Germany in decline and Kohler on the failure of democracy compared with China

A couple of items from The Weekend Australian. A piece reprinted from The Economist described the “simply awful” state of German manufacturing. The index of output shows the sharpest decline since 2009. The services sector also lost momentum. Many economists consider that the contraction can be described as recession and that means the whole Eurozone is in trouble.

Brexit uncertainty and the US/China trade war contribute to the malaise but the main causes are internal. Strangely there is no mention of power prices or the emission control regulations that threaten to strangle the German auto industry. The story does report that stalling car production alone explains nearly half the recent fall in industrial output. But why no mention of the elephant in the room?

Alan Kohler ventured beyond his remit in the finance columns to pontificate about The Battle to Save Democracy.

Democracy seems to be in trouble. It will probably recover from the current mess, but it’s along a long way back. And its made especially pointed by the contrasting success and relative calm of the undemocratic People’s Republic of China.

Does he think that we have something to learn from the PRC? But not long ago he wrote that we need to “face the facts” about climate change and sort out our energy policy to hasten the transition to green power. Perhaps he thinks we can learn from the Germans how to do that!

Off topic. Windwatch at the evening peak since Monday. Percentage of power from wind. 7, 4, 1, 2.4, 10, 5 and 5 at the peak this morning.

Taking up a point in the comments, it is absurd to turn to wind and solar even if there is the capacity to store power when it is surplus to immediate requirements. Apart from the waste of money, think of the shocking environmental damage inflicted by wind and solar developments.

This entry was posted in Economics and economy, Global warming and climate change policy, Oppressive government, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

58 Responses to Germany in decline and Kohler on the failure of democracy compared with China

  1. 132andBush

    …but it’s along way back.

    Is that a direct cut and paste, or a typo?

  2. 132andBush

    And its made especially pointed by the contrasting success and relative calm of the undemocratic People’s Republic of China.

    Inside every ecoloon there is a totalitarian just itching to jump out.

  3. Bruce of Newcastle

    Pining for fascism, eh Alan?

    The dawn of a fascist China — and what it means for us (2017)

    Hand-in-hand with Xi’s attempts to erase challenges from within the CCP has gone a massive increase in repression and social control of Chinese society at large. Ideological and indoctrination campaigns have been launched on a scale not seen since the days of Mao; the Internet and social media are subject to relentless scrutiny and retribution for offenders, while non-governmental organizations and reform-minded lawyers are the targets of unrelenting campaigns of intimidation and imprisonment.

    All the aspects of a classic fascist state are in place in China now.

    The hallmark of a fascist country is nationalist socialism with a compliant industrial sector. Which China now displays. Also the trains run on time in fascist states, which in China they do.

  4. duncanm

    ‘success’
    – human organ harvesting
    – gulags
    – social licenses. Can’t even buy tickets for public transport as a foreigner or low-scorer.

    Sounds like a paradise.

  5. min

    Politicians here do not want to know what is happening in Germany as a result of their renewable energy failure . I e -mailed to many the front cover of Der Spiegal, a left leaning magazine, when it exposed the amount that had been spent to put in renewables , the problems of equipment failure and the means of disposal of said equipment, such as solar panels. Moreover apart from causing loss of jobs and energy poverty, there had been no lowering of emissions. This was found when an audit had been done of this policy.
    It seemed to me that a country such as Germany with the technical expertise that it well known for, could not manage the transition to renewables ,that we could learn some lessons. But no we appear to be going down the same route with the added problems of our size , no neighbours to help out with nuclear power or gas and a smaller population. One of Germany’s problems was the transmission of power from turbines in the North Sea to Bavaria where a lot of their manufacturing is located.
    Now with Brexit , Germany will be in big trouble . So what makes government here think they can do what Germany could not.

  6. Chester Draws

    And its made especially pointed by the contrasting success and relative calm of the undemocratic People’s Republic of China.

    Hong Kong is calm? Xianjiang is calm? Tibet is calm? On the surface maybe, but judging the surface of an authoritarian country with the apparent chaos of a democratic one isn’t very useful. China has some severe internal issues that are not going away just because they suppress them.

    Their economic success is heading for a crash, as all hot runs do. It’s built on some pretty shakey foundations, and some of the corruption will be very exposed if the money dries up. The CCP’s ability to get out of that without trouble will be a better measure of their success than being able to ride the current wave of success. My bet is that they will not be able to keep their population happy during their next recession in the way a democratic state can. Many of the world’s great powers have been brought low by revolutions after a period of prosperity turned sour.

