UNexit

Scott Morrison gave an interesting speech to the Lowy Institute last night.  I particularly enjoyed this comment:

Only a national government, especially one accountable through the ballot box and the rule of law, can define its national interests. We can never answer to a higher authority than the people of Australia.

Well, if Morrison genuinely believes that, and acts on that principle, then he has a lot of work ahead of him. Right now great parts of the Australian public service are not accountable to the Australian people or worse consider themselves accountable to the United Nations and its affiliate bodies.

The restoration of democratic control over the public service is long over due and I suspect will be resisted tooth and nail.

What strikes me though is that Liberal governments only ever take actions against the deep state when they become angry. So Malcolm Turnbull only took on the ABC after he was personally angry that Emma Alberici has done such a transparent hatchet job on his company tax policy. Scott Morrison is taking on foreign interference in Australian domestic policy only after being immigration minister.

But this is a very good start.

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64 Responses to UNexit

  1. stackja

    Liberals once were called The Nationalists.

  2. Declare the UN a subversive organisation expel its proponents , confiscate assetss in Australia . Bring our employees out of New Yok , terminate all funding and participaion in any body assosciated with the un democratic gang . Then repeal all laws it inspired ,shoomin rites, equal opportunity ,racial discrimination ,,poofter marriage and all the crap they advocate . Clean the rubbish out , anyone who doesnt like it can go into exile in communist Europe. ]

  3. stackja

    UN was probably a ALP ego trip.

  4. RobK

    Thanks Sinc,
    I think this is the nub of the issues regarding property rights etc. , it has taken many decades to evolve as an issue. Hopefully it can be neutered more quickly, but I’m not very optimistic. It is a cause worth fighting for, more than any other.

  5. C.L.

    Howard should have changed the culture of the PS years ago.
    He was in office for, what, 11 years or thereabouts.

  6. Kneel

    “We can never answer to a higher authority than the people of Australia.”

    Then here’s a tip Scotty – repeal the legislation that puts international treaties above Australian law!
    Most likely, we’ll go through the motions, then get a “Ya canna change the laws o’ physics, Jim!”.
    Still, there is a glimmer of hope…

  7. C.L.

    We have to admit that tribalism caused us to be blind to the opportunities wasted by Howard. The penny dropped for me when he “gave” $1 billion to the Indonesians after the tsunami. It was during the long summer parliamentary recess. I remember thinking, hold on a second. That’s not your money, mate. He thought it was, though.

  8. Mother Lode

    I am still not sure that it is not chameleon like Morro, after standing next to and adapting to blend in with Trump, has not yet returned to his usual drab grey.

    If Morro actually does make a stand for the nation against the UN though I will be very impressed.

    Coles is learning that dancing to the tune of Somnambulist Gits means dancing alone as their customers waltz instead with competitors. Perhaps the Libs, after being told for years by their supporters, after the debilitating creeping death of Trumble, and now seeing in the US that it is possible for an elected leader to side with their voters, just maybe, just possibly, may be beginning to discern that ‘right’ is not a slightly tweaked version of ‘left’. And maybe it could make them popular…

  9. Pyrmonter

    @ Sinc

    Which matters more, democracy or the rule of law?

  10. Cardimona

    Declare the UN a subversive organisation expel its proponents , confiscate assetss in Australia . Bring our employees out of New Yok , terminate all funding and participaion in any body assosciated with the un democratic gang . Then repeal all laws it inspired ,shoomin rites, equal opportunity ,racial discrimination ,,poofter marriage and all the crap they advocate . Clean the rubbish out , anyone who doesnt like it can go into exile in communist Europe. ]

    This.

  11. A Lurker

    “We can never answer to a higher authority than the people of Australia.”
    Walk the talk and get us out of the Paris Agreement pronto!

  12. 1735099

    The restoration of democratic control over the public service is long over due and I suspect will be resisted tooth and nail.

