. None

    Thanks for posting the Brit cartoons, Tom. All good. And Zanetti seems to be getting SloMo’s measure.

  98. egg_

    Langton is plugging her own book (“Welcome to Country”?) for the School curriculum?
    Goes hand in hand with the ceremonies now in schools in place of “God Save the Queen”?

  99. feelthebern

    Why don’t AFL players have non-white partners?
    Pack of racists.
    AFL should bring in a quota.

  100. feelthebern

    Garrison today.
    One of the greats.

  101. Bruce of Newcastle

    Steve Bright does ripper artwork. I’m sure the swamp would just love to send Boris to St Helena.

    Meanwhile Spooner has a very focused Philip Lowe, RBA honcho, who’s got to the core of the problem.

  102. Top Ender

    Speaking of altar boys, I was an altar boy for some time.

    We used to fight over which of us would do the bell.

    Much better than holding up the book.

    Later we would watch in awe as the priest drank down the rest of the wine.

    Can’t remember why I got into it, or how I got to church every Sunday. Mum drove me to it, in both ways, no doubt.

  103. egg_

    Hand-operated potter’s wheel
    An important advance was the invention of the potter’s wheel, which rotated on a central axis. This enabled the potter to rotate the wheel and the vessel with one hand, while shaping the vessel with the other hand.[21]

    According to Dorothea Arnold, the slow potter’s wheel was invented some time during the Fourth dynasty.[22] Eva Christiana Köhler has subsequently argued that this should be corrected to a substantially earlier period, “the invention of the potter’s wheel is a development which generally accompanied a certain form of mass-production. It enabled standardisation and the rapid production of finished vessels.”[21] According to her, this development can clearly be traced back to the mass-produced conical bowls of the Mesopotamian Uruk culture at Habuba Kabira.[23]

    In production, first, a large clay cone was shaped on the disc. The peak of the cone was the actual point of rotation, around which the bowl was to be formed. It was then sliced off with a wire or a cord. The resulting bowls had a relatively thick wall near the base and marks from rotation and pulling on the underside of the base. Christiana Köhler detected such marks on vessels of the predynastic period, which makes it fairly likely that the slow potter’s wheel was in use in this period.[21]

  104. None

    Greta the Aspybot getting aggro. Like who cares. Except that she’s being exploited.
    Seriously, Aspergers’ sufferers can get quite violent. Here’s hoping Greta does not get stabby.

  105. Empire 5:5

    Rudy Giuliani
    @RudyGiuliani
    Biden says he never talked to his son about his overseas business. Do you think we can prove, with our fact a day disclosures, it’s a lie-a false exculpatory statement. Do we have to prove, or do you already know, it’s a lie, and an incriminating statement.
    10:08 PM · Sep 23, 2019 from Manhattan

    https://mobile.twitter.com/RudyGiuliani/status/1176106151051767813

  106. calli

    What caused the most recent hysteria?

    An embarrassing absence of climageddon.

    So it had to be confected and sold by the usual snake oil merchants. And their latest pinup girl.

  107. Bruce of Newcastle

    If Manafort is in jail for corruption in Ukraine does that mean Biden should be in jail for corruption in Ukraine? Maybe someone could ask some Dems that question.

  108. Top Ender

    Territory leading the nation pro-rata – population about 230,000

    ‘Racist’ welfare cards slammed
    AAP
    GREG ROBERTS

    A B O R I G I N A L organisations have condemned cashless welfare cards and plans to expand their use nationally, labelling them racist and discriminatory at a Senate inquiry.

    The federal Coalition is trying to expand across the Territory the use of the cashless welfare cards, which greatly restrict what a person can spend Centrelink payments on including bans on alcohol, gambling and withdrawing cash. The cards quarantine 80 per cent of payments so money can only be spent on essential items.

    It would start at 50-50 in the NT but there is concern from opponents the Bill allows Families and Social Services Minister Paul Fletcher to decide to quarantine 100 per cent.