    Maybe it won’t happen. But history suggests betting on what looks good for the moment isn’t the best way to go. Remember when Japan was all conquering and it was going to be the dominant economy in the world — only to tank for decades? It wasn’t that long ago.

  7. Roger

    Democracy seems to be in trouble. It will probably recover from the current mess, but it’s along way back. And its made especially pointed by the contrasting success and relative calm of the undemocratic People’s Republic of China.

    Xi’s concentration of political power in his own hands means he will bear the consequences of any economic slowdown and resulting social disorder.

    Meanwhile, his new iteration of “socalism with Chinese characteristics”, the first principle of which is “ensuring Communist Party of China leadership over all forms of work in China”, is stifling economic growth by draining capital from the private sector to less efficient Party controlled enterprises or private/Party hybrid enterprises.

    And then there is demography, Hong Kong, Taiwan, the Uyghurs, the suspicion cast on compromised Chinese companies abroad…

    China may recover from the current mess, but it’s a long way back.

  8. Leo G

    … he wrote that we need to “face the facts” about climate change and … hasten the transition to green power.

    Face and deny.

  9. Buccaneer

    Daigou shoppers buying up vitamins and baby formula in Australia tell the quiet story that all is not well in communist China. Don’t get too enthusiastic about it all falling over though, as China is one big market distortion that will hurt everyone when it fails.

  10. Jock

    I find it offensive to call Kohler a “finance” reporter. But then again so is Tingle etc. My beef with this is that in the 70s and 80s the idiots that led the West thought that it would be a good idea to “let in from the cold” the Chinese PRC. Never refusing an invitation to loot and pillage the PRC responded with exactly that for the last 3 decades. Yes they raised millions from the poverty that they themselves had created. But only because they grimly realised that to gain the support of the masses then terror wasnt enough . They also wanted a shower, electricity and a job. So to do this they needed the acquiesence of the West. And didnt we move up to the plate and drop our pants? The PRC couldnt believe its luck. As Lenin said give a capitalist an inch of rope and he will hang himself.

  11. Dr Fred Lenin

    Renewables fail in Germany ? If the Germans cant make it work who can ? Great engineers , huge industry , skilled workforce and it still fails , the lesson is obvious renewables dont work in an industrial society,outback they are resonably effective but not in th populated areas .
    This is so simple that any kid could understand it ,well perhaps not politicians or carpetbaggers , but of course they profit from it , wonder what they will do when the whole scam comes unstuck?

  12. max

    Alan Kohler is clueless as usually.
    Democracy is not Freedom

    Gary North:
    Today, China is a major competitor in Western markets. Its economy is basically Keynesian. Its workers can move wherever they want. We are seeing the largest migration in the history of man from rural poverty to urban middle-class living. Hundreds of millions of people have moved from the rural countryside to large cities. This is not slave labor; this is free labor. There are no government restrictions on the movement of laborers. There are very few government restrictions on hiring these workers. There is almost no social welfare system imposed by the state. The Chinese labor market is vastly freer than labor markets in the West, which are dominated by trade unions that have gotten government support, meaning the threat of violence, to support the demands of union members. This is one of the reasons why Western manufacturers are having so much trouble competing against Chinese workers.

    Chinese workers are free to move from job to job, and Chinese employers are legally allowed to hire anyone they want. Under these conditions, it is the Western workers who are closer to slavery than Chinese workers are. Western workers who are not trade union members in Western Europe are forced to take less desirable jobs, because labor union members have locked out competition from nonunion workers. Unions have used the government to send out people with badges and guns to prohibit employers from hiring nonunion workers. This is not the free market; this is a government-rigged market.

    So, the next time you hear someone argue that Western workers need to be protected against foreign goods produced by slave labor, point out to him that the reason why Western workers want protection is because they are the slave laborers. They are finding it increasingly difficult to compete against workers who live in a nation that honors the principle of the free mobility of labor and voluntary contracts between employers and employees. China is a fierce competitor, not because it is a slave labor society, but because it is competing against workers who live in a regime of government-rigged labor markets.

    https://www.garynorth.com/public/9860.cfm

  13. Tel

    Chinese workers are free to move from job to job, and Chinese employers are legally allowed to hire anyone they want. Under these conditions, it is the Western workers who are closer to slavery than Chinese workers are.

    Unless you happen to be Uyghur and then you stay here in this prison and work on what you are told to work.

    https://panampost.com/antonella-marty/2017/03/01/chinese-concentration-camps-talking-about/

    Chinese government record on persecution of religious minorities and political prisoners is pretty appalling, even by American standards. The West has it’s share of problems by Gary North is totally kidding himself on the freedom in China.