    That’s strange.
    Obviously I’ve slept through some fairly momentous reforms.
    Or perhaps the world has changed since I last worked as public servant in 2017.
    Back then, I was responsible (through my Director General) to the state government.
    That government changed, of course from time to time, but I was obliged to give frank and fearless advice, and to carry out my duties without reference to the UN.
    That has not changed since 2017.
    What on earth are you on about?

  13. Some History

    The restoration of democratic control over the public service is long over due and I suspect will be resisted tooth and nail.
    That’s strange.
    Obviously I’ve slept through some fairly momentous reforms.
    Or perhaps the world has changed since I last worked as public servant in 2017.
    Back then, I was responsible (through my Director General) to the state government.
    That government changed, of course from time to time, but I was obliged to give frank and fearless advice, and to carry out my duties without reference to the UN.
    That has not changed since 2017.
    What on earth are you on about?

    Go back to sleep, Jack.

  14. Some History

    Well, if Morrison genuinely believes that, and acts on that principle, then he has a lot of work ahead of him. Right now great parts of the Australian public service are not accountable to the Australian people or worse consider themselves accountable to the United Nations and its affiliate bodies.

    Spot on. Not sure if SloMo and the glibs are up to it. But, here’s hoping.

  15. RobK

    Numbers,
    You sound just like a kid with his hands behind his back, saying;”it wasn’t me!”
    If you have had any dealings with environmental regulation, there is almost invariably references to international instruments that are applied beyond call and oblivious to even so much as a triple bottom line.
    I expect the same is likely the case in your field of endeavour, however, your fearless advice was likely parallel to that of a quest for global world order, purely coincidentally, of course.

  16. Entropy

    I will believe it when the infantile requirement for page after page of turgid prose in the Explanatory Memorandum explaining how a Bill before Parliament is complaint with UN obligations is removed.

  17. Des Deskperson

    ‘Right now great parts of the Australian public service are not accountable to the Australian people or worse consider themselves accountable to the United Nations and its affiliate bodies.’

    I’m not sure that I understand this.

    Australia has certainly signed up to a number of international treaties and conventions in various areas of life and work, but these have no force until they are given effect by Australian law, in other words, approved by Parliament on the basis of a bill prepared by the elected government.

    Public servants implement and monitor the application of and compliance with these laws as they do with all other laws passed by Parliament. The government of the may have been wrong or foolish to sign up to these international instruments and the laws enforcing them may be unreasonable, but that’s the government’s problem .

    A public servant who cited a UN convention as the sole basis for their authority would be acting outside that authority and probably in breach – in the APS, at least – of the code of conduct.

  18. RobK

    Des,
    A public servant who cited a UN convention as the sole basis for their authority would be acting outside that authority and probably in breach – in the APS, at least – of the code of conduct.
    No doubt that is so, however, there are instances where (particularly in EPAct, WA) departmental policy is framed as law by virtue of the Act and the department subsequently has “capital P” policy and “little p” policy, but only they can tell the difference (and not very well).

  19. 1735099

    A public servant who cited a UN convention as the sole basis for their authority would be acting outside that authority and probably in breach – in the APS, at least – of the code of conduct.

    That’s another way of saying that Sinc is posting rubbish.

    I expect the same is likely the case in your field of endeavour, however, your fearless advice was likely parallel to that of a quest for global world order, purely coincidentally, of course.

    The only time I came across any reference to UN conventions in the 50+ years I worked for the state Education department, was in 1882, when another principal and I were tasked with writing a brief of planning for a new special school.
    We used the UN convention of the rights of the child.
    196 countries (including Australia) have signed up to this convention.
    Significantly, the USA has not.
    Read it some time, and point out the clauses that you find objectionable.
    Australian governments of both major political persuasions have not.
    This dissonance provides an interesting commentary on the extreme views posted daily here.

  20. pete m

    1882 mate how old are you again?

  21. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The only time I came across any reference to UN conventions in the 50+ years I worked for the state Education department, was in 1882,(sic) when another principal and I were tasked with writing a brief of planning for a new special school.

    You must have been the most ancient conscript ever to serve in Viet Nam.

  22. 1735099

    These are the articles of the UN convention for the rights of the child.
    Australia remains a signatory.
    1. Everyone under 18 years of age has all the rights in this Convention.