    The cards are being trialled in Ceduna in South Australia, Kununurra and the Goldfields in Western Australia and Hervey Bay in Queensland.

    John Paterson, chief executive of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance of the NT, accused the Coalition of trying to impose the Bill on indigenous communities with unwarranted haste and without consent given it was introduced into parliament this month.

    “Once again, we are stigmatised and targeted as not being capable or worthy of managing our own affairs,” Mr Paterson told a Senate Committee in Darwin, comprising three Liberal, two Labor and one Greens MP.

    The trial of the cashless welfare cards is in its fourth year but there are more than 23,000 Territorians on less severe but still restrictive income management BasicsCards dating back to the Howard Government’s 2007 Intervention.

    The Aboriginal community-owned Danila Dilba Health Service CEO Olga Havnen said there was an “astonishing” lack of credible evidence that income management had improved the health and wellbeing of recipients. There had not been improvements in relation to child health, birthweight, failure to thrive, child protection notifications and substantiations, school attendance and family violence, she said.

    NT News – print edition

  109. egg_

    So according to the ABC Red Kezza is a “legend”.

    Recently Tom Gleisner hosting Have You Been Paying Attention? referred to a Sydneyite as entertainment “Royalty“.
    What is it with Melbournians referring to entertainment veterans as “Royalty”?
    “Radio Royalty” seems to be a common catchphrase.

  110. calli

    Brunel is my hero. Closely followed by Mr Loos, Baselgette.

    On the medical side, it has to be Florey.

  111. calli

    I’m probably wrong, but has the billabong appeared at the Cat? I do hope so.

    On Greta – she was telling the truth. She shouldn’t be at the UN. She should be at school. That was a cry for help and all in plain sight.

    Her handlers should be horsewhipped.

  112. calli

    Hmmm…did someone mention potter’s wheels?

  113. calli

    If that doesn’t bring on a Fresh Fred, nothing will. 😁

  114. Leigh Lowe

    Watching 007 Octopussy (snicker) on late night TV in the Outer Hebrides.
    Being dubbed into Gaelic doesn’t help but the “plot” can still be followed without difficulty.

  115. calli

    egg_
    #3165580, posted on September 24, 2019 at 4:56 am
    That’s when I’m not having sex with Dot isn’t it?

    I was chatting with Calli at the time – methinks the old turd likes to be the centre of (male) attention.
    Quelle surprise.

    Mind your manners, egg_.

    I’m not that old. 🤣

  116. calli

    Well, I watched Jack Reacher on FTA. A satisfying number of Bad Guys™ were despatched in a variety of bone crunching ways.

    Tom Cruise is pretty good, provided you ignore the fact that he isn’t blonde, six foot five and three axehandles across at the shoulders.

  117. RobK

    I’d never heard of Brunel until then
    The story of Joseph Whitworth is an interesting one.
    The brief Wikipedia overview doesn’t do his story justice. There was a lot of rivalry in the early industrial revolution that is a tale worthy of our education curriculum. Many tales of philanthropy, attention to detail, and promoting of technical training .
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Whitworth?wprov=sfti1

  118. calli

    Okay. That’s enough from me.

    Liberty Quote
    Tariffs are economic self-harm.

    — Scott Ryan

    Discuss.

    I’m off to clean the loos and polish the leather* sofas. In that order.

    * the last to be made in Australia. In Melbourne. Beautiful quality construction and thick, perfect hides. The loos, on the other hand, are Chinese china to an Italian design. The tops don’t quite fit – only by a slim margin, but it’s annoying and unnecessary.

  119. Nob

    None
    #3165624, posted on September 24, 2019 at 7:13 am
    Greta the Aspybot getting aggro. Like who cares. Except that she’s being exploited.
    Seriously, Aspergers’ sufferers can get quite violent. Here’s hoping Greta does not get stabby.

    Nah, come on.

    That’d be brilliant TV.