  14. Clam Chowdah

    [quote]Democracy seems to be in trouble. It will probably recover from the current mess, but it’s along way back. And its made especially pointed by the contrasting success and relative calm of the undemocratic People’s Republic of China.[/quote]

    Ah yes, the calm that comes from rounding people up by the million and putting them into camps. What a fucking dolt.

  15. C.L.

    Germany in decline

    Uh-oh. That’s never good.

  16. Iampeter

    Yes, manufacturing and Germany. Also the Eurozone, US/China trade war and undomesticated animals inside rooms. This spells trouble for sure.
    What about China’s aggression in the South China Sea?
    What about policies and political parties? Also, Brexit uncertainty levels but what about Boris Johnson?
    Clearly you haven’t considered democracy China green policies implications Europe manufacturing President Xi reports and economists.

  17. I_am_not_a_robot

    Michael Bloomberg’s on the same schtick.
    Echos of some Westerners’ admiration of Soviet Russia in the 1920s and ’30s:

    “I have seen the future, and it works” (Lincoln Joseph Steffens after a visit to Russia in 1920s).

    Thousands of US citizens were lured to migrate to USSR during the Depression, based on similar cheering by notables, and never heard from again.
    Nowadays the danger is not migration but imitation.

  18. Empire 5:5

    Iampeter
    #3170468, posted on September 29, 2019 at 11:01 am

    I like the new trick, PhoneyPony. WordSaladNewsTicker. This surely will prove your political genius beyond doubt.

    And who knew you were an economist too. Today is a big day. The relaunch of your new fake old avatar. Have you organised catering?

  19. stackja

    Konrad Hermann Joseph Adenauer was a German statesman who served as the first Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany from 1949 to 1963. Wikipedia

    Konrad Adenauer (1876-1967) was the first chancellor of West Germany (the Federal Republic of Germany), an office he held for 14 years – an era in which the country recovered from the Nazi dictatorship, built up Europe’s strongest economy, dealt with the Berlin Wall and the Cold War, and gained a leading role in Europe …
    Konrad Adenauer – The German Way & More
    https://www.german-way.com

  20. Eyrie

    It all makes sense when you realise Kohler is a satirical stand up comedian who uses the financial industry as a prop.
    Also a fvckwit.

  21. Iampeter

    I am a rank amateur when it comes to politics compared to you, Empire.

    I mean, calling people fat kids and then spouting gibberish that sounds like it came from a game of thrones character and then pretending an imaginary crowd is cheering for you, is way outside my level.

    You are a true political aficionado!

    Can’t wait to read your deep contributions to this thread of deep political discussion.

  22. Empire 5:5

    I am a rank amateur when it comes to politics compared to you, Empire

    I’m not the one presenting as a political genius. I don’t care how clever or stupid folks think I am.

    You do.

  23. Gerard

    It is physically impossible for there to be a quantum leap in the capacity of batteries.
    Re Germany’s demise. This way always the plan. Read Maurice Strong’s quotes re the destruction of Western economies. Maurice set up UNEP, IPCC, UNFCCC – all part of the plan.

  24. Iampeter

    I’m not the one presenting as a political genius. I don’t care how clever or stupid folks think I am.

    You do.

    LOL! Yea the guy who engaged and got burnt in a debate he had no business even starting, pretending an invisible crowd was cheering you on, is totally not a guy who is desperate for the approval of others. Oh boy.

    Let me give you a tip: EVERY one of your posts that tries to describe me, ends up describing YOU instead. Think about that before you make your next post projecting and evading more.

  25. Tel

    It is physically impossible for there to be a quantum leap in the capacity of batteries.

    Firstly, what makes it “physically impossible” in detail?

    https://interestingengineering.com/new-lithium-ion-battery-breakthrough-could-double-energy-density

    Explain which physical law that particular design is breaking.

    Secondly, why is capacity a significant issue? Current batteries are hamstrung by cost and reliability, not capacity. If you are talking about stationary batteries for grid backup, are you seriously suggesting that Germany is too small to contain sufficient storage at existing energy density?

    Doing a back of the envelope calculation, my all electric household has an average power consumption of about 1000W and at achievable Lithium battery energy density running three days on battery for me would be 1/4 of a cubic meter of storage (presuming 100% efficiency, add a little bit extra if you want). That is only a little bit bigger than the existing fuse and meter box out the front. A typical household air conditioning system is about that size.