    2 The Convention applies to everyone whatever their race, religion, abilities, whatever they think
    or say, whatever type of family they come from.

    3 All organisations concerned with children should work towards what is best for each child.

    4 Governments should make these rights available to children.

    5 Governments should respect the rights and responsibilities of families to guide their children so that, as they grow up, they learn to use their rights properly.

    6 Children have the right to live a full life. Governments should ensure that children survive and develop healthily.

    7 Children have the right to a legally registered name and nationality. Children also have the right to know their parents and, as far as possible, to be cared for by them.

    8 Governments should respect a child’s right to a name, a nationality and family ties.

    9 Children should not be separated from their parents unless it is for their own good. For example, if a parent is mistreating or neglecting a child. Children whose parents have separated have the right to stay in contact with both parents, unless this might harm the child.

    10. Families who live in different countries should be allowed to move between those countries so that parents and children can stay in contact, or get back together as a family.

    11 Governments should take steps to stop children being taken out of their own country illegally.

    12 Children have the right to say what they think should happen when adults are making
    decisions that affect them and to have their opinions taken into account.

    13 Children have the right to get and to share information, as long as the information is not damaging to them or to others.

    14 Children have the right to think and believe what they want and to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. Parents should guide children on these matters.

    15 Children have the right to meet with other children and young people and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.

    16 Children have the right to privacy. The law should protect them from attacks against their
    way of life, their good name, their family and their home.

    17 Children have the right to reliable information from the media. Mass media such as television, radio and newspapers should provide information that children can understand and should not promote materials
    that could harm children.

    18 Both parents share responsibility for bringing up their children and should always consider what is best for each child. Governments should help parents by providing services to support them, especially if both parents work.

    19 Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them.

    20 Children who cannot be looked after by their own family must be looked after properly by people who respect their religion, culture and language.

    21 When children are adopted the first concern must be what is best for them. The same rules
    should apply whether children are adopted in the country of their birth or if they are taken to
    live in another country.

    22 Children who come into a country as refugees should have the same rights as children who are born in that country.

    23 Children who have any kind of disability should receive special care and support so that they can live a full and independent life.

    24 Children have the right to good quality health care, clean water, nutritious food and a clean environment so that they will stay healthy. Richer countries should help poorer countries achieve this.

    25 Children who are looked after by their local authority rather than their parents should have their situation reviewed regularly.

    26 The Government should provide extra money for the children of families in need.

    27 Children have the right to a standard of living that is good enough to meet their physical and mental needs. The government should help families who cannot afford to provide this.

    28 Children have the right to an education. Discipline in schools should respect children’s human dignity. Primary education should be free. Wealthier countries should help poorer countries achieve this.

    29 Education should develop each child’s personality and talents to the full. It should encourage children to respect their parents, their cultures and other cultures.

    30 Children have the right to learn and use the language and customs of their families, whether or not these are shared by the majority of the people in the country where they live, as long as this does not harm others.

    31 Children have the right to relax, play and to join in a wide range of leisure activities.

    32 Governments should protect children from work that is dangerous or that might harm their health or education.

    33 Governments should provide ways of protecting children from dangerous drugs.

    34 Governments should protect children from sexual abuse.

    35 Governments should make sure that children are not abducted or sold.

    36 Children should be protected from any activities that could harm their development.

    37 Children who break the law should not be treated cruelly. They should not be put in a prison with adults and should be able to keep in contact with their family.

    38 Governments should not allow children under 15 to join the army. Children in war zones should receive special protection.

    39 Children who have been neglected or abused should receive special help to restore their self-respect.

    40 Children who are accused of breaking the law should receive legal help. Prison sentences for children should only be used for the most serious offences.

    41 If the laws of a particular country protects children better than the articles of the Convention, then those laws should override the Convention.

    42 Governments should make the Convention known to all parents and children.

  23. 1735099

    1882 mate how old are you again?

    Typo.
    I’m on day 5 of iMac ownership, after 23 years of Windows, but surprisingly the stylish keyboard is providing a bigger challenge than the ios organisational logic.