  120. bespoke

    Morning calli, egg_ is a little testy today (but with good reason) hopefully you can lift is mood. 😎

  121. Nob

    RobK – on a similar theme, this is a really good read for popular engineering history:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00E23TXFO/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

    The development of precision engineering, turbocharged by the industrial revolution, was an utterly necessary step in getting us where we are today. No trains or carbon fibre racing yachts or internet for Greta without these coal-fired advances.

  122. Bruce of Newcastle

    Wherever you go, there you are…

    The Madcap Adventures of ‘Buckaroo Banzai’ Biden (Victor David Hansen)

    Maybe one of Biden’s contacts slipped during the debate, showing he’s really a Red Lectroid.

  123. Mother Lode

    The ABC across the big issues again:

    Why Game of Thrones deserved its Best Drama nomination.

  124. Notafan

    ‘Not being able to manage our own affairs’.

    These are the complaints of people on lifelong white man welfare.

    Self evident, actually.

    As for the bit about no improvement in birthweight failure to thrive etc.

    More appalling evidence of the fundamental inability to ‘manage own affairs’

    All that money thrown at aborigines and everything available yet they have starving third world infant problems

  125. egg_

    What is it with Melbournians referring to entertainment veterans as “Royalty”?

    It probably has something to do with being the cardigan Capital of Australia.

    Instead of pussing spasms there should probably be a cardigan quotient.
    Probably why the NZer got stuck in Melbourne.

    Is there an emoticon for cardigans?

  126. Tel

    and just like that…
    Apple will make the new Mac Pro in Austin, avoiding some China tariffs

    Zippy, Zippy, Zippy … we have already been told that’s impossible. Can’t be done.

    There’s not one person in America who knows how to assemble some bits of plastic.

  127. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Calli, our new Smeg toaster and kettle are Italian designed but have a sneaky tiny line on the purchase label saying ‘made in PRC’. Mock 50’s style, they have the letters s m e g fixed decoratively on them in metal. The kettle is fine but on the toaster there is a very small misalignment in the attachment of the letters. Hardly noticeable but not perfect. Can’t be bothered exchanging it but like most PRC stuff poor quality control. And for the type with the Versace design this toaster costs $750! Still made in PRC but.

  128. Mother Lode

    ‘All you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!’ says Swedish teenager

    Yup.

    Sounds like a teenager.

    The thing about ‘eternal growth’ is something that I have heard from socialists before – and could have been uttered at any time in the last two centuries, but I doubt any socialists would be content if told they would be transported back to the world of 150 years ago – what with the lack of modern medicine, lack of iPhones, opportunities for travel, drafty houses, dubious plumbing etc etc.

    You can see why socialists like to treat economic growth as something undesirable – it means they can treat poverty, the privation, the grey dilapidated towns and all pervasive squalor of socialism as if it is on purpose – a success utterly beyond the reach of capitalism.

  129. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    On our 3 month trip round Europe and the Med last year we dismissed the fantasy of using local inter-island ferries as they mostly don’t fully function any more and flew between destinations. We flew normal airlines except on one short trip Hairy booked us Ryan Air due to timings. We walked through a nearly empty main airport building following signs for miles through walkways and ended up waiting in a heavy mass of under-serviced humanity in a tin shed. Never again.

  130. struth

    Good Moaning.

    Environment activist Greta Thunberg broke down in tears while speaking at the U.N. Climate summit in New York on MondayThe 16-year-old called out the leaders gathered there saying: ‘I shouldn’t be up here. I should be back in school. You have stolen my dreams and childhood’

    Could not have said it better myself.
    Guturres you did this to kids you sick f…k.

    Apparently having dinner with President Trump (peace be upon him) stuffs the climate.
    The climate of doom as brought to you by your marxist global socialist betters.

    In the face of ancient dams built to supply a third of the population they now do still performing brilliantly due to the Flanneries of precipitation still falling, the polar bears (and may I add Koala bears…….there was no need to say goodbye to Blinky bill John Williamson) still causing eskimos to shit in their fur lined bonds, and not one island in the Pacific sinking, that the UN socialists only see western coal as climate wrecking….etc etc , we today see the brainwashed standing in beautiful sunlight on still, cool perfect days screaming at people that the world is burning and amazed no one else can see it.