    Why this hand wringing over energy density when it’s a non issue?!?

  26. Roger

    [China] honors the principle of the free mobility of labor and voluntary contracts between employers and employees.

    Yeah, sure.

    And the Soviet Union enjoyed freedom of religion too.

  27. Empire 5:5

    LOL! Yea the guy who engaged and got burnt in a debate he had no business even starting, pretending an invisible crowd was cheering you on, is totally not a guy who is desperate for the approval of others. Oh boy.

    Let me give you a tip: EVERY one of your posts that tries to describe me, ends up describing YOU instead. Think about that before you make your next post projecting and evading more.

    The debate happened in your superhero fantasy imagination. You brought nothing new to the table. Just more PhoneyPony vacuous assertion.

    The crowd reference wasn’t to me being cheered on. I don’t give a shit if I’m public enemy #1. It has zero impact on my mission. I was talking about the crowd ignoring you. Normal folks typically don’t warm to the obtuse, boring and socially inept.

    Nobody is listening to you. It’s just wacko white noise.

  28. Bruce of Newcastle

    Tel – Doubling energy density of Li-ion batteries takes them from one twentieth to one tenth the energy density of gasoline.

    At the same time the batteries are complex and prone to shorts if the electric field isn’t kept extremely even (which is made hard by edge effects, impurities and age/cycle number).

    Energy density is a big issue for two reasons:
    1. Mobile use (cars, phones etc – both weight and volume)
    2. Cost

    The latter is because the cost of things like cobalt are on mass not energy capacity. So, yes, improve energy density and you lower cost. But you’ll never get to a competitive position viz hydrocarbons. It isn’t physically or chemically possible.

    If you are talking grid support there’s no reason why you’d ever want to use Li batteries anyway. Sodium-sulfur batteries are much better and have been around for such applications for many years. They aren’t sexy though, and Elon doesn’t sell them.

    I do like fuel cells. They overcome things like dendrite growth/shorting issues, and you can employ the energy density of the fuel to keep the unit small. Unfortunately they don’t seem to be ready for prime time yet.

    Of course fuel cells would then displace batteries for things like phones. Who’d want a battery lasting a day when you could fill your phone from a methanol bottle once a week – and you could carry the bottle in your briefcase for long trips.

  29. Dr Fred Lenin

    I was very pleased and surprised when the Russian people started building Christian Orthodox Churches as soon asthey got rid of the communist fascist bolsheviks , 8o years of ruthless supression of religion because they scoldnt allow competing beliefs ,total indoctrination with anti religous propaganda all in vain . It shows people are mot fooled by Marxist lying . The faithfull reconstruction ss of ancient churches destroyed by the fascisr barbarians was inspiring . To top it off when the car with the Red Square May Day parade marshal emerged through the Spasky Gate he was hatless thhenn he crossed himself Orthodox style ,then put his hat on and reviewed the troops , OldVladimir must have been squirming in his glass box .
    Power to the People !

  30. Chris M

    Democracy seems to be in trouble.

    Clearly we need the Reich!

  31. Iampeter

    The debate happened in your superhero fantasy imagination. You brought nothing new to the table. Just more PhoneyPony vacuous assertion.

    What are you even talking about?
    Let me recap this for you:
    1) I said Trump is a corrupt leftist, which triggered you. You had no counter so accused me of never explaining my politics and demanded citations!
    2) Although this has NOTHING to do with what I said and alone proves your ignorance, I easily proved you wrong and gave you a link to just one thread where I’ve laid a lot of things out. Something you have never done. Something you have never demanded from anyone else. Proving you are not only incredibly stupid but also very dishonest.
    3) Not to be stopped by being made a fool, you plunged ahead and tried to dismiss what I said in that thread. You dismissed things like “individual rights” as “talking points” and then made your own attempt at describing what politics is about that resembled a child making an effort to sound like a big boy.
    4) When I laughed at you about this, you said “hey I’m not the one presenting myself as an expert to appear smart to others” when that’s exactly what you’re trying to do.
    5) Now laughing at you about this, you seem to have come back in at around point 3. As if we haven’t already established that you don’t know what you’re talking about, including your own concession to this, and think you projecting your own failings onto me will somehow undo this exchange.

    Can’t wait for your next brilliant contribution.
    I predict more projections and evasions.

    I don’t give a shit if I’m public enemy #1. It has zero impact on my mission. I was talking about the crowd ignoring you. Normal folks typically don’t warm to the obtuse, boring and socially inept.