  24. Some History

    These are the articles of the UN convention for the rights of the child.
    Australia remains a signatory.

    Hey, Jack, there’s “signing” and then there’s “ratifying”. A country can be a signatory although not ratifying a treaty/convention. It’s the ratifying that makes a treaty/convention legally binding. As far as I’m aware, America is not permitted to ratify treaties with foreign entities. It violates some aspect of America’s Constitution.

    Now, Jack, what do you know of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control?

  25. jupes

    A little bit of The Donald has rubbed off onto Morrison.

    Talk is fine, now let’s see him walk the walk. Someone at that speech should have asked him why we are still in the UN which is decades past its use by date, let alone the stupid Paris agreement

  26. Entropy

    Australia has certainly signed up to a number of international treaties and conventions in various areas of life and work, but these have no force until they are given effect by Australian law, in other words, approved by Parliament on the basis of a bill prepared by the elected government.

    Well yes. The point is that when someone refers to a. UN convention as the reason for their regulatory overreach, it is because federal government has incorporated it into legislation.
    An example would be any development in wetlands would be subject to RAMSAR.

  27. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Numbers Ho, from the other thread.

    And, by the way, it’s written “Ph D”.
    And students (possessive plural) should be students’.

    Typo.

    But getting the century wrong is a mere typo…Not good enough, Numbers.

  28. 1735099

    But getting the century wrong is a mere typo…Not good enough, Numbers.

    Grow up….

  29. candy

    I think the UN supports abortion rights so I am not sure how that fits in with rights of the child, the most basic of all, to be allowed to be born.

    Anyhows, I think Morrison has more on mind than the UN.

  30. Rex Mango

    Posted this at Open Thread, but relevant here:

    Just saw transcript of PM’s speech last night (opening below). Have they sneakily snuck in an acknowledgment of veterans next to the welcome to country? Similar to the way Howard mandated that if the Aboriginal flag was to be flown, it has to have Torres Straight Islander one alongside.

    PRIME MINISTER: Acknowledgment of Gadigal, service men and women and veterans. Your Excellency Margaret Beazley AO QC, Governor of NSW and Mr Dennis Wilson Our 25th Prime Minister, the Hon John Howard OM AC Sir Frank Lowy – Chairman of the Lowy Institute Michael Fullilove – Executive Director of the Lowy Institute Colleagues, friends, ladies and gentlemen It’s an honour to be giving this lecture which bears the name of a great Australian – Sir Frank Lowy.

  31. 1735099

    Now, Jack, what do you know of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control?

    SFA, and very happy in that.
    Smokers are suicidal idiots.

  32. ScoMo and Josh are finding their feet. So far, so good. I think they might grow with stature over time and more confidently defend the principles of western civilization. I feel as if we have finally left behind the crazy years beginning with Kevin Rudd’s victory.

  33. RobK

    The only time I came across any reference to UN conventions in the 50+ years I worked for the state Education department,….
    The convention regarding the rights of a child stem from very early on in the piece and are hardly controversial, surprising you’d not found more use of it. As you say, it doesn’t get the airtime that is actually required by the convention itself. That said the majority of its content is statute in any case, separate to the convention, so the convention is superfluous. It could have more effect in other countries however they have even less regard for the instruments they sign. The point here is that the application is arbitrary; the intent is often noble but the implementations are shoddy. Bureaucracy has made an art form of striving to an Agenda 2030.

  34. Some History

    SFA, and very happy in that.
    Smokers are suicidal idiots.

    Well, Jack, you’re just too bright for me.

  35. 1735099

    Bureaucracy has made an art form of striving to an Agenda 2030.

    “Bureaucracy”is a cliche.
    It exists, but is no more an issue in public policy than it is in private industry.
    The most hidebound bureaucracy I’ve ever come across was the army.
    The least – the special school classroom.
    As for using the convention of the rights of the child, it was a useful instrument to remind the bureaucrats you refer to, and the politicians trumpeting their virtue, that the school we were planning was to improve the lives of a cohort of children with severe impairments who had been confined since the mid fifties to an institution where they ate, slept, and went to school in the same building.