    Truly fascinating.

  131. RobK

    Versace design this toaster costs $750! Still made in PRC but.
    Is it one like the one featured in Wallace and Grommet?

  132. Bruce of Newcastle

    Another useful report on the Ukraine gambit:

    The Odor Of Desperation: Jim Kunstler Exposes The 3-Way Ruse Of Ukraine-Gate

    Ruse 1: deflect attention from the main issue, which is Joe Biden’s trolling for payoffs on his missions to foreign lands as vice-president, first Ukraine, where son Hunter was gifted a board of director’s chair and $50K-a-month salary with Ukrainian gas company Burisma, and then a $1.5 billion “private equity investment” to Hunter Biden’s wealth management fund from the state-owned Bank of China.

    Ruse 2: to deflect attention from the damage soon to be inflicted on the Deep State by the forthcoming DOJ Inspector General’s report on FISA court abuses.

    Ruse 3. To set in motion yet another obstruction of justice trap for Mr. Trump on the basis of false charges.

    I don’t think he’s got everything though. I strongly suspect one subthread is to ease Biden out of the primaries…without him releasing whatever dirt file he has in a cupboard somewhere. After 50 years in the Dem swamp the stuff in those files could be quite icky.

  133. cohenite

    Given the global embarrassment already caused, JCU’s vice-chancellor should step down now or be sacked by JCU’s University Council, which should then appoint Professor Ridd as vice-chancellor before stepping down themselves.

    That would be a good threshold for whether sanity is prevailing. It won’t happen though.

  134. Roger

    That’s quite a tanty Greta threw at the UN.

    Meanwhile, Guterres is pumping out the propaganda like…like there’s no tomorrow!

    This is peak hysteria. They’ve nowhere to go after this point.

  135. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    So much stuff being made now in PRC. Clawing back some of it to sustain rust belts in the West will do just that, i.e. sustain jobs, but manufactured prices will rise for these goods due to very much higher labour and other first world costs.

    The answer lies as usual in specialisation. First world should specialise in design, quality and high tech, plus niche products and what we do now, in services.

    On that latter area, service industries, an Education Minister with any sense would stop drama queens like Sandra Harding from doing her best to destroy academic credibility in the sphere of scientific education. Allowing public money to continue to support already established poor academic management is not a good look in international scientific circles where prestige is developed and standards are protected. Supporting a not very capable VC is no way to maintain prestige. The Ridd story is international now and the unfair hounding of Ridd and his sensible papers is being noted.

  136. cohenite

    This is peak hysteria. They’ve nowhere to go after this point.

    How about alarmists start arresting deniers. This is commie/fascism 101. We’ve got a long way to go yet.

  137. Diogenes

    Calli, our new Smeg toaster and kettle are Italian designed but have a sneaky tiny line on the purchase label saying ‘made in PRC’

    You also have to watch out for Bosch made stuff. The stuff from Germany is generally a few hundred more, the stuff from Turkey is about as good as the Chinese made stuff.

    PS
    new thread

  138. John Constantine

    Being Fierce is the New ‘you go girl’.

    Being Fierce in parliament is cheered, Being Fierce as you interview a Tory is cheered.

    Being Fierce anytime a wymynsys deals with dissent is cheered. Life is a Show Trial.

    Political psychosis needing release as Fierce Critique is where we get cultural revolutions.

    After Being Fierce comes Being cold, dark and hungry.

    Psyops and bribes are more effective than thousand bomber raids.

    Comrades.

  139. cohenite

    Pol tot angry:

    Greta Thunberg berates world leaders at UN climate summit

    AFP The Australian September 24, 2019

    A visibly angry Greta Thunberg berated world leaders as she addressed a UN climate summit, accusing them of betraying her generation by failing to tackle greenhouse gas emissions and asking “How dare you?” The Swedish teen, who has become the global face of the growing youth movement against climate inaction, began by telling her audience: “My message is that we’ll be watching you,” eliciting laughter.