    God you’re a delusional cretin. Not caring what the crowd cares is exactly what I’m doing. Not you. You’re desperate for everyone’s approval.
    Unlike you, I don’t regurgitate mindless talking points to fit in with the NPC drones here, but point out the pretty glaring issues with your positions.
    On the other hand, you and others here are very desperate to appear like political aficionado’s.

    That’s why you get so triggered when I point out that even teenagers are less confused about everything than you.

    To even try to flip this on me takes the lack of self-awareness normally encountered at the cat to a whole new level. So congrats on that, I guess…

  32. John A

    Gerard #3170498, posted on September 29, 2019 at 11:53 am

    It is physically impossible for there to be a quantum leap in the capacity of batteries.

    I would hesitate to make such categorical statements about anything other than c.

    In the early 1800s, with Stephenson’s Rocket winning the Rainhill trials, it was considered physically impossible for people to travel faster than 25mph.

    Commuters today with their car computers can verify that logistically we are not doing any better on average than 40kph but physically we know that we can exceed the speed of sound, travel to the moon, and survive.

    It was once considered a limit of the laws of physics that modem data speeds could not exceed 9600baud.

    Beware of the Famous Last Words syndrome.

  33. stackja

    Petering out prefer Berlin Wall?

  34. Eyrie

    For stationary backup batteries, lowest cost over life cycle is the prime criterion. Lithium ain’t it.
    As for fuel cells, they were invented in 1838 and the modern type in 1932. If a technology has been around for that long and isn’t ready for prime time, I’d say it never will be.

  35. Eyrie

    Batteries are limited by simple electrochemistry. Bruce is a chemist and well understands the problem.
    Lithium – air, zinc – air and aluminium – air batteries are much better that the usual lithium ion batteries but have lots of problems and aren’t anywhere near prime time.

  36. Iampeter

    Whether batteries can do more or not is an interesting technical question but it doesn’t change anything about the political question.
    I mean, if “alternative energy” actually worked would you all suddenly support green policies?
    The real issue for conservatives is no real clear position on what politics is about and what a government should or shouldn’t do.
    So they’re left discussing random trivia, or non-essential technicalities that don’t change anything.

    As we see with posts like this from Rafe…

    This is without even getting into how culpable conservatives are for this mess in the first place. Remember it wasn’t the democrats that created the things like the EPA…

  37. RobK

    The absurdity of turning to wind and solar until there is a quantum leap in the capacity of batteries.
    I would have said: “a quantum leap in battery technology “. I agree with both Tel and BoN. The future is hard to predict. Chances are equally good that there will be improvement in baseload technology. I think it is a mistake to be too prescriptive but it is a mistake to turn our back on proven baseload, especially so if it is done in a forced time-frame with technology that isn’t ready for prime time. This forced RE experiment is going way too fast for long time-frame infrastructure.

  38. Mark A

    I mean, if “alternative energy” actually worked would you all suddenly support green policies?

    Wrong question.
    If AE worked I’d be all for it, doesn’t mean I would support all green policies.

    As a matter of fact we used wind power for water bores long before it became fashionable for electricity.
    And wind and solar for electricity in remote areas is the go, with backup generators. No dispute.

  39. Empire 5:5

    No. I don’t care. I don’t come here to make friends, win debates or promote my alleged genius. You have me confused with the only true right-winger on the blog.

    Not caring what the crowd cares is exactly what I’m doing. Not you. You’re desperate for everyone’s approval.

    That’s you, PhoneyPony.

  40. Bruce of Newcastle

    I mean, if “alternative energy” actually worked would you all suddenly support green policies?

    Yes, if it fits the requirements. Electricity generation needs to be 1. least cost, 2. always on and 3. least damaging.

    Coal is all three.
    Nuclear is all three.
    Solar panels are one (3.)
    Solar thermal/molten salt is one (2.)
    Wind is none of them.
    Hydro is two and a half, the half being (3.) since hydro takes up a valley.
    Adding batteries to wind or solar triples the price but adds only one category (2.).

    Which leaves us with hydro, coal and nuclear, with solar where it makes sense due to isolation etc.

    In tech all inventions have to fit an irregularly shaped 4D hole. It is hard to do, as I’ve found out myself several times. Sometimes at the last possible stage too – which is an expensive place in the process to find it doesn’t work.

  41. Dr Fred Lenin

    Is turnbulls perpetual motion hydro scam still on the books? Build some dams instead,put the money to good use ,create an evironment for the pink spotted gudgeon , a 5 millimetre fish , there wil be bloody billions of them . Whata feelgood project that would be ! Social justice for gudgeons !