  36. RobK

    Yes, RAMSAR is a good case to illustrate the point where fed and state laws conflate to make a swamp, even if there wasn’t one to start with.

  37. Some History

    “Bureaucracy”is a cliche.

    I’d like to nominate you for a No Bell Prize.

  38. RobK

    Bureaucracy maybe cliché but it describes the prescriptive nature as you illustrate with the army.
    Along the same lines, Agenda 2030 is prescriptive for the whole of society, all over the world and for an indeterminate period. It’s like everyone being conscripted.
    No thanks.

  39. Shy Ted

    1882 was the hottest year on record in Toowoomba. I remember it well.

  40. Bruce of Newcastle

    Only a national government, especially one accountable through the ballot box and the rule of law, can define its national interests.

    Nationalism and national borders acts like the bulkheads of a ship. It stops you getting swamped by a flood, for example of green progressive globalist ideology. When that infection strikes a nation it collapses, eg Venezuela, but is quarantined from spreading by the borders. That would not be the case in a borderless world, where a toxic ideology could spread like an epidemic, leading to a boot on human faces forever.

  41. Robbo

    The UN takes our money and in return tries to interfere in the way our government runs our country. Those interfering know it alls wallowing in the trough in NYC do nothing for Australia and that begs the question of why do we remain members? Perhaps someone can provide a credible answer so I shall sit back and wait.

  42. Some History

    Perhaps someone can provide a credible answer so I shall sit back and wait.

    Um…. mm… ah… Yep, I got nothin’.

  43. Roger

    The restoration of democratic control over the public service is long over due and I suspect will be resisted tooth and nail.

    The most urgent reform required is in the Immigration & Citizenship section of Home Affairs.

  44. Old School Conservative

    Numbers really does lead with his chin.
    He coulda been a contender.

    1882! From the site’s premier correction bot.
    Then there was Obviously I’ve slept through some fairly momentous reforms. Yep, true.

  45. None

    Look, there is one point to a country’s military and one point only: to defend the country – if necessary to kill and maim those who would attack us – and nothing else. I have zero confidence that recent Coalition defence ministers share my view of what the military is for. Here’s the thing: were Scott Morrison remotely supportive of an effective ADF he would insist Jim Molan got the NSW Senate spot and then he’d replace the current defence minister with Molan. But after what we saw in Victoria with the open Senate spot, I think it would be a Pollyanna who believed Prime Minister Morrison would do anything other than quietly support the Photios faction of the party.

    Am I less than thrilled with what we’ve seen from the Morrison government? You bet I am. I still say he’s better than Turnbull, and I’d still vote for him. But I really don’t like the party’s direction. I don’t think the PM shares many of my core values. And on defence this government doesn’t seem to have views anything like mine.

    James Allen at Quadrant. Exoect nothing but Photios compliance on UN shtick as well.

  46. Boambee John

    Des Deskperson
    #3174952, posted on October 4, 2019 at 1:39 pm
    ‘Right now great parts of the Australian public service are not accountable to the Australian people or worse consider themselves accountable to the United Nations and its affiliate bodies.’

    I’m not sure that I understand this.

    Des

    My memory might be fading, but when Biggles was Foreign Minister, a case went to the High Court, Teo’s case from memory, where the Court held that the simple act of signing a convention or treaty created a reasonable expectation that the document held the force of law in Australia.

    Is there legislation after that case clarifying the situation?

  47. Mater

    The only time I came across any reference to UN conventions in the 50+ years I worked for the state Education department, was in 1882, when another principal and I were tasked with writing a brief of planning for a new special school.

    So a lowly state level public servant, who worked in the outer Barcoo, only had a brief dalliance with a UN convention?
    Wow, Sinc, you’ve been completely snookered! Your assertion is in tatters!
    Bob is representative of all public servants, both state and federal. You probably should have run your theory past him first.

    P.S. Bob. Last time you rolled that story out, you said it was 1983.