    But it was soon clear that the tone of the message would be very serious. “This is all wrong. I shouldn’t be up here. I should be back at school on the other side of the ocean,” the 16-year-old, who is taking a year off from her studies, said.

    “You come to us young people for hope. How dare you?” she thundered. “You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words, yet I’m one of the lucky ones. People are suffering, people are dying, entire ecosystems are collapsing…

    What a world when a seriously disturbed teenager can hold the world to ransom; of course merkel and micron rush to do her bidding and take a shot at the only adult in the room, Trump.

    Pol tot should be in a straight jacket. Tucker Carlson was right: conservatives are gutless; all it would take is a few of them calling this spastic out and more importantly the rats who are backing her.

  140. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Lol. Ripe for VC? Peter Ridd probably had little or no managerial expertise prior to his recent baptism of fire in it. He’s been on a fast learning curve since the start of this firing nonsense though, so would in this regard have a lot to offer managerially. He may not be attracted to the idea though. Many very competent researchers are not, preferring the lab to the desk. As with school teachers, who may also want to stick to their teaching knitting rather than be drawn into administration.

    Sadly, this has left the administration of schools and universities to be run by grasping and overpaid dunces rising through Marxist influenced studies in educational nonsense. Viz Sandra Harding’s CV.

    Ridd would be a very good Head of a private science research institute if Scomo wants to throw a few spare hundred million that way, as he should. Take it off the JCU reef funding. They have been shown to be incapable of proper peer review and funds management, and also seem prepared to waste great amounts of taxpayer funds on a personal VC’s vanity project. Bringing Professor Ridd back into JCU’s Science Faculty would be a start to correcting the state of affairs there, but it seems now unlikely to happen.

  141. Black Ball

    Good morning all.
    Someone upthread asked the question ‘why all the climate hysteria now?’ In my mind it’s because of the upcoming US election. They have tried Russian collusion and failed. The Stormy Daniels saga and failed. Tried smearing Brett Kavanaugh and failed, but have gone back for a second attempt.
    The more they try and push the idea that President Trump is an uncaring bastard, then that’s what the Left will try and do. Climate change certainly falls under this umbrella. Greta Thunberg’s tantrum falls neatly into this discussion. But clear thinking people have had enough and see it for what it is. Stage managed crapola.
    And for a completely different tack, why was Nadia Bartel at the Brownlow last night? Unless James gave her his invite, she had no recourse to be in attendance. Much like Tayla Harris. Why was she handing out the goal of the year award? Get off the stage!

  142. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    “… on the other side of the ocean”

    This is the giveaway. I don’t think Greta enjoyed the ocean waves trip too much.

    The whole thing has obviously been far too much for this disturbed little teen. Put the poor child on a plane back to a quiet clinic in Sweden and keep her pushy parents at arms length for a while.

  143. struth

    Socialists always brainwash children first.
    From Adolf to Give me your children Marxism they must get at the children because without this major tactic they could never succeed.

    We are seeing nothing new.

    A student of history knows what comes next.

    The children will be made to “out” their parents and any adult non believer they know.
    They will be given a licence for violence ( for the planet’s sake) and society will be broken because you have to first destroy what you wish to rebuild into a socialist utopia ( for the Soros elites anyway).

    This is playbook 101 stuff.

  144. Arky

    First world should specialise in design, quality and high tech, plus niche products and what we do now, in services.

    ..
    I think they called this “the clever country”. Remember?
    It was a pack of shit. Just lies. Either you have an industrial base, or you don’t. We are 90% of the way to “don’t”.

  145. 1735099

    Dr Dapin, for a Doctor he is, has little first-hand knowledge of Australian society during the 1960’s.