  42. Chris M

    turnbulls perpetual motion hydro scam still on the books? Build some dams instead,put the money to good use ,create an evironment for the pink spotted gudgeon , a 5 millimetre fish

    They would surely go psycho being pumped uphill each day and dodging the impellers, like living in a theme park ride. I thought this Turnbull brainfart had been dumped? No way do you want to give that maniac any more ego boost. His head could be used to store the energy.

  43. duncanm

    Eyrie,

    technology like Vanadium Redox batteries are much more suited to grid storage.

    Energy density isn’t fantastic, but they are easily extendable – just add volume.

    Japan built a 60MWh job in 2015.

  44. Crossie

    Gerard
    #3170498, posted on September 29, 2019 at 11:53 am
    It is physically impossible for there to be a quantum leap in the capacity of batteries.
    Re Germany’s demise. This way always the plan. Read Maurice Strong’s quotes re the destruction of Western economies. Maurice set up UNEP, IPCC, UNFCCC – all part of the plan.

    Helmet Kohl was the last German chancellor, his successors couldn’t care less for Germany. Upon losing his chancellorship at an election Gerhard Schroder promptly got a job with a Russian power company. Mother Merkel coasted on what others had built and then went all in for renewables without taking any possible consequences into consideration.

    Germany may bounce back but not with the current leadership or with population that is majority green.

  45. Squirrel

    “But not long ago he wrote that we need to “face the facts” about climate change and sort out our energy policy to hasten the transition to green power.”

    If you run that through Google translate it would be something along the lines of “Governments need to make sure that the Green finance sector is a one-way bet – just like equities based on the “old economy” in an era of negative real interest rates and quantitative easing”.

    The current hype about Straya being a “renewable energy superpower”, which will be exporting to Asia through the world’s longest extension lead, is particularly entertaining – the sub-text is obviously “but taxpayers need to underwrite it – even though the technology is proven and ready to go…blah blah blah…..”

  46. pbw

    Rafe,

    The absurdity of turning to wind and solar until there is a quantum leap in the capacity of batteries.

    I wish you wouldn’t keep saying this. It implies that there is some virtue in wind and solar, which will be realised when storage technology catches up. There is no inherent virtue in W&S, but a host of inherent vices. The only reason that W&S has intruded into our lives to such an extent is the spurious religious frenzy about fossil fuels, which is false along every dimension. It’s the suicide pact of western societies, and it is a very bad idea to give it any oxygen at all.

  47. Rafe Champion

    Point taken pbw. Of course, why spend billions wrecking the countryside and extending the grid with highly complex and expense new transmission lines.

  48. Herodotus

    One can hardly blame Xi for looking at the abject failure of democracies in USA and UK, with Australians teetering always on the brink of electing yet another useless Labor government, and deciding that there’s a better way.

  49. Iampeter

    No. I don’t care. I don’t come here to make friends, win debates or promote my alleged genius. You have me confused with the only true right-winger on the blog.

    Not caring what the crowd cares is exactly what I’m doing. Not you. You’re desperate for everyone’s approval.

    That’s you, PhoneyPony.

    Yet we’ve already clearly established that you are the phony.
    No amount of pathetic evasion or projection is going to change this fact.

  50. struth

    Inside every ecoloon there is a totalitarian just itching to jump out.

    Yep.

    Kohler is a communist, obviously.

    Your typical leftist……loves communism but prefers to live in the capitalist west.

  51. Alan sivkoff

    Re Germany’s declining industrialisation and you can understand why the EU is playing hardball with the UK re Bretix, given that Germany & the UK provide the bulk of subsidies to prop up the EU bureaucracy.

  52. It looks like Germany has to have the shit bombed out of it every second generation just to knock some common bloody sense into it.

  53. Or perhaps that applies to all of Europe.

  54. stackja

    30 September 1938 we had ‘Peace in our time’.

  55. sfw

    Tel, 1000 watt household? Either you live on your own and use no electrical devices such as heaters, washers, dryers etc. For normal people with a few kids you will often peak at 3kw or more. If like me you live in a rural area and often repair your own stuff using welders, cutters, lathes etc you need a good power supply, solar and batteries won’t cut it. Throw in a freezer for food well I can only dream of your limited electrical needs.

    We need cheap, plentiful, reliable energy. Without it everyone will suffer lower living standards and deindustrialisation, batteries, pumped hydro, solar and wind etc will only ruin the nation.

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