  48. Anyone here capable of making UNEXIT bumper stickers?

  49. Some History

    P.S. Bob. Last time you rolled that story out, you said it was 1983.

    What’s 101 years among friends!

  50. mem

    Local Governments are adopting UN guidelines regardless of federal policy.
    UN and sustainable development goals as considered by AUS senate committee early this year. https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Foreign_Affairs_Defence_and_Trade/SDGs/Report

    And mid year this is what was sent as a national local government policy position on Climate Change to the Climate Council. Aus Local Gov Association submission https://alga.asn.au/submission-in-response-to-the-climate-change-authority-consultation-paper/
    The UN is directly influencing Local Government in Australia.

  51. Roger

    …were Scott Morrison remotely supportive of an effective ADF he would insist Jim Molan got the NSW Senate spot and then he’d replace the current defence minister with Molan.

    Jim Molan, the Hillary booster in 2016?

    Yes, he’s good on defence and fuel security, but he needs a tight rein.

  52. Art Vandelay

    Like all recent Liberal leaders, Morrison occasionally talks the talk, but he never walks the walk.

  53. Some History

    The UN is directly influencing Local Government in Australia.

    +100

    With the complicity of useful-idiot councillors inspired by the UN stooge, Greta™ Loonborg.

  54. Des Deskperson

    ‘My memory might be fading, but when Biggles was Foreign Minister, a case went to the High Court, Teo’s case from memory, where the Court held that the simple act of signing a convention or treaty created a reasonable expectation that the document held the force of law in Australia.’

    John, my recollection is that the Keating government c.1995 had legislation passed that that reversed – or whatever the appropriate term – the position taken in the Teo case, so I think we are still in a situation where a UN convention or other international has to be given effect by Australian law. Lemme see what else I can find.

  55. iamok

    My thoughts on this? Fuck the UN!

  56. Boambee John

    Thanks Des. I recall that Biggles was somewhat angry at the time, that the High Court had the temerity to challenge him!

  57. a reader

    Anyone hear what that prize idiot Marles had to say today? Apparently sounding slightly nationalistic = hitler

  58. Robber Baron

    Martin Parkinson is still the head of PM&C. ScoMo is lying.

  59. Squirrel

    “An era in which elite opinion and attitudes have often become disconnected from the mainstream of their societies, and a sense of resentment and disappointment has emerged.

    An era of insiders and outsiders, threatening social cohesion, provoking discontent and distrust.”

    So nice to hear a PM say such things, and so un-surprising to discover that some are not at all pleased –

    https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/scott-morrison-lowy-lecture

    “The PM’s Lowy Lecture warning of “negative globalism” is strange, given multilateral institutions are presently so weak……”

  60. Des Deskperson

    ‘https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minister_of_State_for_Immigration_and_Ethnic_Affairs_v_Teoh’

    Interesting, eh?

    So from what I can gather: from this and other material:

    legislation to reverse the effects of the Teoh decision was never, in fact, passed;.

    governments on both sides of politics appear to be continuing to operate on the basis that international conventions must be given effect by Australian law;

    the next High Court challenge may or may not clarify this one way or another.

    According to an AGs briefing on this issues from a few years back and based on related decisions subsequent to the Teoh case, ‘there is significant doubt about whether a future High Court would uphold the doctrine of legitimate expectations so far as it relates to treaties ratified but not implemented into domestic legislation.’

  61. struth

    Those defending the public service.

    Who was it that was about to sign us up to giving control of immigration to the UN, until it was discovered by Sky News who alerted the people?

    Why does our education system follow exactly the agenda 2030 rot regarding everything from Climate bullshit to indigenous studies?
    And much more.
    Des deskperson and definitely Sniffy, obviously aren’t and weren’t high enough up the ladder to see the compliance with these agendas.
    No senior public servant has to sign anything, even though in the first case, they were about to, but they just have to be lefties complying of their own volition, not kept in check by their ministers who are either weak or complicit.
    Try and defend the councils and shires that have signed up to this traitorous rot.

  62. Kae

    Numbers

    Wanna try that Doctor of Philosophy abbreviation again?

    PhD.

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