    Why is that a problem?
    There is a school of thought that an outsider often arrives at a better apprehension of historical and social reality than someone who has been embedded in it. Sometimes you need to stand back to better observe.
    Dapin will tell you that his interest in the topic of national service has its origin in his father’s experience as a conscript in the UK. Dapin’s dad also happened to be Joowish.

    He has written about the Joowish experience in the Australian military in his work

    Joowish Anzacs: Joows in the Australian Military.

    He has honed his writing skills to a fine art. He is a great storyteller. I can well and truly see Mark Dapin knocking Pete Fitzsimmons off the top of the tree in the “Christmas stocking filler Mil. Hist. Blockbuster” caper. Dapin also has a far more authentic Australian voice than Fitzsimmons.

    So, on the one hand he has the problem of being an “outsider”, but on the other, he “has a far more authentic Australian voice than Fitzsimmons”. Contradiction?

    If a myth is defined as widely held but false belief or idea. The idea that “every Nasho who served in Vietnam was a volunteer” is not a myth at all, it is merely a misapprehension.

    Call it what you like – it is simply not historical truth. Analyse the statement. “Every” means “without exception”. “Volunteer” (as the dictionary explains) means “a person who freely offers to take part in an enterprise or undertake a task” or “a person who works for an organization without being paid”. Whichever definition is used, the people who were engaged to serve as the result of a ballot were not volunteers.

    They finished up in the army because they were found (according to the letter they all received) to have “a liability to serve”. In no way is that “volunteering”. The volunteers were those who signed up without being “called up”. To maintain that once balloted in they magically became “volunteers” is absurd.

    Most units gave National Servicemen the choice of active service and most volunteered.

    Again, this is an offence against truth and logic. The use of the word “choice” as applied to individuals who were in the army not because they volunteered, but because of their date of birth, is risible.

    Ironically, ‘The National Servicemen’s Association of Australia,’ was formed in Toowoomba in 1987. Their official position then and now is MOST not EVERY. Perhaps Dapin might have avoided the misapprehension simply by visiting their website?

    The actual text used ion the National Service Association’s website is – “Most but not all units gave National Servicemen the choice of active service and most volunteered.”

    To use “most” they would have to maintain that more “volunteered” than didn’t. Apart from the fact that any CO who gave Nashos a choice would have been in breach of the National Service Act 1964, there is absolutely no evidence for the association’s position beyond anecdote. Anecdote is not history. That statement also conveniently ignores how they came to be in the army in the first place.

    One of Dapin’s strengths as an historian is that his research is thorough and forensic. He is also an engaging writer. Those two talents can co-exist.

    “The Nashos who arrived in Vietnam mostly either wanted or accepted their posting. The Australian Army recognised the menace for their men in having to serve with unwilling or disaffected soldiers and was able, because so many nashos wanted to go to Vietnam, to post reluctant soldiers to units in Australia.”

    (MacGibbon.)

    With due respect to MacGibbon, that is opinion, not history. What research did he undertake to arrive at that conclusion? It is a rationalisation of the situation, not an account of history.

    A very simple test could have been applied to determine whether these men were volunteers or not. They could have been asked “Why are you in the army?” If the answer was “My birth date was drawn” – they were not volunteers. If the answer was “I volunteered for Nasho even though my birth date wasn’t drawn” – they were indeed volunteers.

    That test would have eliminated the bulk of Nashos and reveals the sleight of hand in MacGibbon’s account. His use of “accepted” further reveals the weakness in his conclusion. Acceptance, is, after all, one of the stages of grief.

    The Army had a huge pool to choose from. The data from the AAWFA and Dapin’s own research confirm this.

    Which has no bearing at all on whether there were people serving in Vietnam who simply didn’t want to be there. It doesn’t sit well with the ANZAC myth, but it is a fact of history. The only open question is how many – rich pickings for research there.

    The RSM of 7RAR was a fine soldier, Reg Bandy.

    From my memory of the man, couldn’t agree more.

  146. Tailgunner

    Someone on the last open thread posted a link to the Costa Mesa rally.
    I can’t be did going back so far ..
    But props. Thank you
    #MAGA

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